How to check cats for dehydration

| Updated: Feb 12th, 2021

How to check cats for dehydration

Could your cat be dehydrated? It’s surprisingly common.

Cats in the wild would have eaten food that was 70% water content, and rarely drank water at all. Now, we often feed them dry kibble- and they haven’t all caught up to the need to drink water.

In this article, we’ll explore the symptoms of dehydration, and the two main types: chronic, mild dehydration – like the cat who doesn’t drink like they should – and acute, severe dehydration- like the cat that has been vomiting constantly.

What are the causes of dehydration in cats?

Other than getting stuck in the shed for a couple of days or chronically under-drinking, cats can also become dehydrated due to medical conditions.

The most common of these is renal disease. When a cat’s kidneys begin to struggle, they lose the ability to re-absorb water from the kidneys and therefore keep the water in the body. Instead, they produce a lot of urine, and these cats can quickly become dehydrated if they don’t drink enough to keep up with their output.

The same process occurs, for different reasons, in hyperthyroidism and unmanaged diabetes, both of which often cause dehydration in cats. Repeated vomiting or diarrhea will also cause dehydration in those unable to drink water to replace what they’ve lost.

What are the symptoms of dehydration in cats?

How to check cats for dehydration

Cats that are dehydrated will try to seek out water – you may find them licking the walls of the shower or trying to drink from the toilet. They may also become lethargic and stop grooming themselves.

A quick test for dehydration is to touch their gums (carefully, without getting bitten!) – if they’re at all dry or sticky rather than moist with saliva, your cat is dehydrated and should see a vet. In severe cases, your cat’s eyes will sink into their head and their skin will lose its elasticity.

This means that when you pick up a bit of skin on the back of the neck, it won’t ping back into place. Your cat’s heart rate will also speed up to cope with the lower blood pressure caused by the lack of fluid.

What are the dangers of dehydration?

Dehydration is serious. Whilst mild, chronic dehydration caused by disease can often be solved at home, severe dehydration can result in death.

Mild, chronic dehydration can affect the kidneys as well as other organs. It causes reduced blood flow and so all organs will be at risk. Organs that metabolize drugs, such as kidneys and liver, are particularly at risk if some drugs are used whilst the cat is dehydrated.

More severe dehydration starts to cause heart problems, as the lack of fluid causes the heart to pump faster. This puts the heart under a lot of pressure, and the organs are still unable to get what they need.

At this level of dehydration, the organs will start to die and your cat will be likely to go into a state of shock. Cats at this level are unable to absorb water from their intestines and will die without medical intervention.

How should dehydration in cats be treated?

If you suspect your cat is dehydrated, it’s always best to call your vet for advice. Your vet will probably ask to see your pet – this is for safety, as dehydration can be fatal. They’d rather check your pet over and find it’s mild than tell you to treat at home and find it was more serious than they thought over the phone.

If your cat has a chronic illness and very mild dehydration of 5% or less, your vet may suggest some at-home care. This may involve feeding wet food with extra water added, or providing a rehydration solution for your pet to drink.

Rehydration solutions contain electrolytes to replace those lost in diarrhea or vomiting and are flavored to encourage drinking. You should also encourage these cats to drink more by providing a large choice of water bowls in many different locations, and even cat water fountains. Cat milk may also be an option for persuading these older, ill cats to take in more fluids.

If your cat is only mildly dehydrated, but the symptoms have come on quickly due to vomiting or diarrhea, your vet may suggest treatment at home, but give some medications. This is because a vomiting cat is unlikely to be able to keep water down long enough to absorb it.

Depending on the severity of the vomiting, your vet may recommend your cat has some fluids given at the clinic. This could be under the skin or could be through a needle into their vein.

In severe dehydration cases – for instance, in cases with extreme vomiting, animals that have been locked in a shed for some time, or any animal with a ‘skin tent’ where the skin doesn’t go down quickly at the neck, intravenous fluids are the only way to effectively rehydrate the cat.

It is essential that these cats are not treated at home as their guts will be too compromised to absorb any water they’re given, and they’re usually too much in a state of shock to drink, anyway. It’s important not to rehydrate the cat too quickly, as this puts further pressure on the heart – so your pet will usually have to be hospitalized for 24-48 hours.

These cats need to be carefully monitored to ensure they’re producing urine and may need further testing to identify the cause and severity of the dehydration, as well as monitor their recovery.

Remember: Dehydration can be deadly. Don’t delay- call for advice.

In this Article

In this Article

In this Article

  • What Causes Dehydration in Cats?
  • How Much Water Does My Cat Need?
  • What Are the General Symptoms of Dehydration in Cats?
  • What Should I Do if My Cat Is Dehydrated?
  • Are Certain Cats Prone to Dehydration?
  • How Is Dehydration Treated?
  • How Can I Prevent Dehydration In My Cat?

Cat dehydration happens when there is excessive fluid loss from the cat’s body. When this occurs, it’s not just water loss. It is also a loss of some essential minerals in their body like chloride, sodium, and potassium.

Water is essential to your cat’s health. It helps it maintain good health and replace the fluids that they lose through their urine and feces. Water is also necessary for your cat’s circulation, digestion, and waste removal. If dehydration is left untreated in your cat, the condition can lead to other severe medical concerns.

What Causes Dehydration in Cats?

Dehydration in cats is typically caused by the cat not drinking enough water or by excessive water loss. Cats can also lose moisture by sweating small amounts through their paws but this does not usually cause drastic water loss. Dehydration could be brought about by many different factors like:

  • Diabetes
  • Diarrhea
  • Fever
  • Heatstroke
  • Hot weather or overheating
  • Trauma
  • Vomiting

To help your cat maintain healthy hydration, ensure that they can always access fresh water in a clean bowl every day.

How Much Water Does My Cat Need?

Your cat needs a daily amount of about 3.5 to 4.5 ounces of water per 5 pounds of their body weight. For instance, if you have a 10-pound cat, they should be drinking between 7 to 9 ounces of water daily.

If the cat eats wet food often, you may notice that it doesn’t drink as much water. That’s because the cat is consuming water when they eat. Wet food is made of up to 80% water.

Cats who primarily eat dry food, on the other hand, won’t consume as much water from their food. They need to get hydrated by drinking from their water dish.

What Are the General Symptoms of Dehydration in Cats?

Make sure that your cat is getting enough water as a part of their daily diet. If the cat is not getting enough water, they may become dehydrated.

Some signs of dehydration in cats include:

  • Loss of energy
  • Panting
  • Refusal to eat
  • Sunken eyes
  • Tacky and dry gums

Continued

‘Skin tenting’ is a good test to help you determine if your cat is dehydrated. To do this, gently take a small portion of your cat’s skin around their shoulders, pull it up, and then let go.

If your cat is hydrated, the skin will snap back into place quickly. If the skin falls back down slowly, this your cat could be dehydrated. If your cat’s skin remains up in a tent position and does not fall back down, it can be a sign of severe dehydration. In cases like this, you should seek medical care for your cat right away.

What Should I Do if My Cat Is Dehydrated?

Dehydration is often a sign of a serious underlying medical condition in cats. If you suspect that your cat is dehydrated, contact your veterinarian for help right away.

In the mean time you can try some home remedies to rehydrate your cat:

  • Add a small amount of chicken broth or tuna juice to their water.
  • Instead of dry food, try giving them wet food.
  • Place some ice cubes in their water bowl.

You must get to know your cat’s food and water preferences. For instance, some cats like drinking water from a water dish while some like using a cat fountain. You want to try to encourage them to drink. However, you should never force them.

Are Certain Cats Prone to Dehydration?

Generally, cats that have been diagnosed with another illness and older cats are more prone to dehydration.

For instance, if your cat is experiencing cancer, diabetes, hyperthyroidism, or kidney disorder, it is helpful to talk with your veterinarian about how to maintain healthy and ideal hydration levels for your cat.

How Is Dehydration Treated?

A quick procedure your veterinarian can perform involves them giving the cat fluids under the skin. In severe cases, your veterinarian can recommend hospitalizing your cat and giving them fluids through a needle that goes directly into the cat’s vein. This method can usually rehydrate your cat within a few hours or days.

Your veterinarian will also diagnose the underlying reason for your cat’s dehydration and help you nurse them back to health.

Continued

How Can I Prevent Dehydration In My Cat?

There are a few ways that you can help prevent dehydration in your cat. Some options include:

  • Clean out and provide fresh water in water bowls every day.
  • Provide multiple clean water sources around your house for the cat to drink from.
  • Try giving your cat an electrolyte supplement or meat-flavored water from a trusted pet food store.
  • Use a cat water fountain with fresh water to encourage them to drink.

If your cat appears to be dehydrated or seems hesitant to drink, it’s important to get them to the vet right away. Dehydration in cats can lead to several serious medical concerns that should be addressed as soon as possible.

Sources

Feline Living: “How Much Water Does a Cat Need? How to Get Her To Drink More?”

Dehydration means that a cat has either used or lost more fluids than her body needs to perform basic metabolic functions, without replacing them through drinking. Dehydration also results in electrolyte loss. This decrease in fluids and electrolytes negatively affects circulation, digestion, and toxin removal from the body. If it is severe enough, it can result in organ failure and death.

Ways a Cat May Lose Too Many Fluids

  • By overheating in hot weather
  • Through vomiting
  • By having excessive diarrhea
  • Through a metabolic disorder such as kidney disease, diabetes, or hyperthyroidism.
  • Because of a fever
  • Through blood loss

Reasons a Cat May Not Take in Enough Fluid

  • Cats in the wild are carnivores. They get most of their moisture from the prey that they eat, and as a result they have a low thirst drive.
  • Because cats do not have much of an urge to drink water, it is very easy for them to become dehydrated quickly, especially if they are fed dry food.
  • Cats that are ill may not drink enough water because they feel nauseous or too lethargic to move around.
  • Cats that become lost or accidentally locked in an area without water may become dehydrated.
  • Cats that are left outdoors without access to fresh water may not be able to find an adequate source.
  • Cats may not like the source of water that is available to them. Cats are very sensitive to smells and may not like the smell of the chemicals in tap water. Many cats prefer drinking running water to standing water, and some have very definite preferences for the type of bowl that their water is presented to them in.

Why Is It Important to Know If Your Cat Is Dehydrated?

Cats that are dehydrated begin to feel lethargic. Then they don’t want to eat and drink or move around, so they become more dehydrated. In this way, dehydration can start a vicious cycle, and if it is untreated, it can lead to organ failure.

When a cat’s dehydration is caused by an underlying illness, it is important to know that your cat is sick so that appropriate treatment can be started.

Treatment of Dehydration in Cats

The cornerstone of the treatment of dehydration in cats is fluid replacement. This can be done orally if the pet is not vomiting and has no underlying disease process complicating things. If the cat will not take fluid in orally or can’t keep it down because of vomiting, fluids may need to be given another way. The two most common parenteral (delivered in a way other than through the GI tract) ways of giving fluids are subcutaneously (deposited under the skin) and intravenously (injected directly into a vein).

The second goal of treatment should be directed at resolving the underlying cause of the dehydration. If this was overheating or increased exercise, the treatment might simply be to ensure that there is clean, fresh water available for your cat at all times. If a bout of vomiting caused the dehydration, your veterinarian may treat your cat with anti-emetics or other medications.

If a chronic condition such as kidney disease is causing your cat to consistently be at risk for dehydration, you may need to replace fluids on a regular basis. Subcutaneous fluids may need to be given routinely. You can learn to do this at home.

How to Tell If Your Cat Is Dehydrated

There are some basic ways to tell at home if your cat might be dehydrated:

  • Look at her eyes: If your cat’s eyes are sunken into the sockets and appear dull instead of shiny, it’s likely that she is dehydrated. How to check cats for dehydration
  • Do a skin tent test: Proper hydration helps a cat’s skin remain elastic and supple. A dehydrated cat’s skin may not rebound as quickly as that of a well-hydrated cat when you pull it up. A good place to check this is between the shoulder blades, where there is a good bit of extra skin. Using your thumb and first two fingers, pull some skin up just a bit to make a tent shape, then let go and watch how fast it rebounds to its normal position. It should do so within one second. A dehydrated cat’s skin will not rebound as quickly as a well-hydrated cat’s. An extremely dehydrated cat’s skin may not rebound at all. This test can be tricky to interpret and takes some practice getting to know what normal is. Do not rely on it alone to determine if your cat is dehydrated . . . if your cat shows signs of illness, consult your veterinarian.

Check your cat’s gums:

  • When a cat is well-hydrated, her gums are pink and moist. If the gums appear dry and feel sticky when you touch them, your cat may be dehydrated.
  • When you push lightly on the gum with your finger, then remove it, a blanched area will appear on the gum. The blanched area should disappear, returning to pink, in one to two seconds in a well-hydrated cat. If it takes longer, your cat may be dehydrated.
  • Cats that are ill may be less compliant about handling than usual. Be sure to use care when attempting to look in your cat’s mouth, and stop immediately if she acts upset.
  • Consider the saliva: A well-hydrated cat’s saliva is thin and mostly unnoticeable. If you see thick, more ropey saliva, it may indicate dehydration.
  • Check your cat’s litterbox: A dehydrated cat may become constipated. This may mean that you don’t see stool in the litterbox, you see several small, very hard pieces of stool, or you see small pieces of stool outside of the litterbox.
  • These signs of dehydration are more non-specific and can occur during a variety of illnesses:

    • Lethargy
    • Loss of appetite
    • Increased heart rate

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    Preventing Dehydration in Cats

    Dehydration in cats can rapidly lead to greater illness. Understanding cats’ low thirst drive, knowing how to identify the signs of dehydration, and calling the veterinarian quickly if your cat is ill or seems dehydrated will go a long way toward helping your cat feel better much more quickly.

    How to check cats for dehydration

    How to check cats for dehydration

    Dehydration occurs due to a water and electrolytes imbalance in the body of the cat and this can cause serious complications and even death if left untreated. When the fluid level is lower than normal, the cat begins to dehydrate.

    There are some signs that will help you to know if your cat has lack of liquids and that can save you lot of trouble. If you ever wondered How to tell if a cat is dehydrated, don’t miss the guidelines AnimalWised offers you below. If you notice any of the symptoms of dehydration you will need to provide your pet with fresh water and take them to the vet.

    1. What causes dehydration?
    2. Check their gums
    3. Check the elasticity of your cat’s skin
    4. Check out their eyes
    5. Check their body temperature and heart rate

    What causes dehydration?

    It is sometimes difficult to recognize dehydration in a cat, since the symptoms can be subtle and may be left to ignore. This is why it is important to know what can make your cat suffer dehydration, to be more vigilant and take measures in time.

    There are some diseases that cause this condition such as diarrhea, vomiting, fever, internal bleeding, urine problems, sunburn or heatstroke, among others.

    If our cat suffers any of these problems we will have to closely monitor the symptoms of dehydration and call the vet if required, besides ensuring we provide enough fresh water to drink.

    How to check cats for dehydration

    Check their gums

    Moisture and capillary filling time are two methods to determine if a cat is dehydrated. To check their gum’s hydration you should gently touch it with your finger. Raise the upper lip and do it quickly, because it can simply become dry due to the air if you take too long.

    If the gums are viscous or juicy this may be a sign that your cat is in the first stage of dehydration. If they are completely dry, it may mean that your cat has a severe dehydration.

    A capillary filling test consists in measuring the time in which the capillaries of the gums take to fill with blood again. To do this, press the gum so it becomes white and count how long it takes for them to regain their normal color. In a hydrated cat this takes about two seconds. The longer the gums take to become pink, the more dehydrated your cat will be. This is because dehydration reduces the amount of blood, which is why it will take the body longer to fill the capillaries.

    How to check cats for dehydration

    Check the elasticity of your cat’s skin

    The skin of the cat will lose elasticity and will be dry if it is not well hydrated, so if you are wondering how to tell if a cat is dehydrated, you can check How long it takes for the skin to return to its place after stretching it.

    To do this, gently pinch the skin on the back of your cat and pull it slightly upward, and away from the body. In a cat that is well hydrated their skin will return to their normal state, while if they are dehydrated it will return to its normal state very slowly.

    This test only applies to cats with a normal weight without skin problems and that are not very old, since with age, the skin loses elasticity.

    How to check cats for dehydration

    Check out their eyes

    The eyes can give you much information to know if a cat is dehydrated. The lack of fluids causes their eyes to look more sunken than usual, in addition, they will be very dry and, in cases of severe dehydration, their third eyelid may be visible.

    How to check cats for dehydration

    Check their body temperature and heart rate

    When a cat is dehydrated their heart will pump more quickly, so the heart rate will be higher. In addition, this affects their body temperature, which may be lower than normal.

    You can hold your cat’s leg and feel their temperature. If they have the same temperature as usual you should not worry, but if you notice that they are colder than normal they may be dehydrated.

    How to check cats for dehydration

    This article is purely informative. AnimalWised does not have the authority to prescribe any veterinary treatment or create a diagnosis. We invite you to take your pet to the veterinarian if they are suffering from any condition or pain.

    If you want to read similar articles to How to Tell if a Cat is Dehydrated, we recommend you visit our Other health problems category.

    How To Test If A Cat Is Dehydrated. 6 signs your cat is dehydrated & should see a vet asap. A close up of a terrible skin turgor result!

    How to check cats for dehydrationSource : www.pinterest.com

    A dehydrated cat has a. A good test to help you determine if your cat is dehydrated is called ‘skin tenting.’ to do this, gently take a small portion of skin around the cat’s shoulders and pull it up and let go.

    9 Signs Of Dehydration That Arent Thirst With Images

    A heat stroke is a potentially fatal condition that strikes most commonly during the hot summer months. Another sneaky sign includes skin elasticity, which you can test in a method called “tenting” by gently pulling skin on the scruff of your cat’s neck.

    Big cat rescue freeze dried minnows treats for cats 2. 6 signs your cat is dehydrated & should see a vet asap.

    Cat dog dehydration dogs dog parents cat parenting. A close up of a terrible skin turgor result!

    Catmandoo life essentials freeze dried chicken littles. A dehydrated cat has a.

    Chasing our tails naturally dehydrated beef heart for pets. A good test to help you determine if your cat is dehydrated is called ‘skin tenting.’ to do this, gently take a small portion.

    Check cats for dehydration cats cat body pets. A heat stroke is a potentially fatal condition that strikes most commonly during the hot summer months.

    Cute cat eats dried fish asmr cats cute cat cat treats. Another sneaky sign includes skin elasticity, which you can test in a method called “tenting” by gently pulling skin on.

    Dog dehydration symptoms waggy tales dog health dog. Another way to see if your cat is dehydrated is to conduct a skin turgor test to examine the elasticity of your cat’s skin.

    Found this little one outside of petsmart she was. Another way to test for dehydration is to touch the cat’s gums.

    H3 essentials freeze dried ahi tuna treats for cats 211. As the cat gets more dehydrated, the skin goes back in place more and more slowly.

    How to keep your pet hydrated your pet pets love pet. Capillary refill time may be slow.

    How to make homemade dog food recipe cat food recipe. Capillary testcarefully press a finger against your cat’s gum for a few seconds.

    How to prevent pet dehydration with pet fountains. Dehydration symptoms in cats include lethargy, loss of appetite, elevated heart rate, decreased saliva in the mouth, and.

    How To Test If A Cat Is Dehydrated

    Capillary testcarefully press a finger against your cat’s gum for a few seconds.Dehydration symptoms in cats include lethargy, loss of appetite, elevated heart rate, decreased saliva in the mouth, and panting, according to catster magazine.Determine how frequently your cat is urinating.Gently grab the cat’s skin near the scruff of the neck.

    Gently pinch some skin on the back of the neck/shoulder area.Gently pinch some skin on the back of the neck/shoulder area.Grab a generous amount of skin at the scruff of the neck and gently pull it upwards then let go.Here are two easy tests that you can use to check if your cat is dehydrated.

    Here’s how to do a skin turgor test for dehydration on your cat:Here’s how to do a skin turgor test for dehydration on your cat:However, if your cat’s skin doesn’t quickly return, consult your veterinarian.However, in a dehydrated cat, the skin will be slower to retract.

    Hydrated cats will have elastic skin that bounces right back into place.If it doesn’t, your cat is dehydrated.If it falls back down quickly, your cat is probably ok.If the pinch of skin stays up (the tent), it is a sign of severe dehydration.

    If the process takes longer, your cat is probably dehydrated).If the skin doesn’t “snap back” right away, your.If the skin stays in the “tent” position, your cat is severally dehydrated and needs to see a.If the skin stays up and does not go down, your cat is so severely dehydrated you have to get to a veterinarian urgently.

    If the skin stays up and does not go down, your cat is so severely dehydrated you have to get to a.If the skin tents or sags, you have a dehydrated animal on your hands.If this does not happen, the animal is dehydrated.If you remove the finger, this place is white.

    If you take a pinch of skin over the cat’s shoulders and pull up gently, the skin should snap back into place when released.If your cat is hydrated, the skin will spring back immediately after letting go.In a dehydrated cat, they feel tacky and dry.In a hydrated animal, the skin should immediately return to position.

    In a hydrated cat this will take about two seconds.In a normal cat, the gums should be slick, wet and glistening;In one to two seconds this place should turn pink again.In severe cases, your cat’s eyes will sink into their head and their skin will lose its elasticity.

    Moisture and capillary filling time are two methods to determine if a cat is dehydrated.Pet md suggest that you do the pinch test to tell how dehydrated your cat is.Pull it up as a mother cat would do when carrying a kitten.Raise the upper lip and do it quickly, because it can simply become dry due to the air if you take too long.

    Signs your cat is dehydrated.Skin elasticity testgently grasp some skin at the base of your cat’s neck, and then release it.Slow capillary filling (detectable by a test:That being said, it’s important to understand the key signs of heat strokes in dogs so that you can take immediate action as needed.

    The absolute best way to test for dehydration is to tug on the skin between its shoulder blades.The capillary refill test consists of measuring the time it takes the capillaries of the gums to fill with blood again.The cat’s saliva may be thick.The longer it takes your gums to turn pink, the more dehydrated your cat will be.

    The more dehydrated the cat is, the slower the skin will take to retract back to normal.The most important tests are a packed cell volume and total blood protein test for diagnosing dehydration.The skin of a normal, healthy cat is springy and full, while dehydration causes skin to lose that elasticity.The skin should immediately spring back.

    The skin should spring back when you release.The skin turgor test is one of the best ways to check a cat for dehydration symptoms.Think of this like running your car in a closed garage and being forced to rebreathe the exhaust.This method consists of pressing the cat’s gum with your finger.

    To check their gum’s hydration you should gently touch it with your finger.To do that, you gently gather your cat’s skin behind the neck and between the shoulders and lift it up.To do this, press the gum to turn white and see how long it takes to regain the normal color.To perform this test, simply pinch the skin on your cat’s shoulder.

    We may be in the dog days of summer, but it’s important for pet.What’s the best way to find out if my cat is dehydrated?

    How to check cats for dehydration

    Did you know? Your feline friend has an interesting origin. Cats were originally desert animals and, thanks to evolution, have retained their ability to meet their hydration needs through their food.

    However, sometimes cats don’t get enough water through food alone, and dehydration can come into play. It’s our mission to give you the resources you need to keep your pet healthy, so read on to learn about dehydration in cats, what causes it, symptoms to watch for and how to prevent it with advice from veterinarian and expert animal nutritionist, Dr. Patton.

    Reasons for Dehydration in Cats

    Cats can hydrate somewhat from water-rich food sources, but dry food like kibble might not be the only reason your cat is dehydrated. Other reasons for parched purrers include:

    • Environment: The hotter and drier it is outside, the thirstier your cat will be. Consider both the outside environment and the inside conditions of your home.
    • Activity: Cats that are more active will require more water. Dr. Patton says this is particularly an issue in kittens, who love to frolic and play.
    • Autonomy: Though many cats are given the run of their homes, some cats are limited in their movement during certain parts of the day. Perhaps you shut the door while they sleep with you in bed. While that’s a prime opportunity for cuddling, it also prevents your cat from getting to their water dish at night.

    Other things that can cause dehydration in cats include diarrhea, vomiting, trauma, and diabetes

    Symptoms and Signs of Dehydration in Cats

    According to Dr. Patton, the best way to tell whether your cat is dehydrated is to pinch their skin into a fold and see what happens. If it stays pinched, they are likely dehydrated as decreased skin elasticity is a common sign of dehydration. If their skin quickly becomes smooth again, they are likely just fine.

    According to pets.webmd.com some of the other cat dehydration symptoms include:

    • Lethargy or loss of energy
    • Dry, tacky gums
    • Sunken eyes
    • Refusal to eat
    • Panting

    If you notice any of these other symptoms in your cat, it’s a good idea to get in touch with your vet for professional diagnosis and treatment.

    How to Rehydrate and Keep Your Cat Hydrated

    There are two easy ways to keep your pet cat hydrated and happy.

    1. Provide fresh water: Keep fresh water in an easily accessible spot for them at all times. Keep a water dish on the floor and refill daily and as needed.
    2. Choose hydrating food: Opt for hydrating food that helps them meet water needs while taking in essential nutrients.

    Natural Diet for Cats

    “Vital Essentials’ products are as close to the cat’s natural diet as is made by anybody. Nature knows what it’s doing … I tend to think well of an approach to the cat’s diet that duplicates their natural raw diet.”

    Dinner Patties: Our Dinner Patties feed cats’ natural cravings through abundant protein and no fillers or artificial ingredients. All you need to do is crumble the patties into your cat’s bowl and add water. You can’t force a cat to drink water so mixing that hydration into our dinner patties is a delicious way to ensure your cat is getting the water and nutrients they need while maximizing flavor. Speaking of flavor … which variety will be your kitty’s fave?

    Frozen Food: Vital Cat® frozen food is made at the peak of freshness to retain moisture, so it’s a great choice to keep your cat hydrated. Check out some of our popular frozen pet food below!

    While you’re picking a flavor of dinner patties or grain-free frozen food, make sure to browse the rest of our cat food, treats and snacks, and toppers. All our products are made to retain active nutritional elements your cat needs.

    Have more questions about your cat’s health? Bookmark our blog for feeding tips, info on dental health, and more.

    Practical Solutions for Pets Problems & Publishing

    How to check cats for dehydration

    cat drinking water from faucet

    Cats evolved as desert creatures and have an amazing ability to conserve water, but cat dehydration can still kill. Even though cats seem to prefer to drink water in the weirdest places (the sink? your glass? the TOILET?!) they most often just don’t drink enough water. It’s important to know the signs of cat dehydration and provide ample drinking ops to keep kitty healthy and happy.

    WHAT IS CAT DEHYDRATION?

    Dehydration is the excessive loss of body water. Normal water loss occurs in the cat’s litter box deposits, through moisture exhaled with the breath, and through sweat. These fluids are replaced when the cat eats and drinks.

    I’m sharing this information from my DEHYDRATION entry from Cat Facts, The Series 4 (D): The Pet Parent’s A-to-Z Home Care Encyclopedia which includes these topics: Deafness, Declawing, Dehydration, Dermatitis, Diabetes Mellitus, Diarrhea, Dominance, Dreaming, and Drowning.

    I’ve broken the massive CAT FACTS book into catnip-size alpha-chapter sections. Folks can choose which ones they most need. Each chapter will release every week or so, but ONLY for subscribers on my Pets Peeves Newsletter. Of course, you can still get the entire CAT FACTS book either in Kindle or 540+ pages of print.

    WHAT CAUSES CAT DEHYDRATION?

    Any illness may prompt the cat to stop eating and drinking, and prolonged fever increases the loss of body fluid. Specific disease conditions such as diabetes or kidney failure, as well as injuries or illnesses that result in vomiting, diarrhea, and bleeding are all common causes of dehydration.

    Grey cat drinks water from a pond

    SIGNS OF CAT DEHYDRATION

    A normal adult cat’s total body water is approximately 60 percent of his body weight. Signs of dehydration become apparent when the cat loses as little as five percent of normal body water. A 12 to 15 percent loss of total body water results in imminent death.

    The earliest noticeable sign of dehydration is the loss of skin elasticity. Dry mucus membranes are another sign of dehydration. The cat’s mouth is dry, the gums are tacky instead of wet, and saliva may be stringy and thick.

    HOW TO CHECK FOR CAT DEHYDRATION

    When the loose skin at the cat’s shoulder blades is gently grasped and lifted, it should quickly spring back into place upon release. When slightly dehydrated, the cat’s skin retracts slowly; more serious dehydration causes retracted skin to remain in a ridge, and spring back little if any.

    When your cat suffers dehydration, her capillary refill time (the time it takes for blood to return to tissue after pressure is applied) is delayed. You can get a general idea of the state of dehydration with this easy test. I recommend you do this when your cat feels fine, to know what “normal” looks like.

    Gently press one finger to the side of your cat’s gums; this will briefly block blood flow, and turn normally pink tissue white when the pressure is quickly released. Normally it takes less than two seconds for the white to return to pink. At seven to eight percent dehydration, capillary refill time is delayed by another two to three seconds. Longer than four or five seconds indicates severe dehydration. Such cats may also have sunken eyeballs, involuntary muscle twitches, and their paw pads feel cold.

    Veterinarian male doctor making an infusion therapy to a cat on blue yellow background.

    VETERINARY CARE FOR CAT DEHYDRATION

    A cat with noticeable dehydration needs immediate veterinary attention. Fluid and electrolyte (mineral) loss will be replaced, and steps taken to prevent further loss. Intravenous fluid therapy may be necessary.

    In mild cases in which the cat is not vomiting, oral hydration with plain water may be sufficient. Your veterinarian may prescribe a balanced electrolyte solution such as Ringer’s lactate with five percent Dextrose in water.

    Fluids for treating dehydration in children, such as Pedialyte, are also suitable for cats. They should be given as directed by your veterinarian.

    Has your cat ever suffered from dehydration? Do you have a “kidney cat” and give fluid therapy at home? Please share your experiences! (Oh, and I hope you’ll forward this post to those who need the info…)

    Subscribe to Amy’s YouTube Channel

    I love hearing from you, so please share comments and questions. Do you have an ASK AMY question you’d like answered? Do you have a new kitten and need answers? Stay up to date on all the latest just subscribe the blog, “like” me on Facebook, and sign up for Pet Peeves newsletter. Stay up to date with the latest book give aways and appearances related to my September Day pet-centric THRILLERS WITH BITE!

    Practical Solutions for Pets Problems & Publishing

    How to check cats for dehydration

    cat drinking water from faucet

    Cats evolved as desert creatures and have an amazing ability to conserve water, but cat dehydration can still kill. Even though cats seem to prefer to drink water in the weirdest places (the sink? your glass? the TOILET?!) they most often just don’t drink enough water. It’s important to know the signs of cat dehydration and provide ample drinking ops to keep kitty healthy and happy.

    WHAT IS CAT DEHYDRATION?

    Dehydration is the excessive loss of body water. Normal water loss occurs in the cat’s litter box deposits, through moisture exhaled with the breath, and through sweat. These fluids are replaced when the cat eats and drinks.

    I’m sharing this information from my DEHYDRATION entry from Cat Facts, The Series 4 (D): The Pet Parent’s A-to-Z Home Care Encyclopedia which includes these topics: Deafness, Declawing, Dehydration, Dermatitis, Diabetes Mellitus, Diarrhea, Dominance, Dreaming, and Drowning.

    I’ve broken the massive CAT FACTS book into catnip-size alpha-chapter sections. Folks can choose which ones they most need. Each chapter will release every week or so, but ONLY for subscribers on my Pets Peeves Newsletter. Of course, you can still get the entire CAT FACTS book either in Kindle or 540+ pages of print.

    WHAT CAUSES CAT DEHYDRATION?

    Any illness may prompt the cat to stop eating and drinking, and prolonged fever increases the loss of body fluid. Specific disease conditions such as diabetes or kidney failure, as well as injuries or illnesses that result in vomiting, diarrhea, and bleeding are all common causes of dehydration.

    Grey cat drinks water from a pond

    SIGNS OF CAT DEHYDRATION

    A normal adult cat’s total body water is approximately 60 percent of his body weight. Signs of dehydration become apparent when the cat loses as little as five percent of normal body water. A 12 to 15 percent loss of total body water results in imminent death.

    The earliest noticeable sign of dehydration is the loss of skin elasticity. Dry mucus membranes are another sign of dehydration. The cat’s mouth is dry, the gums are tacky instead of wet, and saliva may be stringy and thick.

    HOW TO CHECK FOR CAT DEHYDRATION

    When the loose skin at the cat’s shoulder blades is gently grasped and lifted, it should quickly spring back into place upon release. When slightly dehydrated, the cat’s skin retracts slowly; more serious dehydration causes retracted skin to remain in a ridge, and spring back little if any.

    When your cat suffers dehydration, her capillary refill time (the time it takes for blood to return to tissue after pressure is applied) is delayed. You can get a general idea of the state of dehydration with this easy test. I recommend you do this when your cat feels fine, to know what “normal” looks like.

    Gently press one finger to the side of your cat’s gums; this will briefly block blood flow, and turn normally pink tissue white when the pressure is quickly released. Normally it takes less than two seconds for the white to return to pink. At seven to eight percent dehydration, capillary refill time is delayed by another two to three seconds. Longer than four or five seconds indicates severe dehydration. Such cats may also have sunken eyeballs, involuntary muscle twitches, and their paw pads feel cold.

    Veterinarian male doctor making an infusion therapy to a cat on blue yellow background.

    VETERINARY CARE FOR CAT DEHYDRATION

    A cat with noticeable dehydration needs immediate veterinary attention. Fluid and electrolyte (mineral) loss will be replaced, and steps taken to prevent further loss. Intravenous fluid therapy may be necessary.

    In mild cases in which the cat is not vomiting, oral hydration with plain water may be sufficient. Your veterinarian may prescribe a balanced electrolyte solution such as Ringer’s lactate with five percent Dextrose in water.

    Fluids for treating dehydration in children, such as Pedialyte, are also suitable for cats. They should be given as directed by your veterinarian.

    Has your cat ever suffered from dehydration? Do you have a “kidney cat” and give fluid therapy at home? Please share your experiences! (Oh, and I hope you’ll forward this post to those who need the info…)

    Subscribe to Amy’s YouTube Channel

    I love hearing from you, so please share comments and questions. Do you have an ASK AMY question you’d like answered? Do you have a new kitten and need answers? Stay up to date on all the latest just subscribe the blog, “like” me on Facebook, and sign up for Pet Peeves newsletter. Stay up to date with the latest book give aways and appearances related to my September Day pet-centric THRILLERS WITH BITE!