How to make egg salad

If you must know.

Although we love the flavor of thick, creamy egg salad (made with full-fat mayonnaise) just like Grandma’s recipe, there are some occasions where you may need to make a few swaps. One serving of egg salad can run you anywhere from 200-300 calories, and swapping in low-fat mayo can save you 50-100. If you’re looking for a lighter version of this classic Southern dish or, you’re one of the rare Southerners who can’t stand mayonnaise – you don’t necessarily have to compromise on a flavorful, silky texture. Here are five substitutes that will yield a tasty, mayo-free egg salad for your next sandwich.

With Yogurt

Most health food bloggers tend to turn to Greek yogurt as their first swap for mayonnaise or sour cream, with good reason. Greek yogurt has a ton of benefits; healthy fats replace oily ones and protein fills you up longer. However, unlike mayo, greek yogurt has a tang that will affect the taste of your egg salad. If you aren’t up for making the full 1-1 swap, try using half mayonnaise and half Greek yogurt in your egg salad. If you do want to use the full amount of Greek yogurt, season it with a bit of salt and pepper, and add a little more mustard to your egg salad. Add the Greek yogurt bit by bit so that you can moderate the taste as you go. On the food safety side, make sure that you have a cooler ready when picking a dairy alternative if you’re taking your salad to go.

With Ricotta Cheese

Never thought about adding ricotta to egg salad? This fluffy cheese might be your new favorite ingredient. Ricotta cheese is made from the leftover whey of other cheeses, so it’s a little softer than most. While it may not be thick enough to be a full 1-1 swap for mayo in your recipe, you could use half mayonnaise and half ricotta – or half Greek yogurt and half ricotta – along with a few seasonings to give your egg salad some pizzazz. If you want to lower the fat further, some home cooks opt for cottage cheese, instead – it has less calories than ricotta and yields a similar result. Again, make sure to add the cheese in spoonfuls, so that you don’t accidentally skip over your desired texture.

With Avocado

While avocado is not this Southerner’s swap of choice, there are a handful of folks who swear by the recipe. Avocados are full of healthy fats, so you get the creamy factor in your egg salad without the oil of mayonnaise. Yes, it’ll turn your egg salad green, but if you have a table of adventurous eaters, avocado and fresh herbs is an elegant way to dress up your tea sandwiches. Add in a whole mashed avocado for every 6-or-so boiled eggs, and throw in a little Dijon mustard, fresh chives or dill, and cracked black pepper for depth. If your egg salad needs a little more liquid, try a squeeze of lemon juice or a drizzle of olive oil.

You may also be interested in this Buttermilk-Herb Egg Salad Sandwich:

With Hummus

Who would’ve thought? If you’re a lover of hummus, you’ll be thrilled with this simple swap for mayonnaise. Hummus is typically made with ground chickpeas, tahini (ground sesame paste), lemon juice, olive oil, and garlic. It’s a thicker binding agent that will keep your egg salad hearty and spreadable, and it’s incredibly flavorful. If the hummus by itself is too thick or dry for your taste, add an extra teaspoon of tahini or a drizzle of olive oil to balance out the texture. This is a great egg salad for dipping; try red peppers, your favorite crackers, carrots, celery, or baguette slices.

With Vinaigrette

If you’re really looking to turn the tables on egg salad, Martha Stewart has a twist for you – take out that binding agent altogether and replace it with your favorite vinagrette. You can make your own, of course, with oils like avocado, walnut, or hazelnut (milder flavors), then cut the oil with an acidity like red wine vinegar or lemon juice. Add in your seasonings, some garlic, and some fresh herbs to make your egg salad flavorful, and whisk in some mustard. With this version, your egg salad won’t stick together well – so use it if you’re planning on topping a leafy salad or making crostini.

Learn how to make a classic egg salad sandwich

How to make egg salad

If you’ve got a limited number of ingredients in your fridge and you need a healthy lunch idea ASAP, our best egg salad sandwich recipe is here to banish those midday hunger pangs. Loaded with a creamy combo of Greek yogurt and hard boiled eggs, this egg salad recipe stands out with fresh lemon, onion, capers, and dill. Piled on top of pumpernickel bread, it’s a fast and filling pantry recipe you’ll be making on repeat.

How do you make egg salad from scratch?

The key to making great egg salad is to make the dressing first, then fold in the eggs (rather than add dressing ingredients on top of the eggs). This ensures that your dressing is properly mixed and the eggs don’t get too smashed as you stir. Here’s how it’s done:

-Whisk together the yogurt, lemon zest and juice, plus salt and pepper.

-Add hard-boiled eggs and gently mix. Don’t overwork it here, chunkier bits of egg add great texture.

-Fold in the onion, capers, and dill.

-Pile egg salad onto toast and sprinkle with additional dill and cracked pepper. Enjoy!

How long do I boil eggs for egg salad?

To cook eggs for egg salad, gently lower them into boiling water and cook for 10 minutes. Transfer them to ice water to stop cooking. Peel and chop them if you’re using them right away, or refrigerate them in their shells for up to a week.

What are some substitutes for egg salad ingredients?

-Mayonnaise: The Greek yogurt in this recipe keeps it on the lighter side, but you can absolutely use mayo instead. The result will be a little bit richer, but equally as delicious!

-Red or white wine vinegar: We love the flavor of fresh citrus in this recipe, but you can use red or white wine vinegar instead. Start with 2 teaspoons of vinegar and work up from there if you’d like it a little punchier.

-Diced pickle, cornichon, or green olives: If you don’t love capers, you can leave them out of this recipe and swap them for another briny ingredient like pickles or olives. Pickles will bring a bit more acidity so you might want to reduce the amount of lemon, and olives will add a little more salt.

-Fresh herbs: This recipe calls for dill, but you can substitute (or add!) any other tender herbs like basil, tarragon, parsley, or chives. Dried herbs won’t work here.

How long does egg salad last?

Kept in a food storage container in the refrigerator, egg salad can last three to four days (according to the USDA). As always, if it looks or smells bad, toss it!

How to make egg salad

Egg salad is something that many people enjoy having for lunch and it’s definitely a favorite summer food for picnics as well.

If you really like egg salad, then you might want to start making it as often as you can. Some people have issues when making egg salad and they wind up making little mistakes, though.

One of the most common mistakes with egg salad involves having it turn out too watery or thin. This can be unsatisfying and most people would not enjoy eating egg salad when it turns out like this.

What can you do when your egg salad just isn’t as thick as it needs to be? There are actually a few options available to you that can help you to turn things around.

Keep reading to learn about several ways that you can thicken egg salad to have a better experience. If you make use of the advice below, then it should be much easier to get your egg salad to turn out right each time.

1 – Simply Let Your Egg Salad Refrigerate

Did you know that simply letting your egg salad refrigerate for a while can sometimes thicken it up quite a bit?

Many people don’t realize this and they wind up worrying that their egg salad isn’t thick enough unnecessarily. You might not understand exactly why this works so well, but it often does the trick if your egg salad is just a little thin.

Essentially, refrigerating your egg salad is going to give the mayonnaise a chance to firm up. It can firm up a lot more than you might realize and you should try this out to see it for yourself.

If your egg salad is very thin and watery, then this might not work well enough to solve all of your problems, but it can work well to thicken up egg salad that is just a little bit off.

After you have refrigerated your egg salad, it’s going to be advisable to stir it up a bit before you decide to serve it. Use a spoon and make sure that you stir it thoroughly so that everything will be mixed together well and you can have a good experience while eating it.

If all goes well, then your issues might be solved without really having to do much at all.

2 – Add More Boiled Eggs to the Mixture

Another option is to go ahead and add some more boiled eggs to the mixture. If you have more eggs left that you can make use of, then this is going to be a good fix for egg salad that is very thin or runny.

Simply boil up some more eggs and then take the time to chop them up like you normally would when making egg salad. Stir these new chopped boiled eggs into the mixture that you already have and then refrigerate it for a while.

After a bit of time has passed, you can check things out to see if your egg salad is now at the desired level of thickness. If it is not, then you might need to add some more so that you can get things where you need them to be.

This is a reliable way to increase the thickness of your egg salad and make things taste as good as they should. The only time where this method will not be ideal will be when you don’t have extra eggs to use.

If you don’t wish to run out for more ingredients, then you might want to turn to other methods to see what you can do.

3 – Add More Non-Dressing Ingredients

Many people fix their egg salad issues by adding more non-dressing ingredients to the egg salad.

A common problem that can cause egg salad to be too runny is that people accidentally use too much mayonnaise or mustard when mixing things up. This could make things a bit runny if the mixture is too skewed in the favor of dressings, but this can be fixed by taking the right steps.

Do you have any ingredients that you could use to change the mixture a bit? Many people add things to egg salad such as diced celery or potatoes. You could take a bit of time to dice up celery or dice up a whole potato to add it to your egg salad mixture.

This is definitely going to thicken things up and it has the potential to add something to the flavor of your egg salad as well. If you wish to have egg salad that is tasty and just thick enough, then this can solve your problems.

You can fix things even when you went a little overboard with the mayonnaise by accident as long as you have some celery or a potato around.

Some people have even found success by using some seemingly unusual ingredients to thicken things up. For example, there are people who swear by using salted crackers to thicken up egg salad.

You can crush the crackers up and add them to the mix before stirring thoroughly to see the results for yourself, but using potatoes or celery might be the better and more traditional option in this case.

Follow the Recipe More Closely

It’s also good to think about where you went wrong and why your egg salad is runny in the first place.

Most people make the mistake of forgetting something or getting the recipe slightly wrong. For example, you might use more mayonnaise than the egg salad recipe calls for and you might not boil enough eggs by accident.

If you take the time to follow the recipe more closely, then you should be able to prevent these issues from occurring. You can check to make sure that you have the necessary ingredients before you even start making the egg salad.

This should give you enough time to gather what you need and you won’t be caught off-guard when you’re already in the middle of making something.

Lots of people try to make egg salad in a hurry and make little mistakes. If this describes what happened to you, then don’t worry too much about it. Every chef makes mistakes from time to time and it happens to even the best culinary experts.

So long as you try to slow things down in the future, it’s going to be easier to get it right. You’ll be able to take things one step at a time so that you don’t make little mistakes.

You should wind up with egg salad that is scrumptious and thick enough for everyone to enjoy without having any issues.

Serve Your Delicious Egg Salad

With your egg salad thickness issues sorted out, it’ll now be easier to get things ready for your dinner or gathering. Your egg salad will surely be a hit if you took the time to do things right.

It can be annoying when your egg salad doesn’t turn out just right the first time, but now you know that you can thicken things up by utilizing several different methods.

Just pick whichever method it is that you think is going to work best. You’ll be able to get your egg salad finished up and it’ll be thick enough to please everyone.

Egg salad is a delicious food and you’ll want to make it more often when you know that you have perfected it.

When I first heard about fried egg salad, I couldn’t grab the mayo fast enough. Could I really turn a pan of sunny-side-up eggs into this Southern lunchtime staple?

Turns out, you certainly can! Created by chefs Aki Kamozawa and H. Alexander Talbot of the brilliant blog Ideas in Food, the recipe does away with of all of the annoying aspects of making egg salad—boiling, cooling, peeling—and keeps all of the good stuff, like the creaminess of the eggs, the richness of the mayo, and the contrast of crunchy add-ins like celery. If like me, you love egg salad but hate peeling eggs (and who doesn’t?), this might become your new favorite method.

The recipe, which appeared (adapted) on Food52, calls for sliced onions and cubes of ham cooked in a skillet along with the eggs. Although that sounds tasty, I thought it leaned more toward breakfast than lunch, so I skipped this step. The frying method is as easy as it gets—just crack the eggs into a bowl, pour them into a hot nonstick pan, then cover with a lid. (I recommend using two to three eggs per person.) Cook the eggs to your desired doneness, as long as the egg whites are firm and the yolk is at least slightly set. I made my egg yolks a bit more “done” than I would have if I was frying them to eat on their own.

When the eggs are cooked, slide them into a mixing bowl and cut them into small pieces with kitchen shears right in the bowl—also ingenious! Then mix in mayo, salt and pepper, and whatever else you like in your egg salad. (For me, it’s minced celery, soft herbs, and a touch of Dijon mustard.)

If you are looking for an easy egg salad recipe, then you have come to the right place. This 4 ingredient egg salad is so good, and is perfect for picnics, poolside lunches and fancy tea sandwiches. It’s a great salad to make if you have boiled eggs left over from Easter, and even if you don’t…it literally only takes a few minutes to make! How to make egg saladHow to make egg salad

For some reason, egg salad sandwiches take me back to when I was a kid. There is just something about a big pile of egg salad served on white bread that reminds me of lunches by our neighborhood pool. Now that I’m an adult, I also enjoy egg salad on a croissant. If you are trying to cut carbs, you can totally eat egg salad on a bed of lettuce or with some sliced avocado. It’s funny…I don’t really make egg salad during the fall and winter, but I always get a craving for it right around Easter time. I guess the thought of boiling eggs for dying reminds me of it or something. Once I make the first batch of it, I seem to keep it around all summer long. It’s such a nice alternative to lunch meat sandwiches! Let me show you just how easy my egg salad is to make with only 4 ingredients…

This post may contains affiliate links, which means if you make a purchase using one of my links, I will receive a small commission.

Easy Egg Salad Recipe

How to make egg salad

Start with 8-10 chopped hard boiled eggs. I like to cook a large batch of Hard Boiled Eggs in the Instant Pot as seen HERE or you can boil them on the stove. HERE is a quick trick for Boiling and Peeling Eggs if you don’t own an Instant Pot.

How to make egg salad

I like to cheat and use my Vegetable Chopper Mandoline Slicer Dicer to chop my eggs quickly, but you can totally just use a knife 😉

How to make egg salad

Add the eggs, ¼ cup of mayonnaise and 1 teaspoon of mustard to a bowl and mix together well, making sure to mash the yolks of the eggs a bit. If you don’t like mustard, you can absolutely leave it out…I don’t think you will really notice it though, it just adds a little bit of zing to the egg salad.

Next, mix in 2 tablespoons of sweet pickle relish, and salt and pepper to taste. If you prefer dill pickle relish, you can use that instead. If you don’t have any pickle relish, just dice up a few of your favorite pickles and add them…easy, peasy!

How to make egg salad

You can serve your egg salad on your favorite bread, croissants, crackers or on lettuce! Be sure to refrigerate any left overs!

Whether you can’t eat, don’t like, or are simply out of mayo, you can still make a tasty egg salad sandwich.

Once upon a time, mayonnaise was the sole contender for binding together a batch of creamy egg salad. Today we have options—all it takes to pull together a mayo-free egg salad is thinking outside of the jar. From creamy avocados to tangy vinaigrettes, there are quite a few options for mayonnaise-free egg salad recipes that are sure to please.

Mayo Alternatives

Without a dressing of some sort, chopped eggs are dry, crumbly bits—the creaminess derived from a binder, such as mayonnaise, transforms them into the soft, palatable salad that’s the highlight of many a classic sandwich. Try other creamy condiments such as ricotta or yogurt or both together—use Greek-style yogurt for a richer texture and less tangy hit of flavor. You could also substitute cottage cheese or hummus. The latter is a good option if you want a non-dairy binder. These alternatives will do the trick when it comes to keeping the salad together, and each imparts its own flavorful twist without overwhelming the eggy taste.

Mashed avocados are another ideal choice, as they have the same quiet appeal of eggs and play nicely with the smoothness of the yolks and the chunkiness of the egg whites. An olive tapenade or chimichurri would also do the trick, keeping the eggs together while also providing a radically different, delicious twist—thin either out with olive oil so they add flavor without overwhelming the egg salad and losing the essential egginess.

If you are looking for an easy egg salad recipe, then you have come to the right place. This 4 ingredient egg salad is so good, and is perfect for picnics, poolside lunches and fancy tea sandwiches. It’s a great salad to make if you have boiled eggs left over from Easter, and even if you don’t…it literally only takes a few minutes to make! How to make egg saladHow to make egg salad

For some reason, egg salad sandwiches take me back to when I was a kid. There is just something about a big pile of egg salad served on white bread that reminds me of lunches by our neighborhood pool. Now that I’m an adult, I also enjoy egg salad on a croissant. If you are trying to cut carbs, you can totally eat egg salad on a bed of lettuce or with some sliced avocado. It’s funny…I don’t really make egg salad during the fall and winter, but I always get a craving for it right around Easter time. I guess the thought of boiling eggs for dying reminds me of it or something. Once I make the first batch of it, I seem to keep it around all summer long. It’s such a nice alternative to lunch meat sandwiches! Let me show you just how easy my egg salad is to make with only 4 ingredients…

This post may contains affiliate links, which means if you make a purchase using one of my links, I will receive a small commission.

Easy Egg Salad Recipe

How to make egg salad

Start with 8-10 chopped hard boiled eggs. I like to cook a large batch of Hard Boiled Eggs in the Instant Pot as seen HERE or you can boil them on the stove. HERE is a quick trick for Boiling and Peeling Eggs if you don’t own an Instant Pot.

How to make egg salad

I like to cheat and use my Vegetable Chopper Mandoline Slicer Dicer to chop my eggs quickly, but you can totally just use a knife 😉

How to make egg salad

Add the eggs, ¼ cup of mayonnaise and 1 teaspoon of mustard to a bowl and mix together well, making sure to mash the yolks of the eggs a bit. If you don’t like mustard, you can absolutely leave it out…I don’t think you will really notice it though, it just adds a little bit of zing to the egg salad.

Next, mix in 2 tablespoons of sweet pickle relish, and salt and pepper to taste. If you prefer dill pickle relish, you can use that instead. If you don’t have any pickle relish, just dice up a few of your favorite pickles and add them…easy, peasy!

How to make egg salad

You can serve your egg salad on your favorite bread, croissants, crackers or on lettuce! Be sure to refrigerate any left overs!

How to make egg salad

This has to be a joke, right? I mean egg salad for Pete’s sake! First of all, who actually eats egg salad past about eight years old? And second, who needs a step-by-step recipe guide to make it?

As to the first question, I eat egg salad. It’s like deviled eggs, on bread. And I like me some deviled eggs.

So who needs directions for it? Anyone who’s never made it. No matter how easy something is, until you’ve seen it for the first time you don’t know that it’s easy.

More important is that this is what this blog is about, and it’s why I wrote the book. I’ve gotten so many comments from people saying, “I haven’t had that for years. I’m going to go make some.” It’s like we’re all trying so hard to make the foods we should like, foods that look impressive and sound intimidating, that we sometimes forget that the simple things are good, too.

I spent several minutes in the grill accessories aisle yesterday looking at various racks to grill delicate foods in. I’ve already got a grill pan that works great for vegetables, but I thought a removable rack would make it easier to do fish. And with the luck I have with seafood, I need all the help I can get.

Then I realized: I like steak and pork on the grill. No, I loooooove steak and pork on the grill. And I’m pretty good at it. There I was, standing there looking at buying some more stuff, stuff that there’s no room for in my kitchen as it is, to try grilling some fish … which I don’t even like all that much.

Sure, I like shrimp and scallops, but grilled salmon? Grilled whitefish? Eh, they’re okay. But if you told me I’d never have them again I wouldn’t cry. So why was I looking at those racks? Because I thought I should like grilled fish. Everyone else seems to. And it’s hard to get right, so people are impressed when you do it well. I like impressing people, don’t you?

People used to eat food they liked, not food that was impressive or that happened to be fashionable. And an egg salad sandwich is about as unfashionable as you can get. That’s why I did it for my 100th post.

Ingredients

How to make egg saladhard boiled eggs, two per person
mayonnaise
mustard

Directions

I’ve tried all the tips for peeling hard boiled eggs, but I always have some that come out ugly. So when I make deviled eggs, I boil a bunch of extras. Sometimes they don’t peel well, sometimes the yolk is too close to the edge, like this one.

How to make egg salad

They taste fine, but they’re not going to look good. So, egg salad time. Start by dicing all the eggs.

How to make egg salad

For eight eggs, like I did here, add about three tablespoons of mayonnaise (home made if you can) and one tablespoon of mustard. I like spicy brown, but will take Dijon or plain yellow in a pinch.

How to make egg salad

Mix it all together, and check if it’s tangy enough. If I’m making it for just me, I’ll go about half-and-half on the mustard and mayo.

How to make egg salad

The dainty way to serve this is to put a scoop of it on a lettuce leaf. Iceberg, of course.

How to make egg salad

Or my way, on some sourdough bread with the lettuce leaf. And a slice of white American cheese, if you’ve got it.

How to make egg salad

Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m going to go throw a steak on the grill to celebrate my milestone.

PS: No, I didn’t buy the rack for the fish.