How to make sandals comfortable

February 19, 2020

How to make sandals comfortable

It’s not the best feeling in the world when you purchase a new pair of sandals only for them to be more uncomfortable than you ever imagined. It often seems that the most stylish ones are the most painful ones. You now feel defeated.

You’re sitting inside your home looking at your new pair of sandals that you’re not sure you can ever wear. You begin to have a stare-off with them, waiting for them to magically become more comfortable for your feet. You need to know how to make sandals more comfortable.

No matter how long you stare at them for, however, nothing’s going to change unless you become proactive. There are a few ways to make your sandals comfortable enough to wear daily, you just need to learn about them! Don’t throw those stylish sandals out quite yet.

Continue reading below for 7 awesome ways to make your sandals comfortable enough to wear them as much as you’d like to!

1. Taping the Toes

Taping your toes together might seem a bit drastic, but it comes in handy when needed. Counting from the big toe, tape the 3rd and 4th toe together. Doing so will help take the pressure off of a nerve located between these toes, making your sandals more comfortable.

When wearing sandals, you can use a medical tape with a skin-tone color that matches your skin tone. You can also consider using clear tape.

Both of these tapes will keep your taped toes discrete. Depending on the type of sandal you’re wearing, you might not even see the tape on your toes!

2. Place Gel Under Feet

Placing a gel pad right at the balls of your feet will help relieve pressure. You don’t need a gel pad the size of your entire foot. A simple circle pad that covers the ball of your feet will work well.

Depending on the type of sandals you wear, this might make your feet feel a bit tight in them. If you have flip flops on, then you won’t have to worry about this being an issue at all. In return, you’ll be able to wear your sandals much longer than when you have no support at all.

3. Use Gel Inserts

Gel inserts are not the same as gel pads placed under the balls of your feet. Gel inserts come in several different styles. You can purchase gel inserts for your toes or for your entire foot.

When wearing thong-style sandals, it’s not uncommon for your big toe and second toe to rub against the thong strap, causing irritation. A toe gel insert is a small circle that clips around the thong strap. This then provides a barrier between your toes and the strap.

It’s perfect for those with sensitive skin. Another issue you may have with sandals is the lack of control you have while wearing them. To provide comfort and stability, you can place gel inserts on the insole of your sandals.

4. Avoid Backless Sandals

If you haven’t bought a new pair of sandals yet and are in the process of buying a new pair, then do your best to avoid backless sandals. Backless sandals can come in handy when needing them for a quick trip to unload groceries out of the car or to the pool or beach. When looking for a sandal to use daily, you’ll want to avoid backless ones.

Without a back, your toes will take on most of the pressure. You’ll find yourself gripping the sandal with your toes and sliding your heel from side to side. Both of these effects of backless sandals can cause discomfort, which is why you should stick to backless sandals when possible.

5. Find Sandals With an Arch

The best sandals for walking daily are ones with solid arch support.

If you can find a sandal with an arch, then you’ve found a winner. Arch support is crucial for an every-day sandal. Finding a sandal with arch support might take you a bit more effort than usual, but it’s possible.

There are sandals out there that provide this type of support, and it’s an essential feature for keeping your feet comfortable. Wearing flat sandals not only causes problems for your feet, but it causes other health issues as well.

6. Shoe Strap Inserts

If you have a pair of sandals with a lot of straps on them, then they’re most likely super stylish. All of those straps, though, can cause blistering and irritation. Rather than giving up on your strappy sandals, consider using strap strips.

Strap strips stick to the inside of the straps of your sandals, so no one will even know they’re there. In return, they’ll prevent all of those painful possibilities of allowing your skin to rub against the straps all day long.

7. Break Them in the Right Way

When buying any pair of new shoes, you need to break them in. Sandals are no exception to this rule. Your sandals might be uncomfortable because you didn’t break them in the right way.

You can’t place your sandals on your feet for the first time and wear them all day long. Ouch! Instead, wear them for a little bit each day until they’re broken in and comfy.

You Need to Know How to Make Sandals More Comfortable!

Knowing how to make sandals more comfortable will help keep your feet happy for years to come. Any pair of sandals are uncomfortable if you don’t take the right steps to make them perform the way you need them to.

Are you in need of more helpful tips like these? Visit our website daily for more!

Leave a Reply Cancel reply

About Me

Hello all. I’m Darcy and I recently started writing on My Zeo about health and fitness (and part of that important health equation is sleep!). As we are all super busy with life, I try to integrate how to stay fit, relax and be healthy and happy through everyday life.

How to make sandals comfortable

I think I have a problem: Aside from the sneakers I wear when I hit the gym, the only shoes I’ve worn for the past four months are my patent nude Sam Edelman Gigi Flat Sandals. I can’t help it, guys. They literally go with everything and are appropriate for almost any occasion, they show off my bright summer pedis, give my feet a sweet t-strap tan line, and they don’t add any extra ( and frankly, unwanted) height to my 6’2” frame.

Any podiatrist reading this right now is shaking his or her head in disappointment. Why? Because I’m not being very nice to my feet. Seriously, my soles are covered in callouses, and my heels are beginning to blister. But what I’m now realizing is that I need to be kinder to my feet, who’ve been doing a lot of walking lately.

The good news is that it is fact possible to find sandals that won’t totally ruin your feet. Because, really, who wants to give up flip flops and strappy shoes during summer? For a little help, I searched the Internet for the best tips on how to treat your feet well in sandals. Here’s what I found:

1. Beware of Backless Styles

Flip flops are great for poolside frolicking, but beware of overdoing it with those backless styles. They add extra pressure on your toes, among other things. “When walking in backless foot wear . your heel slides side to side, creating friction, and your toes have a tendency to grab the ground,” podiatrist Dr. Steve Rosenberg wrote at The Huffington Post. “This can form a buildup of hard thick dry skin known as callous tissue. Over time this tissue eventually can crack, causing the heel to become very painful or the tips of your toes to get inflamed.”

These turquoise sandals have all of the foot-friendly features you need — arch support, cushioned insole, a closed back — because they were designed by orthopedic surgeon Taryn Rose. Styles like this will keep your feet feeling good for hours.

2. It’s All About The Arches

Whenever possible, opt for a sandal that has a little arch support. This’ll be tricky to find in flip flops and some thong sandal styles, but they’re out there! “Finding supportive summer footwear or arch products. will greatly reduce some common foot problems,” Dr. Rosenberg wrote. “Tired legs, sore backs, arch cramps, and general muscle fatigue” are just some of the aches that can ensue after a day of walking around on flat feet.

Birkenstocks are known for their incredible arch support. The footbeds mold to your foot’s shape over time.

3. Think About Your Day Ahead

You bring a sweater if you’re going to eat at a restaurant, you use the bathroom before a long car ride, you book your On The Run tickets months in advance, etc. So why shouldn’t you plan your footwear too? If you know you’re going to be doing a lot of walking, leave the flip flops and highs heels at home. “Dress shoes weren’t meant to walk a quarter-mile from the metro,” podiatrist Dr. Alison Garten told the Wall Street Journal . “That’s exercise. Nobody would dare exercise in a pair of high heels.”

Flip flops aren’t the way to go if you plan on doing a lot of walking. Instead, look for shoes with more support. Your feet will thank you! (Image: Getty Images)

4. Go Big, And You’ll Go Home

This tip seems like a no brainer, but buy shoes that actually fit your feet. (This doesn’t just apply to sandals, by the way.) “If the sandal is too big, your foot will slide around, which will create blisters,” Dr. Rosenberg wrote. “It could also cause the toes to grip the floor of the shoe resulting in an unidentifiable foot pain that comes on gradually after a long day walking and shopping.”

5. Get By With a Little Help

There’s no shame in asking for a little help, and there are plenty of products on the market that are ready to lend a. hand? Foot? Before you relegate agonizing slingbacks and thong sandals to the category of regrettable purchases, strap these on for size. Brynn Mannino of Woman’s Day recommends a plethora of products that’ll help mitigate foot pain, but my personal favorite are the FootPetals’ Strappy Strips. They’re perfect for gladiators and other strappy styles. “Available in four colors, these thin strips adhere to the inside of your shoe straps to help prevent painful blisters and ugly red marks caused by slipping straps and excess friction,” writes Mannino. Genius!

Stick these adhesive cushioned straps on the insides of strappy sandals to protect your feet against blisters.

6. Wax On

Don’t have any Strappy Strips on hand? Shoe designer Anyi Lu has another solution, which she divulged to the Wall Street Journal. “She rubs candle wax or beeswax on problem areas of the leather lining. to soften and smooth them,” the paper reported.

7. Wax. Off?

And when wax isn’t an option, either, reach for your medicine cabinet for a product I suspect (hope) we all have: deodorant. “Place antiperspirant or friction block on the straps,” Aldatz told Fab Sugar. This is an especially useful tip for hot days when your feet can get super sweaty.

Products like this one provide some invisible relief from irritating sandal straps.

8. Elastics Are Everything

“Any time you can find an elasticized insertion, that’s a really good thing because it’s going to keep the fit customized to your foot,” Aldatz told Fab Sugar. Adjustable straps are also great for the same reason. The most important thing is to make sure your sandal fits your foot as best as possible.

Since your feet are likely to swell in the summer heat, a elastic band will provide you with some extra room to grow without the shoes being too big.

How to make sandals comfortable

Are you in the market for some new shoes? Perhaps a pair of open-toe heels? If so, then we have your answer! It’s possible to make these types of shoes comfortable. We’re going to discuss how you can do this and what factors contribute to making them uncomfortable in the first place.

There is a misconception that open-toe shoes are more comfortable than closed toes. Some people believe the airflow makes them feel cooler and helps their feet breathe better, but this isn’t always true. Closed-toed shoes create less pressure on your foot which can be good for those who suffer from bunions or other issues with their feet. Keep in mind how you dress before making a decision if you want an open shoe or not because it may just end up being too warm for many climates!

It’s important to get the right size of shoes so they fit well and don’t pinch any part of your foot while also allowing space in between your toes. If there is no room then rubbing against one another will happen which might lead to blisters.

If you have too much space then your toes will rub the front of the shoe which can also lead to a blister. Another good tip is that if you are wearing them for an extended period, take regular breaks so they don’t get sore from being in one position all day long and make sure to switch sides often.

The best way to make sure an online purchase is a good one, it’s checking out some reviews. One of the best review sites for shoes I’ve found is The Shoe Buddy. They have great articles and advice on shoes for people with various needs so you can find what fits your lifestyle or foot type perfectly!

Blister Prevention

  • Get the right size of shoes so they fit well without pinching any part of your foot while leaving some room between your toes.
  • If there’s no room then rubbing against one another may happen (this might lead to blisters).
  • If there’s way too much space then your toes may rub against the front of the shoe (leading to a blister).
  • Another good tip is that if you’re going to wear the shoes for an extended period of time, take regular breaks. And make sure you switch sides often.

Find Appropriate Size of the Shoe

  • Go to the shoe store and try them on so you can get an idea of how they will fit.
  • You should also measure your foot length, width, and arch height before going into a shoe store. This way you won’t have any surprises when trying out different shoes in person because each brand sizes its shoes differently.
  • A good rule is that if your toes are touching the front or top part of the toe box then it’s too small for you. If there’s not enough space at the end of the shoe bed then it might be a little bit too big for you (this doesn’t mean go up two whole sizes).
  • The best thing to do would be to bring along some measuring tapes with measurements of your foot length, width, and arch height.
  • It’s also important to know how wide the shoe is in order to have a comfortable fit for both your feet and toes – you might be someone who has narrow or regular shaped feet but depending on what type of shoes you want that can make all the difference.

Keep In Mind

    • Always try on more than one pair so that you can compare them side by side before deciding which ones are best suited for you. Make sure they’re not too tight because it could cause problems later like blisters or pain from rubbing against material inside the shoe such as seams, heels, or laces. Shoes should feel snug at first but then loosen up after wearing them for some time.
    • You can also buy a shoe stretcher to make your shoes more comfortable if they’re too tight (usually used for heels). This will expand the opening of the heel, making it easier and less painful to slip shoes on.
    • If you have bunions or hammertoes then be careful about how much space is in each shoe because that could put you at risk for even more discomfort.

Use Shoe Stretcher

You can also buy a shoe stretcher to make your shoes more comfortable if they’re too tight (usually used for heels). This will expand the opening of the heel, making it easier and less painful to slip shoes on.

By Stretching Your Shoes

This strategy is not always practical because many people don’t own one or live in an area where stores sell them. However, it’s generally worth trying this before breaking brand new shoes in just so you have room around your toes without feeling like there is no air.

Note: I’m adding these two sentences as a reminder that stretching isn’t always possible; but when it works, it allows space for toes without having to break in new shoes completely first. Here’s a great article on stretching your shoes. You’ll be able to do it in no time!

Conclusion

The best way to make open toe heels comfortable is by wearing them with the right under-foot care. The more we take care of our feet, the less likely they are to get damaged while on an adventure in high heels. After all, it’s not worth risking your health just for a few hours of style!

Don’t forget about caring for your toes and nails before you head out as well—nail polish can help protect the nail from breaking or peeling around its edges when exposed to moisture (like sweat). If there’s no time for a pedicure beforehand, keep some hand sanitizing gel tucked away in your clutch so that you’re able to clean up between events if needed. And don’t forget to wear cotton socks and stockings.

If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more.

  • In the 1980s, a former river guide created Teva, a Velcro-strapped sport sandal, so his flip-flops could stay on his feet through rugged conditions.
  • Today, you won’t find them just in the canyons of Arizona. Everyone from avid hikers to casual city recreationalists love these practical sandals for their comfort, durability, and support.
  • The Universal Sandal is the brand’s best-seller, but we tried two other styles, the Hurricane XLT 2 ($60) and the Terra Fi 5 Universal ($100), to see how Teva’s footwear performed. We loved their feel and fit.

Some summer jobs, like scooping ice cream or riding a mail route, are but a blip in our professional lives. Others, like Mark Thatcher’s college summer job of guiding rafting trips in the Grand Canyon’s Colorado River, have more widespread reverberations.

Thatcher is the founder of Teva (Hebrew for “nature”), the Velcro-strapped sport sandal that changed the way outdoor enthusiasts traversed rivers and mountains and has become a beloved icon in the outdoor community.

Popular Reviews

As a river guide, he adapted his flip-flops so they would stay on his feet through all the bumps and even flips of his boat. After graduation, he worked as an exploration geophysicist, but was laid off in 1982. His next step, he decided, was to follow his passion for the outdoors by taking his sandal design to the next level.

His inspiration for the sandal straps came from Velcro watchbands — the easy-to-adjust nature of Velcro could be applied just as well to footwear. A couple patents, trademarks, and redesigns later, the modern-day Teva sandal was born. The Teva Universal, which features quick-drying polyester webbing, a cushioned footbed, rubber outsole, and a series of Velcro straps, is still the brand’s most popular style today.

There are plenty more designs to choose from, including platform sandals, special pattern collections (like the commemorative Grand Canyon one), and hiking sneakers. While the looks might differ, the features that stay constant across the Teva brand are comfort, all-weather and all-terrain durability, and support.

How to make sandals comfortable

Patterns are also a hallmark of Teva. In addition to solid colors, it makes more fun and funky options. Collaborations with designers like Anna Sui and trendy startups like Outdoor Voices further opens its fanbase past pure outdoorspeople to fashion-minded recreationalists.

Whether you’re hiking in a national park or walking around the city, it’s almost impossible not to run into someone wearing a pair of Teva sandals (like the three Insider Reviews members below, for example). I tried my first pair a couple weeks ago, while Sally and Breton grew up running around in Tevas, and I can only envy them for being introduced to these sport sandals so early on.

Shop all Teva sandals here: Amazon | Teva | REI

Read on for our detailed thoughts on 2 Teva sandal styles:

Teva Hurricane XLT 2

From climbing unexpected hills in Golden Gate Park, to dancing to my favorite bands and dashing to the next act, to standing for what seemed like hours on the packed-like-sardines subway ride home, my feet endured a never-ending cycle of activity when I went to a music festival in San Francisco this summer. I wore sneakers the first day, but after discovering how much more comfortable these sandals were on the second day, I stuck with them through the remainder of the festival.

I have fairly flat feet, but these sandals don’t have an extreme arch, so they were perfect for the shape of my feet. The footbed is soft, cushioned, and breathable, while the rubber sole has traction that allowed me to walk across the many types of terrain, wet and dry, of the Bay without worry. It was easy to get a comfortable fit by adjusting the three different Velcro straps.

Did I have a funky sandal tan by the end of the weekend? Of course. But the tan lines were a small price to pay for the true all-day comfort and support of these sandals. —Connie Chen, senior reporter

I spent the summers of my childhood living in Tevas, so it was exciting to revisit them as an adult. I’ve been pretty strongly anti-sandals-for-men but I get so hot in the summer that I decided to give them a chance. These Tevas fit exactly as I remember, they’re comfortable, and while the Velcro is a bit dorky, it does offer an adjustable and secure fit, and it’s nice that there are multiple places to tweak the straps to get the ideal fit.

I don’t know if it’s my faulty memory, but I distinctly recall from when I was younger that the Teva footbed felt strange, but the one on this model is super comfortable. It gives your feed the ability to breathe while also maintaining good traction. Mandals are definitely an occasion-specific look (day in the park, light hike in the woods, walking the dog), but I’m really enjoying it.

At $70 it’s a bit of an investment, but if you’re going to do something, do it right, I guess. When I was younger, the only reason to get rid of Tevas and get a new pair was that you grew out of them, and these feel the same way. They’ll be able to take a beating. —Breton Fischetti, VP of e-commerce

Teva Terra Fi 5 Universal

I grew up in both Tevas and Chacos sandals, roaming the springs and creeks of North Florida, whitewater rafting and mudsliding in the mountains of Georgia, and hiking and biking through marshes of barrier islands all through the south. I’ll admit, I generally like the look of Chacos better, but I find Tevas to be slightly more comfortable for my arches. This pair specifically, the Mack Daddy of Teva’s performance sandals, is one of the most comfortable shoes I own.

The sole is ultra-cushioned and has extreme traction both against my foot and against the ground. The straps are extremely secure (more so than what I remember the basic pair to feel like), and the plastic pieces that connect the straps are all padded against the skin to prevent irritation. The cupped heel also keeps me from sliding around, which I appreciate when my feet get sweaty. This features make them excellent for hiking and white-water rafting since you need something cushioned enough to keep you from feeling the acute pressure of jagged rocks underfoot.

Aesthetically, I love that I can transition these from a hike to a day out in Manhattan. I’ve paired these chunky black sandals with a structured white dress and a straw hat (a la my favorite designer, Cecilie Bahnsen), as well as a pair of leggings and a white T-shirt (the outfit I currently have on as I write this). They definitely weren’t designed as a fashion statement, but they’re easy to wear that way — especially considering that designers like Prada are copying Teva’s look. —Sally Kaplan, senior editor

If you love shoes then you’ll love these helpful hacks we’ve found! Whether it’s a pair of six inch stilettos or flat ballet pumps, you’re bound to have a pair of shoes that look better than they feel. Keep your feet happy with these simple tips and tricks that will make your shoes feel more comfortable.

Keep your feet dry with this great tip for waterproofing cloth shoes.

How to make sandals comfortable

Heel grips are great to stop feet slipping out of shoes.

How to make sandals comfortable

Wrap fabric around your flip flop straps.

How to make sandals comfortable

If your shoes squeak, add some baby powder to the inside.

How to make sandals comfortable

Rub sandpaper on the soles of new shoes for better traction.

How to make sandals comfortable

To stretch tight toe areas of shoes, simply fill freezer bags with water and place inside the shoes. Put the shoes in the freezer overnight.

How to make sandals comfortable

If you have tight shoe straps, use moleskin to cushion them.

How to make sandals comfortable

If you’re suffering with blisters on your feet, bathe them in some tea.

How to make sandals comfortable

Smelly shoes?

How to make sandals comfortable

If you’re going shoe shopping, always go in the afternoon or evening. Your feet can swell up to half a size bigger as the day goes on.

How to make sandals comfortable

Newspaper together with leather stretch spray can widen boots.

How to make sandals comfortable

This contraption will stretch shoes properly.

How to make sandals comfortable

Add gel deodorant to the inside of shoes to prevent friction and blisters.

How to make sandals comfortable

Denim is great to use for patching up torn heel linings.

How to make sandals comfortable

Prevent pain from flat shoes with these. Available here.

How to make sandals comfortable

Another way to stretch shoes is to put some thick socks on and then the tight shoes. Apply heat from the hairdryer for a few minutes. Keep the shoes on while they cool. You should find that they’re looser.

How to make sandals comfortable

Make your own innersoles.

How to make sandals comfortable

Source 1

Sha re this post with your friends and family on Facebook or Twitter!

If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more.

  • In the 1980s, a former river guide created Teva, a Velcro-strapped sport sandal, so his flip-flops could stay on his feet through rugged conditions.
  • Today, you won’t find them just in the canyons of Arizona. Everyone from avid hikers to casual city recreationalists love these practical sandals for their comfort, durability, and support.
  • The Universal Sandal is the brand’s best-seller, but we tried two other styles, the Hurricane XLT 2 ($60) and the Terra Fi 5 Universal ($100), to see how Teva’s footwear performed. We loved their feel and fit.

Some summer jobs, like scooping ice cream or riding a mail route, are but a blip in our professional lives. Others, like Mark Thatcher’s college summer job of guiding rafting trips in the Grand Canyon’s Colorado River, have more widespread reverberations.

Thatcher is the founder of Teva (Hebrew for “nature”), the Velcro-strapped sport sandal that changed the way outdoor enthusiasts traversed rivers and mountains and has become a beloved icon in the outdoor community.

Popular Reviews

As a river guide, he adapted his flip-flops so they would stay on his feet through all the bumps and even flips of his boat. After graduation, he worked as an exploration geophysicist, but was laid off in 1982. His next step, he decided, was to follow his passion for the outdoors by taking his sandal design to the next level.

His inspiration for the sandal straps came from Velcro watchbands — the easy-to-adjust nature of Velcro could be applied just as well to footwear. A couple patents, trademarks, and redesigns later, the modern-day Teva sandal was born. The Teva Universal, which features quick-drying polyester webbing, a cushioned footbed, rubber outsole, and a series of Velcro straps, is still the brand’s most popular style today.

There are plenty more designs to choose from, including platform sandals, special pattern collections (like the commemorative Grand Canyon one), and hiking sneakers. While the looks might differ, the features that stay constant across the Teva brand are comfort, all-weather and all-terrain durability, and support.

How to make sandals comfortable

Patterns are also a hallmark of Teva. In addition to solid colors, it makes more fun and funky options. Collaborations with designers like Anna Sui and trendy startups like Outdoor Voices further opens its fanbase past pure outdoorspeople to fashion-minded recreationalists.

Whether you’re hiking in a national park or walking around the city, it’s almost impossible not to run into someone wearing a pair of Teva sandals (like the three Insider Reviews members below, for example). I tried my first pair a couple weeks ago, while Sally and Breton grew up running around in Tevas, and I can only envy them for being introduced to these sport sandals so early on.

Shop all Teva sandals here: Amazon | Teva | REI

Read on for our detailed thoughts on 2 Teva sandal styles:

Teva Hurricane XLT 2

From climbing unexpected hills in Golden Gate Park, to dancing to my favorite bands and dashing to the next act, to standing for what seemed like hours on the packed-like-sardines subway ride home, my feet endured a never-ending cycle of activity when I went to a music festival in San Francisco this summer. I wore sneakers the first day, but after discovering how much more comfortable these sandals were on the second day, I stuck with them through the remainder of the festival.

I have fairly flat feet, but these sandals don’t have an extreme arch, so they were perfect for the shape of my feet. The footbed is soft, cushioned, and breathable, while the rubber sole has traction that allowed me to walk across the many types of terrain, wet and dry, of the Bay without worry. It was easy to get a comfortable fit by adjusting the three different Velcro straps.

Did I have a funky sandal tan by the end of the weekend? Of course. But the tan lines were a small price to pay for the true all-day comfort and support of these sandals. —Connie Chen, senior reporter

I spent the summers of my childhood living in Tevas, so it was exciting to revisit them as an adult. I’ve been pretty strongly anti-sandals-for-men but I get so hot in the summer that I decided to give them a chance. These Tevas fit exactly as I remember, they’re comfortable, and while the Velcro is a bit dorky, it does offer an adjustable and secure fit, and it’s nice that there are multiple places to tweak the straps to get the ideal fit.

I don’t know if it’s my faulty memory, but I distinctly recall from when I was younger that the Teva footbed felt strange, but the one on this model is super comfortable. It gives your feed the ability to breathe while also maintaining good traction. Mandals are definitely an occasion-specific look (day in the park, light hike in the woods, walking the dog), but I’m really enjoying it.

At $70 it’s a bit of an investment, but if you’re going to do something, do it right, I guess. When I was younger, the only reason to get rid of Tevas and get a new pair was that you grew out of them, and these feel the same way. They’ll be able to take a beating. —Breton Fischetti, VP of e-commerce

Teva Terra Fi 5 Universal

I grew up in both Tevas and Chacos sandals, roaming the springs and creeks of North Florida, whitewater rafting and mudsliding in the mountains of Georgia, and hiking and biking through marshes of barrier islands all through the south. I’ll admit, I generally like the look of Chacos better, but I find Tevas to be slightly more comfortable for my arches. This pair specifically, the Mack Daddy of Teva’s performance sandals, is one of the most comfortable shoes I own.

The sole is ultra-cushioned and has extreme traction both against my foot and against the ground. The straps are extremely secure (more so than what I remember the basic pair to feel like), and the plastic pieces that connect the straps are all padded against the skin to prevent irritation. The cupped heel also keeps me from sliding around, which I appreciate when my feet get sweaty. This features make them excellent for hiking and white-water rafting since you need something cushioned enough to keep you from feeling the acute pressure of jagged rocks underfoot.

Aesthetically, I love that I can transition these from a hike to a day out in Manhattan. I’ve paired these chunky black sandals with a structured white dress and a straw hat (a la my favorite designer, Cecilie Bahnsen), as well as a pair of leggings and a white T-shirt (the outfit I currently have on as I write this). They definitely weren’t designed as a fashion statement, but they’re easy to wear that way — especially considering that designers like Prada are copying Teva’s look. —Sally Kaplan, senior editor

How to make sandals comfortable

1. Too Tight Straps

While many leather straps stretch with wear, you can shorten the breaking-in process with water. H2O can gently stretch leather, molding it to the shape of your foot, says Meghan Cleary, author of Shoe Are You? Before you wear shoes out the first time, spritz them with “a light spray of plain water,” she says. “Wear them around until dry.”

2. Blisters

These are most likely to crop up on the bottoms of feet because of friction between your feet’s soles and the shoe’s. To avoid blisters, line each shoe with moleskin foam, which creates a cushion. The padding absorbs friction with a layer of cotton over the foam. “Adhere it to the inside of each shoe before the first time you wear them,” suggests Cleary.

Dr. Scholl’s Molefoam Padding, $28.46 for an 8-pack; Amazon.com

3. Arch Pain

Shoes that cause this likely don’t provide enough support in the middle of your foot. Stick to brands known for supportive kicks, including Cole Haan, Clarks and Onex, suggests Kimberly Ade, a stylist at Keri Blair Image Experts in Denver. Or at the very least, “opt for wedges instead of skinny heels,” she says. Wedges distribute weight away from the ball of your foot and more evenly throughout the shoe. And when you wear heels, choose ones that are shorter than three inches, adds Ade. But if most shoes make your arches ache, orthotics, custom-fitted shoe inserts from a podiatrist, may help…for a price. They can set you back $800.

4. Sweaty Feet

Too-small shoes can heat up your tootsies and cause blisters. To get a better fit, “only buy shoes at the end of the day when your feet may be swollen and tired,” suggests O’Keefe. Even if the shoe fits, the material may turn up the temperature. Save patent leather and rubber for colder times of year, and opt for breathable canvas and natural leather in warmer weather. And if you’re wearing socks, choose cotton ones, rather than those with artificial fabrics, to absorb sweat. One more trick: Cleary recommends sprinkling baby or shoe deodorizing powder in shoes before wearing them to soak up moisture while they’re on your feet.

5. Cuts on the Back of Your Heels

Shoes that dig into your skin can be some of the most painful to wear. While you may think they’re too snug, the problem is more likely that they’re too big. Overly spacious shoes let feet shift around and are the biggest reason for cuts, says Ade. Consider taping heel pads into the back of your shoes. The cushion “prevents your heel from moving in and out of the shoe and skin from getting cut,” Ade explains.

Foot Petals Heavenly Heelz, $6.95 for a pair; FootPetals.com

6. Calluses

The hard, dead skin that can form on the soles of feet and the sides of big toes can be tough to get rid of. But prevention starts with choosing well-fitting shoes. “Avoid jamming your foot into a shoe that’s too small or narrow,” says Cleary. Another good idea: Wear socks or tights in shoes, which can thwart unwanted friction. “If you already have calluses, soak, pumice and moisturize your feet often.” Or use a foot file to slough them off.

Diamancel Diamond File for Foot Calluses, $38; Sephora.com

7. Heels Sinking into Grass

Attending a dressy outdoor wedding? Rethink the stilettos. Many types of heels sink into the ground and even thick carpet, making maneuvering tricky and dancing next to impossible. If you must wear skinny heels, tack on a heel cap that adds surface area to the bottom of your heel, lowering your chances of getting stuck in the ground. Otherwise, stick to wedges, which elongate legs like heels do, but are more comfortable outdoors.

Solemates High Heelers, $19.90 for two pairs; Solemates.com

8. Scuffed Leather

A single visible scratch can make nice, new shoes look like old, poorly made ones. While there’s no way to completely avoid scratching leather shoes, polishing shoes you wear often can help, says Ade. “The more you polish, the less likely scratches are to form,” she explains. For best results, once a month, wash the shoe before polishing; then, use a cream-based polish and buff with a soft cloth. Keep in mind that patent leather is more prone to deep scratching, Ade adds.

9. Wobbly Heels

You’re walking around when BAM—your heel detaches from the sole. How embarrassing. Not all shoes have a sturdy metal shank that connects the inner sole to the heel. So before you buy, walk around the store to make sure the heels aren’t wobbling. Ade says chunkier heels are better bets. Whatever shoes you purchase, “don’t rock back and forth in them; that’ll weaken the attachment,” Ade points out. If heels do detach, a cobbler can reattach them for about $20—which may or may not be worth it depending on the original shoe cost.

10. Soles Wearing Off

Dressier shoes’ soles can quickly become scuffed from hitting the street, resulting in tattered-looking footwear. Try sole protectors, whichmake soles extra-durable and slip-resistant. “Adding rubber soles to the bottom of shoes or heel taps can extend the life of the soles and heels,” Cleary explains. Ask a cobbler to add rubber soles; the service runs anywhere from $15 to $30.

After a year of living in loungewear and pyjamas, we’re all eagerly anticipating getting ‘dressed up’ again as the roadmap out of lockdown takes effect. Cute summer dresses, heels – you name it, we’re excited to wear our fancy clothes and feel like our old selves again .

For as long as we can remember, our feet have alternated between slippers and trainers so, we’re already anticipating that we might experience a little bit of discomfort when we first slip on a pair of heels, but that needn’t be the case.

Thankfully, there are loads of products and hacks out there to make your high heels more comfortable and stop them rubbing – here are the best tips and tricks.

1. Lose some height

If you fall in love with a pair of heels but just know that the 5-inch stiletto is going to play havoc with your feet, don’t panic. Shoe repair shops should be able to shorten the height of your heels up to one inch depending on the shoe type to make them more comfortable.

How to make sandals comfortable

2. Concentrate on how you walk

Walking in heels really is a science. A stroll in your trainers is not the same as spending the night in high heels – you need to pay way more to the rest of your body. The main takeaways? Engage your abs and walk heel-to-toe for the smoothest Elle Woods-worthy walk.

3. Wear your heels in

Before wearing them out, wear your heels in by pulling on a pair of thick socks and walking around your house in them for a few hours. This will stretch all the areas that otherwise might pinch your feet.

How to make sandals comfortable

4. Pick the right shape heel for your foot

It sounds silly, but if you know that you have wide toes which make pointed heels uncomfortable or your feet are flat so anything higher than a 3-inch heel aches – don’t do it to yourself. Invest in heel styles that you’ve found most comfortable in the past as chances are, you’ll be more likely to reach for them in the future too.

5. Use moleskin

Not only can you use moleskin to line your shoes – an easy way to avoid any rubbing – but this wonder material can also be cut and applied directly over any blisters you have brewing or likely problem areas.