How to find replacements for toilet paper

How to find replacements for toilet paper

In the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, stores across several countries reported toilet paper shortages. This may inconvenience many people and cause them to turn to other products.

However, a pandemic is not the only reason to consider toilet paper alternatives, some of which may reduce waste and help the environment.

It is essential to note, however, that most of these options are not suitable to flush.

Anything soft enough not to irritate skin and thick enough not to break can work as a toilet paper alternative. We list some of the best options below.

How to find replacements for toilet paper

Share on Pinterest Baby wipes are one possible toilet paper alternative.

Some people use baby wipes if they have sensitive skin as they do not cause irritation or leave behind lint. Some people may prefer them to toilet paper because they feel cleaner after using them.

Adult wet wipes are virtually identical to baby wipes and work just as well.

People who cannot find baby wipes or adult wet wipes can try clean-up wipes instead.

Some wipes contain only water or a trace of alcohol, but others contain disinfectants, such as bleach or ammonia. Therefore, it is advisable to check the ingredients and avoid anything that disinfects surfaces.

Wipes are more expensive than toilet paper.

The Guidelines for Assessing the Flushability of Disposable Nonwoven Products (GD4), do not recommend flushing wipes. A 2019 report shows that wipes labeled as “flushable” by manufacturers do not break apart in sewers.

A bidet is a small bowl or receptacle that a person can use to rinse themselves after using the toilet.

Some bidets attach directly to the toilet, while others are standalone pieces of furniture for the bathroom. Toilet attachments tend to be cheaper and easier to install.

A bidet can leave a person feeling slightly wet, so consider placing a few cloths next to the toilet to dry off.

Sanitary pads are absorbent and soft, but much thicker than traditional toilet paper. If a person chooses to use a sanitary pad instead of toilet paper, they will not need to use many of them, which may help compensate for the fact that they can be expensive.

Some people use reusable or cloth sanitary pads. These soft, washable pads also work well as toilet paper for people who are comfortable washing and reusing them.

Do not flush any type of sanitary pad.

Reusable cloth, sometimes called family cloth, is fabric ‘toilet paper’ that people can use, wash, and use again.

It is usually much thicker than traditional toilet paper, which means a person may be able to use less of it.

According to the University of Arizona Office of Public Affairs, reusable cloth can transmit infections from one family member to another because it may harbor bacteria and other pathogens.

It is essential to thoroughly wash the cloth between uses, making sure to sanitize before washing and dry on a hot setting. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offer advice on the best way to launder — but this advice is not specific to family cloths.

Wash hands thoroughly before handling or washing family cloth.

Facial tissue and napkins boast a similar thickness to toilet paper. Some table napkins may be too rough to use, but others are sufficiently soft. Try experimenting with different options.

Some facial tissue contains menthol and other minty fragrances to help with congestion. This can irritate sensitive skin, so choose only fragrance-free options.

Do not flush napkins and tissues. Dispose of them in the trash.

Washcloths and towels are thick and are usually very soft. Try cutting up a few large, older towels to make smaller strips. Or purchase a large pack of hand rags and store them near the toilet.

Towels and washcloths present the same concerns as family cloth and may spread germs. Store them in a secure place and thoroughly disinfect before washing.

Always wash hands thoroughly after handling and using towels and washcloths to wipe after using the toilet.

Sponges are absorbent and soft but a person may find them difficult to use. Before use, wet the sponge then wring it out to ensure it is sufficiently soft.

Never reuse a sponge after having a bowel movement. Family members should never share the same sponge, even if a person only used the sponge to wipe urine.

Some sponges are safe to wash in the washing machine, so check the package instructions. Most sponges, however, will fall apart in the washing machine. This means they are very expensive disposable wipes.

Toilet paper tends to dissolve more quickly than most alternatives, which are thicker and not designed for sewer systems.

Do not flush alternatives such as wipes, sanitary pads, paper towels, and similar products. Even wipes that say they are flushable can clog pipes. For those on a septic system, flushing alternative toilet paper may cause even more issues.

It may be okay to flush some toilet paper alternatives, such as thin tissue. To test whether something is flushable in a septic tank, try the following:

  1. Place four sheets of the toilet paper alternative in a plastic container with a lid.
  2. Fill the container two-thirds full with water.
  3. Shake the container for 10 seconds, then wait for the water to settle. If the toilet paper begins to dissolve, it is flushable.

To reduce the mess and smell associated with reusable or alternative toilet paper, invest in a small covered trash can. Use two cans if the family opts for a mix of disposable and reusable alternatives.

When it is time to wash a load, soak reusable cloth in warm water with a little bleach. Then place in the washing machine as its own load, without other clothes. Wash at a very high temeprature.

Dry in the dryer to sanitize, and use the highest heat setting to help kill germs.

Family members should not share reusable toilet paper options since it can carry bacteria, yeast, and other microbes.

Instead, try giving each family member a set of reusable cloth in a different color so that each person knows which is theirs.

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As of 1:30 p.m. Saturday, March 21, 70 Maine residents have been confirmed positive for the coronavirus, according to the state. Click here for the latest coronavirus news, which the BDN has made free for the public. You can support this mission by purchasing a digital subscription .

With the novel coronavirus reaching pandemic levels, everyone has been stockpiling for the Centers for Disease Control’s recommended social distancing, self-isolation and self-quarantine, which could last for several weeks. That’s led to stores running out of products like hand sanitizer, hand soap and toilet paper.

Hopefully, you have enough toilet paper or flushable wipes to last your family for the next few weeks. But if you haven’t been able to procure rolls of toilet paper in bulk, though, here are a few alternatives that you can use, and how to stay sanitary while doing it.

Paper towels and tissues

Paper towels and tissues are probably the closest analogs to conventional toilet paper (and, frankly, ones that you may have already considered). But if you do decide to trade these paper products for your usual toilet paper, it’s important to know that you shouldn’t flush paper towels or tissues after using them.

Despite their textural similarity to toilet paper, the fibers in these paper products do not break down the same way and can cause clogs in plumbing and septic systems. Instead, toss used tissues and paper towels in a garbage can with a lid lined with an appropriately-sized garbage bag or plastic grocery bag. When full, throw them out with the rest of the trash.

How to find replacements for toilet paper

Paper

Upcycled paper may come in handy if you run out of toilet paper. Try to find white printer paper, catalogs or a phone book, if you still have one, to use. Avoid using glossy magazine pages, as the colored ink might rub off in sensitive places. Newspapers can be used in place of toilet paper, but exercise the same caution with inks. Receipts may seem ply-able, but many of them are covered with chemicals like BPA, so they are best avoided.

Like with paper towels and tissues, do not flush this paper down the toilet — keep it in a lidded garbage can next to the toilet and take it out with the trash.

Cardboard toilet paper rolls

Don’t throw away those cardboard toilet paper rolls (or paper towel rolls, for that matter). Peel the layers of roll off it until you have enough to wipe with. If you want to make it more comfortable, wet it lightly in the sink before using. Again, throw used cardboard “wipes” away to prevent clogging your drain pipes.

How to find replacements for toilet paper

Cloth

The “family cloth” is a tried-and-true off-grid homestead staple that might come in handy in times of toilet paper crisis. You can use a variety of dish cloths, face towels or clean t-shirt rags to make a “family cloth,” or follow these instructions from WikiHow for preparing a more formally sanctioned one. Compile a stack of individual cloths, and use each one only once before tossing in a sealed hamper or garbage can. Wash separately from other laundry. This may be the best option for people with septic systems that could get clogged with paper towels and tissues.

Sponge

This method has an ancient lineage: sponges were used in Ancient Rome in lieu of toilet paper for cleanup in the bathroom. Now, sanitation is extra important for this method. Sponges pick up filth and bacteria quickly, so start with a brand new sponge (ideally, without an abrasive scrubbing top). After you’ve cleaned yourself with the sponge, submerge the sponge in diluted bleach or boiling water for five minutes and dry thoroughly before using it again.

Water

When all else fails, using water to clean yourself after going to the bathroom is both efficient and sanitary. There are inexpensive bidet attachments available online, or you can make your own handheld “bidet” using a spray bottle or a perineal irrigation bottle, or peri bottle (normally used for women to use after childbirth), which you can find in the pharmacy or baby supply aisle. Simply spray yourself clean and shake or drip dry.

This story was written well before the pandemic—but now here we are, hoarding toilet paper and fearing the next shortage, and Nick Douglas’ message feels even more timely, even urgent. So we present this to you as a reminder that cloth toilet paper should never be something to consider. Everything’s bad, but it’s not that bad. —Eds.

“The family cloth” is a reusable alternative to toilet paper, made of rags, old t-shirts, sewn fabric, or purchased cloth wipes. They are mostly used for wiping pee, but some families use them for poop and periods. The practice (common until the modern era) is now mostly featured in eco-conscious and “frugal” housekeeping blogs and Etsy shops . A while back BuzzFeed published a sympathetic explainer about the wipes. (At the end, readers are asked to respond with “Good for them, not for me!” or “I’d try it at some point.”) Before it grows any more, let’s make it clear: “Family clot h” is not a life hack.

The downsides of cloth wipes (we refuse to call them “the family cloth”) are obvious: You have to keep a sealed hamper, and you have to do more laundry. Cloth users argue that it’s really not a big deal, that it’s no worse than dealing with dirty underwear, as if dealing with dirty underwear isn’t already bad. They insist that the practice is hygienic, that the wipes don’t smell much, that it’s all not a big deal really. Okay.

Cloth wipes also pose a problem for guests, in that you should never offer cloth wipes to your guests. “We always keep a box of facial tissues in the bathroom cabinet for guests,” says one of BuzzFeed’s sources. This is gross and pointless! Keep a roll of toilet paper for your guests! Good lord!

Real Adults Never Run Out of Paper Products

Is your home always stocked with the cushiest brand of tissues, toilet paper, paper towels, and…

Use this step-by-step guide to get your toilet flowing again

We’ve all been there. You go to flush, but instead of water going down, you see it rising up and up and up. . . . You panic: Did I really use that much toilet paper?

Toilet clogs are a pain to deal with anytime, but during the pandemic, they can really make you panic—you can’t afford to have a nonworking toilet, and you may be reluctant to have a plumber in your house. The good news: “Most clogs you can clear yourself,” says Andrew Chandler, lead plumbing technician at Plumbing in Pink in Greenville, S.C. The key, he says, is usually a good plunge.

Below, plumbers offer their advice on how to clear a toilet clog yourself and when you should call a professional. (As for what not to do, don’t use Drano or boiling water.)

If you’re looking to replace your toilet, see below or check the models in our toilet ratings. One of our key tests assesses how well models flush.

We use simulated waste consisting of 160 solid polyethylene balls, seven sponges studded with No. 10 screws for realistic weight, and nonlubricated latex condoms filled with water. The best in our tests flush it all down in one go; the worst clog with the first flush.

How to Unclog a Toilet Step by Step

1. If you drop something in your toilet—say, a child’s toy—try extracting it first. Don’t force it down with a flush. Even if it carries down the pipes, it still has to move around 100 to 200 feet to get to the city’s sewer. “For a lot of people, once the object is out of sight, it’s out of mind,” says Mike DeSilva, a plumber and president of Plumbing Plus in Poway, Calif. “But this can cause problems later. Use a coat hanger or whatever you can to fish it out.”

A note on wipes: Don’t flush them, even if you see “flushable” on the package. Unlike toilet paper, wipes don’t break down easily and may include adhesives that help them stay taut, and that can cause problems down the line. “They’ll go down,” Chandler says. “But they can totally ruin a septic tank and cost you about $5,000 to $10,000 to fix. If you’re on a city sewer, they’re an extra cost to the city to clean up.” The city’s waste treatment workers have to fish out the wipes and take them to a dump. Likewise, don’t flush paper towels or shop towels.

2. If a wad of toilet paper is stuck, reach for the plunger. First, you’ll need to turn off the water to ensure that the toilet doesn’t overflow while you’re working. Just make sure a decent amount of water is in the bowl so that when you free up the stoppage, there’s water to help move the waste down the drain, DeSilva says.

Place the plunger directly over the bowl drain. Slowly push the plunger down so that it compresses, then vigorously and quickly pull the plunger up and then down while trying to maintain a seal between the plunger and the toilet bowl. You should feel some resistance and suction until the stoppage is released. Raise the plunger. If you see the waste and water go down, immediately turn the water back on and start flushing. If not, keep plunging until the stoppage is completely cleared.

3. If a plunger gets you nowhere, try a toilet bowl cleaner. Pour a small amount of liquid cleaner that’s formulated with hydrogen peroxide as a lime and rust remover directly into the toilet bowl and let it sit for 30 minutes to a few hours. Check to see if chemicals in the cleaner have broken down the waste and your toilet bowl has drained, DeSilva says. Flush once the water has gone down.

4. Get an enzyme cleaner. Enzyme cleaners, such as Green Gobbler, are made of a concentrated mixture of bacteria that break down waste in your toilet but won’t hurt the pipes. You can buy them at home improvement stores. They’re ideal for older homes with cast iron pipes because harsh cleaners such as Drano can corrode metals. Once you pour it into the toilet, let it sit for about 24 hours (don’t flush) so that it has time to work. DeSilva suggests pouring an enzyme cleaner down the toilet a few times a month to maintain a healthy system.

5. Call a plumber. “When you can’t unclog a toilet with a plunger or if you notice a mainline stoppage between the house and the street, you need professional help,” Chandler says. Water coming up in other places, such as in a sink or shower, is an indication that there’s backed-up waste farther in the pipes that you can’t see.

Because of the pandemic, when you schedule a visit, ask the plumber if he will wear personal protective equipment when he comes to your house, and whether he cleans his equipment after each service call. Explain the issue on the phone with the plumber in advance; if you need to talk in person, stay at least 6 feet apart, keep the conversation as brief as possible, and make sure you are both wearing masks. Plan to have your family stay in a separate room of the house while the plumber works, and open the windows for airflow.

What Not to Do

Don’t use boiling hot water. Though it could unclog the toilet, you could end up damaging it. “If you start using too much hot water, you’ll heat up your toilet,” DeSilva says. “Your toilet sits on a drain connection with a wax ring. If you heat it up too much, you might melt that seal.” That can result in a leak at the base of the toilet, and you’ll have to remove the toilet entirely to replace the seal underneath.

Don’t pour Drano down your toilet. Drano is a highly corrosive chemical. It can damage pipes, so much so that they can eventually break apart. If they break, you’ll have a much bigger problem than a toilet clog.

Best Toilets From CR’s Tests

CR members with digital access can read on for ratings and reviews of the top three toilets from our tests, all of which earn Excellent ratings for solid-waste removal.

How to find replacements for toilet paper

How to find replacements for toilet paper

It really is one of the great (albeit first-world) debates. Roommates move out over it. Married couples squabble because of it. And it’s got a shockingly long Wikipedia entry (we’re talking 130 footnotes, people).

But just what is the right way to hang a toilet paper roll? This infographic suggests that you use less paper when you drape the end over the top of the roll, simply because it’s easier to see. You also don’t have to reach as far to grab the paper, and if you buy toilet paper with a pattern printed on it, it appears on the over-the-top side. Plus, every fancy toilet-paper-folding hotel in the country does it that way.

On the flip side, I hear from friends (and the vocal Internet community) that positioning your roll so it faces back (a.k.a. the “under” method) makes it harder for cats and toddlers to unravel the whole thing.

So what do our experts say?

“Definitely over,” says Sarah Richardson, Good Housekeeping‘s home design director and host of HGTV’s Sarah Sees Potential. “Hotels can’t be wrong — they replace toilet paper more than anyone. Plus, if you place it under, you can’t do the fancy fold at the end of the paper.”

Michaelle Exhume, an analyst in the Cleaning and Home Products Lab at the Good Housekeeping Research Institute, is on Team Over, too. Though she has no scientific proof, she doesn’t like the idea of the paper hanging so close to the bathroom wall, since it might pick up germs resting there. “I always find myself correcting it, if someone places it in the wrong direction,” she says.

TELL US: How do you hang your toilet paper — and why?

GP PRO offers a large selection of commercial toilet paper dispensers so that you can find the solution that best suits your facility and its patrons. From coreless toilet paper dispensers and center pull toilet paper dispensers to jumbo toilet paper dispensers , GP PRO offers several size, storage and shape options for commercial toilet paper dispensers. Our commercial toilet paper dispensers come in a variety of colors, sizes, and finishes to ensure that your solution will accommodate the needs of your facility. Plus, our commercial toilet paper dispensers help reduce waste, have high customer satisfaction rates, help improve hygiene, and can offer a personalized solution to enhance your facility in a number of different ways.

In addition to GPPRO’s unbeatable selection of commercial toilet paper dispensers, we also offer quality, dependable commercial toilet paper to match. Coreless toilet paper , center-pull toilet paper , jumbo toilet paper , and more are all available to fit your dispensing solutions. Our commercial toilet paper is soft, absorbent, and strong to give your tenants, guests, or patrons the quality they deserve. Plus, our bulk toilet paper online is cost-effective choice for keeping your facilities stocked at all times.

With GP PRO products and solutions like these, you can feel assured that your facility is getting the best in commercial toilet paper and commercial toilet paper dispensing solutions. Check out the entire selection of commercial toilet paper and commercial toilet paper dispensers from GP PRO to enhance your facility today!

Trust and Honesty in the Plumbing/Mechanical Industry

Honest and straight up. Will not try selling you things you don’t need. We are not interested in selling unnecessary extra work to make a quick buck or commision. We show up ready to take care of your problem and earn your future business. Potential issues encountered and recommendations will be noted and presented to customer but in the end its your home and your decsion.

No open ended hourly rate surprises. All jobs quoted before any work begins so you know the total cost. No guessing costs or worrying if job seems to be taking to long. Our plumbing company is fully licensed bonded and insured for your protection. Certificate of insurance available upon request.

Will never ask for money down. Some companies ask for money down before any work begins on bigger projects. We phase the work into progress payments so you are only paying for work that is completed. This is usually done after each city inspection so you know the work was done right.

ABOUT US

Ajax Plumbing Supply was established in 1955 by the Salinas family as a television, appliance, and plumbing supply store.

Throughout the years it evolved to be a leading local provider of plumbing supplies in San Antonio and the surrounding areas including Bexar County, Kendall County, Blanco County, Comal County, Guadalupe County, and Atascosa County.

Today, the store remains a Salinas family legacy and is known locally as the go-to specialty store for hard to find parts for older plumbing fixtures.

Considerable savings is passed to customers given the long-standing relationships Ajax Plumbing Supply has with national wholesalers and distributors giving them preferrable pricing.

Ajax Plumbing Supply purchases so many water heaters that their price rivals some of the “big box” stores making Ajax the place to go for water heaters in San Antonio with the best water heater prices in town– not to mention an all around fair and affordable pricing policy.

How to find replacements for toilet paper

How to find replacements for toilet paper

  • Garbage Disposals & Dishwasher
  • Kitchen & Bath Faucets Replaced
  • Laundry Tub Replacements
  • Outside Spigot Replacements
  • Toilet Repairs
  • Water Heater/Softener Install
  • Vanity/Toilet Installs
  • Bathtub and Shower Installation
  • Natural Gas Piping
  • Primary and Back-Up Sump Pumps
  • Small Homeowner Remodels
  • Water and Drain Piping Repairs
  • Water Meter Service Valves
  • Valve Replacements
  • Garbage Disposals & Dishwasher
  • Kitchen & Bath Faucets Replaced
  • Laundry Tub Replacements
  • Outside Spigot Replacements
  • Toilet Repairs
  • Water Heater/Softener Install
  • Vanity/Toilet Installs
  • Bathtub and Shower Installation
  • Natural Gas Piping
  • Primary and Back-Up Sump Pumps
  • Small Homeowner Remodels
  • Water and Drain Piping Repairs
  • Water Meter Service Valves
  • Valve Replacements

How to find replacements for toilet paper

How to find replacements for toilet paper

  • Garbage Disposals & Dishwasher
  • Kitchen & Bath Faucets Replaced
  • Laundry Tub Replacements
  • Outside Spigot Replacements
  • Toilet Repairs
  • Water Heater/Softener Install
  • Vanity/Toilet Installs
  • Bathtub and Shower Installation
  • Natural Gas Piping
  • Primary and Back-Up Sump Pumps
  • Small Homeowner Remodels
  • Water and Drain Piping Repairs
  • Water Meter Service Valves
  • Valve Replacements
  • Garbage Disposals & Dishwasher
  • Kitchen & Bath Faucets Replaced
  • Laundry Tub Replacements
  • Outside Spigot Replacements
  • Toilet Repairs
  • Water Heater/Softener Install
  • Vanity/Toilet Installs
  • Bathtub and Shower Installation
  • Natural Gas Piping
  • Primary and Back-Up Sump Pumps
  • Small Homeowner Remodels
  • Water and Drain Piping Repairs
  • Water Meter Service Valves
  • Valve Replacements

How to find replacements for toilet paper

A toilet is an important fixture in every home. It is rare to find a homeowner or property owner who has never faced problems with their toilets. Whether it is normal clogging or strange noise from the tank, finding a plumbing expert to diagnose the problem is paramount. A technician from Our plumbing company will not only come and fix the issue with your toilet, but will also advice you accordingly on how to prevent similar problems from occurring.

Unfortunately at this time, we are NOT accepting more work requests due to high demand. We do want to help you though. We suggest using Thumbtack for your needs. It will give you the best company who is also available to help.