How to decrystallize honey

Learn how easy it is to decrystallize honey so you don’t have to throw it away!

­Have you every opened your pantry to find your delicious, liquid gold honey suddenly completely crystallized?

Its a bummer, but the good news is there is no need to toss it out.

It hasn’t gone bad at all, thanks to the antibacterial properties of honey it can actually last for several years.

How to decrystallize honey

Save these tips for how to decrystallze honey to Pinterest!

We use a ton of honey in our house.

Once I discovered that Logan was willing to try just about anything if it was dipped in honey, I made sure to always have a nice, large bottle on hand.

The problem, though, with buying the larger bottles of honey is that they tend to crystallize over time.

We aren’t going through them as fast as the smaller containers.

Why Does Honey Crystalize?

Crystallization of honey is a natural process and, though not convenient, is nothing to worry about.

Simply put, the glucose in the honey is precipitating out of the liquid honey.

There are a few factors that can affect how quickly your honey crystallizes.

That will depend on factors like the conditions under which your honey has been stored and the variety of honey that you have.

Higher fructose honeys will last longer without crystallizing.

Honey stored at colder temperatures will crystallize faster than honey stored above 70 degrees F.

Which explains why we have more of a problem with this during the fall and winter months than we do in the summertime.

You can actually still use honey it crystallized form, so long as you can get it out of the container.

It will soften and dissolve when added to a cup of hot tea just fine.

How to Decrystalize Honey

There are a couple of ways to fix your crystalized honey, all of which are really pretty easy.

How to decrystallize honey

Save these tips for how to decrystallize honey to Pinterest!

Decrystalize Honey By Soaking in Water

My favorite way to decrystallize honey is to boil water in my tea kettle, then place the jar or container of honey in a large bowl or pot and pour the hot water around it.

Let it soak for several minutes until the honey has softened and liquified itself again.

How long it needs to soak will depend on how crystallized it is, how cold it has been stored at, and the quantity of honey.

Naturally, a larger container will take longer than a small amount.

If needed, replenish with additional hot water if it is taking a long time.

2. Decrystalize Honey in the Microwave

Another way to decrystallize honey is to place the honey in a microwave-safe container, with the lid removed.

Then, microwave the honey over medium power for 30 seconds at a time, stirring in between microwaving sessions.

Continue until it has been decrystallized.

Be careful not to scorch or boil the honey.

What I don’t prefer about this method, is that you can’t really do this with crystalized honey that comes in a plastic bottle.

The microwave can warp the plastic.

I tried this before and my bottle definitely came out shrunken and misshapen, so you really need to remove the honey and put it in a glass or ceramic container.

But, that can be kind of difficult when the honey is stuck in its solid state.

Unless the container has a wide enough mouth to scoop the honey out and transfer it to another bowl or jar that is microwave safe!

5 Favorite Uses for Honey

Honey isn’t just for adding to a cup of hot tea. Here are a few of our favorite uses for this delicious, sweet liquid gold.

How to decrystallize honey

Save these tips for how to decrystallize honey to Pinterest!

Natural Cough and Sore Throat Remedy:

Honey is the perfect addition to Homemade Cough Syrup.

It helps coat the throat and will draw pus from wounds and has antibacterial and antimicrobial properties.

Plus, it makes the whole concoction taste a lot better.

Easy Chicken Dinner Recipes:

One of our absolute favorite easy chicken dinner recipes – in terms of taste and the fact that it takes literally 10 minutes max to whip up – is this Honey Mustard Baked Chicken.

Chicken is baked up to sweet, tender perfection in a sauce of honey, fresh rosemary, and dijion mustard.

Baking:

Honey is a great sugar substitute in baking, especially in recipes like this Honey Corn Bread Muffin.

When substituting in recipes that originally call for sugar, you won’t need to use as much honey as sugar to achieve your desired sweetness.

This is due to honey’s high fructose content.

These recipe for Baked Almond Joy Donuts is another baking recipe that calls for honey.

Drink Sweeteners:

Honey is great for sweetening drinks because it dissolves a lot easier than granulated sugar does.

That means you can eliminate making a simple syrup.

Condiment:

Honey is great drizzled or used as a dip for many things.

Kids can dip homemade chicken tenders in honey.

Drizzle it on top of pancakes or waffles in place of syrup.

I also love it glazed on top of this Honey Marmalade Mustard Glazed Corned Beef (perfect for St. Patrick’s Day!).

What are some of your favorite uses for honey?

Love these tips for how to decrystallize honey?
Sign up for Good Life Eats email updates and never miss another post!

How to decrystallize honey

Did your jar of honey crystallize? This is totally normal, and natural. Crystallized honey is just as edible and delicious as liquid honey, but if you don’t like the texture of crystallized honey, it is quite simple to soften honey by adding heat.

Heating honey will liquefy crystallized honey. But bee careful. If you overheat the honey during the decrystallization process you risk changing the quality and losing raw honey nutrients and benefits.

To preserve the best qualities of that raw honey, you must melt it slowly in a glass jar using low, indirect, and constant heat for as long as the honey takes to decrystallize.

Decrystallize Honey in 4 Steps

Step One: Place glass jar of honey into a larger glass or ceramic bowl (if your honey comes in a plastic bottle spoon out crystallized honey into a sealable glass jar).

How to decrystallize honeyHow to decrystallize honey

Step Two: Heat a pot of water up to a temperature between 95°F and 110°F. You can create this warm water bath using a kettle, instant pot, or, if you want precision, a sous vide cooker.

Step Three: Pour the warm water bath into the bowl and jar of honey is sitting in. Make sure the water line is above the level of the honey but below the lid. You do NOT want water to accidentally get into your honey jar or container.

How to decrystallize honey

Step Four: Leave the jar of honey sitting in the bath, stirring occasionally, until the honey reliquifies. Monitor the water temperature with a thermometer and adjust by adding hot or cool water to keep it at or below 110°F.

How to decrystallize honeyHow to decrystallize honey

The length of time that your honey will take to decrystallize depends upon the amount you are liquefying, but a typical honey jar takes a little over an hour to decrystallize.

Why Does Honey Crystallize?

Pure, raw honey crystallizes naturally over time as the sugar “precipitates out” of the solution into crystal form. Honey is made up of glucose and fructose. Different honey varietals have different ratios of these sugars, which means different honeys crystallize at different rates.

The higher the glucose, the faster a honey will crystallize. These include:

  • Clover honey
  • Lavender honey
  • Dandelion honey

Honeys that are higher in fructose than glucose crystallize more slowly. These include:

Remember, crystallized honey has not spoiled! Honey does not go bad, and crystallized honey still has the same quality and flavor, just maybe a different color and texture. Learn more about the science of honey crystallization.

Decrystallization: A “HONEY-DON’T” LIST

Don’t microwave raw honey to decrystallize it. Microwave ovens cook food unevenly (that is why you have to turn your microwave dinner halfway through the cycle). You can’t control the temperature at all and are likely to scorch or boil at least some of your raw honey in a microwave.

Don’t boil raw honey. You may be tempted to immerse your entire honey jar in boiling water, but that will destroy beneficial enzymes and other properties found only in raw honey.

Don’t heat honey in a plastic bottle. Don’t take the risk that you’ll melt plastic into your honey.

Don’t liquefy honey over and over again. Decrystallize only what you need at one time. The flavor and aroma of the honey will fade with repeated cycles of heating and cooling (and liquefying and crystallizing).

Honey, Please.

Sign me up for those sweet recipes and hive news.

What Happens When You Overheat Raw Honey

Whether you buy raw local honey for the benefits of the pollen or if you are a gourmand with a taste for the world’s most delicious raw honey, you have excellent reasons to take extra care when decrystallizing your honey.

Pollen, propolis, antioxidants, and enzymes found in raw honey are destroyed at temperatures above 110°F. Heating honey higher than 140°F degrades the quality of the honey and temperatures above 160°F caramelize the sugars. Once caramelized, what you have in your honey jar may be sweet, but it isn’t really honey anymore.

The boiling point of water is 212°F. If you really want to preserve your raw honey while decrystallizing it, you can’t just drop the jar in boiling water. Most residential hot water heaters are set to 140°F, so even tap water will need to be monitored closely with a thermometer if you are using it to decrystallize honey.

Learn how easy it is to decrystallize honey so you don’t have to throw it away!

­Have you every opened your pantry to find your delicious, liquid gold honey suddenly completely crystallized?

Its a bummer, but the good news is there is no need to toss it out.

It hasn’t gone bad at all, thanks to the antibacterial properties of honey it can actually last for several years.

How to decrystallize honey

Save these tips for how to decrystallze honey to Pinterest!

We use a ton of honey in our house.

Once I discovered that Logan was willing to try just about anything if it was dipped in honey, I made sure to always have a nice, large bottle on hand.

The problem, though, with buying the larger bottles of honey is that they tend to crystallize over time.

We aren’t going through them as fast as the smaller containers.

Why Does Honey Crystalize?

Crystallization of honey is a natural process and, though not convenient, is nothing to worry about.

Simply put, the glucose in the honey is precipitating out of the liquid honey.

There are a few factors that can affect how quickly your honey crystallizes.

That will depend on factors like the conditions under which your honey has been stored and the variety of honey that you have.

Higher fructose honeys will last longer without crystallizing.

Honey stored at colder temperatures will crystallize faster than honey stored above 70 degrees F.

Which explains why we have more of a problem with this during the fall and winter months than we do in the summertime.

You can actually still use honey it crystallized form, so long as you can get it out of the container.

It will soften and dissolve when added to a cup of hot tea just fine.

How to Decrystalize Honey

There are a couple of ways to fix your crystalized honey, all of which are really pretty easy.

How to decrystallize honey

Save these tips for how to decrystallize honey to Pinterest!

Decrystalize Honey By Soaking in Water

My favorite way to decrystallize honey is to boil water in my tea kettle, then place the jar or container of honey in a large bowl or pot and pour the hot water around it.

Let it soak for several minutes until the honey has softened and liquified itself again.

How long it needs to soak will depend on how crystallized it is, how cold it has been stored at, and the quantity of honey.

Naturally, a larger container will take longer than a small amount.

If needed, replenish with additional hot water if it is taking a long time.

2. Decrystalize Honey in the Microwave

Another way to decrystallize honey is to place the honey in a microwave-safe container, with the lid removed.

Then, microwave the honey over medium power for 30 seconds at a time, stirring in between microwaving sessions.

Continue until it has been decrystallized.

Be careful not to scorch or boil the honey.

What I don’t prefer about this method, is that you can’t really do this with crystalized honey that comes in a plastic bottle.

The microwave can warp the plastic.

I tried this before and my bottle definitely came out shrunken and misshapen, so you really need to remove the honey and put it in a glass or ceramic container.

But, that can be kind of difficult when the honey is stuck in its solid state.

Unless the container has a wide enough mouth to scoop the honey out and transfer it to another bowl or jar that is microwave safe!

5 Favorite Uses for Honey

Honey isn’t just for adding to a cup of hot tea. Here are a few of our favorite uses for this delicious, sweet liquid gold.

How to decrystallize honey

Save these tips for how to decrystallize honey to Pinterest!

Natural Cough and Sore Throat Remedy:

Honey is the perfect addition to Homemade Cough Syrup.

It helps coat the throat and will draw pus from wounds and has antibacterial and antimicrobial properties.

Plus, it makes the whole concoction taste a lot better.

Easy Chicken Dinner Recipes:

One of our absolute favorite easy chicken dinner recipes – in terms of taste and the fact that it takes literally 10 minutes max to whip up – is this Honey Mustard Baked Chicken.

Chicken is baked up to sweet, tender perfection in a sauce of honey, fresh rosemary, and dijion mustard.

Baking:

Honey is a great sugar substitute in baking, especially in recipes like this Honey Corn Bread Muffin.

When substituting in recipes that originally call for sugar, you won’t need to use as much honey as sugar to achieve your desired sweetness.

This is due to honey’s high fructose content.

These recipe for Baked Almond Joy Donuts is another baking recipe that calls for honey.

Drink Sweeteners:

Honey is great for sweetening drinks because it dissolves a lot easier than granulated sugar does.

That means you can eliminate making a simple syrup.

Condiment:

Honey is great drizzled or used as a dip for many things.

Kids can dip homemade chicken tenders in honey.

Drizzle it on top of pancakes or waffles in place of syrup.

I also love it glazed on top of this Honey Marmalade Mustard Glazed Corned Beef (perfect for St. Patrick’s Day!).

What are some of your favorite uses for honey?

Love these tips for how to decrystallize honey?
Sign up for Good Life Eats email updates and never miss another post!

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What to do with Crystallized Honey

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When Good Honey Goes Bad…Not bad, really, just crystallized.

If you have ever wondered about that jar of honey in your cabinet, you aren’t alone. I’ve been asked by many people if the jar they bought years ago is still good. Happily, I have good news. It definitely is!

How to decrystallize honey

Crystallized Honey on Left
Liquid Honey on Right

Almost all unheated, unfiltered honey crystallizes; some just crystallize sooner than others. Crystallized honey is preferred over liquid honey by many people (me included). You can cook with crystallized honey. It works in tea; in stir-fry; and as an easily spread glaze on fish, meat and fowl. It doesn’t drip off the bread and you can eat it like candy. You know that beautiful creamy spread in the Natural Food store that sits beside the liquid honey? It might be called Whipped Honey, Spun Honey, Churned Honey, Candied Honey, Honey Fondant, Creamed Honey or Set Honey, but whatever name you choose, it originates from crystallized honey.

Once the honey leaves the hive where it’s a balmy 95° to 104° (sounds good right about now in February) it begins to crystallize. When the weather outside the hive is extremely cold, like it is now, honey can crystallize if the bees aren’t directly on it. It’s the natural state of honey.

If you prefer your honey liquid you can re-liquefy it. Gently warm the honey by placing the container in a warm water bath (never over direct heat) or in a warm, sunny windowsill. I don’t recommend doing this in a plastic container even if it’s BPA Free. The most important thing to remember about re-liquefying honey is to never heat it above 104°. That is when you destroy the enzymes, antioxidants, pollen and propolis and then whole point of having raw, natural honey is negated. The problem with re-liquefying your honey is that once it cools it will begin the process of crystallization again. The process of re-liquefying multiple times can cause the honey to lose its consistency and can affect the taste. If you prefer to have liquid honey it’s best to heat up only the amount of honey you want and leave the rest in the container.

But the best way to enjoy your liquid honey without worrying about crystallization is to consume it quickly! As many of my customers say, it never lasts long enough to crystallize!

How to decrystallize honey

If you prefer your honey a little thicker you can follow these easy directions to make your own creamy honey spread.

First you will need to have some “seed honey”. Much like making yogurt or cheese, the culture replicates. So if you want creamy, smooth honey you’ll want crystals that are small and uniform in size. If you are a chunky fan then larger crystals will make you “crunchy” creamed honey. Our honey (Ann Bee’s Naturals) just happens to crystallize to tiny, spreadable crystals. If yours doesn’t you can by some creamed honey to use as your seed. Then you’ll use your seed honey by introducing at least a Tablespoon into the jar (1lb). Then you’ll stir it well and place into the refrigerator for at least 2 weeks. It’s important to stir the seed all the way to the bottom of the jar or it won’t cream evenly.

Beekeepers, this could be a great addition to your product line. No drip honey is much easier for kids to handle which means less mess for moms to clean. Now that is a great selling point! And if you are making large batches of creamed honey, just use the 1TBSP to 1lb ratio and use a paint stirring drill attachment to mix it up.

Learning how to decrystallize honey will save you money and extra trips to the store. Honey can last for years if you know how to save it!

Have you every opened your pantry to find your delicious, liquid gold honey suddenly completely crystallized? Its a bummer, but the good news is there is no need to toss it out.

It hasn’t gone bad at all, thanks to the antibacterial properties of honey it can actually last for several years.

How to decrystallize honey

Why Does Honey Crystalize?

Crystallization of honey is a natural process and, though not convenient, is nothing to worry about. Simply put, the glucose in the honey is precipitating out of the liquid honey.

There are a few factors that can affect how quickly your honey crystallizes. That will depend on factors like the conditions under which your honey has been stored and the variety of honey that you have.

Higher fructose honeys will last longer without crystallizing. Honey stored at colder temperatures will crystallize faster than honey stored above 70 degrees F.

Which explains why we have more of a problem with this during the fall and winter months than we do in the summertime.

You can actually still use honey it crystallized form, so long as you can get it out of the container. It will soften and dissolve when added to a cup of hot tea just fine.

How to decrystallize honey

How to Decrystallize Honey

There are a couple of ways to rid your honey of its crystallization, all of which are really pretty easy.

1. Soak in Hot Water

My favorite way is to boil water in my tea kettle, then place the jar or container of honey in a large mixing bowl or pot and pour the hot water around it. Let it soak for several minutes until the honey has softened and liquefied itself again.

How long it needs to soak will depend on how crystallized it is, how cold it has been stored at, and the quantity of honey. Naturally, a larger container will take longer than a small amount.

If needed, replenish with additional hot water if it is taking a long time.

2. Microwave

Another way to decrystallize honey is to place the honey in a microwave-safe container, with the lid removed, and microwave the honey over medium power for 30 seconds at a time, stirring in between microwaving sessions. Continue until it has been decrystallized, careful not to scorch or boil the honey.

What I don’t prefer about this method, is that you can’t really do this with honey that comes in a plastic bottle. The microwave can warp the plastic (I tried this before and my bottle definitely came out shrunken and misshapen), so you really need to remove the honey and put it in a glass or ceramic container.

But, that can be kind of difficult when the honey is stuck in its solid state!

How to decrystallize honey

5 Favorite Uses for Honey

Honey isn’t just for adding to a cup of hot tea. Here are a few of our favorite uses for this delicious, sweet liquid gold.

Natural Cough and Sore Throat Remedy: Honey is the perfect addition to Homemade Cough Syrup. It helps coat the throat and will draw pus from wounds and has antibacterial and antimicrobial properties. Plus, it makes the whole concoction taste a lot better.

Easy Chicken Dinner Recipes: One of our absolute favorite easy chicken dinner recipes – in terms of taste and the fact that it takes literally 10 minutes max to whip up – is this Honey Mustard Baked Chicken. Chicken is baked up to sweet, tender perfection in a sauce of honey, fresh rosemary, and dijion mustard. This One Pan Honey Roasted Turkey and Vegetables also looks amazing!

How to decrystallize honey

Baking: Honey is a great sugar substitute in baking, especially in recipes like this Gluten Free Cornbread. When substituting in recipes that originally call for sugar, you won’t need to use as much honey as sugar to achieve your desired sweetness due to honey’s high fructose content

Drink Sweeteners: Honey is great for sweetening drinks because it dissolves a lot easier than granulated sugar does, which means you can eliminate making a simple syrup. Try: Boozy Pumpkin Chai Latte and Fig Bees Knees.

Condiment: Honey is great drizzled or used as a dip for many things. Kids can dip homemade chicken tenders in honey. Drizzle it on top of pancakes or waffles in place of syrup. Personally, I can’t wait to try these Paleo Baked Pears.

Planning a dinner party and need some inspiration?

How about looking for a new slow cooker dinner idea?

We’ve got you covered in our ever-growing Facebook group! If you’re not a member yet, why not?!

How to decrystallize honey

We’re chatting cooking techniques, dessert ideas, and everything in between. If you’re already a member, invite your friends to join us too!

How to decrystallize honey

Have you ever looked in the honey jar and found your honey has solidified? Over time, raw honey forms crystals, and becomes solid, a process known as crystallization.

While this is a natural occurrence that all types of honey will experience, it is understandable why it can be a nuance that many find annoying. For some people, the texture is completely repulsive to the point that they avoid it at all costs.

In today’s article, we are going to go over the proper course of action to take if your honey jar does begin to crystallize. It should be noted that although this may occur to your jar of honey, for the most part, crystallized honey is not something that you should be concerned about health wise. It is still safe to eat and it will still retain its flavor. We can’t promise however that it will still be as smooth as it once was if you like to smear it onto your toast though.

Before we get into our article, you may be curious as to why honey crystallizes in the first place. Well, it’s rather simple and it mainly depends on the sugar content of your honey. The higher the sugar content of honey (especially over 70%), the faster it will crystallize. Crystallized honey may be fun to eat with a spoon, but it’s no good for using in recipes or spreading on bread.

Luckily, there are several things that you can do to help get your honey back to its smooth texture. All you need are a couple of tools that you likely have right at home.

What should you do to get it back in its original liquid state?

  • Crystallized honey
  • Saucepan or pot
  • Stove
  • Glass jar
  • Water

1. Transfer Honey to a Glass Jar

If it is in a plastic jar, transfer your honey to a glass jar. Since plastic cannot abide high temperatures, a glass jar is the best option. You can use a knife or a spoon to stab and scoop out the solidified honey from the container.

2. Heat up the Honey

Meanwhile, have some water heating up in a pan or pot on the stove. After you have transferred all the honey to the glass jar, put the jar in the heating water. Ensure the stove is at low or medium heat. Do not let the water come to a boil – rather, let it simmer.

Don’t submerge the jar. How much water you use for the process will depend on how tall your glass jar is. For good results, ensure the water reaches halfway or two thirds of the way up the side of the glass jar.

Another thing: ensure the water in the pot does not get into the honey jar. You can put a lid on the jar, but don’t shut the lid too tightly. If air can’t escape, the jar will explode.

3. Monitor the Progress as You Wait

Let the jar sit in the simmering water for approximately 20 to 30 minutes. You can set a timer if you have a forgetful nature. Meanwhile, you can stir the honey a bit to speed up the process. If you are going to stir the honey, you won’t need to have the lid on the jar.

If you have some tongs or something to hold the hot jar with, take it out once in a while, and swish the honey around to see what progress you are making. How liquid you want the honey to be is up to you – gooey and sticky or runny and easy-flowing.

4. Take it Out of the Water

When you can’t see crystals forming anymore, it is time to turn off the heat and take the jar out of the heating water, and give it time to cool. To prevent the honey from cooling too quickly, put it in a bowl of warm water.

After the honey cools down, you can enjoy it with crackers, biscuits, bread, or whatever else floats your fancy. Finally, see that you seal the jar of honey tightly before you store it. The best storage temperature is between 64 and 75 degrees. You should never store honey in a refrigerator.

Generally speaking, dealing with crystallized honey is not something that is too burdensome of a task. The best part is that anyone can get their honey nice and smooth again. Just follow these steps the next time you find that your honey has become solid, and you will be spreading it on your bread in no time.

We hope that our article on decrystallizing honey has been helpful to you. Have you ever had to deal with crystallized honey before? Let us know below what your experience was like. And of course, feel free to share with us what you did to get your honey back to its natural state.

Have you ever reached into your cupboard, ready to enjoy some golden sweetness, and discovered your honey has crystallized? Don’t panic. And don’t throw it out. Understand exactly what crystallization – also called granulation – is and follow these three simple steps to decrystallize your beloved sweet and make it liquid again.

How to Decrystallize Honey

Step 1
Place your bottle of honey with its lid off inside a pot. Pour warm water (water should not exceed 110º F) into the pan and allow to sit until the honey melts.

Step 2
In five-minute intervals remove your bottle from the pan, stir the honey and return it to the warm water. Continue this process until the honey has returned to its liquid consistency state.

Step 3
After your honey has returned to its normal consistency, remove the bottle from the pan and allow your honey to cool. Tightly seal the bottle and store at cool to room temperature.

What is crystallized honey?
Crystallization does not mean your honey has gone bad. In fact, it’s honey’s natural process of preserving itself, often occurring after three to six months of storage. Do not throw it out! We repeat, do not throw it out! Crystallized honey is still edible. Some even enjoy its grainy consistency as a spread on toast or as a cooking ingredient.

Many factors contribute to honey crystallization. The main reason is its ingredient composition. Honey is a highly concentrated solution of two sugars: glucose and fructose. Typically, honey contains 70% carbohydrates and less than 20% water. Since this is unbalanced, the glucose separates from the water forming the crystallized appearance.

Besides its ingredient composition, what are other factors that contribute to crystallization?

The percentage of glucose vs. fructose in the honey. If there’s a higher percentage of glucose in the honey composition, the rate of crystallization may speed up.

The temperature where the honey is stored. If honey is stored in too cold an environment the speed of crystallization can increase, including when it’s in the honeycomb. So if your honey is hiding out in your fridge, you may want to place it in your pantry.

The amount of pollen in the honey. Whether your honey is raw, semi-processed or processed will determine how fast it crystallizes, and how much pollen it contains. Pollen in honey is normal, and verifies what plants the bees were feeding on. Raw honey contains more pollen grains than processed honey and therefore it can crystallize faster.

One of my biggest pet peeves is honey that has crystallized and hardened! It seems like it happens so quickly and honey is expensive right now. Don’t throw away your crystallized honey, I’ll show you how to Decrystallize Honey.

How to decrystallize honey

Here is my sad little bottle of crystallized honey. When your honey crystallizes it’s a nuisance but it doesn’t mean it’s gone bad. The sugar in the honey solidifies over time, it happens especially fast in cooler temperatures. Some kinds of honey with higher fructose will last longer but it’s inevitable once you open it. Don’t throw it away, honey is expensive and there are a couple of easy fixes.

You can still scoop out a spoon of crystallized honey to put in your tea or hot beverage, the crystals will melt in the hot liquid.

How to decrystallize honey? The secret is warming it up:

Set your bottle of honey in a small saucepan on the stove filled with water, slowly bring the heat up. As the water warms up around the bottle it will start melting the sugar crystals. Continue warming it, don’t let it boil. When the honey has completely liquified take it out of the water. It will be good to go again but keep it tightly sealed. Exposure to air will make it go back to the crystal form quickly.

How to decrystallize honey

The microwave is another option but you have to be very careful. Open the top of the bottle and put it in the microwave for 15-30 seconds, continue 15-30 second intervals and shake in between. You don’t want to just let it go for a long time without watching and stirring. It will heat up so fast and can burn you easily and melt the container compromising the integrity of the plastic.

Keeping it liquid:

It’s not going to stay liquid forever, it will crystallize again over time. The best thing you can do is to keep it tightly sealed, the less air exposure the better. Keeping it in a glass jar helps because it’s not as porous as plastic. It also makes the heating process easier the next time you have to heat it up again. Next time you buy one of the little plastic bears pour it into a glass mason jar or some kind of glass jar with a tight fitting lid.

A few tricks I want to share:

As long as we are talking about honey, here is a trick that I like to share. When you are trying to measure things like honey, peanut butter, cream cheese. It’s hard to scrape out the measuring cup or spoon and get the correct measurement.

How to decrystallize honey

To make it easier run hot water on the inside of the spoon or cup you are going to measure with. When it’s warmed up the food slides right off. This works great with scooping ice cream too. You might like my post How to Soften Brown Sugar that has Hardened. It’s a very similar problem and it also has an easy fix.

Read more of our amazing posts filled with clever tips and hacks: