How to build a garbage can screen

Hide your unsightly trash can with a stylish wood screen.

Skill Level

Start to Finish

Tools

  • speed square
  • chop saw
  • circular saw
  • drill
  • post hole digger
  • measuring tape
  • pencil
  • level
  • shovel
  • scrap board or bucket
  • paint roller
  • paint tray
  • paintbrush
  • eye and ear protection

Materials

  • (8) 1×4 x 10′ pressure-treated boards
  • (2) 4×4 x 10′ pressure-treated posts
  • 2×6 x 10′ pressure-treated board
  • 2″ galvanized decking screws
  • quick-mix concrete
  • 1 gallon exterior paint and primer in one
  • drop cloth

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by: Tomas Espinoza

Like this? Here’s more:
  • Pinterest
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Introduction

The L-shaped screen is designed to accommodate two standard size wheeled trash cans. The screen is 60″ wide, 36″ deep and 48″ tall.

Step 1

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by: Tomas Espinoza

Dig Post Holes

Dig three holes with a post hole digger; each hole should be 12″ deep. Use measuring tape to ensure the proper post location.

Step 2

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by: Tomas Espinoza

Measure and Mark Posts

Mark three 4×4 posts at 60″ long with measuring tape and pencil.

Step 3

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by: Tomas Espinoza

Cut Posts

Cut posts using a chop saw.

Step 4

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by: Tomas Espinoza

Measure and Mark Boards

Mark the 1×4 boards with measuring tape and speed square. The front of the screen requires a 60″ board, while the side requires a 36″ board.

Step 5

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by: Tomas Espinoza

Cut Boards

Using a chop saw, cut the 1×4 boards to the correct dimensions for both the front and side of the screen. Repeat process to make several boards.

Step 6

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by: Tomas Espinoza

Mix Concrete

Mix water and quick-set concrete mix together in a bucket or on a scrap wood piece. Mix it using a shovel until you get a thick consistency.

Step 7

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by: Tomas Espinoza

Set Posts in Concrete

Once the holes are dug, set the posts in position (cut side down), and add the concrete mixture around the post with a shovel. Make sure the posts are level and plumb.

Step 8

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by: Tomas Espinoza

Add Temporary Bracing

Temporarily secure posts with 1×4 boards across the top and bottom with a drill and screws until the concrete sets.

Step 9

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by: Tomas Espinoza

Remove Bracing

Once the concrete is set, remove the bracing boards.

Step 10

How to build a garbage can screen

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo By: Tomas Espinoza

Photo By: Tomas Espinoza

Attach Slats

Starting at the bottom, begin attaching the 1×4 slats to the front of the screen using 2″ decking screws. Keep in mind, you may need to scribe or customize the bottom side of the first board to fit with the slope of the lot. Make sure the top of the first board is level before attaching to the posts. Repeat to install side slats. Tip: Use a decking screw between the boards to get a uniform gap.

Step 11

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by: Tomas Espinoza

Cut Top Rail

Cut a 2×6 board to cap off the screen. To create clean corners, make a miter cut with a chop saw.

How to build a garbage can screen

These DIY privacy screens are a great way to get the privacy you want inside and out, whether it be for your deck, porch, area of your yard, or even your windows.

Some of these privacy screens can also be used to hide anything unsightly in your yard such as trash cans, recycling bins, an air conditioner, or even areas of your yard that you just don’t love.

All of these DIY privacy screen projects are beginner-level and low-budget. You’ll learn a lot without spending a lot, and have a great build that you’ll be eager to share.

Garbage Can Privacy Screen

” data-caption=”” data-expand=”300″ data-tracking-container=”true” />

This privacy screen is perfect for hiding your unsightly trash cans and recycling bins and even a compost bin if you have one. The screen has a modern look to it thanks to the black paint and dark stain. It’s a great beginner project only taking three different sizes of wood boards.

Wooden Gate Window Privacy Screens

” data-caption=”” data-expand=”300″ data-tracking-container=”true” />

Here’s an indoor privacy screen that’s going to give your home a real farmhouse or cottage feel. It’s the perfect alternative to curtains and gives you a lot of privacy, making it a great choice for front windows. The privacy screen is made to look just like old gates but you’ll build them new. A DIY barn door could also give the same feeling.

Trellis Backyard Privacy Screen

” data-caption=”” data-expand=”300″ data-tracking-container=”true” />

Here’s an outdoor privacy screen that’s made out of lattice and cedar boards to form a trellis to add privacy or hide anything that you don’t love about your yard. You can also use it to hold up vines or climbing roses as they grow.

Outdoor Privacy Screen

” data-caption=”” data-expand=”300″ data-tracking-container=”true” />

Here’s another outdoor privacy screen and this one is built to give some privacy to a deck. It’s made mostly out of fence boards making it a great budget project. You’ll love the Venetian feel it will add to your yard from both inside and out.

Pretty DIY Window Privacy Screen

” data-caption=”” data-expand=”300″ data-tracking-container=”true” />

If you’re looking for a solution to add more privacy to a single-window in your home, this window privacy screen is your answer. It’s a very easy DIY project that includes building a frame and using fabric to cover it. You could really change up the look by stenciling your own fabric or using fabric in your favorite print.

Wood Privacy Screen

” data-caption=”” data-expand=”300″ data-tracking-container=”true” />

A simple porch gets a makeover and some added privacy in this wood privacy screen building project. Add some plant holders to the inside of your screen and you have the perfect area to relax on your patio furniture without anyone bothering you.

Decorative Outdoor Privacy Screen

” data-caption=”” data-expand=”300″ data-tracking-container=”true” />

If you’re looking for more than just a plain wooden privacy screen, you’re going to love this one that uses a wooden frame and then some metal decorative privacy screen panels. It’s a straight forward DIY project that gives you a big payoff.

Outdoor Privacy Curtains

” data-caption=”” data-expand=”300″ data-tracking-container=”true” />

An easy way to add some privacy to your outdoor spaces is by hanging outdoor curtains. You’ll simply need to build a frame, attach a curtain rod, and then hang some already made outdoor curtains. In just an afternoon you’ll have a fun new area that’s completely yours.

Under $100 Privacy Screen

” data-caption=”” data-expand=”300″ data-tracking-container=”true” />

Here’s another project for a curtain privacy screen but with this one, you’ll make your own curtains out of drop cloths. This whole project will cost you less than $100 from start to finish.

Trashcan Privacy Wall

” data-caption=”” data-expand=”300″ data-tracking-container=”true” />

Hide your trash cans away with style with this free DIY privacy screen project. A base and frame are built and then a lattice board is attached as the final step. You could stain it, paint it, or even keep it unfinished.

Introduction: Trash Can / Bin Screen

How to build a garbage can screen

How to build a garbage can screen

How to build a garbage can screen

How to build a timber screen for those not so attractive Trash Cans / Rubbish Bins

Firstly, what you’ll need:

1. Oriental Screens (or regular lattice screens). See images below. Can be purchased at the big hardware stores such as Lowes or buy online

2. Treated pine timber for frame

3. Liquid nails or similar

4. Screws. Longer ones for the frame and Add Tip Ask Question Comment Download

Step 1: Select Your Screen

Select the screening timber. This will depend on your trash can / bin size and preference for final look. One of the better options is the type of lattice in the picture below, which is generally called ‘oriental’ lattice. Most lattice comes in widths of about 35″ (900mm) or 47″ (1200mm_. For my bins 35″ worked perfectly as they are just over 40″ (1m) high and this allowed a gap at the bottom of the doors.

Step 2: Build the Frame

The best way to work out the frame size is with the bins in place.

Measure the height so the bottom side of the top rails are above the bin lids (otherwise you wont get the bins out!). The width needs to be just bigger then the bins side by side but you want to allow at least a 2″ (50mm) gap either side of the bins and in between so they easily wheel in and out.

I won’t include too much detail around the frame as it is very depended on your bin sizes and location of the bins. In short you need a frame down each side and across the top, to allow bin access out the front

Step 3: Attach the Fixed Screen Panels

The top and front of your bin screening with open but first

attach the side panels. Below is an image of the side panel cut out to fit against the wall.

Then attach to the frame. It’s important to mount this so it is sitting about 1″ (20mm) above the top of the frame. This is so when you attach the top hinging panels it will hide their edges. Don’t make it sit too far out in front of the frame, otherwise you will have issues opening the front doors.

Step 4: The Top Opening Panel

Measure and cut one of your lattice panels to fit the top.

You have the option of 1 opening panel or 2, although we chose 1 as its less work and quite simply easier. As per the picture below, reinforce this panel with extra lattice pieces across all edges to increase its rigidity, important as it will hinge and be opened often. Remove, glue and reattach the stapled cross pieces to increase its strength.

Attaching the hinging top panel is fairly simple, just 2 basic hinges at the back attached to the back treated pine timber.

Step 5: Attach the Front Doors

Now for the front doors. This is probably the trickiest part as the doors can be fiddle to get straight and opening perfectly.

First measure and create the doors themselves. As in the picture below, we created the door as 1 piece then cut it into 2.

Then attach 2 hinges to each door. This will require some trial and error to get each door the same height as each other and opening smoothly.

Once you’ve completed that, you’re past the hardest part!

Step 6: Handles

Attach the top panel handle and handles for the two front

doors. Whilst they are not shown in the images here, to hold the doors closed we used magnetic catches which only cost a couple of dollars at any hardware. This produces a nice clean look.

Be the First to Share

Did you make this project? Share it with us!

Recommendations

How to build a garbage can screen

How to build a garbage can screen

How to build a garbage can screen

How to build a garbage can screen

Make it Fly Challenge

How to build a garbage can screen

Summer Fun: Student Design Challenge

How to build a garbage can screen

Fandom Contest

How to build a garbage can screen

Comments

How to build a garbage can screen

That turned out really nice, it sort of has a cabana look to it 🙂

How to build a garbage can screen

My yard is littered with ­unsightly items such as garbage cans and a generator. It’s all essential stuff that I can’t get rid of, but it’s a mess. I might as well have a rusty old Dodge out there too. Any suggestions for bringing order to the outside?

Often our homes look better because of what we can’t see rather than what we can. In other words, your best bet is to hide that stuff behind a privacy screen that complements your home’s architecture.

We built ours for special projects editor Joe Bargmann to hide a pair of 30-gallon garbage cans at the end of his driveway. “We wanted to keep the trash away from the house without upsetting the neighbors,” Joe says. We used off-the-shelf supplies from our local home-improvement center and put it together in an afternoon.

When designing your screen, don’t forget that whatever you’re hiding needs to be accessible. You’re not building a closet. We built an L-shaped screen and attached it to an existing fence to create a three-sided structure. With one side open away from the street, Joe can easily fill the cans and the city can remove them unhindered on trash day. No fiddly door here. We also didn’t add a roof, which would have made it impossible to flip the lids off the cans without pulling them out first. We left 6 inches of clearance around the cans so they slide in and out easily. Keep in mind that if you build a screen around a generator, make sure you can still access its controls and maintenance pointsand don’t block the exhaust vent.

To make the side panels, we started with 8 x 4foot sheets of cedar lattice. Most home centers and lumberyards also stock lattices made of pressure-treated wood or vinyl, which is available in a variety of colors. Cut these to size with a circular saw (watch out for nails and staples) and then sandwich them between a frame made of 1x stock. Don’t forget to use fasteners rated for outdoor projects, such as stainless-steel screws or hot-dipped galvanized nails. Attach these panels to pressure-treated 4 x 4 corner posts set in the ground or in precast concrete deck blocks, which is what we used. Another solution is to fasten the panels to 36-inch-long 2 x 2 stakes driven 12 inches into the ground. You could build a portable screen that isn’t secured to anything, but don’t expect it to survive a gust of wind. Cap the panels and posts with a rail.

Joe stained his screen gray to match the color of his house, though he also considered letting it weather gradually in order to blend in with its rustic surroundings.

Finally, before installing a structure that significantly changes the way your home looks, check for any local ordinances or neighborhood covenants that may limit what you can build. Plus, it’s always common courtesy to let your neighbors know what you’re doingthough chances are they’ll appreciate the upgrade. “Every one of our neighbors has stopped by to thank us for putting our screen up,” Joe says. “They couldn’t be happier.”

How to build a garbage can screen

1. Simple and Very Inexpensive

Probably the least expensive way to hide trash cans outside – and the easiest to make. This one from ishouldbemoppingthefloor.com is simple, nice enough looking, and does the trick. Looks like it could be made in a few hours (minus waiting for the stain to dry) and, for the most part, out of wood scraps you probably already have around your property.

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by : ishouldbemoppingthefloors.com

2 and 3. These are a step above the first one, but still easy and inexpensive.

With these examples, there’s really no reason not to hide your trash cans in a pleasant way that blends with your house. You can click on the photos to be taken to the website that shows more detail.

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by : apartmenttherapy.com

How to build a garbage can screen

photo by : mcdonalgardencenter.com

4. A little more substance and a little more time involved.

This is the one for you if you want still want something simple to hide trash cans and you want to try your hand at easy block laying. Looks like a good first project to learn s little masonry skills.

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by : imgur.com

5. Setting posts and cross members.

This one should also be fairly inexpensive. It’s a matter of putting in posts and the cross braces between them. Then all that’s needed is to attach the bamboo screen to the braces. This would be good in a low wind area. Where we live the bamboo screen would wind up in the next country almost any winter day and half the days in summer.

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by : houzz.com

6 and 7. Also a matter of posts and braces, with lattice this time.

Here are two examples to show the different way to hide trash cans by “covering” them with either a stained lattice run (actually hiding an air conditioning unit) on a diagonal or a white painted lattice that is square to the posts.

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by : decksource.com

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by : houzz.com

8. A lattice enclosure.

This one is not actually used for this purpose, but is good looking and could be customized to hide trash cans, especially in an area where raccoons or juvenile delinquents frequent.

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by : trellisstructures.com

9. This one was actually designed to be an outdoor shower.

Although this one is technically not designed to hide trash cans, it’s a very nice and sturdy look. It’s a little formal, but that might be what your property requires!

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by : decoratingfiles.com

10. This one is beautiful and would fit in great with a Mission style home.

Leave it to Better Homes and Gardens to figure out such a good looking way to hide trash cans. This would look perfect in one of the Mission style homes in many large cities.

How to build a garbage can screen

Attributed to : bhg.com

11. This is the one we’re building on our property.

Although we currently live in a no frills ranch home, we’re fixing it up every chance we get – and going with what we call a Mission / Asian theme. I’ll try to remember to take photos as we go, but it’s going to be modeled directly from this one, although we’re going to do something different with the house numbers.

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by : sugarsugarhouse.com

12. The next few ways to hide trash cans involves complete enclosures.

This first enclosure is probably the most basic. It looks like it’s made from old reclaimed barn wood. It could probably be made with wood from pallets, and the rustic look it has is pretty nice.

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by : britishstandardfence.com

13. Same idea but a bit more formal.

This isn’t my favorite color of stain, but this way to it’s nice enough that it would look good in any yard. Notice the curved top makes it have a bit more interest than just a flat top.

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by : listotic.com

14. Hey, there’s a garden on top of the trash!

This would be a good way to do both – hide trash cans and have a small garden without losing any space. Also, there’s a bit more work involved with this one as there are three recycling cubbies on the left side.

How to build a garbage can screen

Attributed to : bbc.co.uk

15. Now we’re getting into some time and money…

This one would be for someone who wants to spend a few weekends working out a way to hide trash cans, and your recycling, and maybe things you don’t want your kids to see. I mean, they never take out the trash, right? There’s also room under the trash can for some garden tools or trash bags or whatever. This one also has a garden on the top.

How to build a garbage can screen

Photo by : apartmenttherapy.com

16. Here’s a bonus one!

This one serves multiple purposes. A very nice way to hide trash cans on one side, an air conditioner unit on the other side, and store tools in the middle.

How to build a garbage can screen

When I envisioned our square foot garden or le jardin as we sometimes call it, I would think of lush herbs growing, happy producing plants with perfect shiny vegetables growing, butterflies happily flying around our flowers, and nasty trash cans in the corner…LOL. Ok, nasty trash cans were not part of my vision, it’s actually ruining my vision so we must hide them!

How to build a garbage can screen

Our trash cans ended up in our side yard because we hated keeping them in the garage. It’s as simple as that. We like having them outside and it’s convienent to roll them out to the curb and bring them back.

How to build a garbage can screen

So we decided we would build a screen to hide them. We wanted something easy and considered lattice, but lattice just doesn’t seem to hold up. Brian came up with an idea using regular fence boards.

He dug holes and added posts. It’s pretty standard fence construction. Dig hole, insert post, mix and pour concrete, and then fill the rest of the way up with the excavated soil.

We chose 6-foot 4×4 posts and set them about 18 inches in the ground. We chose the 4×4 post instead of the landscape timber (which is like a 4×4 but has rounded corners – you see them used a lot for cheap fences) because they seem to be made of better quality wood and don’t seem to warp as bad or as frequently as the landscape timbers.

The above picture shows the posts immediately after setting. When we establish the height of the fence we will trim off the extra wood. Here I want you to notice how the ground slopes up to the house. It’s gradual, but significant. That will come in to play later.

4×4 post: “Hey everybody! Come and see how good I look!”

Be sure to use a level to make sure your posts are vertical and your fence panels are horizontal.

How to build a garbage can screen

Okay, next step, remember how the ground slopes up to the house? Start with the farthest, lowest post and set one horizontal panel at the top. Using a level, make sure its horizontal and set it to the next post. In the above picture, the right end of the starter panel is attached to the lowest post. The left post will be trimmed off at the top of the panel.

And one last thing, Brian recommends using screws for your fence. In fact, he prefer screws over nails for just about everything. They hold tighter and longer, and they are easily reversible in case you need to remove something and fix or replace it. We tend to do that a lot to get it just right.

How to build a garbage can screen

Here is a picture of the left side. We did the same thing here as we did on the right side…start with the lowest post and set a horizontal panel to the other post. Here is a handy tip: To get the left side and the right side to be the same height, hold a fence panel between the opening with the level sitting on top of it. Use this fence panel to mark the height of the left (higher) side by setting it at the top of the right (lower) side.

How to build a garbage can screen

In the above picture we have trimmed off the top of the left post and added a few more horizontal panels.

How to build a garbage can screen

From here its all basic…just keep adding panels down until you can’t fit any more. It’s okay to not go all the way to the ground because grass will grow to close the gap. If you’re really uncomfortable with your gap, you’re more than welcome to dig out the dirt, add another panel, and then backfill. Just be sure to stain your panels before backfilling to protect them. The wood is not going to last as long if its exposed to dirt, water, and bugs, but at least if it’s stained it will add a little bit of protection.

How to build a garbage can screen

Here, after trimming off the excess, we took more fence panels and added them to the corner and top for a trimmed out look.

Then we trimmed off the top panel where it was sticking out and added one more board for trim vertically on the right side to cover up all the screw holes.

So here is a shot of the completed (but unstained) screen fence. You can see that there is plenty of room inside for the trash can to sit and also for us to roll it in and out and maneuver it around.

The last thing we did is stain it. We love our Ready-Seal Pecan stain .

How to build a garbage can screen

Ah, much better! What ugly trash can?

How to build a garbage can screen

What an easy solution to hide your trash cans, its just wood posts and regular ol’ fence boards. Hello? Grass seed can you please sprout? We’re waiting…

That’s right, no more trash cans ruining the look of my garden! This would be a great easy way to also hide your air conditioner, which we will probably do in the future.

Last updated on September 21, 2020

Our backyard is a bit of a mess in some places; some parts of it are nice and neat, planted with pretty flowers, grass trimmed, patio swept, etc., but other parts of it are basically just junk storage! Now that the weather has warmed up, we’re spending a lot more time in our backyard, and the junk is a bit of an eyesore. So I decided to build a super simple DIY trellis screen to hide the mess. It took me about two hours to build and install it (with lots of breaks for a glass of ice water in the air conditioned house; it was 97 degrees out the day I was building it…whose dumb idea was that?!), and it’s working perfectly to make the whole backyard look pretty and “on purpose”!

I can’t wait for the vine to grow up onto the trellis and really cover that whole half of the pathway; it’s going to be so pretty!

If you have an eyesore area in your backyard, try putting up a little trellis screen. It really is easy to make, and it makes a huge difference!

By the way, they do make prefab, pre-framed sections of trellis that you can just install, but then you’re limited to the sizes, shapes, and colors that are available at your local hardware store. I figured it would be easier to “custom build” a trellis screen that perfectly fit our space than to try to make a prefab one fit.

Simple DIY Trellis Screen

  • 2 hours (time spent doing stuff)
  • 0 minutes, unless you paint your trellis (time spent waiting around)
  • 2 hours (total project time)

Tools

  • circular saw
  • AirStrike nailer
  • cordless drill
  • tape measure

Materials

  • 4’ x 8’ sheet of lattice
  • enough 1×4 cedar boards to frame the edges of your finished trellis TWICE (the lattice will be sandwiched between a front and back frame)
  • galvanized nails
  • exterior screws

Instructions

Here’s what the side of our house looked like before. We had the gravel and that path put in last fall, and we purposely placed the path closer to the fence so that we could use the gravel area for storage. But it didn’t really occur to me how ugly the storage part of it would be. 🙂

So I decided to cover it up!

The first thing I did was figure out what shape and size I needed my finished trellis screen to be. The pathway between the side of the house and the fence is 8’ wide, so I figured I would use the full 4’ width of the lattice. But I wanted to attach the trellis to both the house and the fence on the other side to give it more stability, and the lattice is taller than the fence. I measured the fence and cut the lattice down to the same height using my circular saw.

NOTE: Be extremely careful cutting lattice. There are metal staples at every single intersection of the crossed boards; make sure your saw doesn’t run into any staples!

Once the lattice was cut down to size, I measured the edges and cut 1×4 cedar boards down to size to create a frame for the lattice. Be sure that you cut two boards for each edge so you can frame the front and back of the lattice at the same time. I measured and cut the boards for the sides and bottom frame first, because I knew I wanted the top frame to run all the way across to the fence, and I wanted to measure again once the lattice was framed up, just to double check.

To attach the frame to the lattice, lay one board under the lattice and one on top, sandwiching the lattice in between the two boards. Line the boards up with each other and with the edge of the lattice, then use a nail gun to nail through all three pieces everywhere you can. I used my AirStrike nailer, and it made super quick work of the framing; I really love that thing!

Once the frame was attached on the bottom and sides, I stood the lattice up and measured the length for the top frame piece. I cut two boards to that length and attached them to the lattice. On the fence side of the top frame, I stuck a small scrap of wood in between the boards and nailed them together to make sure the boards weren’t just wiggling around on the fence side.

Then my mom and I stood the lattice up, and she held it in place while I attached it to the house and fence. Because the entire finished trellis is only about 2″ wide, there wasn’t really a good way to screw the trellis directly onto the house.

So instead, I used a few small 2×2 scraps as cleats; I put the 2×2 up against the frame of the trellis and attached it securely to the trellis with screws. Then I was able to screw the 2×2 into the house to hold the trellis up. I used four of these cleats (one at the top and one at the bottom on both sides of the lattice) and the thing is super stable!

On the fence side I toenailed a few screws in through the cedar boards and into the fence, from both sides.

Mom planted a nice flowering vine in a huge pot, and we put that in front of the trellis, along with our strawberry pots. And now the “utility” area of our yard is totally hidden!

And there’s still enough room for my DIY pulley clothesline between the trellis and the house; perfect!

Once that vine starts climbing on the trellis, it’s going to look even better!

It just makes the whole yard look a lot more “finished” and thought out, so I’m really happy with it!

And from the patio, where we spend most of our time, you can’t see any of the junk…just a nice, pretty trellis!

This post may contain affiliate links, which means that we earn a small percentage of each sale. As an Amazon Associate I earn from qualifying purchases.

Having trash cans stored in your front yard can really hurt your curb appeal, and many HOAs will fine you for it. Here’s the easy way to hide your trash bins behind a DIY lattice wall – with free PDF woodworking plans!

Our trash and recycling cans have always been along the side of our house since before we moved in.

One day I was talking to my neighbor about random HOA rules and he mentioned that you weren’t supposed to have your garbage bins in view of the street.

But, how do you hide your garbage cans outside?!

At the time, I figured oh well, since they had always been there, but I also decided that eventually I would fix it.

I can’t move them, because our garage is always an active project zone and we have our shed in the small space behind the garage.

But, when I saw some roadside wood scraps one day, I knew I could make a free simple way to hide our trash cans.

Using a small trellis to hide garbage cans is both functional and attractive.

This is also a great solution if you are looking for outdoor garbage can storage!

How to build a lattice garbage can enclosure

How to build a garbage can screen

Here’s how I built this outdoor garbage can enclosure.

So my scraps were free, but they were 2-3 foot long scraps of fence posts that someone tossed in a pile when they finished their new fence.

I basically wanted to make a platform enclosure for the two cans to rest on and attach a lattice wall to it.

I couldn’t just dig down into the ground and build the wall because I know a bunch of wires and our main water line run right through that area.

The most important thing to remember if you do this for yourself is to make sure the base is wide enough for the TOPS of both of your trash cans and is tall enough to go a few inches above the lid.

How to build a garbage can screen

So I started by building the base. I created a frame with support beams first.

How to build a garbage can screen

Then I cut fence boards to fit on the beams. Each board rested on at least two beams.

I used my RYOBI AirStrike nail gun to nail them in place.

How to build a garbage can screen

Then I built the wall. I cut the longest board I had taken into through strips about two inches wide.

Then I cut a piece of lattice (this was the only thing I bought for this project) to be the size I needed.

For me, it was 3 feet wide by 4 feet tall. Then I nailed this to the boards I’d just cut.

How to build a garbage can screen

Finally, I attached this to the outside of the base with screws along the bottom and one stabilizing cross-beam using a 2″x2″ I’ve had laying around.

The wall needed to be stabilized from the top or it would eventually snap off if only connected by the screws at the bottom.

I cut a 45 degree angle on each end of the beam and nailed it into place.

How to build a garbage can screen

How to build a garbage can screen

In the end, it was exactly what I wanted! Out outdoor trash cans look so much more hidden.

How to build a garbage can screen

How to build a garbage can screen

This project was great because it was almost entirely free.

I was able to build the entire thing in about 3 hours.

I was glad to get this project done this way even though it had been on my list for almost two years, but was never a priority.

This is a simple DIY way to hide your trash cans and can be customized easily for your space!

If you want to hide your indoor trash, check out our DIY tilt out kitchen trash can and our laundry room trash can hack!

Any questions about this garbage can fence DIY project?