How to cook boiled shrimp

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How to cook boiled shrimp

There are many different ways to make shrimp seasoning. The most popular versions attempt to mimic commercially produced brands, while others are completely unique. Some seasonings for shrimp are dependent on the way the shrimp is cooked — specifically, if the shrimp is grilled or baked, the spice ingredients may be different than if the shrimp is boiled.

Many people love the flavor of commercial shrimp seasoning and want to make their own. The primary ingredient in these seasonings usually is ground bay leaves. Other ingredients include celery salt and ground celery seed. The blend may also include paprika; dry mustard powder; ginger; cloves; nutmeg; salt; and red, black, and white pepper. By making it from scratch, the shrimp seasoning can be adjusted to have less salt or a different amount of pepper, for instance, allowing the chef to create a dish to suit a particular diet or to favor a particular flavor.

Others may prefer to have Cajun shrimp seasoning, particularly if they are grilling the shrimp. The Cajun seasoning often has chili powder, paprika, onion powder, garlic, oregano, white pepper, salt, and sugar. Other people might prefer their grilled shrimp to have blackened shrimp seasoning. It is similar to Cajun seasoning but also contains cayenne pepper, and it gives the shrimp a blackened appearance. Again, the chef has control as to how spicy the seasoning is.

Some people may prefer to make a more unique shrimp seasoning. For example, shrimp often have an Asian flare on many menus. There are plenty of recipes for this variety of shrimp seasoning available. Commonly, it contains paprika, coriander, sugar, and black sesame seeds.

It is very popular to boil shrimp as well. When boiling the shrimp, the ingredient list may remain nearly the same, but the difference is that all the ingredients are whole, not ground. The ingredients are usually wrapped in a cheese cloth, or they can be strained after boiling. In this way, the shrimp are flavored, but the ingredients are not in direct contact with the shrimp. For example, a good shrimp seasoning for a shrimp boil might include whole bay leaves, ginger root pieces, peppercorns, fresh dill sprigs, mustard seeds, whole cloves, and coriander seeds.

In all, making your own shrimp seasoning can be much healthier than using a commercially produced brand. The chef can control the amount of salt and sugar that is used, for instance. In addition, if she wants to use a particular spice, such as ginger, for its health benefits, she can add more of that spice than a commercial brand may otherwise include.

How to cook boiled shrimp

An excellent dish that can be enjoyed any time of the year is shrimp. Shrimp is delicious, can be prepared a number of different ways, be an entrée or part of a larger dish, and is quite healthy. While most people prefer to either grill or fry shrimp, these may not be the best ways to cook the shell fish. This is because grilling and frying will either dry the shrimp out or require you to use unhealthy oils that takes away the natural taste and makes the shrimp less healthy. The best way to cook shrimp is to bake shrimp in the oven. This can be done quickly and easily.

The first step in baking shrimp in the oven is to prepare the shrimp for baking. If you live in an area where you get fresh shrimp, this step may require you to peel the shrimp. However, you may be able to skip this step by purchasing either pre-peeled or frozen shrimp. If you are using frozen shrimp, be sure to let them fully thaw out for a couple hours before cooking them. You could speed this process up by putting them under water, but make sure the water is cool so it doesn’t start cooking the shrimp.

Once the shrimp are peeled and thawed, the next step is to apply your seasoning. This part of the process depends largely on your recipe or personal tastes. If you do not have a preference, baked shrimp that is not seasoned is still quite delicious. However, squirting some butter or a citrus juice on the shrimp and seasoning with salt and pepper could add a lot to taste. While you are preparing the shrimp for the oven, you should pre-heat the oven at about 450 degrees farenheight.

After the shrimp have been prepared and the oven is ready, you can now place the shrimp in the oven. You could put the shrimp on ready to eat wooden skewers, but for simplicity a cooking sheet could also be used. Be sure to grease up the cooking sheet and then place the shrimp on the sheet. The shrimp shouldn’t be touching each other, but you do not need to leave too much space in between each one.

After you have put the shrimp in the oven, be sure you monitor the shrimp closely. Depending on how thick each shrimp is, they could be done baking quite quickly. Small shrimp may be done in as little as 6-8 minutes, while larger shrimp may take 10-12. After you take the shrimp out of the oven be sure you allow at least 10 minutes for them to cool prior to consumption.

This Lowcountry tradition from coastal South Carolina is the easiest way to entertain this summer.

Try the shrimp boil recipe Matthew demonstrates in the video above.

Every Southerner remembers their first shrimp boil. That’s because it’s more than a meal — it’s a party. My first shrimp boil was at summer camp in Southern Georgia. There it’s mostly referred to as a “lowcountry boil”, as it’s famous in the Lowcountry of Georgia and South Carolina.

This outdoor entertainment tradition (although it can be made indoors too) goes by many names, including Frogmore Stew, one-pot, or farmer’s seafood boil. No matter what you call it, it’s an easy, one-pot solution for feeding a crowd. Keep reading for step-by-step instructions on how to cook a shrimp boil, plus get ideas for how to host an awesome shrimp boil gathering this summer.

What Is a Shrimp Boil?

While shrimp boils vary from coastal town to coastal town, most contain some variation of the following: shrimp, other types of seafood, sausage, corn, lemon wedges, and potatoes. The ingredients are boiled in a large pot, typically over an outdoor cooker. Once it’s ready, the meal is often served on newspaper-covered tables for easy cleanup. It’s not fancy, but it’s good.

The classic Lowcountry boil originated on the coastal Sea Islands of South Carolina. But there are conflicting stories as to exactly how the Lowcountry boil came to be. Some claim it was an invention of local shrimpers who used what they had on hand to make a stew, while another story goes that a National Guardsman on duty in Beaufort, South Carolina, invented the stew when he was cooking a meal for 100 soldiers.

Regardless of its origin story, the shrimp boil is without a doubt the easiest way to entertain during the summer. Whether you’re hosting an outdoor gathering, or you simply want to cook a shrimp boil at home for your family, keep reading to learn how.

Shrimp Boil Equipment: Outdoor vs. Indoor

You can have your shrimp boil one of two ways: outdoors or indoors. For a shrimp boil cooked entirely outdoors, you’ll need an outdoor cooker (like this outdoor propane burner stove from Amazon). You’ll also need a large stockpot, and long-handled skimmer or a steamer basket to safely remove the shrimp and other ingredients from the pot.

However if you want to achieve the same results indoors, you can simply cook your shrimp boil in a large stockpot over the stove. Indoor shrimp boiling is a good introduction to this dish, before you decide to up your shrimp-boil game and take it outdoors.

How to Cook a Shrimp Boil Step-by-Step

We’re going to be using Dave’s Low Country Boil recipe from Allrecipes Community Member Lisa, who describes this recipe as, “Famous in the Low Country of Georgia and South Carolina. This boil is done best on an outdoor cooker. It has sausage, shrimp, crab, potatoes and corn for an all-in-one pot all-you-can-eat buffet!” This recipe uses crab in addition to shrimp, but you can easily omit, replace, or add ingredients as you see fit.

Ingredients

  • 1 tablespoon seafood seasoning (such as Old Bay®)
  • 5 pounds new potatoes
  • 3 (16 ounce) packages cooked sausage (kielbasa is recommended)
  • 8 ears fresh corn, cut in half, husks and silks removed
  • 5 pounds whole crab, broken into pieces
  • 4 pounds fresh shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • Optional: 2 whole lemons cut in half

Instructions

  1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil over an outdoor cooker, or over the stove on medium-high heat. Add Old Bay Seasoning to taste.
  2. Add potatoes and sausage. Cook for 10 minutes.
  3. Add corn and crab. Cook for another 5 minutes.
  4. Add shrimp and lemons (optional). Cook for another 3 to 4 minutes.
  5. Drain off the water and pour the contents out onto a picnic table covered with newspaper. Grab a plate and a beer and enjoy!

How to Host a Shrimp Boil — Make It a Party!

If you aren’t already convinced that a shrimp boil makes the best party food I’ll sum it up for you here: 1) The prep work is minimal, 2) The dishes are minimal, 3) Your guests will love it. Here are a few of our best tips for hosting the summer’s best shrimp boil.

Prep the Table

Shrimp boils are inherently communal. Forget dishes — a large pot of food is literally dumped on a table covered in newspapers instead. You’ll probably want to avoid serving a shrimp boil on your prized, antique, hickory table. Instead invest in a cheap folding table from Amazon that can be stored away when not in use.

For a truly communal experience, guests can eat with their hands, just be sure to provide plenty of napkins and wet wipes (bonus points for providing these disposable bibs). And don’t forget to provide butter, hot sauce, and additional lemon wedges for your guests.

Pick Some Sides

The beauty of a shrimp boil is you don’t need to make anything else — it’s an entire meal in itself. But if you do feel the urge to add some fun sides or even dessert to the mix here are some of our favorites: Hush Puppies, Sweet Restaurant Slaw, Simple Baked Beans, Refreshing Watermelon Salad, and Banana Pudding IV.

Don’t Forget the Drinks!

You’ll want to keep your guests entertained while the boil is roaring. In addition to beer (because, it’s required) you can offer your guests some refreshing, summertime cocktails and mocktails to help them beat the heat. Here are some favorites: Watermelon Sangria, Beer Margaritas, Virgin Cucumber Mojito, and Spicy Lemon Ginger Switchel.

And at the end of the day, don’t forget to have fun! Because a shrimp boil requires so little prep work, you can spend more time with loved ones. So sit back, relax, and enjoy.

How to cook boiled shrimp

Want an easy way to make your summer party stand out? Here’s everything you need to throw a fun and successful shrimp boil party!

How to cook boiled shrimp

This post may contain affiliate links which give us a small commission, if you buy anything through the link, without costing you anything extra. Thanks for supporting our family business!

While firing up the grill for a backyard BBQ is a classic choice for feeding a crowd in the heat of summer, it isn’t your only option. To keep things interesting, I love a good ol’ fashioned shrimp boil. (In my head I am saying that with a terrible hillbilly accent)

A shrimp boil a beautiful meal that is easy to make, looks impressive, and feeds a crowd.

One of my favorite parts of this recipe is that the seafood is cooked separately from the other ingredients so even our family members with shellfish allergies can join in the festivities!

How to cook boiled shrimp

When you have friends or family over for a get-together this summer, try this Old Bay shrimp boil for a low country party in your own backyard.

HOW LONG TO BOIL SHRIMP?

Wondering how long to boil shrimp? The best part about boiled shrimp is that the cooking process requires very little maintenance. Although this recipe takes an hour to make, the shrimp itself cooks in just 5 minutes. That’s right, you just boil shrimp for 5 minutes!

How to cook boiled shrimp

This shrimp boil recipe uses peel-and-eat shrimp in the shell to add more flavor, which adds to the cooking time slightly from pre-peeled shrimp, which I usually do for 3 minutes.

WHAT KIND OF POT SHOULD YOU USE?

To create your shrimp boil, it’s important you have a shrimp boil pot. While there are a lot of specific pots available just for shrimp boils, you don’t need to invest in an expensive or special pot if you have one that will get the job done.

How to cook boiled shrimp

First, you’ll want to choose a pot that can cook all of the ingredients for the size party you’re throwing. A bigger pot is always better than one that might be too small. Think a lobster or canning pot – any large pot will work.

Canning pots tend to be less expensive, or you can invest in specific shrimp boil pot right off the bat.

If you’re serving a large group, I recommend a pot with a removable strainer basket to make finishing and serving the dish a lot easier and safer. You’ll be straining the cooked food out of the boiling water, and you want to be sure you don’t spill any on yourself!

How to cook boiled shrimp

HOW TO DO A SHRIMP BOIL

For shrimp boil success, follow these instructions:

  • Fill your shrimp boil pot halfway with cool water.
  • Add potatoes, and lemons to the pot. Add ½ cup of the Old Bay seasoning and the crab boil package and bring the water to a boil.
  • Maintain a rapid boil for approximately 10 minutes, then add the sausage and corn.
  • In a large pasta pot, melt 1 stick of butter.
  • When the butter is melted, add garlic, beer, 1 TBS salt, 3 – 4 TBS pepper, and 4 cups of water. Bring to a boil.
  • When the potato and corn are nearly finished, add the shrimp to the smaller pot; the shrimp is cooked when it turns pink, approximately 5 minutes.
  • While the shrimp is boiling, drain the potatoes, corn, and sausage from the larger pot.
  • Layer the potato, corn, and sausage mixture with ½ pound of melted butter and Old Bay seasoning in a large serving bowl. Create at least 4 – 5 layers in your bowl to be sure all of the ingredients get coated in seasoning.
  • Drain the shrimp pot and transfer to a serving dish. Sprinkle with Old Bay Seasoning to taste.
  • Serve while warm and enjoy!

ALLERGY NOTE: If you have someone with a shellfish allergy show up unexpectedly, set aside some cooked sausage, corn, and potatoes for them before mixing with the shrimp. Or keep the shrimp in a separate bowl like we did.

WHAT IS A LOW COUNTRY SHRIMP BOIL?

A low country shrimp boil is a traditional dish that has roots in a variety of different coastal states. While Louisiana boils typically feature crayfish, and New England boils use clams and crab, Georgia and South Carolina boils use shrimp as the main seafood attraction. This region is also where the term “low country” comes from.

How to cook boiled shrimp

Shrimp boils were originally designed to be filling and fast meals that could feed a crowd and use locally available ingredients.

When I’m serving a shrimp boil, I pair it with fresh salad, crusty bread, cocktail sauce, and lots of melted butter for dipping. Put out some little dishes of Old Bay seasoning for people to sprinkle or dip into. Oh and slice a few more lemons into wedges for those who like to squirt it on their shrimp.

For beverages, serve sweet iced tea or a cold beer – be sure to buy extra of the IPA you used in the boil! I also like having some lime and cucumber water on hand for a healthy drink option.

Everybody will need a lot of extra napkins, or rolls of paper towels. (Trust me on this one!) You can also give them bowls for discarding shrimp shells.

How to cook boiled shrimp

To keep your shrimp boil somewhat tidy, cover your table with newspaper. This not only gives you a rustic and casual feel, it also makes clean up a breeze!

Be intimidated by fish boils no longer! Break out your stock pot and load it up with this traditional dish for your family and friends this summer.

PIN TO SAVE FOR LATER

Don’t lose this recipe! Pin to save the shrimp boil and then leave a photo in the comments of the pin when you have your own. We love seeing what you make!

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Celebrate the end of summer with a New Orleans-style shrimp boil. In this traditional one-pot dish, the shrimp, corn, and potatoes are cooked together in a spicy, flavorful broth, which is then used for dipping.

Gallery

Recipe Summary

Ingredients

Bring 5 quarts of water to a boil in a 10- to 12-quart pot. Squeeze lemon juice into water, then add the halves. Add onions, garlic, salt, and spice bundle. Reduce heat to a simmer; cover, and cook 10 minutes.

Add potatoes to pot; return liquid to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer, covered, until potatoes are almost tender, 15 to 20 minutes. Add corn; continue cooking 5 minutes more.

Remove from heat. Stir in shrimp, submerging them completely. Cover, and let stand until shrimp are cooked through, about 3 minutes. Ladle 2 cups of broth into a glass measuring cup; drain the rest in a large colander, discarding liquid.

Make spicy butter: In a small bowl, stir together melted butter and hot sauce to taste. Divide butter among small dishes or ramekins.

Divide reserved broth among small bowls for dipping. Transfer shrimp and vegetables to a large platter, and serve with spicy butter, if desired.

Cook’s Notes

If you don’t own a large enough pot, you can use two smaller pots to make this recipe. Just divide the ingredients in half, wrapping the spice mixture in two bundles.

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How to cook boiled shrimp

Boiling is the common method for cooking shrimp that need to be chilled for appetizers such as shrimp cocktail or a shrimp salad. Generally the shrimp is boiled in salted water, but many professional chefs boil the shrimp in a flavorful broth to infuse it with even more flavor. Any size of shrimp works, depending on what you are making — jumbo shrimp works best for shrimp cocktail and shrimp remoulade, while smaller shrimp are ideal for cold shrimp salad. Use shell-on shrimp if possible, as it has more natural shrimp flavor than peeled shrimp.

Fill a large pot with water. Add kosher salt and bring to a boil. Use about 3 to 4 quarts of water for every 2 pounds of shrimp.

Add the shrimp and boil until they are opaque and heated through, about 2 to 3 minutes. Use a food thermometer to make sure they have cooked to a temperature of 145 degrees Fahrenheit, recommended by FoodSafety.gov for safe consumption.

Drain the shrimp and place on a baking sheet in a single layer. Allow them to cool for about 5 to 10 minutes. Place them in the refrigerator for an or until the shrimp are completely chilled.

Peel the shrimp after they are chilled if you used shell-on shrimp. Use a paring knife to make a shallow slit down the back of each shrimp and remove the black vein before serving.

How to cook boiled shrimp

Want an easy way to make your summer party stand out? Here’s everything you need to throw a fun and successful shrimp boil party!

How to cook boiled shrimp

This post may contain affiliate links which give us a small commission, if you buy anything through the link, without costing you anything extra. Thanks for supporting our family business!

While firing up the grill for a backyard BBQ is a classic choice for feeding a crowd in the heat of summer, it isn’t your only option. To keep things interesting, I love a good ol’ fashioned shrimp boil. (In my head I am saying that with a terrible hillbilly accent)

A shrimp boil a beautiful meal that is easy to make, looks impressive, and feeds a crowd.

One of my favorite parts of this recipe is that the seafood is cooked separately from the other ingredients so even our family members with shellfish allergies can join in the festivities!

How to cook boiled shrimp

When you have friends or family over for a get-together this summer, try this Old Bay shrimp boil for a low country party in your own backyard.

HOW LONG TO BOIL SHRIMP?

Wondering how long to boil shrimp? The best part about boiled shrimp is that the cooking process requires very little maintenance. Although this recipe takes an hour to make, the shrimp itself cooks in just 5 minutes. That’s right, you just boil shrimp for 5 minutes!

How to cook boiled shrimp

This shrimp boil recipe uses peel-and-eat shrimp in the shell to add more flavor, which adds to the cooking time slightly from pre-peeled shrimp, which I usually do for 3 minutes.

WHAT KIND OF POT SHOULD YOU USE?

To create your shrimp boil, it’s important you have a shrimp boil pot. While there are a lot of specific pots available just for shrimp boils, you don’t need to invest in an expensive or special pot if you have one that will get the job done.

How to cook boiled shrimp

First, you’ll want to choose a pot that can cook all of the ingredients for the size party you’re throwing. A bigger pot is always better than one that might be too small. Think a lobster or canning pot – any large pot will work.

Canning pots tend to be less expensive, or you can invest in specific shrimp boil pot right off the bat.

If you’re serving a large group, I recommend a pot with a removable strainer basket to make finishing and serving the dish a lot easier and safer. You’ll be straining the cooked food out of the boiling water, and you want to be sure you don’t spill any on yourself!

How to cook boiled shrimp

HOW TO DO A SHRIMP BOIL

For shrimp boil success, follow these instructions:

  • Fill your shrimp boil pot halfway with cool water.
  • Add potatoes, and lemons to the pot. Add ½ cup of the Old Bay seasoning and the crab boil package and bring the water to a boil.
  • Maintain a rapid boil for approximately 10 minutes, then add the sausage and corn.
  • In a large pasta pot, melt 1 stick of butter.
  • When the butter is melted, add garlic, beer, 1 TBS salt, 3 – 4 TBS pepper, and 4 cups of water. Bring to a boil.
  • When the potato and corn are nearly finished, add the shrimp to the smaller pot; the shrimp is cooked when it turns pink, approximately 5 minutes.
  • While the shrimp is boiling, drain the potatoes, corn, and sausage from the larger pot.
  • Layer the potato, corn, and sausage mixture with ½ pound of melted butter and Old Bay seasoning in a large serving bowl. Create at least 4 – 5 layers in your bowl to be sure all of the ingredients get coated in seasoning.
  • Drain the shrimp pot and transfer to a serving dish. Sprinkle with Old Bay Seasoning to taste.
  • Serve while warm and enjoy!

ALLERGY NOTE: If you have someone with a shellfish allergy show up unexpectedly, set aside some cooked sausage, corn, and potatoes for them before mixing with the shrimp. Or keep the shrimp in a separate bowl like we did.

WHAT IS A LOW COUNTRY SHRIMP BOIL?

A low country shrimp boil is a traditional dish that has roots in a variety of different coastal states. While Louisiana boils typically feature crayfish, and New England boils use clams and crab, Georgia and South Carolina boils use shrimp as the main seafood attraction. This region is also where the term “low country” comes from.

How to cook boiled shrimp

Shrimp boils were originally designed to be filling and fast meals that could feed a crowd and use locally available ingredients.

When I’m serving a shrimp boil, I pair it with fresh salad, crusty bread, cocktail sauce, and lots of melted butter for dipping. Put out some little dishes of Old Bay seasoning for people to sprinkle or dip into. Oh and slice a few more lemons into wedges for those who like to squirt it on their shrimp.

For beverages, serve sweet iced tea or a cold beer – be sure to buy extra of the IPA you used in the boil! I also like having some lime and cucumber water on hand for a healthy drink option.

Everybody will need a lot of extra napkins, or rolls of paper towels. (Trust me on this one!) You can also give them bowls for discarding shrimp shells.

How to cook boiled shrimp

To keep your shrimp boil somewhat tidy, cover your table with newspaper. This not only gives you a rustic and casual feel, it also makes clean up a breeze!

Be intimidated by fish boils no longer! Break out your stock pot and load it up with this traditional dish for your family and friends this summer.

PIN TO SAVE FOR LATER

Don’t lose this recipe! Pin to save the shrimp boil and then leave a photo in the comments of the pin when you have your own. We love seeing what you make!

This post may contain affiliate links.

How to cook boiled shrimp

How to cook boiled shrimp

I used to purchase shrimp boil seasoning until I learned that creating a seasoning mix recipe is so simple. Now I use it in my delicious shrimp boil recipe.

The Classic Shrimp Boil

Here in the south, there’s a tradition that comes with fall, a shrimp boil! It consists of many things that are harvested now, such as corn and onions, and proteins such as shrimp or crab. You can vary what you put into it, just use what are favorites in your family. The key to the seasoning is Old Bay®. Old Bay is a combination of spices that can be used on many things.

Shrimp Boil Recipe

First, you’ll need a big pot. The size depends on how much of the shrimp boil recipe you’ll be making. I have a large stainless steel canning pot that is perfect. Add a few gallons of water. Again, it depends on how much you’ll be making. This is a great project to do outside, but it can be done on the stove as well.

Bring the water to a boil. Add a stick of butter for each gallon of water. Use real butter, as margarine just won’t give you the same flavor. Add 1/4 cup of the shrimp boil seasoning mix for each gallon of water. It may seem like a lot of spice but you’re not making soup, you’re infusing spice into the protein and veggies, then removing everything from the liquid.

Here is a break down of the vegetables and proteins for each gallon of water of this shrimp boil recipe.

Ingredients

  • 1 pound potatoes, red potatoes work the best, washed and quartered (I don’t peel mine)
  • 1 medium onion, quartered (I use yellow onions)
  • 1/2 stalk celery, cut into quarters
  • 4 carrots, washed, but leave the skins on, quartered
  • 4 ears of sweet corn, cut in 2″ sections
  • 1-2 pounds of shrimp, shelled and deveined (or 1-2 pounds of crab legs, 1-2 pounds crawfish, or some combination of each)
  • Optional: throw in a half-pound of andouille sausage if you want a traditional cajun shrimp boil recipe.

Directions

Place the shrimp boil spice mix recipe and all the vegetables in the boiling water and simmer until tender. Add the shrimp or crab or crawfish. Simmer just a few minutes, then scoop all of it out onto big platters. Drizzle some melted butter on top of all of it. Serve family style!

You can vary the vegetables if you like. Red potatoes are best since they hold up to boiling and stay firm. Russets tend to get mealy and fall apart. I’ve added Sunchokes and rutabaga to mine, and even some cabbage. This also freezes well if you want to make some ahead for later.

Shrimp Boil Seasoning Recipe

This seasoning is very versatile and easy to make. I still can’t believe I’ve been buying it!

  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon celery salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cayenne pepper
  • 1/4 teaspoon smoked paprika

That’s all there is to it. Mix it up and place it into a jar that can be sealed. Use it for this recipe, or on chicken or fish or whatever. I know there are even some potato chips brands that use this same seasoning mix. In other words, it’s delicious! This shrimp boil seasoning recipe can easily be doubled or tripled for more volume.

Other Copy Cat Recipes Add Too Much

There are a lot of copy-cat recipes out there that contain coriander, cinnamon and bay leaf. These are not in the original recipe, so the flavor profile would be different. But feel free to experiment!

Shrimp boil recipes and seasonings aren’t complicated or expensive, so try it out and have a party!

About Debra Maslowski

Debra is a master gardener, a certified herbalist, a natural living instructor and more. She taught Matt and Betsy how to make soap so they decided to bring her on as a staff writer! Debra recently started an organic herb farm in the mountains of Western North Carolina. You can even purchase her handmade products on Amazon! Connect with Debra Maslowski on G+.

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About Matt & Betsy

How to cook boiled shrimp

Matt and Betsy are passionate about living naturally and building a like-minded community focused on the sustainable lifestyle.

DIY Natural is about rediscovering the traditional value of doing things yourself, doing them naturally, and enjoying the benefits. Welcome to the movement! (read more)