How to be a wholesome american girl

  1. How to Organize a Charity Fashion Show
  2. How to Open a Daycare in North Carolina
  3. Daisy Girl Scout Activities on Respecting Authority
  4. Free Summer Camps for Kids in Sacramento
  5. How to Become a Foster Parent in California

How to be a wholesome american girl

American Girl, notably known for manufacturing historic dolls for all age groups, lives by the philosophy of celebrating young girls and their unique goals and dreams for the future. American Girl’s wholesome background celebrates diversity, and some girls may dream of becoming American Girl models for print merchandise catalogs and websites. The modeling field is extremely competitive, and few girls will land an official modeling position, but many girls are eligible to model for local American Girl fashion show fundraisers, which are fun and rewarding and take place within your own community.

How to be a wholesome american girl

Visit the official American Girl fashion show website and view its FAQ section, which details the steps to becoming a child model with American Girl. As of February 2011, American Girl only works with professional child modeling agencies. Email the corporate contact on the American Girl website for further information on how to get in touch with these agencies. KidsInCommercials.com, a child modeling agency, features clients who work with American Girl. The agency offers consultation advice to parents about helping their children land print and commercial advertisements.

Visit the American Girl website’s Fashion Show Locator page for further information on hosting a fashion show. This page gives instructions about how to request manuals for hosting an event, materials needed for setting up a fashion show and contact information for a personal event consultant.

Confirm that your organization meets the guidelines before hosting an American Girl fashion show. If you are affiliated with a nonprofit 501 organization and the funds you raise will benefit U.S. children between the ages of newborn and 12, you are eligible.

Schedule your show in a facility with enough room for an audience of 1,000 to 1,500 guests. If you would like to visit a facility near you to get an idea of the proper space requirements, visit the American Girl fashion show locator’s website and view the map provided to see where the nearest scheduled show near you is taking place. You may also call the official American Girl contact phone number 800-360-1861 for additional information on fashion show registrations, yearly show schedules and deadlines within your area.

Applications are now open! Please take a moment and fill out the form below to request your American Girl doll. After you submit the form, your application will be reviewed by our program operations team and you’ll receive an email letting you know whether your application has been approved.

Due to the volume of expected applications, please allow a few weeks before all applications are processed.

For any questions, please email [email protected] or call 703-836-2121. We wish everyone successful fundraising events this year and thank you for all you do to serve your communities!

How many dolls can I get?

Maximum is one per calendar year. Due to overwhelming response and to maximize our giving, we are allowing qualified 501©3 organizations to receive one American Girl doll per calendar year.

How many dolls are being donated each year?

We’re pleased to share that, once again, we will be donating approximately 5,000 American Girl 18-inch dolls ( nearly $500,000 in retail value) through this program in 2021.

Do I have to be a Good360 Member nonprofit to receive a doll?

No. However, Good360 membership is free to all 501©3 organizations as well as other tax exempt charitable groups (schools and houses of worship). Membership allows groups to source a wide variety of product donations every year.

Is there an administrative fee?

Yes. In order to maintain this donation program for years to come, an administrative fee of $25 will be assessed to cover the costs of shipping and handling.

Why do I have to pay an administration fee?

Good360 is a 501©3 nonprofit organization that is now managing this donation program for American Girl, including the storage, shipping and handling of the product, and does not have the funds available to cover these administrative costs for the thousands of dolls to be donated. Good360 is not selling the dolls.

Can I choose the doll I want?

No. As always, we receive a predetermined mix of American Girl dolls to donate each year, so we’re unable to fulfill specific requests.

At what point do I make my payment?

After receiving your approval letter. Eligible groups will be directed to a special link to source their doll.

When will the program end?

The auction program will end when we have donated the maximum number of dolls (

5,000) allotted to this program.

Can my doll be used for something other than a fundraiser?

No. The Good360 American Girl Doll Donation Program is a nonprofit fundraising initiative authorized by American Girl. This program operates approximately from January to March.

Will American Girl dolls be made available to distribute to individuals in need?

Yes. Good360 nonprofit members may source American Girl dolls through their online marketplace beginning in June 2021.

By Francis K Githinji | Submitted On November 24, 2008

How to be a wholesome american girl

Little girls are very cute and charming. Everyone loves and appreciates them. Sometimes, big girls refer to themselves as little girls and this is pretty popular too. Today, let us focus on the real little girls and find out what they are all about. First, if you are the mother of a little girl you must have noticed that they love to wear pretty things. Many times, you as the parent will look for pretty things for your little girl and, with the onset of great fashion for little girls; you are bound to find a lot of variety which will definitely amaze you. When you are looking for something really good, you do not have to leave the confines of your home, this is because the Internet will serve you the purpose of shopping for great stuff right at home. It is very convenient and, you will find very many boutiques for clothes of little ones.

I came across a very beautiful site called little girl’s boutique which has all you need for your child. First, their site is beautiful and, it will appeal to every child and parent alike. It is pink and, blue in color and the soft colors are really appealing. The shop then features many things and to be specific, you will find dresses, hats, shoes and accessories. When you click on dresses, you will reveal a variety of beautiful dresses that will ensure that you are left wide eyed. There are varieties like formal and flower girl dresses. They come in different styles which will ensure that you choose some of the latest in child fashion. If you are preparing your child to be a flower girl, this is the best place to be. You will be amazed by the amazing fashion and designs. When it comes to a variety of hats, you will also see all the fashions that will make you want to get one or more. The other category for girls is shoes. Shoes for small girls need to be classy, with style and comfortable. At this boutique, you will find that all the kinds of shoes that will amaze you.

For accessories, find out what is the latest when it comes to caps, gloves and many other things. It is very vital to ensure that you make your girl smile every time you buy clothing for them. When they have the right thing to wear, your little one will also like to have fun with friends. Taking your child to meet friends and have fun will ensure that they grow in a wholesome way, to become important people in society. This is the way to bring out beautiful girls as they seek to mark their influence in society. There are so many other things you can do to ensure that your child stays forward in this regard. The bottom line is to enjoy every minute of every day by relaxing and finding good recreational activities for them. There is nothing more that any parent would want more than seeing their child growing up in a happy environment.

Yr Wonkette began posting this Thanksgiving Prayer by William S. Burroughs and Gus Van Sant back in 2006, and quite a few things have changed since then. The deadpan list of Bloody American Triumphs is more relevant than ever in this Plague Year of 2020, and if Burroughs were with us today, he might look at his 1986 poem and wonder how he’d ever been such a starry-eyed optimist. Back in the anxious Thanksgiving of 2015 we fretted because the presidential campaign featured “serious debates over registering religious minorities and bringing back torture.” Heh. We were so innocent back then, and didn’t think that guy had any chance of really getting elected.

So now we have elected a new president, but the failed one continues to insist that never happened, because voting isn’t real if the Great Man says it isn’t. The good news is that, through all four years, according to Gallup at least, he never had the approval of a majority of Americans. And a clear majority rejected him in the election.

But it remains anyone’s guess whether the Trump years mark the beginning of a new, degraded era where all politics will be terrible forever, or a temporary season of madness from which we’ll emerge blinking in confusion, swathed in bandages and wondering why Canada keeps asking us if we remember anything, especially where we stashed Toronto. There’s no shortage at all of decent church-going people with their mean, pinched, bitter, evil faces who seem ready to keep supporting outright fascism.

And now we have a genuine plague, a pandemic whose deadly reality makes Burroughs’s “laboratory AIDS” line seem almost quaint, as conspiracy theories go (and a reminder that you probably shouldn’t get your epidemiology from a Beat poet, either). Frankly, I can’t rule out the possibility that William Burroughs might have turned out to be a COVID crank, just for the cussedness of it. Or maybe he’d look at the pandemic and be even more convinced than ever that we’re a nation of idiots, suckers at the carnival cruise happy to believe in magic pills the “president” hawks, willing to infect each other for the sake of the GDP. Hell, maybe both.

Burroughs might well look at 2020 and have a good rueful laugh. He told us so. We had An American Dream, and we almost pissed it away because the loudmouthed crazy uncle from TV was so entertaining, and because so many of us really resented that there had been a Black president. Burroughs might have said Donald Trump was the president America had been working toward for decades.

This year, our bleak Thanksgiving prayer is made even bleaker by the plague. Even those of us who haven’t lost friends or loved ones to the disease have empty seats at the table, because the safest thing is to not travel, and the best way to tell distant friends you love them is to keep yourself the hell away from them. No pile of winter coats on the bed in the guest room, but instead we’ll chat over the computer. (No, really, join us! Here!)

But we’ll be thankful that we’ve made it far enough to hope it will be better next year, and that we’ve turned some kind of corner on the strangeness of the last four years. We’re thankful that Reality seems poised for a comeback. We have each other, even if for the moment we can’t go to a restaurant. We’re looking forward to being able to sleep a bit more, maybe.

For all the petty small-minded terribleness and evil out there, we still have the option of laughter, because it sure as hell beats giving in to the bastards.

A happy and safe Thanksgiving to all Wonkers everywhere, and remember to Buy (almost) Nothing tomorrow.

Yr Wonkette is funded entirely by reader donations. We’re thankful for YOU. If you can, please consider a $5 or $10 monthly donation, and we’ll be so thankful it’ll make your head spin.

Doktor Zoom’s real name is Marty Kelley, and he lives in the wilds of Boise, Idaho. He is not a medical doctor, but does have a real PhD in Rhetoric. You should definitely donate some money to this little mommyblog where he has finally found acceptance and cat pictures. He is on maternity leave until 2033. Here is his Twitter, also. His quest to avoid prolixity is not going so great.

Yr Wonkette began posting this Thanksgiving Prayer by William S. Burroughs and Gus Van Sant back in 2006, and quite a few things have changed since then. The deadpan list of Bloody American Triumphs is more relevant than ever in this annus horribilis of 2019, and if Burroughs were with us today, he might look at his 1986 poem and wonder how he’d ever been such a starry-eyed optimist. Back in the anxious Thanksgiving of 2015 we fretted because the presidential campaign featured “serious debates over registering religious minorities and bringing back torture.” Heh. We were so innocent back then, and didn’t think that guy had any chance of really getting elected.

William S. Burroughs – A Thanksgiving Prayer youtu.be

Now we find ourselves in the third year of an illegitimate presidency, with impeachment looking likely but actual conviction in the Senate not appearing likely at all, because everybody in an entire political party lost their damn minds. It remains anyone’s guess whether the Trump years mark the beginning of a new, degraded era where all politics will be terrible forever, or a temporary season of madness from which we’ll emerge blinking in confusion, swathed in bandages and wondering why Canada keeps asking us if we remember anything, especially where we stashed Toronto.

Even if there are fewer than four Trump years, the cleanup from this mess is going to take decades, and a substantial chunk of the nation seems to have sworn fealty to the glib, pouting sociopath leading their torchlight parade. We said in 2017 we had no idea where the bottom was in American politics, but we hadn’t reached it yet — and holy fuckballs, we still haven’t. Now we have a “president” issuing pardons to actual war criminals, and who has somehow managed to increase the number of lies he tells daily. See? He really is a workaholic.

Burroughs might well look at 2019 and have a good rueful laugh. He told us so. We had An American Dream, and we — or at least a slim plurality of those of us who voted in just the right number of states in 2016 — picked the guy who promised to vulgarize and falsify that dream until the bare lies were central to his “governance.” Just enough of us were desperate enough to believe the comforting lies about how the coal jobs will come back, the manufacturing jobs will come back, the blacks will finally stop insisting their lives matter, and if only we’re brutal enough, the browns will stop seeing the USA as a place of refuge.

We can only assume that Burroughs would say Donald Trump is the president America has been working toward for decades. Sure, three million more of us voted for the competent but sometimes excessively private lady with the emails, but that’s not how our system works, so stop being a crybaby and suck it up. Also, show us your papers. And get to work sandblasting that pesky poem off the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty. To be honest, we prefer people who aren’t tempest toss’d or wretched refuse. We like winners.

Sick of winning yet? Or just sick?

And yet. For all the churchgoing people with their mean, pinched, bitter, evil faces insisting Jebus wants chicken sandwiches with a side of gay-hating, we can still be thankful there are 16-year-olds who are determined to keep the planet livable, and members of Congress who’ll remember Elijah Cummings’s admonition, “Come on, man. We’re better than that” — even when there’s reason to doubt we are. We can be thankful for schools that give EVERYBODY eat, diplomats who insist on telling the truth, and people in government who fix things that were broken by idiots. We can be thankful there are tiny babies we can guide through our big messy world with Mr. Rosewater’s one rule for living on Earth: “God damn it, you’ve got to be kind.”

We’ll be thankful anyway, even if at times we can only be thankful it’s not worse than it is. We’ve got each other, there’s a highly evolved descendant of a dinosaur in the oven, and the bed is covered with the winter coats of people we love — or can at least tolerate for a few hours, although we may have to ask them to please not wear that MAGA hat to the table. If people are getting married and having babies in this crazy stupid world, then there must be hope. For all the petty small-minded terribleness and evil out there, we still have the option of laughter, because it sure as hell beats giving in to the bastards.

A happy and safe Thanksgiving to all Wonkers everywhere, and remember to Buy (almost) Nothing tomorrow.

Yr Wonkette is supported by reader donations. We’re thankful for YOU. Please send us more to be thankful for.

Doktor Zoom’s real name is Marty Kelley, and he lives in the wilds of Boise, Idaho. He is not a medical doctor, but does have a real PhD in Rhetoric. You should definitely donate some money to this little mommyblog where he has finally found acceptance and cat pictures. He is on maternity leave until 2033. Here is his Twitter, also. His quest to avoid prolixity is not going so great.

Is my daughter too young for an American Girl Doll? She’ll be 5 1/2 at Christmas. If I’m going to spend so much money, shouldn’t I buy it now so she doesn’t grow out of it so quickly?

Advertisement

  • Add your Answer own comment
  • Ask your own question Add Question
  • Join the Mamapedia community Mamapedia

Report This

  • Write Message K.F. K.F. a private message
  • Read more More from that K.F. has written K.F.
  • Browse local questions Questions
  • Helpful?

Featured Answers

I got my daughter the Bitty Baby when she was younger. She is 6 now and has a regular doll, that she got last Christmas. I do have rules for her with the doll, as far as not bringing it outside. I think it is appropriate for her age though.

Report This

More Answers

My daughter got Molly at 6 and Kit came to live with us when my 2nd daughter was 5.
THe girls are now 13 and 15 and pretty much the dolls sit on a shelf but they were played with quite a bit from the time they got them until they were about 10 or 11.
I think she is a perfect age. Be sure to get the books. My daughters loved them as well.

Report This

Grandparents bought our girls their dolls when they were that age. They LOVED them. But our 13 year old no longer plays with them, the 10 year old still does. However there are other dolls that are a LOT cheaper. My 10 year old received on bought at Target for about $39 I think. She loves that one just as much. Here is a link. http://www.BFCink.com/ For the clothes, if you google “18” doll clothes” you will get many sites that sell clothes that fit American Girl Dolls and their clones. I do not think the kids know the difference at that age, so I would start with the cheaper ones if I had to do it again.

Report This

we got them their first when they turned 5. they got their 2nd for kindergarten graduation (almost 6). now they’re asking for felicity because she will not be sold anymore, so they’re getting her and some accessories for xmas.
i personally dislike the existence of such a doll. i didn’t even know it exists until we moved to NY. now, that’s all my 6 year olds talk about.
they do not treat those dolls any differently then any 5 dollar doll, but i cannot restrict their play with them just because they’re so pricey. so i let them bring them with them when we go out and about.
yes, kids are ready at age 5 and up.
parents will never be ready.

Report This

My oldest daughter is 12 & just gave hers to my 6 yr old – they enjoy them for a while but they are expensive. I asked my mother in law to buy my youngest a less expensive one last year which I ‘m glad she did because she doesn’t even know where it is! My oldest was about 5 or 6 when she got her 1st one.

Report This

I just bought my 5.5 year old her first American Girl doll and she loves it. I don’t think 5 is too young. I am actually going to buy my soon-to-be 3 year old the Bitty Babies for Christmas this year, too! Good luck, they are fun dolls.

Report This

Interesting. my daughter (almost 6)knows her cousin has one cousin is 6 1/2. and my sil really works to push the doll on my niece and make her love it. IT’s something they enjoy together teaparties and going on special shopping trips to buy outfits etc. I will sit can play boardgames and puzzles and help set up race traces adn do art projects but i don’t think i would be able to hype the amg doll up that much. So far my daughter hasn’t asked for one. so i was thinking of waiting to just see if she ever asks for one. I love to read outload but just haven’t gotten into the AMG books, i think when my daughter can read them herself she might, but i guess i’ll wait until then.

I did see walmart sold kits that have the fabric so you can sew your own doll clothes that sounded fun to me.

Report This

I think it depends on your daughter. My older daughter got hers at 7 and she’s always treated Ruthie very well. My younger daughter got Elizabeth at 5 and she’s been drawn on, stepped on, and scratched. She LOVES that doll and takes her to every overnight at Grandma’s, puts her to bed at night, and loves to dress her up, so I don’t regret the early purchase, but we won’t be taking Elizabeth to the doll hospital until my daughter is a little older and I know she’ll be treated better.

Report This

whats the difference?? a doll is a doll right?? im confused here.

Report This

My granddaughter got her first one at 4 years old. She has always been really good with her toys. Mom also laid down the rule that the doll was not to go outside! –R. H.

Report This

When my daughter was 5 or so, she got the Bitty Baby and some accessories and loved loved loved it! Eventually she also got Samantha (around age 8) when it was all the rage with her classmates and they were all reading the books. We got a couple of good years out of Samantha – we would suggest accessories to family and friends when they asked for gift ideas – so accumulated quite a bit of gear. My niece (4 years older) was obsessed with Felicity, so I think my daughter wanted the doll mostly to fit in with her friends and cousin. I was disappointed that she lost interest in it so quickly. I have it carefully packed away, so hopefully one day she can pass it along to someone else. I don’t regret buying it for her, just wish she’d gotten a little more mileage out of it since it was so costly. But some kids are like that, on to the next new thing before you know it! If you think at 51/2 your daughter is able to care for the doll properly, I don’t see any reason not to get it now. With luck, she will play with and enjoy it for a LONG time! 🙂

You told your parents they were a good investment!

How to be a wholesome american girl

Good news for anyone who’s insisted on keeping their entire American Girl doll collection in the basement of their childhood home: it might actually be worth a small fortune.

According to Apartment Therapy, OG favorites like Felicity, Samantha and Molly have become legitimate collector’s items, some fetching thousands of dollars on eBay. But before you go digging Kirsten out of the attic, take note that your doll has to meet certain conditions to be truly valuable (monetarily, that is; no one can put a price tag on the unadulterated joy you felt as you dressed Miss Larson in her Santa Lucia dress on Christmas morning in 1994).

The most prized dolls are the ones manufactured by American Girl’s original owner, Pleasant Company, which was founded in 1986 by Pleasant Rowland. She sold the company to Mattel in 1998, and in 2008, Mattel began “retiring” the original four American Girls—Samantha, Kirsten, Molly and Felicity—making them extra-valuable as collector’s items. (Felicity and Samantha were later re-introduced.)

How to be a wholesome american girl

If your doll is a “white-bodied” version—meaning that their torsos were made from white cloth instead of the flesh-colored fabric they use today—the price goes up even more. (Only three dolls, Samantha, Kirsten and Molly, were ever manufactured with the white torsos; the flesh-colored fabric was introduced in 1990 ahead of the launch of Felicity, whose dresses had lower-cut necklines than her predecessors’.)

The dolls really raking in the big bucks are the ones that were signed and numbered by Rowland herself. This Molly doll and this Samantha sold for just under $3,000 each. Don’t despair if your doll lacks a signature, though; one unsigned Samantha from 1986 still commanded $1,640—and that’s despite the fact that one of her eyes sticks a little.

Follow House Beautiful on Instagram.

October 18, 2018

My Journey With American Girl Fan!

It’s hard to believe we are nearing the end of 2018. In March I turned 24, crazy right?! I started American Girl Fan in 2008 when I was 14. yes, 10 years ago!

On that July day when I first hit the publish button, I would’ve never guessed I would be writing here a whole decade later. I didn’t know I had started a journey that would change my life. I only wanted to meet a few girls who loved American Girl dolls as much as I did. I didn’t have friends who were into American Girl, so I thought it would be fun to create a place to connect with other fans. I had no idea what was in store or how all of this would shape me into who I am today.

I already had a passion for writing, but I didn’t know that I would find a new passion for photography, or that crafting would bring out the maker in me, eventually leading me to my job and business that I love.

God has given me abundant blessings through American Girl Fan. I started it with Him by my side and I believe He helped me keep it going. You reading this today, are one of those blessings. I’m also grateful to have had the opportunity to work with and talk to lots of inspiring business women and entrepreneurs who motivated me even further to do what I enjoy.

So many of you have encouraged and supported me over the years. None of this would’ve happened without you and I can’t thank you enough for joining me on my journey!

This year I have worked full time on my Etsy shop, Creative Doll Crafts, and I recently launched my second business, Uniquely Me Bows. Between making new items and packaging orders, I couldn’t find the time needed to post here. I never forgot about it though.

For months I did a lot of thinking and praying about the future of American Girl Fan and I feel now is the time for me to step away. As hard as it was to make this decision, I know it’s right and I have peace about it in my heart. 🙂

It really has been an amazing 10 years sharing with you and I couldn’t have asked for any better! I’m so proud of this wonderful, creative community of doll collectors!

My website will stay where it is, so you can come back at anytime to read my previous posts and tutorials when you want to. 🙂

I’m on Instagram if you’d like to continue to follow my doll photography and shop updates: @creativedollcrafts

My previous email is inactive but you can write to me at [email protected]

I’m always updating my shops, pop in and see what’s new!

Thank you again for your visits, kind words, and overwhelming support. It has meant so much to me and the memories still encourage and inspire me everyday.