How to make cloth fireproof

When choosing the right insulation material, the various properties of that material and how well they fit with your home’s needs becomes very important. You naturally want to make sure that the insulation will be effective enough to contribute to the overall energy efficiency of your home, but there are other characteristics that might not get as much attention that are equally important. As insulation’s whole purpose is to blanket your house to provide a barrier against heat transfer, selecting insulation that is also fireproof is vital. Take a look at some of the most common options for fireproof insulation in Sacramento, CA:

  • Fiberglass: Made of glass that is spun into fibers, then combined with plastic polymers, fiberglass insulation is naturally fire resistant. However, although the fiberglass itself will not burn, you will need to be careful with batts that are backed with paper or foil, as these materials can burn quickly.
  • Mineral wool:With a high melting temperature, mineral wool is an insulation material that’s a great fit for thermal applications because of its superior fire-resistant properties. In fact, whether the mineral wool is composed of recycled iron and steel byproducts, or from actual mineral rock itself, the material is naturally non-combustible.
  • Fibrous mats:Fibrous mats are one of the most common types of insulation used in the home, and are made up of a group of various minerals that as a unit are referred to as asbestos. The potential health risks of asbestos are well known, however there are very few replacement resources available at this time, and asbestos therefore continues to be one of the leading materials not only in insulation composition, but in shingling and even car parts as well. Asbestos is a very strong material with high heat and chemical resistance that doesn’t conduct electricity, which also helps to lower the fire risk for the insulation.
  • Cellulose:While cellulose insulation isn’t totally fireproof, there are flame retardants that can be added to help the material resist combustion. When treated with these fire-resistant chemicals, cellulose can withstand temperatures of up to 300 degrees before potentially catching on fire. Cellulose that is composed of foam material is even less easily combustible, as it’s able to withstand temperatures up to 400 degrees.

When it comes to finding insulation that is fireproof in Sacramento, CA, there will be several options available to you. However, you will need to make sure that whichever one you choose is a good overall fit for your home, and that’s where our team at 5 Star Performance Insulation, Inc. comes in. Having installed fireproof insulation for more than 20 years, you can count on us for help identifying the best insulation product for your home, with the fireproof characteristics needed to keep your home protected in the event of a fire emergency. For high-quality fireproof insulation that you can rely on for years to come, make sure you give us a call to schedule your consultation. We look forward to working with you soon!

A lee cloth is a great piece of equipment to keep on board your boat. During long passages or rough seas it’s often best to sleep in the center of your boat in the main cabin (or saloon). However, with the heeling of a monohull, you want to make sure that you’re snug and secure in your berth, even when you end up on the high side. This is where a lee cloth becomes your best friend. A lee cloth is a piece of fabric that acts like a safety net to keep a sailor in his or her bunk. We’re going to take a closer look at lee cloth designs and show you how to make one.

Making a lee cloth is a simple sewing project, but it does require some critical thinking when it comes to attaching it to your boat. This is going to be slightly different for everyone depending on the setup of your boat and which berth your lee cloth is for. In the video, you will see that we created a webbing strap for each upper corner of our lee cloth and attached it to the woodwork in our Islander 37 sailboat. Another common attachment method is to use line to secure the lee cloth to strap eyes or handrails above the berth.

For the fabric choice on this lee cloth, we chose to use a Phifertex ® Mesh fabric to allow for airflow. In a tight bunk, it can be nice to use a fabric that breathes well for more comfortable sleeping, but really you can use any strong fabric like Cotton Duck, soft trampoline mesh, Sunbrella or polyester bag mesh.

As an optional addition to your lee cloth you could add storage pockets to the outside to hold small electronics, glasses or other small necessities. We’ll outline a couple different pocket methods for you in the video.

In this video you will learn how to pattern, make pockets, add binding, make straps and install your lee cloth.

Video Chapters:

  • Patterning – 0:37 min.
  • Making Pockets – 1:50 min.
  • Finishing Lee Cloth – 4:51 min.
  • Making Straps – 7:50 min.
  • Installing – 10:34 min.
  • Materials List – 12:12 min.

Materials List:

  • Fabric (we used Phifertex ® Vinyl Mesh Sand #416)
  • V-92 Polyester Thread
  • Sunbrella ® 2″ Facing (we used Linen #102471)
  • #2 spur grommets #26316
  • 1″ polypropylene webbing
  • 1″ Stainless Steel Fast Eye Snap Hook #100532
  • 1″ Side Release Buckle #3711
  • Stainless Steel Strap Eye #28221
  • Polyurethane Foam with Fabric Backing 1/2″ #105431 (optional for padded pocket)
  • Sunbrella ® Acrylic 1″ Bias Binding (optional for pocket trim)

Have you made a lee cloth before? Do you have any tips on attachment methods or design? Share them in our comments!

Sometimes referred to as fireproof fabric, fire resistant, flame retardant fabric or flame resistant fabric, our fire retardant fabrics include Industrial 18oz Vinyl, Sunforger Army Duck, and Duvetyne—see these products below.

Adding Fire Retardant to Fabrics

Virtually all of the canvas and fabric available at Big Duck Canvas can be professionally treated to achieve fire retardant specifications. Please contact us for details and pricing on this service and the different flammability standards, codes and/or certifications available.

Related: The video below shows how fabrics react to open flame:

Ok, 63 items were added to your cart. What’s next?

Your cart contains 63 items

Continue Shopping Estimate Shipping Charges

Bull Denim Preshrunk USA Fabric Rattan (Light Gold) 12oz/56″

How to make cloth fireproof

Fabric Samples

See the color, feel the hand. “Know before you sew.”

How to make cloth fireproof

USA Bull Denim

Premium, preshrunk, USA made and NEW colors! Ideal for apparel, slipcovers and more.

How to make cloth fireproof

Special Offers

Save 10% on your first order and be notified about promotions.

How to make cloth fireproof

Waxed Canvas

Long-time customer favorite, highly-discounted pricing.

How to make cloth fireproof

Slipcovers?

Our Stone Washed canvas is a very popular slipcover fabric and tremendous value.

How to make cloth fireproof

Wholesale

Special volume pricing, free samples, more for qualified accounts.

How to make cloth fireproof

Outdoor Fabric

Waterproof, lasting color fabric: pool furniture, awnings, marine use

How to make cloth fireproof

Custom Fabric Color Matching

Order the exact color fabric you need. Minimums apply. Learn more.

How to make cloth fireproof

Sewing Thread

Bonded Nylon, polyester thread for commercial and home sewing, priced right!

How to make cloth fireproof

#makers

Big Duck customers are amazing artists and makers! Customer Project Photos

How to make cloth fireproof

You can easily make a fireproof safe to protect your valuables, which can be retrieved once you’ve extinguished the fire. There are several items in the house that you might have that you can use as a fireproof safe. What you need is a little creativity. In this article, I’m going to teach you how to build a fireproof safe that is simple yet effective.

How to Build a Fireproof Safe

Take your money and other valuables, and place them in a container that is safe and re-sealable. It should hold them safe and secure from any contaminants or moisture.

Install the re-sealable bag in an unsightly container, such as a frozen food bag or casserole tin. The bag would continue to depend on the hiding place that you are using to keep the fireproof secure.

Another solution is to put your waterproof, re-sealable bag into an empty, water-filled ice container. The water inside will freeze when located in a freezer. That will dissuade you from wasting your money when you need it because the ice must first be thawed out. It’s also the least possible location a robber might attack, which offers extra security against a house fire.

Store the bag in a safe, fireproof spot. The most effective choice is a fridge or freezer since such items are the most likely to survive a house fire. A robber certainly wouldn’t know to search in those locations either. In such situations, it’s also necessary to hide your valuables in the ground, within a tin can, to act as a fireproof safe.

The Tips on How to Build a Fireproof Safe

Here are some tips on how to build a fireproof safe

Gypsum Board

The most popular technique for fireproofing safes is to use gypsum boards (drywall), which you can mount on the outside of the safe between sheets of metal. The explanation of why the gypsum board is so successful in combating fire is that it includes hydrates in the form of vaporized water or steam when subjected to adequate heat release. It implies that the safe interior pressure does not reach the critical temperature of the gas, as long as the gypsum board includes hydrates.

When a fire-resistant safe is revealed, the vapor fills inside the safe and acts both as maintaining a limited temperature. It also acts as a pressure seal against the external fire heat. The trick here is for a specified period to ensure a reasonable balance between humidity and heat.

Concrete Composite

In addition to gypsum frames, there is a range of more high-tech options to create efficient fire-resistant safes. Another increasingly common method is to use a concrete-based composite material to fill the voids in a fire-resistant safe. It provides a somewhat specific solution to the process of fireproofing, which typically focuses on covering the safe with tubing instead of venting it with gypsum. Primarily this material is built for sealing off the inside and transmitting heat gradually and preserving the safe.

Although concrete composite safes are better standard, they are typically considerably heavier and much more costly. The best thing to remember is that after being subjected to flames, you must replace fireproof safes in the gypsum board.

The Types of Fireproof Safes

Here, I will briefly discuss the different types of fireproof safe that eventually, you can learn how to build a fireproof safe on your own.

Fireboard safes

Fireboard safes have a simple degree of security from the fire, which is of high value. They are light as well and thus easy to move frequently. As the name implies, they use fire-prone board panels as their substrate for insulation. You can place these boards into the home safes’ structure spaces during the final assembly phase.

Reinforced Fireboard Safes

Reinforced fireboard safes are made, but could have an extra thick exterior steel layer to provide higher standards of anti-theft security. It renders the safe stronger. That can also imply that the safe has much less protection against burning because thicker steel can quickly generate heat from the outside to the inside.

Composite safes

Composite safes contain thin steel walls and a specific cement-like material prone to fire. A polymer that is poured into the storage container makes these types of safes durable. The safe’s structure continues to differ from manufacturer to manufacturer and can contain mixtures of gypsum, or some other fire-resistant materials.

Where to Install a Fireproof Safe

With a residential property, there is no foolproof place suggested. We may also have some suggestions for safer areas to mount a safe to secure valuables from the burglar, fire, and flooding.

Find someplace, which is in low activity or hard to locate a section of the house. We suggest putting it in a dressing room or bedroom closet. The safe will be in the wall and protected with a door that compacts or cabinetry may be installed around it to suit the room.

Fire presents the second major hazard to your house. The safest place to set up a safe must be at the corner where two exterior walls meet. It gives a heavy safe the most security and helps to prevent fire exposure. It’s best to keep the home safe at the lower floor in a house with multiple levels. Whether your house or condo is fitted with an emergency device, it is wise to install it inside the sprinkler radius. Find out more about Fireproof Safes.

Conclusion

Essential items and fixtures at home can be damaged in a fire. Documents and passports will be difficult to reprocess for you to recover. Objects with sentimental value such as pictures and souvenirs can get lost. What makes things harder is the idea that most of these objects are highly valuable and irreplaceable. That’s why it pays dividends to know how to build a fireproof safe.

A lee cloth is a great piece of equipment to keep on board your boat. During long passages or rough seas it’s often best to sleep in the center of your boat in the main cabin (or saloon). However, with the heeling of a monohull, you want to make sure that you’re snug and secure in your berth, even when you end up on the high side. This is where a lee cloth becomes your best friend. A lee cloth is a piece of fabric that acts like a safety net to keep a sailor in his or her bunk. We’re going to take a closer look at lee cloth designs and show you how to make one.

Making a lee cloth is a simple sewing project, but it does require some critical thinking when it comes to attaching it to your boat. This is going to be slightly different for everyone depending on the setup of your boat and which berth your lee cloth is for. In the video, you will see that we created a webbing strap for each upper corner of our lee cloth and attached it to the woodwork in our Islander 37 sailboat. Another common attachment method is to use line to secure the lee cloth to strap eyes or handrails above the berth.

For the fabric choice on this lee cloth, we chose to use a Phifertex ® Mesh fabric to allow for airflow. In a tight bunk, it can be nice to use a fabric that breathes well for more comfortable sleeping, but really you can use any strong fabric like Cotton Duck, soft trampoline mesh, Sunbrella or polyester bag mesh.

As an optional addition to your lee cloth you could add storage pockets to the outside to hold small electronics, glasses or other small necessities. We’ll outline a couple different pocket methods for you in the video.

In this video you will learn how to pattern, make pockets, add binding, make straps and install your lee cloth.

Video Chapters:

  • Patterning – 0:37 min.
  • Making Pockets – 1:50 min.
  • Finishing Lee Cloth – 4:51 min.
  • Making Straps – 7:50 min.
  • Installing – 10:34 min.
  • Materials List – 12:12 min.

Materials List:

  • Fabric (we used Phifertex ® Vinyl Mesh Sand #416)
  • V-92 Polyester Thread
  • Sunbrella ® 2″ Facing (we used Linen #102471)
  • #2 spur grommets #26316
  • 1″ polypropylene webbing
  • 1″ Stainless Steel Fast Eye Snap Hook #100532
  • 1″ Side Release Buckle #3711
  • Stainless Steel Strap Eye #28221
  • Polyurethane Foam with Fabric Backing 1/2″ #105431 (optional for padded pocket)
  • Sunbrella ® Acrylic 1″ Bias Binding (optional for pocket trim)

Have you made a lee cloth before? Do you have any tips on attachment methods or design? Share them in our comments!

  1. What Are Fire Resistant Clothes Made Of?
  2. The Advantages of Wool Clothing
  3. Nomex Vs. Indura Cotton
  4. Natural Vs. Synthetic Clothing
  5. The Disadvantages of Polyester Cotton

How to make cloth fireproof

Hemera Technologies/AbleStock.com/Getty Images

Although no fabric is fireproof, certain textiles resist fire better than other fabrics. Fire-resistant fabric, also known as flame-retardant fabric, is so designated based on the time it takes for the fabric to burn. Fire-resistant fabric may be naturally fire resistant because of its natural fiber weave, or treated with a fire-resistant chemical to resist heat and flames.

How to make cloth fireproof

Wool is generally considered the most flame-resistant natural fiber, because it is difficult to ignite, and flames are often extinguished in the fibers. Natural fibers, such as silk, cotton and wool, are more susceptible to fire than manufactured fibers, but cloth manufacturing techniques can improve their fire resistance. Natural fibers can be treated with a chemical solution that improves flame resistance. When a material made of natural fibers is constructed with a tight weave, the material provides improved flame resistance.

Acrylic, Polyester and Nylon

Synthetic acrylic, polyester and nylon fabrics can be hazardous when they burn, because the materials can melt and cause burns on the skin when used as clothing fabrics. Despite this danger, these synthetic fabrics are considered fire-resistant fabrics, because they resist ignition at much higher temperatures than natural fibers. Synthetic materials can also be treated with fire-resistant chemicals to increase their ability to withstand high temperatures.

Kevlar and Nomex

How to make cloth fireproof

Strong, heat-resistant aramid fibers are used in the brand-name fabrics Kevlar and Nomex. The fabrics are well known for their uses in body armor and bulletproof vests worn by members of law enforcement. Kevlar and similarly manufactured fabrics are inherently fire resistant, more than any other type of fabric, and they are often used to make heat-resistant gloves for welders and glass blowers and protective clothing for firefighters.

How to make cloth fireproof

Catching a spark and blowing it into a flame is a skill that can save your life. But you need a material to catch that spark. Here’s how to make it!

How to make cloth fireproof

Put the pieces of 100 percent cotton cloth in a tin with a hole in the top for ventilation, then heat it until the smoke comes out and ignites. (Pantenburg photos)

by Leon Pantenburg

Charcloth is a material that has been “cooked” like charcoal is at high temperatures until it becomes black. Properly-made charcloth will easily catch a spark and grow into an ember. This ember can be transferred to a tinder bundle and blown into a flame.

Once you discover how easy it is to make charcloth, you’ll never have an excuse for running out, or not having some in your survival kit. Here’s the items you need, and what you need to do:

Materials:
A regular-sized Altoids or other brand of mint tin, with a small hole punched in the top. The photos show a larger tin can for increased production.
Blue denim from old Wranglers or Levi 501s or work jeans works very well as the material to be charred. Other 100 percent cotton items and some organic materials can also be used. Another favorite material is 100 percent cotton insulated underwear. We favor denim because there is never a shortage of old jeans in any group of growing boys!

Also, if you ever need to make charcloth in an emergency, chances are somebody will be wearing jeans! And don’t forget that a 100% cotton bandanna can provide lots of charring material. (But test every batch before including it in a survival kit – you never know when some charcloth might not work!)

A source of heat – campfire coals work well, and so does a backpacking or camp stove. You can use a barbecue grill or propane heater in your backyard. Charring is a smoky process, so make sure you go outdoors.

Once these items are assembled, tear up the denim and pack it loosely (so the contents have some spring to them) to the top of the can.
How to make cloth fireproof

Place the can on the heat source and cook.

Actual cooking time will vary, depending on heat intensity, outdoor temperature etc. The heat should be high enough that the can starts to smoke through the hole in the top.

At some point, in about five to ten minutes, the smoke should ignite. Then adjust the heat, if possible, so the flame stays about two-to-four inches high. When the flame dies down, and the smoke lessens, take the can from

Finished charcloth should be completely black, but flexible and not brittle.

How to make cloth fireproof

Most of us these days use plastic tarps for keeping things dry, but we forget that once upon a time, folks had to make their own waterproof materials… and you can too, even if you are living off the grid or just trying to live like the old-timers. In this video, Jon Townsend talks about how folks used oilcloth in the 1700s: As tent/tarps and ground cloths for camping, waterproof gear bags, water-resistant clothing, covering their costly hats in the rain, and for other water-shedding purposes… and then he gets right into showing you how to make oil cloth yourself.

Instead of boiling linseed oil with toxic lead oxide as the old-timers used to do, he starts with pre-boiled linseed oil. He adds some paint thinner to act as a drying agent, plus some iron oxide (rust). Mix those together, and then it’s time to get busy!

Get busy doing what? Well, painting that stuff onto a stretched linen cloth, in order to saturate its fibers and fill all of those little square holes that are part of its structure.

During the course of the video, he shows some oilcloth that he made a few years earlier, which is in bad shape. Seemingly, the cloth itself has been destroyed by acids and all that remains is a weak coating of the oil paint that gives oil cloth its name. But he also talks about another one he made, which has lasted pretty well.

He also tosses in some CYA info, in which he warns folks that this stuff is flammable, and maybe they don’t want to burn themselves to a crisp.

In the comments, he notes that a little more than a week later, the oil cloth was fully dry and ready to use. Pretty cool.