How to drink citrate of magnesium

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  • How Does It Work?
  • Magnesium Citrate Dosing
  • Usage
  • Side Effects

Constipation occurs when you go an abnormally long period of time without a bowel movement. Constipation can be caused by a lack of fiber in your diet, as a result of dehydration or due to certain medications. One treatment for constipation is magnesium citrate, a laxative that can be purchased without a prescription 2.

How Does It Work?

Magnesium citrate is a type of laxative known as a hyperosmotic laxative 2. When you consume magnesium citrate, it passes through your digestive tract and pulls water from the surrounding tissues into your intestines 2. The increase in water stimulates contraction of the muscles around your intestines, resulting in the muscles propelling fecal material forward. The water also helps to soften fecal material that may have gotten dried out and stuck.

Magnesium Citrate Dosing

How to Use Benefiber

Magnesium citrate comes as a liquid 12. For an adult the standard dose is 240 mL, which is approximately one cup. For children between the ages of 6 and 12, the standard dose is 50 to 100 mL, which is approximately 1/4 to 1/2 of a cup. For children between the ages of 2 and 6, the recommended dose is 4 to 12 mL, which is approximately 1 to 3 tsp.

  • Magnesium citrate comes as a liquid 1.
  • For children between the ages of 6 and 12, the standard dose is 50 to 100 mL, which is approximately 1/4 to 1/2 of a cup.

Usage

If you are taking magnesium citrate, you can mix the liquid with water or juice 2. A full dose of magnesium citrate will result in a bowel movement within a half-hour to three hours, though smaller doses may take longer to produce a bowel movement 2. You can take magnesium citrate with food, but it may take longer for the drug to have an effect 2. Be sure to drink two full glasses of water or some other liquid after taking magnesium citrate to replace some of the water your body will lose 2.

Side Effects

Stool Softener Side Effects

Although magnesium citrate is safe for most people to use, it can cause some side effects 2. For example, you may develop diarrhea after taking magnesium citrate 2. Other side effects include:

  • bloating
  • flatulence
  • anal irritation
  • abdominal cramping
  • sweating
  • weakness

Magnesium citrate can cause you to become dehydrated and develop electrolyte imbalances, which can lead to dizziness, fainting and heart palpitations 2. If you experience any of these symptoms, contact your doctor and stop taking magnesium citrate 2.

If you are planning to have a colonoscopy or if you wish to relieve occasional constipation, then an oral solution of magnesium citrate is something your doctor is likely to recommend.

If you are planning to have a colonoscopy or if you wish to relieve occasional constipation, then an oral solution of magnesium citrate is something your doctor is likely to recommend.

Chronic constipation, diverticulitis, and irritable bowel syndrome are some common problems faced by a majority of people. Some people simply cannot have bowel movements without the use of laxatives. This is an indication that the body is unable to perform its function naturally. A colonoscopy is a diagnostic test used to detect the cause of these problems. However, this procedure demands an empty and clear colon and rectum. Magnesium citrate oral solution is often recommended in such situations, as it acts as a laxative, however, its usage should be limited only to cure occasional constipation. Prolonged and continuous use of this solution is not advisable.

How Does the Oral Solution of Magnesium Citrate Work?

Most people who suffer from constipation simply do not drink enough water. As a result there is improper formation of fecal matter. These people have great difficulty passing these improper and hard stools, which make bowel movements very painful. They often experience great relief by using stool softeners, which work by drawing out excess water from the intestine in order to form soft stools which can be easily passed.

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Magnesium citrate works on a similar principle. The process through which laxatives absorb water from the intestines is called osmosis. Magnesium citrate solution draws water from the colon and the tissues of intestine to form soft stools. The water contained in the solution itself also helps clean the colon. Additionally, it also helps meet the daily magnesium requirement of the body, in case of a deficiency.

How to Take the Solution?

You should never ever drink the solution on your own recommendation. It is strongly advised that you consult your health care provider regarding the amount of dosage, duration, etc,. If you suffer from any colon problem, diabetes, heart disease, kidney disorder, diverticulitis, etc, it is better to let your health care provider know about it well in advance. Administer the dosage of the solution exactly as prescribed on the prescription label or as per your doctor’s directions.

Magnesium citrate solution tastes bitter, hence it would make sense to mix it in fruit juice and then drink it. However, if you plan to drink it prior to any test or surgery, consult your doctor, because certain surgeries impose dietary restrictions. If your doctor advises you against drinking a fruit juice you may try chilling the solution before drinking it. Chilling it, reduces the bitter taste to some extent. No matter how you decide to take your dose, you should always drink 1 to 2 glasses (8 to 16 ounce) of water along with it. Similarly, keep yourself well-hydrated while you are on this dosage.

Magnesium citrate solution begins its work within 30 minutes to 2 hours after the dose. Hence, avoid taking the dose late in the evening or before bedtime, unless the health care provider advises otherwise. In case you missed the dose, you should skip the dose entirely, and take the next dose as per schedule. Avoid taking double doses. If you miss the dose just before the test, call your doctor to check if it would affect the test. If it does, you might have to reschedule your appointment.

Side Effects

Common side effects, which do not demand medical intervention include mild nausea and diarrhea. However, severe magnesium citrate side effects also exist, and may require immediate medical attention. If you notice any of the following side effects after ingesting the solution, do not hesitate to call your doctor at the earliest.

  • Dehydration
  • Shortness of breath
  • Dizziness
  • Chest pain or heart palpitations
  • Excessive sweating
  • Extreme drowsiness
  • Muscle weakness
  • Redness or flushing of face
  • Severe nausea or vomiting

Thus, magnesium citrate is an effective laxative and colon cleanser. However, execute fair amount of caution while ingesting it to avoid any possible side effects.

It is very important that the following preparation is followed exactly as outlined.

Do not have anything to eat or drink after the second bottle of magnesium citrate is consumed.

Preparing for Your Colonoscopy at UConn Health

One week before the procedure:

  • Stop taking any iron supplements.

Three (3) days before the procedure:

  • Stop taking Vitamin E, Motrin, Advil, Aleve, ibuprofen, etc. You may continue aspirin.
  • If approved by your physician, stop taking any blood thinners (Coumadin, Warfarin, Plavix, Pradaxa, etc.).
  • Take your usual medications for blood pressure, heart problems, lung problems, and other chronic health conditions. Check with your physician or GI Endoscopy office at 860-679-4784 if you are unsure whether to take or stop a medication.
  • Purchase the following items from your pharmacy. A written prescription from your physician is not required:
    • Two (2) bottles of magnesium citrate (10 ounce). Do not purchase red (cherry flavor).
    • One (1) package of Dulcolax tablets (laxative).

Day before the procedure:

  1. Upon wakening, take four (4) Dulcolax tablets (laxative), with a large glass of water.
  2. You need to follow a clear liquid diet ALL DAY – no red or purple liquids. No solid foods, milk or milk products. Choices:
    Apple juice
    Sprite
    Ginger ale
    Fresca
    Tea and coffee (honey, sugar, sugar substitutes ok – no milk)
    Jell-O (no red or purple)
    Popsicles (orange, lemon-lime)
    Vitamin Water or Gatorade (orange, lemon-lime)
    Clear soup, broth (vegetable, beef or chicken)
    White grape juice
    Hard candy
  3. In the evening, at 6 p.m., drink the entire content of the first bottle of magnesium citrate. Drink an 8 oz. glass of water at this time.
  4. Continue to follow a clear liquid diet through the evening to prevent dehydration.

Day of the procedure:

  1. Five (5) hours before your scheduled arrival time, you need to drink the entire content of the second bottle of magnesium citrate, and one 8 oz. glass of water. You should not have anything else to drink (or eat) until after your procedure (except the approved medications with a small sip of water). Check with your physician or GI Endoscopy office at 860-679-4784 if you are unsure whether to take or stop a medication.
  2. You must have a friend or family member available to provide you with transportation to the and from the procedure.

Additional Instructions for Afternoon Procedures

For procedures that are scheduled to start after 12 p.m., it is okay to drink clear liquids (black coffee or tea without sugar or milk, water, 7UP, ginger ale or apple juice) until 6 hours before the start time of the procedure.

DO NOT EAT ANY SOLID FOOD AFTER MIDNIGHT THE NIGHT BEFORE YOUR PROCEDURE.

Generic Name: magnesium citrate (mag NEE see um SIH trate)
Brand Name: Citrate of Magnesia, Citroma, Citroma Cherry, Citroma Lemon
Dosage Forms: oral capsule (125 mg; 133.3 mg); oral liquid (1.745 g/30 mL); oral tablet (100 mg)

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Sep 11, 2020. Written by Cerner Multum.

What is magnesium citrate?

Magnesium is a naturally occurring mineral that is important for many systems in the body, especially the muscles and nerves. Magnesium citrate also increases water in the intestines.

Magnesium citrate is used as a laxative to treat occasional constipation.

Magnesium citrate may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Warnings

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

Before taking this medicine

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take magnesium citrate if you have other medical conditions, especially:

a sudden change in bowel habits that has lasted longer than 2 weeks;

if you are on a low-magnesium or low-potassium diet.

It is not known whether magnesium citrate will harm an unborn baby. Do not use this medicine without a doctor’s advice if you are pregnant.

It is not known whether magnesium citrate passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medicine without a doctor’s advice if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take magnesium citrate?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Take magnesium citrate on an empty stomach, at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal.

Measure liquid medicine with the dosing syringe provided, or with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Take this medicine with a full glass of water.

Magnesium citrate should produce a bowel movement within 30 minutes to 6 hours after you take the medicine.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 7 days of treatment, or if the medicine produces no results. Not having a bowel movement after using a laxative may be a sign of a condition more serious than occasional constipation.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

What happens if I miss a dose?

Since magnesium citrate is used when needed, you may not be on a dosing schedule. If you are on a schedule, use the missed dose as soon as you remember. Skip the missed dose if it is almost time for your next scheduled dose. Do not use extra medicine to make up the missed dose.

What happens if I overdose?

Seek emergency medical attention or call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

What should I avoid while taking magnesium citrate?

Avoid taking any other medicines within 2 hours before or 2 hours after you take magnesium citrate. Laxatives can make it harder for your body to absorb certain other drugs.

Magnesium citrate side effects

Get emergency medical help if you have signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat.

Stop using magnesium citrate and call your doctor at once if you have:

no bowel movement within 6 hours after taking the medicine;

pain with bowel movements, rectal bleeding;

watery diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, severe stomach pain;

painful or difficult urination;

flushing (warmth, redness, or tingly feeling);

a light-headed feeling, like you might pass out;

weak or shallow breathing, slow heartbeats; or

muscle weakness, increased thirst.

Common side effects may include:

loose stools, diarrhea, stomach cramps;

This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088.

Magnesium citrate dosing information

Usual Adult Dose for Constipation:

240 mL orally one time.

Usual Pediatric Dose for Constipation:

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What other drugs will affect magnesium citrate?

Other drugs may interact with magnesium citrate, including prescription and over-the-counter medicines, vitamins, and herbal products. Tell each of your health care providers about all medicines you use now and any medicine you start or stop using.

Frequently asked questions

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Remember, keep this and all other medicines out of the reach of children, never share your medicines with others, and use this medication only for the indication prescribed.

Always consult your healthcare provider to ensure the information displayed on this page applies to your personal circumstances.

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Jay Yepuri, MD, MS, is a board-certified gastroenterologist and a practicing partner at Digestive Health Associates of Texas (DHAT).

Magnesium citrate is an osmotic laxative which comes in a liquid form. It is a combination of the element magnesium that is bound to citric acid. Magnesium citrate can be bought without a prescription in a drug store.

It may be used to treat occasional constipation, acid indigestion, or in prescribed amounts, it is used to help clear the large intestine of stool before a test (such as for a colonoscopy), procedure, or operation on the digestive system.  

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Verywell / Ellen Lindner

This medication can also increase the amount of magnesium in the body, but other forms of magnesium are available which have the same effect and do not act as a laxative. Brand names of magnesium citrate that may be recommended for constipation or bowel preparation include:

  • Citrate of Magnesia
  • Citroma
  • LiquiPrep

Health Benefits

Constipation is the infrequent passing of hard stools. Constipation is a common problem that many adults experience from time to time. Some people find that constipation can happen more frequently or become chronic.

It can be uncomfortable and in some cases lead to problems such as hemorrhoids or anal fissures because of straining to pass hard stools.   There are a variety of products available to treat constipation, including magnesium citrate.

Magnesium citrate works by pulling more water into the intestines, which is called osmosis. When there is more water in the intestines, the stool becomes softer or even watery and is easier to pass.

Magnesium citrate is available over-the-counter in many drugstores under private and generic labels, but it should be used under the direction of a physician.

In most cases, using magnesium citrate on an infrequent basis to treat constipation is going to be safe. However, using magnesium citrate on a long-term basis to treat constipation could result in other health problems. It’s recommended that magnesium citrate only be used for constipation after consulting with a physician.

Possible Side Effects

Some of the adverse effects that people experience with magnesium citrate include abdominal discomfort, nausea, gas, and cramps.   There are usually mild but if severe symptoms occur, or a bowel movement doesn’t occur within about three hours after taking the magnesium citrate, it’s important to contact a physician.

More serious side effects are uncommon but can include irregular heartbeat, changes in mood, confusion, drowsiness, muscle weakness, severe diarrhea, severe abdominal pain, bloody stools, or rectal bleeding. Allergic reactions are not common with magnesium citrate.

It’s also important to let the doctor know about any other medications being taken, especially digoxin, sodium polystyrene sulfonate, or antibiotics such as Vibramycin (doxycycline), tetracycline, Minocin (minocycline), Levaquin (levofloxacin), or Cipro (ciprofloxacin), because magnesium citrate may decrease the effectiveness of these medications.  

Usually, taking these medications two or three hours before taking the magnesium citrate can help avoid this effect, but check with a doctor or a pharmacist to be sure.

Overuse of laxatives may have some harmful effects. In particular, overuse of osmotic laxatives such as magnesium citrate may lead to too much fluid loss. This can, in turn, lead to electrolyte imbalances, especially in people who have other medical conditions such as kidney disease.  

People who should avoid magnesium citrate include those who have a heart condition, a bowel obstruction, low calcium levels, low sodium levels, myasthenia gravis, neuromuscular disease, or who are dehydrated or on a low-magnesium diet.  

Using magnesium citrate while pregnant or nursing appears to be safe but a physician should be consulted prior to taking it.

If more than the recommended amount of magnesium citrate is taken, call the Poison Help line at 1-800-222-1222.

Dosage and Preparation

The instructions and dosage for using magnesium citrate will be available on the bottle, but most often the dosage for constipation in adults is 10 ounces.   For children 6 to 12 years old, the dosage may be 5 ounces. For children under the age of 6, seek help from a pediatrician about constipation.

Drinking 8 ounces of water after taking magnesium citrate is important to replace the fluid loss from the body when more water is pulled into the intestines.

Because of the taste, some people find that magnesium citrate is easier to drink if it is chilled in the refrigerator for a while before drinking it. This product is a laxative and it may cause diarrhea, and therefore drinking plenty of fluids after taking it is important in order to prevent dehydration.

When magnesium citrate is used to clear out the colon prior to a procedure, such as a colonoscopy, the doctor’s office will give instructions on when to start taking it. It is important to use the product according to physician instructions because if the large intestine isn’t cleared of stool, it may be necessary to postpone the test or procedure and start the process all over again.

If there are any questions about using magnesium citrate, contact the doctor’s office. A pharmacist may also be able to help with general questions about this drug such as how it should be taken and if there could be any potential side effects or interactions with other medications or supplements.

A Word From Verywell

Constipation is common and is usually not a reason to visit a doctor unless it becomes chronic or it is causing significant discomfort or pain. For many people, the first instinct to resolve constipation is to turn to an over-the-counter laxative, and in most cases, laxatives are safe to use once in a while.

Magnesium citrate is mild when used in the recommended amounts, and may help result in a bowel movement. However, in larger amounts, which is prescribed by a physician to clear out the colon of all stool, magnesium citrate can cause a lot of diarrhea.

Constipation that is occurring more frequently should be discussed with a physician in order to discuss the most appropriate way to resolve it and to find out if there is an underlying cause that needs diagnosis and treatment.

Generic Name(S): magnesium citrate

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This product is used to clean stool from the intestines before surgery or certain bowel procedures (e.g., colonoscopy, radiography), usually with other products. It may also be used for relief of constipation. However, milder products (e.g., stool softeners, bulk-forming laxatives) should be used whenever possible for constipation.Magnesium citrate is a saline laxative that is thought to work by increasing fluid in the small intestine. It usually results in a bowel movement within 30 minutes to 3 hours.

How to use Citrate Of Magnesia

Read and follow all directions on the product package. If your doctor has directed you to use this product before surgery or a bowel procedure, he or she should tell you how long before the surgery/procedure you should take this product. If you have any questions, ask your doctor or pharmacist. To improve taste, this product may be chilled in the refrigerator before use. Do not freeze.

Dosage is based on your medical condition, age, and response to treatment. Drink a full glass of water (8 ounces or 240 milliliters) after taking this product unless otherwise directed by your doctor. Doing so will help prevent serious side effects (e.g., a loss of too much body water-dehydration).

If this product is used too frequently, it may cause loss of normal bowel function and an inability to have a bowel movement without using the product (laxative dependence). If you notice symptoms of overuse, such as diarrhea, abdominal pain, decreased weight, or weakness, contact your doctor promptly.

Avoid taking tetracycline/quinolone antibiotics (e.g., doxycycline, tetracycline, ciprofloxacin) within 2 hours before or after this product. Doing so may decrease the effect of the antibiotic.

If this product fails to produce a bowel movement, or if you think you may have a serious medical problem, contact your doctor promptly.

Generic Name: magnesium citrate (mag NEE see um SIH trate)
Brand Name: Citrate of Magnesia, Citroma

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com on Sep 11, 2020. Written by Cerner Multum.

What is Citrate of Magnesia?

Magnesium is a naturally occurring mineral that is important for many systems in the body, especially the muscles and nerves. Citrate of Magnesia also increases water in the intestines.

Citrate of Magnesia is used as a laxative to treat occasional constipation.

Citrate of Magnesia may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Warnings

Follow all directions on your medicine label and package. Tell each of your healthcare providers about all your medical conditions, allergies, and all medicines you use.

Before taking this medicine

Ask a doctor or pharmacist if it is safe for you to take Citrate of Magnesia if you have other medical conditions, especially:

a sudden change in bowel habits that has lasted longer than 2 weeks;

if you are on a low-magnesium or low-potassium diet.

It is not known whether Citrate of Magnesia will harm an unborn baby. Do not use this medicine without a doctor’s advice if you are pregnant.

It is not known whether magnesium citrate passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not use this medicine without a doctor’s advice if you are breast-feeding a baby.

How should I take Citrate of Magnesia?

Use exactly as directed on the label, or as prescribed by your doctor. Do not use in larger or smaller amounts or for longer than recommended.

Take Citrate of Magnesia on an empty stomach, at least 1 hour before or 2 hours after a meal.

Measure liquid medicine with the dosing syringe provided, or with a special dose-measuring spoon or medicine cup. If you do not have a dose-measuring device, ask your pharmacist for one.

Take this medicine with a full glass of water.

Citrate of Magnesia should produce a bowel movement within 30 minutes to 6 hours after you take the medicine.

Call your doctor if your symptoms do not improve after 7 days of treatment, or if the medicine produces no results. Not having a bowel movement after using a laxative may be a sign of a condition more serious than occasional constipation.

Store at room temperature away from moisture and heat.

In this Article

In this Article

In this Article

  • Health Benefits
  • Health Risks
  • Amounts and Dosage

Magnesium has been referred to as “the forgotten electrolyte”. Like sodium, potassium, and calcium, magnesium becomes a positively charged ion (cation) in the body, where it is responsible for enabling and regulating muscular function. Magnesium is the fourth most abundant cation in the body, and is found in every tissue in the body.

Magnesium citrate is a form of magnesium often taken in supplement form. Magnesium citrate is a salt, an ionic compound, that contains positive magnesium ions and negative citrate ions — the same negative ions that form citric acid when combined with positive hydrogen ions.

The name is ambiguous and may refer to salts that have these ions in a 1:1 ratio, a 3:2 ratio, or other ratios. Magnesium citrate is formed by combining magnesium oxide with citric acid, a reaction that creates magnesium citrate and water.

Magnesium citrate dissolves readily in water, so it may be used in powder, capsule, or liquid form. This also makes it an excellent source of dietary magnesium which absorbs readily into the bloodstream and bodily tissues.

Health Benefits

Magnesium citrate is a good source of magnesium ions that are needed throughout the body. Magnesium is needed in every tissue in the body. It works with nucleic acids to produce energy, and it is involved in more than 300 enzyme systems that regulate protein production, signal transmission in nerves and muscles, blood pressure, blood glucose, and other functions.

The health benefits of magnesium citrate include:

Digestion Regulation

Magnesium citrate causes the intestines to release water into the stool. This softens the stool and relieves constipation and irregularity. Magnesium citrate is more gentle than some of the other magnesium compounds and found as the active ingredient in many commercially available laxatives.

Muscle and Nerve Support

Magnesium is needed in order for muscles and nerves to function properly. Magnesium ions, along with calcium and potassium ions, provide the electrical charges that cause muscles to contract and that allow nerves to send electrical signals throughout the body.

Bone Strength

Magnesium citrate helps to regulate the transport of calcium across cell membranes, playing a key role in bone creation. The bones are also a reservoir that stores magnesium for the body. Approximately 60% of the body’s total magnesium is in the bones.

Heart Health

Magnesium helps to keep the heartbeat regular, by regulating conduction of the electrical signals that control the heart’s timing. Magnesium citrate is commonly used to prevent arrhythmia. Arterial stiffness is a risk factor related to atherosclerosis that can cause cardiovascular problems. Magnesium citrate helps to make the artery walls more flexible, reducing this risk.

Continued

Health Risks

It is estimated that half of the U.S. population does not get enough magnesium in their diets. This is surprising, as magnesium should be available in vegetables and other food sources. One explanation suggests that soils may have become depleted of magnesium, producing crops and vegetables that are also depleted.

Magnesium Deficiency

Magnesium deficiency can cause the following problems:

  • Muscle spasms
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Cardiac arrhythmia
  • Osteoporosis
  • Migraine headaches

Under normal conditions for healthy individuals, excessive intake of magnesium citrate does not pose a health risk because the kidneys remove excess magnesium from the bloodstream.

Some people may experience diarrhea, nausea, and abdominal cramping when taking magnesium citrate supplements. If this happens, discontinue or reduce your dosage until these symptoms disappear.

Magnesium Toxicity

However, long-term use at very high doses (such as the dosages used for laxatives and antacids, which may be as high as 5,000 mg/day) may cause magnesium toxicity. Symptoms of magnesium toxicity include:

  • low blood pressure
  • nausea and vomiting
  • facial flushing
  • irregular heartbeat
  • cardiac arrest

Do not take magnesium-based laxatives or antacids for more than once per week without consulting with your doctor.

Amounts and Dosage

The Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for magnesium is 400-420 milligrams (mg) per day for adult men, and 310-320 mg per day for adult women. Women who are pregnant may increase this amount to 350-360 mg per day.

A normal diet will provide most of the RDA for magnesium, so most brands only recommend taking 250 mg/day as a supplement. Take capsules or tablets with a full 8 ounce glass of water and with a regular meal.

However, higher doses may be suggested if you are using magnesium citrate as a laxative or as an antacid. Follow the label directions, and do not use it as a laxative or antacid for more than 1 week without consulting a doctor.

Magnesium is readily available from food, and can be obtained from leafy vegetables, nuts, seeds, and whole grains. An easy way to remember this is to associate magnesium with fiber. In most cases, foods that are good sources of fiber are also high in magnesium.

As with all supplements, you should check with your doctor if you are considering adding magnesium citrate supplements to your diet.

Sources

Clinics in Colon and Rectal Surgery: “Medical Treatment of Constipation.”

Medical Sciences: “Magnesium: The Forgotten Electrolyte—A Review on Hypomagnesemia.”

Medline Plus: “Magnesium Citrate.”

National Institutes of Health: “Magnesium.”

Nutrients: “Magnesium: Are We Consuming Enough?”

Nutrients: “Magnesium in Prevention and Therapy.”

Physicochemical Problems of Mineral Processing: “Methods of Preparation of Magnesium Organic Compounds from Natural Dolomite.”

Trials: “Effects of magnesium citrate, magnesium oxide and magnesium sulfate supplementation on arterial stiffness in healthy overweight individuals: a study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.”

U.S. Food and Drug Administration: “FDA Drug Safety Communication: Low magnesium levels can be associated with long-term use of Proton Pump Inhibitor drugs (PPIs).”

USDA: “FoodData Central.”

Wiener medizinische Wochenschrift: “Significance of magnesium in cardiac arrhythmias.”