How to know when cookies are done

Are your cookies raw in the middle, or have they become hard? How to tell when cookies are done is partly a matter of taste because what’s crispy to some bakers is overdone to others. Just a minute or two in the oven separates gooey cookies from cookies that are still raw in the middle or crispy cookies from those that are too far gone. Fortunately, there are several ways to check if cookies are done to avoid these cookie catastrophes.

Set the Timer for the Minimum Time

First, before baking cookies, use an oven thermometer to make sure your oven is actually the temperature that is given on the oven dial.

Always check on cookies at the minimum time given in your recipe. You can easily cook them longer if necessary, but you can’t “uncook” cookies that have baked too long and are now too hard or too brown. If they need a minute or two longer, be sure to reset the timer for those extra minutes. Thinking you’ll just give them a bit longer without setting a precise time is a recipe for getting distracted and letting the cookies burn.

Lift to See the Bottom

Nearly all cookies will brown at least a little on the bottom while they cook, and some recipes even give you a color for which to look, such as slightly brown or light brown. For example, cookies like snowballs – also known as butterballs or Mexican wedding cookies – should not brown on top. The only way to know for sure that they’re done is to roll one over and see that it’s just slightly brown on the bottom.

Check the Edges

Many times, the recipe will tell you that the edges should be slightly brown or “just beginning to brown.” Edges brown before the middle, so the edges can burn while the middle is still cooking. Some cookies – sugar cookies, for example – are best when the edges are set but not brown. You can check the edges visually without lifting the cookie, and with practice, you’ll be able to see that the edges look more set than the center of the cookie, even when the edges are not yet brown.

If the recipe tells you to let the cookies cool on the cookie sheet for two minutes as chocolate chip cookie recipes do, that means the cookies will continue to cook while cooling because the sheet is still very hot. In these cases, you can experiment with the timing of removing the cookies from the oven.

The centers might look like they still need more cooking, and they will do that while they’re resting on the cookie sheet. If you wait until the middle is totally cooked, you may find that your cookies are overdone after they cool on the cookie sheet.

Use the Toothpick Test to Know if Cookies Are Done

When cookies are thicker – like when baking brownies, which are essentially bar cookies – you can sometimes use a simple wooden toothpick to test and see if they’re done. Insert the toothpick into the middle of the brownies or other bar cookie, and if the toothpick is free of cookie particles when you pull it out, they’re done. In fact, they’re probably done even if a few particles stick to the toothpick.

If it looks like batter is sticking to the toothpick, though, they’re not done unless you’re going for gooey brownies. If that’s the case, only you can truly know when the brownies are done because cooking time depends on how gooey you like them. Just know that a minute is a long time to a cookie, and going from raw batter to gooey center can be the difference of only a minute or two.

There is nothing better than freshly baked cookies, but nothing worse than discovering those cookies are burnt on the bottom due to uneven baking. Convection microwave ovens are ovens that circulate hot air throughout the oven during baking, resulting in completely even heat distribution, so you may never have this problem again. Convection oven cookies can be baked on all of the different racks in the microwave, and will always come out evenly baked. Sugar cookies are one type of cookie that can be made in the convection microwave, and make for a good tester if you’ve never baked cookies this way before.

How to Bake Cookies in the Microwave

Preheat the convection microwave oven to 350 degrees F. Use butter or shortening to grease cookie sheets. Combine the brown sugar, white sugar and shortening, then beat in one egg at a time. Add the vanilla and mix thoroughly.

Combine the flour, baking soda and salt in a separate bowl. Mix the powder well, so that there are no clumps. Stir the dry mixture into the liquid mixture, and mix it until all of powders have dissolved and there are no lumps.

Use a tablespoon-sized spoon to make rounded balls of dough. Drop them onto the cookie sheet about one inch apart from each other. Fill additional cookie sheets with the cookies until the dough is gone, and place them on any of the racks in the oven, as the heat in the convection oven will bake them all equally.

Bake the cookies in the convection microwave oven for 8 to 10 minutes, until they are a golden color. Allow the cookies to cool completely before serving.

Use any type of cookie recipe to make cookies in a convection oven. Simply adjust the baking time for the cookie to about 25 percent of what the recipe calls for, and check them regularly the first time you bake them.

Are your cookies raw in the middle, or have they become hard? How to tell when cookies are done is partly a matter of taste because what’s crispy to some bakers is overdone to others. Just a minute or two in the oven separates gooey cookies from cookies that are still raw in the middle or crispy cookies from those that are too far gone. Fortunately, there are several ways to check if cookies are done to avoid these cookie catastrophes.

Set the Timer for the Minimum Time

First, before baking cookies, use an oven thermometer to make sure your oven is actually the temperature that is given on the oven dial.

Always check on cookies at the minimum time given in your recipe. You can easily cook them longer if necessary, but you can’t “uncook” cookies that have baked too long and are now too hard or too brown. If they need a minute or two longer, be sure to reset the timer for those extra minutes. Thinking you’ll just give them a bit longer without setting a precise time is a recipe for getting distracted and letting the cookies burn.

Lift to See the Bottom

Nearly all cookies will brown at least a little on the bottom while they cook, and some recipes even give you a color for which to look, such as slightly brown or light brown. For example, cookies like snowballs – also known as butterballs or Mexican wedding cookies – should not brown on top. The only way to know for sure that they’re done is to roll one over and see that it’s just slightly brown on the bottom.

Check the Edges

Many times, the recipe will tell you that the edges should be slightly brown or “just beginning to brown.” Edges brown before the middle, so the edges can burn while the middle is still cooking. Some cookies – sugar cookies, for example – are best when the edges are set but not brown. You can check the edges visually without lifting the cookie, and with practice, you’ll be able to see that the edges look more set than the center of the cookie, even when the edges are not yet brown.

If the recipe tells you to let the cookies cool on the cookie sheet for two minutes as chocolate chip cookie recipes do, that means the cookies will continue to cook while cooling because the sheet is still very hot. In these cases, you can experiment with the timing of removing the cookies from the oven.

The centers might look like they still need more cooking, and they will do that while they’re resting on the cookie sheet. If you wait until the middle is totally cooked, you may find that your cookies are overdone after they cool on the cookie sheet.

Use the Toothpick Test to Know if Cookies Are Done

When cookies are thicker – like when baking brownies, which are essentially bar cookies – you can sometimes use a simple wooden toothpick to test and see if they’re done. Insert the toothpick into the middle of the brownies or other bar cookie, and if the toothpick is free of cookie particles when you pull it out, they’re done. In fact, they’re probably done even if a few particles stick to the toothpick.

If it looks like batter is sticking to the toothpick, though, they’re not done unless you’re going for gooey brownies. If that’s the case, only you can truly know when the brownies are done because cooking time depends on how gooey you like them. Just know that a minute is a long time to a cookie, and going from raw batter to gooey center can be the difference of only a minute or two.

Chilled dough is the secret to perfect ready-to-be-shaped cookies.

How to know when cookies are done

Rolling and cutting out cookies is a holiday tradition for a reason: It’s so much fun! Make those cookies stay in their perfect shape with these easy tricks and tips.

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1 Chill the Dough in Disks

How to know when cookies are done

The single biggest thing to keep in mind when making cut-out cookies is to chill the dough and keep it chilled throughout the rolling and cutting process. After mixing your cookie dough, the first step is to give the dough its first chill. But rather than just sticking the mixing bowl with a big lump of dough in the fridge, first use your hands to press the dough into two equal-size disks.

Wrap each disk in plastic wrap and place the disks in the refrigerator to chill for about 15 minutes.

2 Roll Out the Dough

How to know when cookies are done

Next take the disks, one at a time, out of the fridge and roll to the thickness specified in your recipe.

When it comes to the rolling, there are a couple of ways to go. The dough can be rolled out on a floured work surface or a non-floured surface.

For a floured surface, use as little flour on the surface and rolling pin as possible. Introducing extra flour can toughen the dough and affect the texture of the finished cookies. Consider using confectioners’ sugar instead, as it won’t toughen the dough like flour can.

3 Cut the Dough

How to know when cookies are done

One thing to remember when cutting cookies: Be sure to cut the shapes close together to minimize dough scraps. While scraps can be re-rolled, they should be re-rolled only once. Rolling dough over and over creates overworked dough, leading to tough baked cookies.

To cut, lay a cookie cutter on the dough, firmly press straight down and lift straight back up without twisting or sliding the cutter. When lifting the cutter, use your finger or a chopstick to gently press on smaller or more detailed areas to help release the dough. If the cutter is sticking, dip the edges in confectioners’ sugar before cutting.

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Google Chrome: Check the cookies and the domains they are sending data to:

Start browsing using a new Private window and navigate to the URL of your website. Open the Developer Tools. Depending on your browser this can be done in different ways. For Google Chrome go to View > Developer > Developer Tools or CMD + ALT + I on Mac or F12 on Windows.

‍Now open the Application tab and check the cookies for each domain. Usually the cookies have names that resemble the name of the service they are being used by. You can also Google search the cookie names to find specific information about them.

Mozilla Firefox: Check the cookies and the domains they are sending data to:

Start browsing using a new Private window and navigate to the URL of your website. Open the Developer Tools. In Firefox, go to Tools > Web Developer > Storage Inspector or CMD + ALT + I on Mac or F12 on Windows.

Now open the Application tab and check the cookies for each domain. Usually the cookies have names that resemble the name of the service they are being used by. You can also Google search the cookie names to find specific information about them.

Safari: Check the cookies and the domains they are sending data to:

Start browsing using a new Private window and navigate to the URL of your website. Open the Developer Tools. In Safari, go to Develop > Show Web Inspector or CMD + ALT + I on Mac or F12 on Windows.

Now open the Application tab and check the cookies for each domain. Usually the cookies have names that resemble the name of the service they are being used by. You can also Google search the cookie names to find specific information about them.

Use an extension to identify services

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Cookies are files which are stored on your computer, smartphone, tablet or other device when you browse the Internet. They are designed to hold data specific to a particular user and website, and can be accessed either by a web server or the user’s computer or device. This allows a website to deliver a page specifically tailored to a particular user (which is why you get all those targeted ads!), or the page itself can contain some script which is aware of the data in the cookie and so is able to carry information from one visit to the website (or related site) to the next. Cookies have become HUGE business as data collection and sharing drive significant revenues to companies.

Recent legislation such as GDPR and CCPA aim to regulate what organizations can and can’t do with cookies and by extension, your data.

What information should a compliant cookie policy contain?

To be compliant with privacy and cookies laws, your Cookies Policy or cookies clause should:

1) state that you use cookies on your website and explain briefly what cookies are,
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How long does it take to bake cookies at 350?

Generally, cookies are baked in a moderate oven — 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) — for 8 to 12 minutes, depending on the size of the cookie. For chewy cookies, allow them to cool on the baking sheet for 3 to 5 minutes before transferring to a cooling rack.

How long do cookies need to be in the oven for?

Sprinkle each cookie with a tiny pinch of salt and bake in the preheated oven for 20 minutes, or until they are golden-brown on the edge and slightly paler in the centre. Remove from the oven and transfer to a wire rack to cool before serving.

Why did my Toll House cookies come out hard?

Adding too much butter can cause the cookies to be flat and greasy. Adding too little butter can cause the cookies to be tough and crumbly. Sugar sweetens the cookies and makes them an enticing golden brown. Adding too little sugar can affect the taste and texture of cookies.

How long do you cook Nestle cookie dough?

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Break along pre-scored lines. Place 12 cookies 2 inch apart on ungreased baking sheet(s). Bake 11-12 minutes or until golden brown.

At what temperature should cookies be baked?

350° is the standard temp for a cookie, and it’s a great one. Your cookies will bake evenly and the outside will be done at the same time as the inside. Baking at 325° also results in an evenly baked cookie, but the slower cooking will help yield a chewier cookie. The outsides will be a little softer, too.

Can you bake cookies at 375?

Bake at 375 degrees F until golden and crunchy on the outside, and chewy on the inside, 10 to 12 minutes. For super-chewy cookies: Substitute cake flour for all-purpose flour.

What mode should cookies be baked?

The middle rack offers the most even heat and air circulation which helps cookies bake consistently. The bottom rack of the oven is closest to the heat source (ovens heat from the bottom unless you have the broiler on), so it can result in burnt bottoms.

How do you know when cookies are baked?

Open up the oven, pull out the rack a bit, and push the sides of the cookie very lightly with a spatula or your finger. If the edge stays firm and doesn’t fall inwards, then your cookies are done. If you leave a noticeable indention, then your cookies likely need a few minutes more in the oven.

How do you know when cookies are ready?

Here are some ways to know if your cookies are done: Look at the sheen. This is my favorite way to tell if a cookie is done. For sugar cookies or delicate cookies, look for slightly golden edges/sides. Use the glossy test and the poke test for dark cookies.

How do you keep Toll House cookies from going flat?

Reduce baking soda to 1/2 tsp and add 1/2 tsp of baking powder. Increasing the brown sugar will produce a softer and chewier cookie because brown sugar has a higher moisture content than granulated sugar. Soft and chewy cookies may be stored in airtight containers.

Why are Toll House cookies so good?

According to the New York Times, Wakefield used to chill the cookie dough overnight when she made the cookies at the Toll House Inn. And the Times’ own experimentation left them to believe that refrigerating cookie dough gives cookies a richer taste, a darker color, and stronger hints of toffee and brown sugar.

What does adding an extra egg do to cookies?

Adding an extra egg yolk increases chewiness. Rolling the cookie dough balls to be taller than wider increases thickness. Using melted butter (and slightly more flour) increases chewiness. Chilling the dough results in a thicker cookie.

Can you bake Toll House edible cookie dough?

Unlike many traditional cookie dough recipes which often pose a risk of salmonella because of raw eggs and flour, edible cookie dough does not contain eggs, and the flour has been treated with heat so it is safe to eat. The cookie dough is made just to eat — and not for baking.

Can you bake edible cookie dough into cookies?

Can I bake your edible cookie dough? No, the gourmet edible cookie dough you purchased is made specifically for consuming unbaked. It does not include the ingredients necessary for making delicious baked cookies.

Can I use milk chocolate chips instead of semi sweet?

Do not substitute milk chocolate for recipes that call for semi – sweet or bittersweet chocolate.

How to know when cookies are done

In the picture above are six cookies. Five of them have a defect of sorts; the last one is beautifully baked. Either identify your problem biscuit by the picture or by the points below and figure out how to bake it better next time.

Problem #1: Flat, rock hard cookies

If your cookies look like the first one in the above picture, it’s probably because the dough contained too much sugar leaving your biscuit overly crunchy (as in don’t feed them to grandpa) and dark brown. They probably also got stuck to the baking sheet. Ease up on the sugar in the recipe.

Problem #2: Dry and stiff cookies

Did your biscuits not spread out as desired and taste dry and crumbly? You probably have too much flour in the recipe. The excess flour caused too much gluten to form, preventing the cookie from softening and spreading.

Problem #3: Dark and crispy cookies

If your cookies came out resembling the third one in the biscuit line up of shame, it’s likely that they were made from good dough, but either baked for too long or at too high a temperature. So, they probably came out of the oven too brown and too hard. Try removing your cookies from the oven sooner, or perhaps invest in an oven thermometer to check that your oven temperatures are accurate.

How to know when cookies are done

Problem #4: Pale and soft cookies

These biscuits aren’t hard to identify from the batch. They were probably baked from a good consistency dough but ended up a bit under baked and raw on the inside. Either the oven temperature is too low or they were taken out too soon. When baking always keep an eye on your cookies and take them out when they’re golden.

Problem #5: Crispy on the outside, raw on the inside

If your cookies look like biscuit number 5, then you’re most likely looking at too much butter in your biscuit dough. That, or the dough wasn’t cool enough before baking. Warm cookie dough or excess butter will cause the cookies to spread too much, baking quickly on the outside but remaining raw in the middle. Next time, chill your cookies in the fridge for 10 minutes before you bake them. If the problem persists, use less butter.

Problem #6: No problem at all

This cookie is slightly chewy, full of butter and chocolate flavour and beautifully golden brown. It baked perfectly.

Hopefully these explanations have set you on the right track if you’ve been experiencing some cookie woes. Remember, practice makes perfect. Everybody’s kitchen equipment and ingredients are slightly different, so it might take you a few tries to perfect your cookies even if you have a great recipe.

How to know when cookies are done

Tips for perfect cookie baking

  • Leaving your cookie dough in the fridge overnight will make for more delicious cookies, plus the dough will be easier to work with the next day.
  • Watch your cookies very carefully while they are baking – you want to take them out at exactly the right moment, when they are golden but not hard.
  • If you like thinner, crisper cookies, reduce the amount of flour you use slightly.
  • Bake your cookies on baking parchment or on a Demarle Silpat Baking Mat. This helps prevent sticking and burning.

What are your most common cookie problems and how have you best avoided them?

Desserts always taste better when they are sugar-coated—and even more so when they’re coated in powdered sugar. In particular, crinkle cookies—cake-y cookies that are chewy on the inside and crispy on the outside—are famous for the powdered sugar that creates their cracked appearance.

While these cookies taste fantastic regardless of their appearance, many people struggle over getting the appearance and consistency of the crinkles just right. But it’s not as hard as it looks, so long as you know what to focus on when making them!

I’ve compiled a list of expert tips for you that will make your crinkle cookies look like they came right out of a professional bakery, whether they’re chocolate, lemon, or whatever flavor you prefer.

How to know when cookies are done

The Key to Amazing Crinkles: Dough Spread & Expansion

Crinkle cookies are meant to have gaps between wrinkles of powdered sugar; these gaps should be about 1/8 of an inch wide for them to be noticeable at a distance. Achieving this perfect appearance relies solely on the amount of spreading and expanding they do in the oven. These common end-result issues can be easily explained by spread:

  • A flat layer of powdered sugar? The cookie didn’t expand enough when baking.
  • Patches of powdered sugar? The cookie expanded too much.

These problems are easily avoided when following the tips below in conjunction with your favorite crinkle cookie recipe.

Tip #1: Use Baking Soda & Baking Powder Together

According to the recipe via Cook’s Illustrated, a combination of both baking soda and baking powder is needed to create the right amount of spread for the cookie to get perfect crinkles.

Baking soda raises the pH level of the dough and weakens the gluten structure of the cookie. When the gluten structure is weakened, the cookie will both lift and spread.

As for the necessity of the baking powder, The Kitchn notes that, while baking soda neutralizes the acid by raising pH levels, sometimes it is not enough to create a significant rise in the cookie. Therefore, the purpose of adding baking powder (a pre-combined mixture of baking soda and an acid) is to provide additional lift.

Most recipes call for the use of 1 teaspoon of baking powder to 1 cup of flour, but I followed the Cook’s Illustrated recipe and added ¼ teaspoon baking soda as well—and recommend you do the same.

How to know when cookies are done

Tip #2: Keep Dough at Room Temperature

Refrigerated dough will spread less than room temperature dough.

Cold dough spreads less because it takes more time for the butter to melt. As a result, the dough will set before the butter is completely melted. When baking crinkle cookies, you want the dough to spread. Therefore, crinkle cookie dough doesn’t require a long, refrigerated rest and should be baked at room temperature.

How to know when cookies are done

Tip #3: Roll Your Dough in Granulated Sugar First

Coating cookies in granulated sugar prior to coating them in powdered sugar promotes proper cracking by causing the top of the cookie to dry out before the interior of the cookie is finished baking.

How to know when cookies are done

Granulated sugar does this by absorbing moisture from the cookies and dissolving early in the baking process. After a few minutes, the dissolved sugar recrystallizes and draws out even more moisture from the cookie’s top.

So before you roll your cookie dough in powdered sugar, roll it in granulated sugar first.

How to know when cookies are done

Tip #4: Bake Your Cookies at 325°F

Oven temperature determines how much or how little a cookie spreads—and while 350°F is the optimal temperature for most cookies, crinkle cookies are a bit different.

How to know when cookies are done

If crinkle cookies are baked at 350°F, the outside bakes and hardens more quickly, which doesn’t give the dough enough time to spread. As mentioned earlier, the spreading of the dough is essential to a good crack.

Therefore, crinkle cookies are best baked at 325°F; this temperature allows the ingredients to spread and melt onto the sheet for a longer amount of time before they start to bake and harden (but not spread for too long, which occurs at lower temperatures).

How to know when cookies are done

Tip #5: Bake One Sheet at a Time

It seems like a waste of time at first—if you have two oven racks, then baking two sheets at once makes the most sense. But for these finicky cookies, a little patience is required.

Because heat rises, the hottest part of the oven is at the top; if you bake two sheets at a time, the first tray shields the second from being exposed to this heat. Without that blast of heat, the second tray of cookies doesn’t create crinkles that look anywhere near as nice as the first.

Baking one sheet at a time ensures that the cookies crack evenly from the dry heat of the oven.

How to know when cookies are done

Get Out There & Bake!

These delicate-looking cookies are both complex and rich in flavor; they are guaranteed to impress your friends and family. They may appear daunting at first, but by utilizing the tips I’ve given you, a batch of perfect crinkle cookies will be yours every time.

How to know when cookies are done

More Helpful Baking Hacks:

  • Why You Don’t Actually Need Any Pans to Bake Like a Pro
  • Screw Pillsbury: You Can Make Better Slice & Bake Cookies Yourself
  • The Foolproof Way to Perfect Home-Baked Bread

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