How to make horse treats

How to make horse treatsThis Homemade Horse Treat Recipe is simple, affordable, and kid-safe!

When I was a teenager, I tried my best to convince my parents that I needed a horse. They didn’t realize at the time how serious I was about entering the world of agriculture so they made me a half-hearted deal. They said that if I would fence an area and build a shelter for a horse that they were game for purchasing an equine companion for me.

It was the dead of winter so they had serious doubts that I would follow through, but my will broke through the ice in the ground and the fence & shelter became a reality. Long story short, I purchased my first horse, named him Oreo, and continued to grow my love for animals every year since.

Now I have 4 kiddos who have developed a deep bond with their pony, Ginger. Ginger came from a wonderful family on the other side of the state. My husband knew this family from the barn where he rode when he was younger.

They were looking to re-home this sweet girl because their children had outgrown her. The mother knew that we had children and were in the market for a horse so she gave her to us! We were so thankful for her generosity!

We purchased our second horse, a Tennessee Walking Horse/Percheron cross named Pearl, after my husband got jealous of the kids’ pony and we bought one more horse, Bailey, shortly after. Ginger, Pearl, and Bailey have outgoing and lovable personalities, they enjoy long walks by the pond, and they both have a major sweet tooth ;). They absolutely LOVE it when we bring treats down for them so I decided to make some homemade horse treats instead of just purchasing them from the store.

Simple Homemade Horse Treats

The kids and I made these homemade horse treats together in about 20 minutes total. It was extremely simple and the recipe only required 5 ingredients–> That’s my kind of recipe! Try them out for yourself and be sure to let me know what you (and your horses) think about them!

Homemade Horse Treats Ingredients:

  • 3 cups Oats (I used Quick Oats)
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 2 chopped or grated carrots
  • 1/4 cup Molasses
  • 1 cup applesauce

Homemade Horse Treats Directions:

  1. Preheat your oven to 350 F.
  2. Grease or line a baking sheet to keep the treats from sticking.
  3. Mix the oats and the flour together in a large bowl until they are combined well.
  4. Finely chop or grate the carrots. My food processor is broken, so my carrots aren’t as fine as I would like.
  5. Now you can stir in the applesauce and molasses. Mix well.
  6. Roll the treat mixture into balls (whatever size you want to give to your horses).
  7. Place the uncooked treats onto the greased or lined baking pan and bake at 350 F for 15 minutes.
  8. Let your ponies eat up!

How to make horse treats

Simply let these treats cool off and then store them in a gallon Ziploc Bag in your fridge or freezer. They keep for 1-2 weeks in the fridge and even longer in the freezer. We feed these homemade horse treats to our goats, dogs, and even our kiddos…Everyone loves them!

You could even add treat making to your kids’ chore list! It is a fun activity and they can give them directly to the animals themselves!

You can switch up the ingredients a little bit if you want…add in some finely chopped apples, ground cinnamon, crushed peppermint, etc…just BE SURE that whatever you add is safe for horses.

How to make horse treatsThis Homemade Horse Treat Recipe is simple, affordable, and kid-safe!

When I was a teenager, I tried my best to convince my parents that I needed a horse. They didn’t realize at the time how serious I was about entering the world of agriculture so they made me a half-hearted deal. They said that if I would fence an area and build a shelter for a horse that they were game for purchasing an equine companion for me.

It was the dead of winter so they had serious doubts that I would follow through, but my will broke through the ice in the ground and the fence & shelter became a reality. Long story short, I purchased my first horse, named him Oreo, and continued to grow my love for animals every year since.

Now I have 4 kiddos who have developed a deep bond with their pony, Ginger. Ginger came from a wonderful family on the other side of the state. My husband knew this family from the barn where he rode when he was younger.

They were looking to re-home this sweet girl because their children had outgrown her. The mother knew that we had children and were in the market for a horse so she gave her to us! We were so thankful for her generosity!

We purchased our second horse, a Tennessee Walking Horse/Percheron cross named Pearl, after my husband got jealous of the kids’ pony and we bought one more horse, Bailey, shortly after. Ginger, Pearl, and Bailey have outgoing and lovable personalities, they enjoy long walks by the pond, and they both have a major sweet tooth ;). They absolutely LOVE it when we bring treats down for them so I decided to make some homemade horse treats instead of just purchasing them from the store.

Simple Homemade Horse Treats

The kids and I made these homemade horse treats together in about 20 minutes total. It was extremely simple and the recipe only required 5 ingredients–> That’s my kind of recipe! Try them out for yourself and be sure to let me know what you (and your horses) think about them!

Homemade Horse Treats Ingredients:

  • 3 cups Oats (I used Quick Oats)
  • 1/2 cup flour
  • 2 chopped or grated carrots
  • 1/4 cup Molasses
  • 1 cup applesauce

Homemade Horse Treats Directions:

  1. Preheat your oven to 350 F.
  2. Grease or line a baking sheet to keep the treats from sticking.
  3. Mix the oats and the flour together in a large bowl until they are combined well.
  4. Finely chop or grate the carrots. My food processor is broken, so my carrots aren’t as fine as I would like.
  5. Now you can stir in the applesauce and molasses. Mix well.
  6. Roll the treat mixture into balls (whatever size you want to give to your horses).
  7. Place the uncooked treats onto the greased or lined baking pan and bake at 350 F for 15 minutes.
  8. Let your ponies eat up!

How to make horse treats

Simply let these treats cool off and then store them in a gallon Ziploc Bag in your fridge or freezer. They keep for 1-2 weeks in the fridge and even longer in the freezer. We feed these homemade horse treats to our goats, dogs, and even our kiddos…Everyone loves them!

You could even add treat making to your kids’ chore list! It is a fun activity and they can give them directly to the animals themselves!

You can switch up the ingredients a little bit if you want…add in some finely chopped apples, ground cinnamon, crushed peppermint, etc…just BE SURE that whatever you add is safe for horses.

How to make horse treats

About a year ago, we wrote a horse treat blog post about finding the right recipe for your no-bake homemade horse treats. As one of our most popular blogs, we thought we would build upon that topic with some at-home recipes we’ve compiled that you can use to treat your four-legged friend.

Horses bond through experiences with their owner and what better way to bond with a horse than through food? By providing your horse with some homemade goodness, you can show you appreciate them and respect them – and that can go a long way for your budding relationship.

How to make horse treatsPhoto by Pixabay from Pexels

Recipes for Our Top 3 Favorite Homemade Horse Treats

While we can’t take credit for all these great recipes, we are happy to compile them all in one place for you to use when you are feeling ambitious. The following recipes aren’t difficult, so you don’t have to be a pro baker to make them, and when you see how much your horse loves them it will give you the motivation you need to try all three recipes. Just make sure you’re getting plenty of exercise in between all the snacks!

1. The Ultimate Horse Cookie Recipe

  • 1 carrot
  • 1 apple
  • 1/2 cup molasses (or honey)
  • 2 cups oats
  • 1/2-3/4 cup flour (or make oat flour by throwing some oats into a blender/food processor)
  • 1 tablespoon of vegetable oil or coconut oil
  • 1 tablespoon water (optional)
  • Preheat oven to 300-325 degrees
  • Grate the carrot and finely chop the apple
  • Mix together all of the ingredients. Please keep in mind that depending on variations such as the size/type of apple, what kind of oats you use (rolled or steel-cut oats don’t absorb as much moisture as quickly as quick oats), whether you use honey or molasses, etc. you may need to tweak the amounts of the ingredients. You should be able to squeeze a ball of dough in your hand and it shouldn’t fall apart.)
  • Roll and press into balls with your hands and place them on a greased baking sheet. If the dough is too sticky add more flour and/or water
  • Bake for about 28-32 minutes on the middle rack, checking on them often, until golden brown
  • Cool and store in a sealed container and use within a week. They’ll stay the freshest stored in the fridge

2. Earth Muffins

Ingredients:

  • 1/4 cup Bob’s Red Mill ground flax seed
  • 3/4 cup warm water
  • 1/2 cup organic sugar
  • 2 cups Bob’s Red Mill oat flour
  • 2 cups Bob’s Red Mill oatmeal
  • 1 teaspoon of sea salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 cup frozen blackberries

Directions:

  • Preheat the oven to 375°F.
  • Soak ground flaxseed in warm water for 10 minutes until it turns a gelatinous consistency.
  • In a mixing bowl, combine flax-and-water mixture with sugar.
  • Stir in oat flour, oatmeal, salt, and cinnamon until well-combined.
  • Pour batter into a greased mini-muffin pan.
  • Firmly press one berry thick side down into each muffin.
  • Bake for 18-20 minutes.

3. Homemade Oatmeal Horse Treats

  • 1 large Carrot
  • 1 large Apple
  • 1 cup Molasses
  • 2 1/2 cups Old Fashioned Oats
  • 2 Tablespoons Oil
  • Shred the carrot and the apple into a large bowl.
  • Add in the oil, oats, and molasses. Stir to combine well so that all the oats are covered in the molasses.
  • Pour the mixture into a greased 9×13 baking dish. Pat the treats down with a spoon or with your fingers so they are flattened into the pan.
  • Bake at 400 degrees for about 40 minutes or until they begin to get crispy.
  • Remove the treats from the oven and let them cool for a while. The treats will harden slightly as they cool. Once they are hardened you can score into pieces.

The best thing about making homemade horse treats is that it doesn’t have to be difficult. Most of the time, you can make delicious horse treats with the items sitting in your pantry. Ultimately, the important thing is to choose ingredients that are safe for horses and that cater to the specific taste preference of your horse. If you pay attention to what they like, you can’t go wrong with giving them treats!

If making your own homemade horse treats seems a little too challenging or time-consuming, you can always wait for your Saddlebox monthly subscription box. Each month includes delicious treats specifically designed for your horse! It’s the easiest way to show how much you care!

Published: Sep 17, 2015 · Modified: Jun 3, 2020 by ihearthorses · This post may contain affiliate links · 1 Comment

Making homemade treats for the horse in your life is not only fun, it allows you to tailor the treats to your horse’s taste – whether they are picky or on a special diet – which is something you can’t always do with store-bought choices. It also allows you make them in the size and texture you want. For example, maybe you have minis and want tiny treats, or want a soft, easy-to-eat treat for training. Here’s how you can make your own homemade horse treats:

How to make horse treats

Ingredients

To start, let’s talk about ingredients. Here are some basic “horse friendly” ingredients. Remember to go light on the sugar! Although horses love it, some have medical issues such as insulin resistance or Cushing’s that require low starch/sugar diets. So if you are unsure about an ingredient, ask your vet first.

For flours/oats:

  • Oats (rolled, whole, steel cut)
  • Whole Wheat Flour

How to make horse treats

Sugars:

  • Molasses
  • Brown Sugar
  • Sugar

How to make horse treats

Fruits and Veggies:

  • Apples
  • Bananas
  • Berries
  • Coconut
  • Watermelon
  • Pears
  • Carrots
  • Squash
  • Sweet potatoes

How to make horse treats

Other:

  • Coconut Oil
  • Apple Sauce
  • Peppermint (you can give them all natural candies but remember to check the sugar. Do NOT feed sugar free as some of those sweeteners may not be safe for your horse. Remember to ask your vet if unsure)

How to make horse treats

Foods to avoid

  • Broccoli
  • Cauliflower
  • Cabbage
  • Cherries (some say these are safe, some sources say no, to be safe, we put them on this list)
  • Chocolate
  • Maple Syrup
  • Milk
  • Tomatoes
  • Peaches (like cherries, some say peaches are safe, we are erring on the side of caution)
  • Peppers
  • Rhubarb
  • Raw potatoes
  • Raw Garlic
  • Spinach
  • Avocados

For more information on plants and foods that are toxic to equines, visit the ASPCA’s list.

Making Horse Treats

Once you have decided on the homemade horse treats you want to make, assembling them is easy. As long as you choose a type of flour and/or oats, one or two fruits/veggies, oil or apple sauce and a sugar (optional), your treats will work fine.

When measuring ingredients, you want to keep the ratio of dry and liquid ingredients roughly equal, so that you make a batter that is not too dry or too sticky. You can adjust your amounts as you experiment.

How to make horse treats

Baking

In general, set your oven for 350 degrees F. This temperatures works well for most combinations.

You can put your treats in a pan lined with parchment paper or roll into balls and set on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.

Cook time will depend on your treats, with average baking time being around 20-30 minutes. After 10 minutes, avoid burning by checking every 5 minutes. You want them firm and slightly brown.

Remove from oven and if you put them in a pan, you can cut them into squares after cooling 5-10 minutes.

Storage

Store all treats in an air-tight container for storage. Since there are no preservatives, it’s best to use them within a week (your horse won’t complain!).

How to make horse treats

Inspiration

If you need inspiration on what to bake, check out Food.com, they have quite a few horse treat recipes, include these yummy “D-Ring Delights.”

Do you have a favorite homemade horse treats recipe? Share it in the comments for your fellow horse lovers to try!

Blog for horse lovers! Riding tips, equestrian news, and musings of a hunter/jumper rider.

How to make horse treats

I look at a golf course and think, oh I’d love to ride MY HORSE on that. I hate mornings but will be up at 5am for a horse show. I’m working on a horse mystery for teens. I’m a horse addict. So naturally my blog is about all thing horses-from hunter/jumper tips to horse treat recipes. Welcome!

How to make horse treats

  • Horse blog
  • Horse Care
  • Horse grooming
  • Horse show
  • Horse treats

When is the last time you did something nice–really nice–for your four-legged partner?

Doesn’t your horse deserve something special after carrying you around and doing what you ask (most of the time!) day after day? I think it’s time to make your trusty steed some homemade horse cookies. Don’t settle for the store-bought version and pay for horse treats that are often stale and expensive.

I tried all the popular recipes I could find and quite a lot of experimenting have came up with the ultimate horse treat recipe. Let me know how your horse likes them!

How to make horse treats

How to make horse treats

How to make horse treats

The Ultimate Horse Cookie Recipe

Ingredients

1/2 cup molasses (or honey)

1/2-3/4 cup flour (or make oat flour by throwing some oats into a blender/food processor)

1 tablespoon of vegetable oil or coconut oil

1 tablespoon water (optional)

Directions

Preheat oven to 300-325 degrees

Grate the carrot and finely chop the apple

Mix together all of the ingredients. Please keep in mind that depending on variations such as: the size/type of apple, what kind of oats you use (rolled or steel-cut oats don’t absorb as much moisture as quickly as quick oats), whether you use honey or molasses, etc. you may need to tweak the amounts of the ingredients. You should be able to squeeze a ball of dough in your hand and it shouldn’t fall apart.)

Roll and press into balls with your hands and place on a greased baking sheet. If dough is too sticky add more flour and/or water

Bake for about 28-32 minutes on the middle rack, checking on them often, until golden brown

Cool and store in a sealed container and use within a week. They’ll stay the freshest stored in the fridge

How to make horse treats

Tip: Cut the batch in half for less cookies. A full batch makes about 24 cookies depending on the size you make them.

Bonus Tip: Some readers swear by blending all the ingredients together in a blender/food processor before cooking. I don’t do this but if you try this let me know if you prefer this method in the comments below!

Bonus Bonus Tip: These treats can be enjoyed by humans and dogs too!

The Good Stuff

Now here’s the fun part. Consider the above your base recipes, perfectly fine on their own but even better when you add one or more of the following:

Low sugar: Use cooked sweet potato instead of apples, and a little flaxseed and egg instead of molasses

Reader favorite: Peppermints – crushed and added to the dough or place a whole one on top (perfect for the holidays)

Add chopped up dates in the dough

A few coconut flakes on top

Sugar cubes (go easy here – too much sugar isn’t good for your horses health or figure!)

Banana can be used as a substitute for the apple

Reader favorite: Applesauce (try replacing part of the molasses with applesauce to lower the sugar, or if you can use in place of the apple)

If you think of any yummy additions I didn’t list, leave a comment below. Now, time to get baking. Your horse will thank you.

Here’s the thing about no bake horse treats: most of the treats you feed a horse are no-bake in the first place. I mean, think about it. Grain, carrots, apples, peppermints, hay . . . you don’t bake these things in the oven. They are just perfect the way they are.

When you’re trying to come up with ideas for easy no bake recipes for your horse, keep this in mind: anything that your horse already likes to eat can be put into a no-bake treat, as long as you have a ingredient to mix it all together and make it “stick.” In most cases, those “sticky” ingredients will be molasses, honey or peanut butter.

How to make horse treats

In addition, you need ingredients to make your no bake horse treats have some texture. Some of the perfect things for this include any kind of grain (sweet feed is great for treats), oats or oatmeal, shredded or chopped carrots, or crushed peppermints. The possibilities here are really endless; as long as it’s safe for horses to eat, you can really chop/shred up anything and mix it into a batch of horse treats.

Rather than post a specific horse treat recipe here, I’m going to suggest that you have fun with it and do some experimenting to see what kind of treats work best for you (and what your horse likes the most). Here are some things to keep in mind as you try to create your own unique treats:

— Start out using only a small amount of your “sticky” ingredient like molasses or honey, because your treats can quickly become “too wet” and unable to hold a shape. You want them to be able to stick together on their own in room temperature without being too stick in your hand.

— You can use baking tools like muffin pans and scoops if you want, but the best way to shape your horse treats is simply with your hands. Don’t be afraid to get messy . . . that’s what soap and water are for!

— Make sure to keep in mind the size of your horse and what size treats might be “too big” for a mouthful. It’s better to make treats a little too small rather than a little too big for your horse.

— After you’ve made your no bake treats, put them in the refrigerator for a few hours at least to help them set and harden.

— If you are going to use peppermints, there are a few different options you can try. You could crush them up and mix the crushed mints into the treats themselves, or you could press a whole peppermint into the top of the treat once you’ve finished making them.

— Don’t try to get too fancy with the shape . . . a simple ball is usually good enough!

— It’s very rare, but sometimes horses may have a peanut allergy. If you’re going to use peanut butter as your thickening agent, make sure to test a tiny bit on your horse and see how they react. (Peanut butter is usually okay, but don’t feed your horse plain peanuts.)

How to make horse treats

Easy Horse Treats Recipe

Well I have been so busy with writing and posting articles, making videos, Christmas gifts and decorating that I have been a bad horse mom, and haven’t bought treats for my poor deprived ponies! Ok, they aren’t deprived at all, but I still haven’t remembered to buy horse treats for them when I am at the feed store, or Dover’s.

How to make horse treats

And honestly, the fancy horse treats are really expensive!

So since I have been busy making people treats, I decided to gather what I had to make some horse treats too. And the great thing is you an make horse treats with common things that you probably already have in your kitchen. And you really don’t have to be too precise when it comes to measuring either. If the batter is too runny, add some more oats or flax seed, or both.

If the batter is too thick, add some more water. Easy peasy.

And to make really nice bite size treats, I like to use a mini muffin pan. It works great, and you can make 24 to 48 treats at one time. A real time saver! And with the money you will save by making your own treats, it is well worth the investment, in my opinion.

And these turned out so well, I think I am going to make another batch for my friend Lynda, for her horses for Christmas. So Lynda, if you’re reading this….Merry Christmas!

Easy Horse Treats Recipe

Ingredients

  • Ground flax seed
  • Quick oats (oatmeal)
  • Unsweetened applesauce
  • Molasses
  • Brown sugar
  • Pink Himalayan rock salt
  • Cinnamon
  • Starlight mints (optional)
  • Water

What You Will Do

Start with the dry ingredients. I started with about 2 cups of ground flax seed and added in 2 cups of quick oats. Then I added some brown sugar, and molasses. Again, I didn’t really measure any of this, I just added everything in a big bowl.

How to make horse treats

Then I added some water, and remembered I had a brand new container of unsweetened applesauce, bonus. You can use any type of applesauce you have. I just happened to have the unsweetened kind.

I added some water, and then some more flax seed, and some more oatmeal and applesauce until I had a fairly large batch of horse treat batter. Next I added in the pink salt and cinnamon. And let me tell you, it smells really good!

Once everything was mixed well, and the batter was a little sticky, I greased a mini muffin pan and filled each cup with the mixture. After filling the muffin pan, I baked the treats at 350 degrees Fahrenheit for about 45 minutes.

How to make horse treats

After I pulled them out of the oven, I pressed a starlight mint into each treat and after a few minutes pulled the warm treats out and allowed them to fully cool on a piece of parchment paper.

Some of the mints I pushed into the treats, while with another set, I placed it the way they are in the fancy minty muffins. I keep trying to make mine as dark as the minty muffins, but I haven’t figured out their recipe, yet.

When they were cooled, I filled up my horse treat container out in the barn.

Better Than Store Bought Treats

I haven’t done this in so long. But I need to do it more often. I like knowing what my horses are eating, and they seem to love the homemade treats just as much as they love the expensive store bought ones.

How to make horse treats

These treats remind me of the German Minty Muffins. You know, the ones you can find online for around $20.00 a bag. I don’t know about you, but I can find a lot of other horse stuff to buy that I can get a lot of use from rather than expensive horse treats.

So give this a try, and see what your horses think!

These no-bake horse treats make a great reward after a long ride, or as an easy way to get healthy, natural supplements into your horse’s diet.

Whether you’re dealing with a dull coat, hard keeper, senior or just want to maintain your horse’s current condition, these treats can help you get on the right track.

All of these supplements can be fed daily (you can find a sample feeding schedule in the Savvy Guide to DIY Horse Care) but if you don’t want to make a change to your horse’s feeding program right away, adding these to their treats is a great way to start.

How to make horse treats

Here are some of the key ingredients in this no-bake horse treat recipe, and the health benefits that go along with them!

Coconut Oil

Coconut oil contains medium chain triglycerides (MCT) that are easier to digest, absorb and convert to energy than the traditionally used vegetable oils. It’s been reported to assist with ulcers, acidosis, colic and dysbiosis and is particularly helpful for horses on a grain based feed.

It’s also a great way to hide less palatable supplements and medications.

Coconut Oil is energy dense and yields about 2 times more energy than starch or protein. It gives your horse a readily digestible energy, without the “hotness”.

Another bonus is that it’s naturally resistant to rancidity, and can be safely stored at room temperature for several years versus vegetable oils which may only last a few months.

Apple Cider Vinegar

Apple Cider Vinegar (ACV) works to acidify the stomach for better digestion and absorption of minerals.

This can help protect your horse against bacteria, parasites and waterborne
diseases. Research has also shown that it can slow the absorption of sugar into the bloodstream, which is helpful for those founder-prone ponies/horses that are sensitive to sugar.

An alkaline environment in the horse’s digestive tract can cause intestinal stones to grow to the point of causing dangerous obstructions. The acidifying effect of ACV helps dissolve the enteroliths, or ideally prevent them.

This is particularly useful in areas with hard water, or for horses that
consume a lot of alfalfa hay.

Both horses and humans alike have benefited from ACV to help control arthritis pain and stiffness. When fed daily, ACV works to restore pH balance and increase crucial minerals, all of which improves joint health.

Chia Seeds

Chia seeds have very high levels of Omega-3 fatty acids, even more than flax and fish oils. With an ideal 3:1 ratio of Omega-3s to Omega-6s you’ll be sure to notice a new shine on your horse’s coat and improved hoof
growth.

With natural anti-inflammatory properties, and without the side effects associated with bute and other drugs, Chia seeds are a good alternative for recovery or maintenance.

As an added bonus, it’s a permitted supplement for use in performance horses by the USEF.

If you live in a sandy area, you already know the importance of keeping the digestive track clear. The gel-like substance created when chia seeds are mixed with saliva (or any liquid) help to pass food, sand, and other debris through the guts.

Chia seeds can withstand extreme temperatures and have a shelf life of 2-5 years. This makes it convenient and easy to store, unlike many oils and supplements (with the exception of coconut oil of course!).

Read more here: Chia Seeds for Horses – Top 10 Benefits

Himalayan Salt

Himalayan salt is a rock salt, mined from the Himalayas in Pakistan, and is believed to be one of the purest salts available.

Extracted from the mines by hand, it is then hand-crushed, hand-washed, and dried in the sun. This leaves the natural minerals intact, unlike heavily
processed “table salt” which is mostly just sodium chloride.

If you’ve ever had a regular salt block sitting untouched for months, you’ll want to give Himalayan salt a try. Most horses love it, and seem to prefer it over any other option.

This can be especially useful in the summer months when your horse is sweating and needs the extra sodium, or in the winter if you want to encourage drinking.

It also contains small amounts of natural minerals and trace elements.