How to increase melatonin production

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How to increase melatonin production

Most melatonin used in 2011 is made synthetically, though there are a number of natural melatonin sources. This hormone is produced in a part of the brain known as the pineal gland. It is also found in other diurnal animals, regulating the sleep cycle so that these animals sleep during the night and are awake during the day. Melatonin can be extracted from the brains of these animals and used in melatonin supplements. Plant-based alternatives are marketed as natural, though these supplements do not contain any melatonin.

Melatonin is created in the brain as a response the natural cycle of day and night. In most people, enough of this hormone is created naturally to successfully start the sleep cycle, though the melatonin levels may drop off in the winter and as a person ages.

Animals that are awake during the day and asleep at night also produce melatonin to regulate this cycle. The only natural source of melatonin that can be used in medication comes from the pineal glands of these animals. Buried deep within the brains of cows, sheep, and other diurnal animals, pineal glands can be harvested and the melatonin extracted. Though the rest of the animal is not wasted, harvesting this gland is not a cost-effective process. Additionally, viruses found in the brains of animals can cause disease in humans, so natural melatonin gathered from animal sources is not generally used anymore.

Nowadays, natural melatonin is not available in most of the world. Companies that package this drug as natural usually use synthetic melatonin that does not include preservatives, dyes, or additives. This type of melatonin is made in a laboratory and is not derived from natural sources.

Aside from real melatonin, there are a number of herbal alternatives that are sometimes labeled as natural melatonin. Extracts from plants in the grass family are used in some medicines instead of animal-based melatonin. These extracts are often labeled as “Gramineae,” which is the plant family in which these grasses are found.

Synthetic and natural melatonin is often used by people who have difficulty sleeping. It can help people get over jet lag more quickly as well as those who have long-term sleeping problems. As the melatonin production decreases in the pineal gland with age, a person may supplement their natural supply of this hormone with a melatonin pill.

How to increase melatonin production

If you’ve been struggling to fall asleep, then you may want to look into ways to naturally produce more melatonin. Because when it comes to drifting off easily at night, this hormone is where it’s at. And the more you can do to boost its production — or at least not impede its production — the better off you’ll be.

“Melatonin is a hormone produced by the pineal gland within the brain that helps regulate our sleep-wake cycle,” Dr. Kelly Bennion, an O2X human performance specialist, tells Bustle. “Melatonin levels follow a circadian rhythm, such that our melatonin levels rise in the evenings to help prepare our body for sleep. They then drop during the early morning hours, helping prepare us for wakefulness.”

And there are several things that can throw it off. As Dr. Nikola Djordjevic, tells Bustle, “Light is the most important factor for melatonin production.” Even seemingly insignificant things, like looking at your phone before bed, or how much sunlight you get each day, can play a role.

The good thing is, once you know what impacts melatonin, you can use that knowledge to your advantage. Read on below for a few ways to ensure your body has enough melatonin, according to experts, so you can get better sleep.

Avoid Looking At Your Phone At Night

“Many electronics, including laptops and smartphones, emit blue light,” Rose MacDowell, chief research officer at Sleepopolis, tells Bustle. “This type of light is similar to sunlight in its effect on the human body.”

And it can wake you up. “Blue light sends signals through the retina to the brain, which shuts down melatonin release in response,” she says. If you scroll through your phone at night, as so many people do, you may want to consider ditching it in favor of a book, or other screen-free activity.

by DailyHealthPost Editorial May 19, 2019

How to increase melatonin production

How to increase melatonin productionIf you suffer from occasional insomnia or if it’s a nightly battle for you, you’ve likely looked at all of the natural solutions currently out there.

You may have even tried some melatonin supplements, and if you’re like many individuals, had some disappointing results.

While research has shown the body’s naturally-produced melatonin helps regulate sleep, synthetic melatonin has proven less than impressive.

One thing that has been virtually ignored, however, are the foods that are able to increase the body’s natural melatonin production.

Melatonin is a hormone produced by the pineal gland. Not only does it control your circadian (sleeping and waking) cycles, but it is responsible for regulating other hormones as well. It plays a role in regulating female reproductive hormones including menstruation and menopause.

While young people have the highest melatonin levels, production of this hormone wanes as we age. Some scientists believe this is why older adults struggle more with sleeping for the recommended amount of hours or even why they may go to bed earlier and wake up before the sun.

Boosting Melatonin Production Naturally

Several factors can throw off the body’s natural melatonin production. These include a time change, jet lag, shift work, and even poor vision. And, as stated, it generally decreases in production as we age.

Melatonin supplements are made with synthetic ingredients in a lab or with cow urine.

And though the supplements may have slight benefits, especially for people suffering with occasional insomnia, they don’t always offer long-lasting or significant results for those who struggle with sleep on a nightly basis.

There are several foods, however, that can naturally increase melatonin production, eliminating the need for a supplement.

According to GreenMedInfo, researchers with Thailand’s Khon Kaen University found that some tropical fruits have significant effects on melatonin production.

The scientists gave study subjects a variety of fruits and then measured the amount of melatonin circulating throughout the body by looking at 6-sulfatoxymelatonin (aMT6s).

The researchers found pineapples, bananas, and oranges were able to increase melatonin presence significantly.

Pineapples increased the presence of aMT6s over 266% while bananas increased levels by 180%.

Oranges were able to increase melatonin by approximately 47%.

While supplements are often thought of as the natural alternative to prescription drugs, they are made to mimic those things we find naturally in foods.

In other words, they too are a poor substitute for good nutrition and some supplement manufacturers (though not all) are in the business to make money, not with noble intentions of increasing the collective health.

How to increase melatonin production

Natural Melatonin

Not getting enough sleep? Before you blame the construction going on outside of your window or your dog barking, ask yourself if this has been a long term problem. It might be an internal issue. Perhaps, your body isn’t producing enough melatonin to fall asleep and stay asleep. The human body naturally produces melatonin, but you can also add it to your diet in supplement form to aid with your irregular sleep patterns.

How to increase melatonin production

Daily Diet and Light Exposure Can Affect Sleeping Patterns

When your body isn’t producing enough melatonin naturally, don’t worry – there are ways to organically try to raise your natural melatonin levels.

How to increase melatonin productionSweet cherry in clay plate on the wooden board

Suggested Foods to Eat

According to Green Med Info, Khon Kaen University in Thailand conducted a study where 30 healthy human subjects were observed over a period of two weeks to see which fruits, if any, raised their natural melatonin levels. The results concluded that tropical fruits such as bananas, pineapples, and oranges were the highest contributors.

Other foods noted to naturally raise melatonin levels include, but are not limited to:

  • Cherries, cherry juice
  • Oats
  • Sweet corn
  • Rice
  • Ginger
  • Barley
  • Mangosteen
  • Tomatoes

A great way to incorporate enough fruits into your diet is by making a simple smoothie! All you need is a blender and some fruit. Check here for more information.

How to increase melatonin production

Change in Daily Behavior

Depending on your home and work situation, your body might not be producing enough melatonin at the appropriate time of day. Our circadian rhythms respond to light and darkness, so you may not be spending enough time in the daylight.

A quick fix that can go a long way is to go for a 10-minute walk outside in the morning or afternoon – to let your body know that it is daytime. Many of us commute to work in some form of transportation be it a car, train or bus(minimal sunlight exposure), go into our office, order in lunch, and then leave the office to go home when it is dark out. This lack of natural light exposure confuses our bodies and in effect, throws off our circadian rhythms and the time of day in which melatonin is produced in our bodies. Your body thinks it is supposed to be awake at night, which is why you may have trouble sleeping. Going for a walk during the day will not solve all of your sleeping problems, but it will definitely be a start. Helping your body to recognize when it is daytime will go a long way with your natural melatonin production.

Another solution, that is easier said than done, is to go to bed earlier. Going to bed when it is dark out can help set your body back on track to help secrete the hormones needed to function properly. This will make your body more alert during the day, rather than at night.

Natural Sleep Aid, Natural Remedies, Magnesium for Sleep, Nutrition News

How to increase melatonin production

How to increase melatonin productionGetting a good night’s sleep is a satisfying, energizing, and vital part of a healthy life.

However, per the National Sleep Foundation, almost six out of ten Americans report having insomnia at least a few nights a week.

This article shares some proven natural remedies for falling asleep faster, sleeping longer and enjoying a better night’s sleep.

Melatonin is a natural hormone made by a gland in the brain that helps regulate the sleep and wake cycles. Researchers in recent studies have found that eating tropical fruits such as pineapples and bananas, as well as certain vegetables, can naturally increase melatonin in the body and help to improve sleep and remedy insomnia.

Melatonin levels start rising in the evening and go up to a peak level in the early hours of the morning, perhaps at around 2:00 or 3:00 a.m, and then it reduces. Melatonin production also declines with increasing age. This may partially explain why some people can sleep fine for a few hours and then suddenly find themselves wide awake in the night and unable to go back to sleep.

The research study showing how tropical fruits increase melatonin was published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry. Thirty healthy volunteers ate one fruit at a time, with a one-week period left between fruits. Significant increases in melatonin were observed after eating pineapple (a 266% increase), banana (180%) and orange (47%). The researchers made important discoveries about fruit consumption for those people with age-related melatonin deficiency symptoms such as sleeplessness and insomnia.

Eating more vegetables can increase melatonin levels in the body as well. Ninety-four Japanese women participated in a recent study. Half of the women ate high amounts of selected vegetables for 65 days, while the other half were told to avoid the same vegetables.

At the end of the study, the average daily intake of melatonin from eating the vegetables was significantly higher than the non-vegetable group. Another Japanese study tracked consumption of vegetables such as tomato, pumpkin, spinach, radish, cabbage, carrot, etc., and discovered that there was 16% more melatonin in the women with the highest vegetable intake.

Supplements of synthetic melatonin are made commercially in a lab. Because they often offer several milligrams per supplement, which is far more than the body makes naturally, common side effects of these supplements can include daytime sleepiness, dizziness, headaches, nightmares, anxiety or irritability. Melatonin supplements are usually only recommended for short-term use as they can inhibit the body’s own ability to manufacture melatonin.

In addition to fruits and vegetables, the brain can be assisted in its melatonin production by taking calcium supplements. William Sears, M.D. writes: “Calcium helps the brain use the amino acid tryptophan to manufacture the sleep-inducing substance melatonin. This explains why dairy products, which contain both tryptophan and calcium, are one of the top sleep-inducing foods.”

It’s important to note that a balanced ratio of calcium and magnesium, that uses twice as much calcium as magnesium, is important to overall health and that these two minerals should be taken together for best results.

Digestibility and absorption are important factors in selecting the best forms of calcium and magnesium to use. For example, Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs is a natural insomnia remedy that contains highly absorbable forms of these minerals and it is effective for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, restless leg syndrome, bone strength, menopause insomnia and teenage insomnia.

Sleep Minerals II also contains vitamin D and zinc which are beneficial to immunity, and it’s delivered in a softgel form mixed with natural rice bran oil. This creates a creamy paste inside that makes it better assimilated than tablets or capsules and it provides a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Kimberly B. of Troy, Michigan says: “I have been taking Sleep Minerals II for about a month now. I have tried everything out there and this supplement is amazing. I have suffered with insomnia for 2 1/2 years. I have also had restless leg syndrome my entire life and this is the first relief I’ve ever had…gone for a month now.”

Richard P. of Parkville, Maryland says: “The Sleep Minerals are making quite a difference. I was regularly waking up at around 3:00 a.m. and after a few days of use my sleep improved quite a lot. I wake up once a night to go to the bathroom, but the great thing is, I then fall back asleep and sleep several more hours. This has been a great improvement.”

Fruits, vegetables and absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium are good remedies to increase melatonin in the body and help with better sleep. For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

Walnuts, almonds, tart cherries, tart cherry juice, nut butters, whole grains, kiwis, pineapples, bananas and oranges. Yogurt is also a good choice. Teas that help with sleep and relaxation include chamomile, lemon balm and passionflower.How to increase melatonin production

A study showing how fruits increase melatonin appeared in the Journal of Food Chemistry. 30 volunteers ate one fruit at a time. Significant increases in melatonin were observed with pineapple (a 266% increase), banana (180%) and orange (47%).

How to increase melatonin production

If you’re among the many, many people who don’t get enough sleep, or good quality sleep, you could be seriously endangering your health . Not only are you left tired and moody with impaired metabolism and reflexes, but the production of melatonin becomes lacking.

Have you heard of this vital hormone? Most of us think of it in the form of “natural” sleep aid tablets that we can take to encourage deeper rest or avoid jet lag. But melatonin is actually produced internally during the night. And not only is it involved with sleep, but it has a multitude of other amazing benefits within the body.

Let’s explore more about why melatonin is so important for good health and how to optimize natural production.

Protects against the leading causes of death

Melatonin is one of the body’s most potent weapons against inflammation, which is the root problem of many chronic health conditions and leading causes of death such as heart disease, diabetes and high blood pressure.

Studies show that having sufficient melatonin reduces the severity of high blood pressure and protects the heart against damage. Recent research also suggests that those with low melatonin levels have twice the risk of developing type II diabetes.

Slows brain aging

Melatonin is a strong antioxidant, which means it prevents cell damage caused by molecules called free radicals. It is this effect that is linked with melatonin’s ability to slow neurodegeneration and reduce markers of brain aging. In animal studies, daily exercise combined with sufficient melatonin production was found to improve markers of Alzheimer’s disease and boost the ability to learn and remember information. This may be thanks to melatonin’s ability cross the blood-brain barrier and protect cells against a toxic protein called beta-amyloid.

Both Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease are associated with low levels of melatonin, so improving natural production may help ward off these conditions.

Prevents the development of cancer

Melatonin helps regulate reproductive hormones and cell growth, so it follows that scientific studies have demonstrated its ability to protect against cancers related to reproductive organs. This includes cancers of the breast, ovaries, endometrium, prostate and testicles.

This is backed up by evidence showing that those who are exposed to light at nighttime are more likely to develop cancer. For example, nurses who work nights were shown to have 36 percent higher rates of breast cancer, while another study estimated the risk to be 60 percent higher. This is attributed to the dysregulation of the natural circadian rhythm and melatonin production.

Melatonin also protects against the harmful side effects of conventional cancer treatments like chemotherapy and radiation.

Helps with weight control

Melatonin is known to exert beneficial effects on the metabolism (potentially by balancing thyroid function) and also upregulates the action of the type of fat that is responsible for burning calories and generating heat. In this way, melatonin is believed to stave off weight gain and obesity.

Strengthens immune system

Along with improving many functions against poor health and disease, melatonin also directly improves the action of our built-in immune system. The production of immune cells like interleukin-2 is increased in the presence of sufficient melatonin in the system.

Fights migraine headaches

Natural production of melatonin helps reduce the advent of migraine headaches, and supplementation has also shown to be beneficial. One study demonstrated that taking melatonin before bedtime for three months could decrease migraine frequency by half.

Keeps you looking youthful

By acting as a potent antioxidant, melatonin protects tissues and skin from free-radical damage, which can otherwise leave them looking saggy, dull and wrinkled. Melatonin is able to protect both protein and fat tissues in the body, and can cross all cell barriers to perform its antioxidant function efficiently. No wonder getting a good night’s sleep can make you look 10 years younger.

Supports mood balance

Since melatonin is made from the good-mood chemical serotonin, it is said to be tied to a healthy mood balance.

Decreases the risk of osteoporosis

Scientific research has shown that melatonin can help restore imbalances in the system that keep bones strong and help them heal. This means that melatonin is a key factor in preventing bone diseases like osteoporosis.

How melatonin is produced

Melatonin is produced when the suprachiasmatic nucleus (part of the hypothalamus) tells the pineal gland to start production. This process is regulated by the biological or circadian clock, which functions in step with cycles of daylight and darkness .

Our eyes are very sensitive to light, and we even have light sensors in our skin. When there is light in our surroundings, signals are sent to the brain that say, “It’s daytime!” Melatonin production is stopped, and other hormones are upregulated to promote alertness (e.g., cortisol).

When our surroundings are dark or lit only with light in the yellow-orange-red spectrum (similar to natural firelight), the pineal gland is signaled to produce melatonin.

How to optimize internal melatonin production naturally

There are a few lifestyle and dietary habits that can be used to optimize natural production of melatonin.

How to increase melatonin productionFirst of all, it is vital to “program” the biological clock properly by ensuring that we get bright daylight during the day and are not exposed to any light during the night. This means no texting or reading on a tablet late into the night.

In fact, the best way to tell the body that it’s nighttime is to wear yellow- or orange-lensed glasses after the sun has gone down, and/or use lights that are in the warm spectrum. Salt lamps or low-blue lightbulbs are a great option.

Certain foods can also help boost melatonin regulation by providing raw materials such as vitamins and minerals. Some examples are potassium, magnesium, B vitamins and complex carbohydrates. These building blocks are used to make serotonin, which is the immediate precursor to melatonin. Bananas, oats, turkey, chicken, almonds, pineapple, oranges, tomatoes and cherries are all great sources of the things we need to make our own internal melatonin naturally.

Natural Sleep Aid, Natural Remedies, Magnesium for Sleep, Nutrition News

How to increase melatonin production

How to increase melatonin productionGetting a good night’s sleep is a satisfying, energizing, and vital part of a healthy life.

However, per the National Sleep Foundation, almost six out of ten Americans report having insomnia at least a few nights a week.

This article shares some proven natural remedies for falling asleep faster, sleeping longer and enjoying a better night’s sleep.

Melatonin is a natural hormone made by a gland in the brain that helps regulate the sleep and wake cycles. Researchers in recent studies have found that eating tropical fruits such as pineapples and bananas, as well as certain vegetables, can naturally increase melatonin in the body and help to improve sleep and remedy insomnia.

Melatonin levels start rising in the evening and go up to a peak level in the early hours of the morning, perhaps at around 2:00 or 3:00 a.m, and then it reduces. Melatonin production also declines with increasing age. This may partially explain why some people can sleep fine for a few hours and then suddenly find themselves wide awake in the night and unable to go back to sleep.

The research study showing how tropical fruits increase melatonin was published in the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry. Thirty healthy volunteers ate one fruit at a time, with a one-week period left between fruits. Significant increases in melatonin were observed after eating pineapple (a 266% increase), banana (180%) and orange (47%). The researchers made important discoveries about fruit consumption for those people with age-related melatonin deficiency symptoms such as sleeplessness and insomnia.

Eating more vegetables can increase melatonin levels in the body as well. Ninety-four Japanese women participated in a recent study. Half of the women ate high amounts of selected vegetables for 65 days, while the other half were told to avoid the same vegetables.

At the end of the study, the average daily intake of melatonin from eating the vegetables was significantly higher than the non-vegetable group. Another Japanese study tracked consumption of vegetables such as tomato, pumpkin, spinach, radish, cabbage, carrot, etc., and discovered that there was 16% more melatonin in the women with the highest vegetable intake.

Supplements of synthetic melatonin are made commercially in a lab. Because they often offer several milligrams per supplement, which is far more than the body makes naturally, common side effects of these supplements can include daytime sleepiness, dizziness, headaches, nightmares, anxiety or irritability. Melatonin supplements are usually only recommended for short-term use as they can inhibit the body’s own ability to manufacture melatonin.

In addition to fruits and vegetables, the brain can be assisted in its melatonin production by taking calcium supplements. William Sears, M.D. writes: “Calcium helps the brain use the amino acid tryptophan to manufacture the sleep-inducing substance melatonin. This explains why dairy products, which contain both tryptophan and calcium, are one of the top sleep-inducing foods.”

It’s important to note that a balanced ratio of calcium and magnesium, that uses twice as much calcium as magnesium, is important to overall health and that these two minerals should be taken together for best results.

Digestibility and absorption are important factors in selecting the best forms of calcium and magnesium to use. For example, Sleep Minerals II from Nutrition Breakthroughs is a natural insomnia remedy that contains highly absorbable forms of these minerals and it is effective for sleeplessness and insomnia, as well as for heart health, restless leg syndrome, bone strength, menopause insomnia and teenage insomnia.

Sleep Minerals II also contains vitamin D and zinc which are beneficial to immunity, and it’s delivered in a softgel form mixed with natural rice bran oil. This creates a creamy paste inside that makes it better assimilated than tablets or capsules and it provides a deeper, longer-lasting sleep.

Kimberly B. of Troy, Michigan says: “I have been taking Sleep Minerals II for about a month now. I have tried everything out there and this supplement is amazing. I have suffered with insomnia for 2 1/2 years. I have also had restless leg syndrome my entire life and this is the first relief I’ve ever had…gone for a month now.”

Richard P. of Parkville, Maryland says: “The Sleep Minerals are making quite a difference. I was regularly waking up at around 3:00 a.m. and after a few days of use my sleep improved quite a lot. I wake up once a night to go to the bathroom, but the great thing is, I then fall back asleep and sleep several more hours. This has been a great improvement.”

Fruits, vegetables and absorbable forms of calcium and magnesium are good remedies to increase melatonin in the body and help with better sleep. For more information, visit the Sleep Minerals II page.

Walnuts, almonds, tart cherries, tart cherry juice, nut butters, whole grains, kiwis, pineapples, bananas and oranges. Yogurt is also a good choice. Teas that help with sleep and relaxation include chamomile, lemon balm and passionflower.How to increase melatonin production

A study showing how fruits increase melatonin appeared in the Journal of Food Chemistry. 30 volunteers ate one fruit at a time. Significant increases in melatonin were observed with pineapple (a 266% increase), banana (180%) and orange (47%).

Melatonin sleep aids are growing in popularity, with 3 million Americans using them in 2012, according to a nationwide survey from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. If you’re among them or are considering melatonin for sleep, it’s smart to understand exactly how melatonin works.

“Your body produces melatonin naturally. It doesn’t make you sleep, but as melatonin levels rise in the evening it puts you into a state of quiet wakefulness that helps promote sleep,” explains Johns Hopkins sleep expert Luis F. Buenaver, Ph.D., C.B.S.M.

“Most people’s bodies produce enough melatonin for sleep on their own. However, there are steps you can take to make the most of your natural melatonin production, or you can try a supplement on a short-term basis if you’re experiencing insomnia, want to overcome jet lag, or are a night owl who needs to get to bed earlier and wake up earlier, such as for work or school.”

If you’d like to harness melatonin’s sleep-inducing effects, Buenaver recommends taking these steps.

Work with, not against, melatonin’s sleep-inducing signals.

“Melatonin levels rise about two hours before bedtime,” Buenaver says. “Create optimal conditions for it to do its job by keeping the lights low before bed. Stop using your computer, smartphone or tablet—the blue and green light from these devices can neutralize melatonin’s effects. If you watch television, be sure you’re at least six feet away from the screen. Turn off bright overhead lights too.” Meanwhile you can help program your body to produce melatonin for sleep at the right time of day by getting exposure to daylight during the morning and afternoon. Take a walk outside or sit beside a sunny window.

What the Experts Do

Lower the Light to Prep for Sleep

Johns Hopkins sleep expert Luis F. Buenaver, Ph.D., C.B.S.M., keeps the lights low in the evening to help his mind and body prepare for sleep. But if he has to work in the evening or answer emails, he uses filters to screen out the blue and green wavelengths of light emitted by his smartphone and computer. “Your brain associates this light with daytime, and it can interfere with melatonin’s sleep-promoting effects. A filter can help.” Many types of blue-light filters are available online and in stores.

Consider melatonin sleep help for occasional insomnia.

“Even sound sleepers have trouble falling asleep or staying asleep once in a while,” Buenaver says. “You may want to try melatonin for sleep if you have difficulty for more than a night or two.” Research shows that a supplement may help people with insomnia fall asleep slightly faster and may have bigger benefits for those with delayed sleep phase syndrome—falling asleep very late and waking up late the next day.

Use melatonin sleep supplements wisely and safely.

“Less is more,” Buenaver says. Take 1 to 3 milligrams two hours before bedtime. To ease jet lag, try taking melatonin two hours before your bedtime at your destination, starting a few days before your trip. “You can also adjust your sleep-wake schedule to be in sync with your new time zone by simply staying awake when you reach your destination—delaying sleep until your usual bedtime in the new time zone. Also, get outside for natural light exposure. That’s what I do,” Buenaver says.

Know when to stop.

“If melatonin for sleep isn’t helping after a week or two, stop using it,” says Buenaver. “And if your sleep problems continue, talk with your health care provider. If melatonin does seem to help, it’s safe for most people to take nightly for one to two months. “After that, stop and see how your sleep is,” he suggests. “Be sure you’re also relaxing before bed, keeping the lights low and sleeping in a cool, dark, comfortable bedroom for optimal results.”

Skip melatonin for sleep if …

Do not use melatonin if you are pregnant or breastfeeding or have an autoimmune disorder, a seizure disorder or depression. Talk to your health care provider if you have diabetes or high blood pressure. Melatonin supplements may also raise blood-sugar levels and increase blood pressure levels in people taking some hypertension medications.

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