How to make a prize wheel

Instructions for an Amish Knitting Board

If you’re putting on a backyard carnival, or even something a little more formal and large-scale, one of the essential games is a prize wheel, where you spin a large wheel and whatever the wheel’s marker lands on is the resulting prize. A homemade prize wheel can be made cheaply and easily if you have the right tools and equipment. One of the essential tools is a diagram of the prize wheel set up to help you with assembly.

Building the Wheel

Print out and study the diagram of the prize wheel that can be found in the resources section. Use this to base your project on.

Tie a 16-inch piece of string to a pencil. On the opposite side of the string, tie the end to a tack or nail. Press the nail into the exact center of your piece of plywood. Use the ruler or yardstick (which might work better) to find the center. Once in place, pull the string taut and draw a perfect circle on the top of your wood. Once it’s drawn, remove the string and nail.

Use whatever saw you feel most comfortable with to cut out your circular template. Sand the edges of your wheel to ensure that there are no splinters.

Divide the wheel up into 12 equal pie shapes. Using the ruler or yardstick, draw 6 straight lines from one edge of the wheel to the other, spreading each of the lines out evenly. They should all intersect in the center of the wheel.

Do something to individualize the different wedges. Paint each a different color, for example.

Cut your dowel rod(s) into 12 equal parts, each measuring approximately 6 inches. Use your wood glue to glue each of the rods onto the edge of the wheel — on the line between two adjacent sections of board. If you feel the need to secure them more firmly, drill a screw through the bottom of the board up into the dowel rod.

In the center of the wheel, where your 6 lines intersect, and where you placed the nail to use your string/pencil, drill a hole through the wood. The hole should be wider than the body of the lag bolt you are going to use, but still small enough that the head of the bolt won’t fall through.

Building the Stand

Set the 1-by-2-by-24 pieces and the 1-by-1.5-by-32 piece of wood on a table. They should be in parallel lines, and their edges should be about 4.5 inches from the next board. The longer board should be in the middle. Make sure their top edges (the 2-inch and 1.5-inch long edge are lined up together so they are in a straight line — this will mean that the longer board sticks out 8 inches more than the other two.

Apply wood glue generously to the top of the three strips of wood, and place the 2-by-10-by-15 piece of wood on top of all three of them. Make sure that you place the board as shown in the diagram, with the 15-inch side spanning all three strips of wood, and then the 10-inch side 7 inches from the top and 7 inches from the bottom of the edge pieces. When flipped over, the wood will resemble a ribcage. Allow the glue ample time to dry.

Use your nail gun or hammer and nails to nail the base board onto the wooden strips. Do this for added support. Try to put about three nails into every wooden strip.

Drill a small pilot hole into the middle of your baseboard (the 2-by-10-by-15 piece). Use a measuring tape, ruler or yardstick to make sure you have the center. This will help position the wheel on when you assemble it, and also allow the lag bolt to make a clean, straight entry when screwed in.

Screw your small piece of wood (0.75-by-1.5-by-4.5) onto the longer end of your middle wood strip. Position it so that it points upward (4.5 inches up), and 0.75 inches wide. (Have the 0.75-inch side touch the 1.5-inch end of the center strip.)

Screw or nail your piece of rubber onto the wood from last step. Have it so that it is pointing inward, toward the center of the baseboard. It needs to be long enough so that when the wheel spins, it flaps against the dowel rods and is still able to slow the wheel down.

Put two washers over the pilot hole in your base board. Put the assembled wheel on top, making sure that the rubber piece doesn’t bend under the wheel. Put two more washers on top of the hole in the center of the wheel, and then screw in your lag bolt through the hole. Make sure that the bolt isn’t too tight or the wheel won’t spin, and make sure that it’s not too loose that it wobbles continuously. Fine-tune your tightening, and give it a spin.

Introduction: Game Show/Prize Wheel

How to make a prize wheel

How to make a prize wheel

How to make a prize wheel

Most of my projects have been fairly small or of a medium size. My sisters work was putting on a youth event and the theme was The Price is Right. So they asked me to make some of the price is right games included the big wheel. This is the biggest and probably the coolest thing I have ever made.

Step 1: Tools & Materials

1. Ryobi Nail Gun

3. Random Orbit Sander

4. Dewalt Table Saw

7. Rust-Oleum Spring

a. Rust-Oleum Apple Red

b. Rust-Oleum Black

8. Ryobi HOT GLUE GUN

10. DEWALT DW618 Router

11. Rockler Circle Cutting Jig

Step 2: Cutting the Two Circles

I got a half sheet of plywood and found the center. Then i tapped a little hole in the center for the jig to guide on.

This wood was 1/2 thick so I took a couple passes to cut it all the way through.

Step 3: Outside of Circle

I got thin plywood for the outside of the wheel. Its about a 1/8″ thick. Make sure to cut it in long strips so it will bend easily. The width of the strips I cut were 12″

Step 4: Making the Wheel

I cut down a few pieces of 2×4’s to 11″ for the inside of the wheel. This would attach the two halfs so I could wrap the plywood around the edge.

I then used a 1 1/4″ forstner bit to cut a hole in the middle for the 1″ pipe to go through. This is what will make the wheel spin. I then pre drilled a bunch of holes for screws to attach the thin plywood to the circle. I then came back with a nail gun to add more strength to the bond.

Step 5: Finishing and Sanding the Wheel

I used wood filler to cover up the nail holes and as many of the screw holes as I could. Once it was dry I sanded it down and used black spray paint to cover the whole thing.

Step 6: Building the Base

I used 2×4’s for this step. The two long pieces that would be on either side of the wheel had a hole cut in it for the pole so that it could spin freely. It was roughly 4 foot tall pieces.

I then cut some 18″ inch piece to put between the two halfs. I used pocket holes to attach these. Then I cut some angled pieces to add extra support to the base. I used 2 1/4 inch screws here to keep everything together. I didnt use any glue so I could take this apart.

Step 7: Spinning Issues

Once I had squared up the base the wheel was having a lot of trouble spinning so I used a jig saw to a cut a opening in the side pieces so that the wheel would just drop in and sit on top. This helped a lot with movement and I used some silicone spray to make it spin faster.

Step 8: Section Seperaters

I cut some 1 inch strips of the thin plywood to act as dividers for the wheel. I painted them a metallic silver. I measures out 11.5 inches and attached a strip.

Step 9: The Marker

I needed a way to determine what prize the contestants would win when they spun the wheel. So I used a 25″ long piece of wood and a small piece of acrylic. The wood attached to one side of the base and the acrylic triangle was glued on the end.

Step 10: Prize Options

We laminated a bunch of different prize cards and used hot glue to attach them to the wheel. This was so they could be changed in the future.

Step 11: Enjoy Your New Spinning Wheel

Overall I am very happy with this build. It came out great and was a lot of fun. Let me know in the comments below if you have any questions.

Be the First to Share

Did you make this project? Share it with us!

Introduction: Game Show/Prize Wheel

How to make a prize wheel

How to make a prize wheel

How to make a prize wheel

Most of my projects have been fairly small or of a medium size. My sisters work was putting on a youth event and the theme was The Price is Right. So they asked me to make some of the price is right games included the big wheel. This is the biggest and probably the coolest thing I have ever made.

Step 1: Tools & Materials

1. Ryobi Nail Gun

3. Random Orbit Sander

4. Dewalt Table Saw

7. Rust-Oleum Spring

a. Rust-Oleum Apple Red

b. Rust-Oleum Black

8. Ryobi HOT GLUE GUN

10. DEWALT DW618 Router

11. Rockler Circle Cutting Jig

Step 2: Cutting the Two Circles

I got a half sheet of plywood and found the center. Then i tapped a little hole in the center for the jig to guide on.

This wood was 1/2 thick so I took a couple passes to cut it all the way through.

Step 3: Outside of Circle

I got thin plywood for the outside of the wheel. Its about a 1/8″ thick. Make sure to cut it in long strips so it will bend easily. The width of the strips I cut were 12″

Step 4: Making the Wheel

I cut down a few pieces of 2×4’s to 11″ for the inside of the wheel. This would attach the two halfs so I could wrap the plywood around the edge.

I then used a 1 1/4″ forstner bit to cut a hole in the middle for the 1″ pipe to go through. This is what will make the wheel spin. I then pre drilled a bunch of holes for screws to attach the thin plywood to the circle. I then came back with a nail gun to add more strength to the bond.

Step 5: Finishing and Sanding the Wheel

I used wood filler to cover up the nail holes and as many of the screw holes as I could. Once it was dry I sanded it down and used black spray paint to cover the whole thing.

Step 6: Building the Base

I used 2×4’s for this step. The two long pieces that would be on either side of the wheel had a hole cut in it for the pole so that it could spin freely. It was roughly 4 foot tall pieces.

I then cut some 18″ inch piece to put between the two halfs. I used pocket holes to attach these. Then I cut some angled pieces to add extra support to the base. I used 2 1/4 inch screws here to keep everything together. I didnt use any glue so I could take this apart.

Step 7: Spinning Issues

Once I had squared up the base the wheel was having a lot of trouble spinning so I used a jig saw to a cut a opening in the side pieces so that the wheel would just drop in and sit on top. This helped a lot with movement and I used some silicone spray to make it spin faster.

Step 8: Section Seperaters

I cut some 1 inch strips of the thin plywood to act as dividers for the wheel. I painted them a metallic silver. I measures out 11.5 inches and attached a strip.

Step 9: The Marker

I needed a way to determine what prize the contestants would win when they spun the wheel. So I used a 25″ long piece of wood and a small piece of acrylic. The wood attached to one side of the base and the acrylic triangle was glued on the end.

Step 10: Prize Options

We laminated a bunch of different prize cards and used hot glue to attach them to the wheel. This was so they could be changed in the future.

Step 11: Enjoy Your New Spinning Wheel

Overall I am very happy with this build. It came out great and was a lot of fun. Let me know in the comments below if you have any questions.

Be the First to Share

Did you make this project? Share it with us!

How to make a prize wheel

Note: This is the latest post in our series of audience engagement posts.

One of the challenges of corporate events is to break out of the cycle of sameness. A series of speeches, presentations, panel discussions and an uninspired trade show can have a hypnotic effect on attendees.

So why not shake things up a little and create some fun, energetic activity with a Virtual Prize Wheel? Here are 5 ways to use a Virtual Prize Wheel for audience engagement at corporate events:

1. Create a Name Wheel for Your Prize Drawing

Instead of drawing a name out of a hat and announcing the winner on stage, use a Spin to Win Virtual Prize wheel to take things to a howl new level. Instead of putting prizes on the prize wheel, put drawing entrants on it. Then, as the wheel spins the crowd excitedly watches to see whose name pops up – is it their name, or one of their friends? Finally, as the wheel gets close to stopping it slows down increasing the tension and excitement.

One of our clents told us that the Name wheel really woke the crowd up first thing in the morning after a late night.

It’s a simple audience engagement ideas that can be easily implemented in any event.

2. Golden Ticket: Find Your Ticket to Spin the Wheel

How to make a prize wheel

Remember the exciting anticipation of seeing who would win the Golden Tickets in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory? You can do the same thing in your event. Tape a few Golden Tickets under the seats in your general session. Then, ask people to check to see if they have the Golden Ticket, and the crowd will go wild. Next, bring the winner or winners onstage to spin the Virtual Prize Wheel for a chance to win a few select prizes.

It’s a short audience engagement activity that will really create a sense of excitement and energize the audience.

3. Drive Traffic to the Show Floor

Trade show booths are too often a dull affair. Bring more excitement – and booth traffic – with a “Spin To Win” prize drawing. Our Virtual Prize Wheel can be activated by attendees smashing a big button – a satisfying motion that will have attendees lining up to play.

You can use this as a stand alone drawing or in conjunction with a more advanced audience engagement game such as a trade show passport game. (FYI – this could easily be sponsored item!)

4. Recognition: Pick a Prize after Achieving a Milestone

You have employees or members you need to recognize for having reached an important organizational milestone (years as an employee or member, sales achieved, certification, achieving a career goal a monumental number of times). Rather than give them all the same prize, why not bring them on stage to spin the Virtual Prize Wheel? You can make them all worthwhile prizes, with one exceptional prize – more about picking prizes here. This adds more drama and excitement to a required yet sometimes less interesting part of your event.

5. Prize Entry and Drawing

You can use a Virtual Prize Wheel to do more than offer a prize. It can be used to capture lead data. The chance to win a prize will encourage attendees to self-enter their contact data, get agreement to your lawyer’s lengthy terms and conditions, plus answer a few survey questions that help you determine their potential lead value. Use multiple Virtual Prize Wheel kiosks to simultaneously capture lead data from hundreds of people over the course of your event.

Some events offer lower level prizes at the kiosks and have a regular drawing for some larger prizes throughout the event.

Final Thoughts

The virtual prize wheel is a simple interactive that can help you create fun, audience engagement in sales meetings and customer events. Hopefully, these ideas gave you some inspiration that will help you break out of the cycle of sameness.

How to make a prize wheel

SocialPoint recently introduced 3-dimensional layered graphics to our popular Virtual Prize Wheel game.

We thought this would be a great time to share that product enhancement, plus share many other recent Virtual Prize Wheel examples. Our goal is to inspire you as you consider how to graphically portray your brand with our interactive games.

Our Virtual Prize Wheel is fully customizable to your brand. There are three main areas for customization:

  • The prize wheel slices, which can have up to 5 colors and your choice of fonts
  • The center circle where clients often put their logo
  • The background image

How to make a prize wheel

Most of the examples we will show you here focuses on the background image , as that is where you have the most opportunity for creativity and design. First, let’s start with the new 3-D looks:

New 3-Dimensional, layered look Virtual Prize Wheel templates

The new templates add a 3-D semi-circle that wraps around or even overshadows the prize wheel. The Virtual Prize Wheel examples shown feature either a metallic or wood look. Also, there is a pointer layered over the rotating wheel that better mimics a physical prize wheel. The center of the wheel can also be customized with a graphic object that can layer above the wheel slices.

Below you can see two client examples and two templates, including one huge prize wheel drawing held on stage at a sales meeting for the contest finalists.

How to make a prize wheel

How to make a prize wheel

How to make a prize wheel

How to make a prize wheel

While these new 3-D templates expand the visual potential of how you can represent your brand on our Virtual Prize Wheel game, here are many other design choices to inspire you:

Full-frame photos on Virtual Prize Wheel

These three examples are some of the most dramatic designs. They feature a full-frame lifestyle photo background that showcases the exhibitors’ offerings. If you go this bold route, consider having exhibit graphics that promote your game.

How to make a prize wheel

How to make a prize wheel

How to make a prize wheel

“Spin To Win” text on Virtual Prize Wheel

Some exhibitors put “Spin To Win” in big bold letters on their prize wheel, to make it perfectly clear to passing attendees what’s going on in their booth. Here are three representative Virtual Prize Wheel examples. Some exhibitors will put the “Spin To Win” or “Play To Win” on their exhibit graphics instead – check out the last example in the Vertical Virtual Prize Wheels below.

How to make a prize wheel

How to make a prize wheel

Graphic texture background on Virtual Prize Wheel

Some exhibitors keep their Virtual Prize Wheel nice and simple, for flexibility in using it at multiple events throughout the year, or because they are relying more on their booth graphics.

How to make a prize wheel

How to make a prize wheel

Combined design elements on Virtual Prize Wheel

These exhibitors combined multiple design elements, such as full-frame background photos, headline text, product or other photos, plus company or event logos.

How to make a prize wheel

How to make a prize wheel

How to make a prize wheel

How to make a prize wheel

Vertical Virtual Prize Wheel examples

Depending on how you design your exhibit structure, a vertically-oriented TV monitor may work better, as for these 5 examples. Many of these examples combine multiple design elements, including photo backgrounds, headlines, logos, and even social media hashtags.

How to make a prize wheel

How to make a prize wheel

Kiosk-mode Virtual Prize Wheel for iPads and other tablet computers

All the previous examples were for Virtual Prize Wheels on big, flat screen TV monitors. Our Virtual Prize Wheel can also be put on one or more iPads in your booth. This is especially true for exhibitors who want to capture lead data with their game players, or know who won what prizes. These two examples show the splash screen promoting the game, before attendees self-enter their data and then spin the wheel.

How to make a prize wheel

Our Virtual Prize Wheel game gives you an enticing digital activity to get more people into your booth. You can customize it in many ways to match and promote your brand. I hope you’ve been inspired to start designing yours.

If you’d like to see more about how you can drive more booth traffic, keep attendees engaged longer, and capture leads with our fun interactive trade show games, feel free to contact us with questions or to discuss your event with one of SocialPoint’s Digital Strategists. We’ll help you generate a serious increase in excitement, crowds, and leads.

Today’s DIY project is fairly simple, but it sure does bring a lot of fun games, endless laughs and makes some pretty awesome memories for all your family. It’s DIY Wheel Of Fortune from cardboard.

How to make a prize wheel

Wheel of Fortune From Cardboard

  • Cardboard
  • Paint, brushes and black marker
  • 2 plastic bottle caps
  • Hot glue
  • Scotch tape
  • Scissors
  • Hammer and nails

1. One of the most important steps is cut out your cardboard circle. You may need two of them depending on the thickness of your cardboard. (We had to cut 2 circles and glue them together). Then divide the circle in triangles to have as many slots as you want. We made some thick slots and some slimmer ones.

How to make a prize wheel

2. Color the slots. This is a fun job for the kids. Map out the colors and design your wheel of fortune.

How to make a prize wheel

3. After the paint dries, write the activities (in our case) on each slot using marker (for example these 25 dare ideas).

How to make a prize wheel

4. Find the center of the circle. This is really important for the balance. Once you find the very center – pock the hole through your cardboard circle wheel with the nail. Then, poke a hole through the plastic bottle cap. Hammer the nail (with the cardboard wheel and bottle cap on it) to the wall. You can glue on another bottle cap on top of the nail for the looks.

How to make a prize wheel

Now it’s time for fun! Take a look at what we did with it with it. It’s hilarious!

How to Play the Life of Luxury Slot Game Online

A prize wheel is a game of chance with many winners. When participants spin the wheel, the section they land on dictates their winnings. Everyone loves a prize, and a prize wheel is a great way to elicit participation and excitement from your party guests, potential clients or customers. And the game is as easy to run as it is to play. Simply keep the rules clear and the prizes coming, and it’s sure to be a hit at your next event.

Determine the price that you will charge participants to spin the prize wheel. This cost can be determined by the profits you are looking for, the cost of prizes, the cost of the wheel (or rental) and projected participation. Or, for promotional events, you might only charge a nominal fee or allow participants to play for free or in exchange for contact or other information.

Advertise the prize wheel at least one month before you run the game. Let potential participants know how much it will cost to spin the wheel (if anything) and the types of prizes available.

Limit the number of tickets that you give away/sell to the number of prizes that you have available. If participants can play for free, announce any limits on the amount of times a single participant can play.

Describe the available prizes to the participants and audience members.

Allow each participant to spin the wheel. Consider asking them their name, where they are from or what brought them to the event (or any other banter) to make the contest more entertaining.

Announce the participant’s prize to the participant and the spectators.

Distribute the prize.

If, for any reason, you run out of a certain prize, remove it from the prize wheel. If participants land on this empty space, allow them to spin again.

The spinning prize wheel is one of the best games and it is very fun and entertainment. The wheel consists of the different pie- pieces sectioned off. Now, the rest of stood vertically for carnivals and you make sure about woodworking skills with the right materials. It at any point the contestant in control picked a letter that was not in the puzzle, picked a letter that was already called, picked a vowel instead of a consonant after spinning, solved the puzzle incorrectly or if he or she hit to lose a turn. you want to search the best creators in spinning wheel professionals at https://pickerwheel.com/ here. , the player in control loses all his or her money and turns and gives up prizes.

Creating The Wheel:

First of all, you need to complete the projects is supplies. You make sure about the squad sheet of plywood is 5- foot- long wooden 2X4, lag bolt, 2-6 washers. You can fit over the lag bot, dowel roads, scrap pieces of rubber tubing, sand and paint. In these tools, you need to measuring tape, pencil, paintbrush, drill and white glue. This project starts with a cut square piece of plywood that 2-4 feet wide/ long. Then, the width depending upon the spinning wheel you would like to make. There is possible to make 2- foot diameter that plywood due to use 2 feet wide. Now, the purchased your board, set the tablet or floor on trace on 2 or 4 circle surface. Moreover, use pencil tied to string with free from end board’s center for best results

Make Wheel:

Use the cut circle and sand edges after done to eliminate any splinters or sharp edges. you can find out the center of your circle as well as drill a hole through the center. typically, the wheel spins after finished the basic wheel manufacturing and you can add some details. However, the section up board into 12 equal shaped pieces due to any number of pieces that correlate to the prizes or games that use the wheel. Then, the wheel is divided into each piece of the different colors as it flourishes you would pieces.

Creating The Stand:

The paint on the wheel to dry cut 12, 6 inches long pieces and one 3- inches piece off dowel rod and the paint of any color. You will perfect measure on your2x4 flat onto your table or workbench about down 4 inches from the top. Next, you make your marketing wheel is dry lace the round bored on top of 2×4. Most importantly, you make drilled the hole for lag bol and resting directly with over the board. It is the right option for this project and centered wit mark on 2x 4 and a hole in the center of the wheel. It also assumed that drill hole than your lag bolt-on 2×4 piece of wood. There are screws the lag bolt through the some gives that wheel still able to spin is comfortable.