How to sleep in class

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By Nicholas Guinn (edited by Athena Phommivong)

The next time you’re in class, whether you are a student or teacher, look around and you will probably see a student with their head down on their desk catching some Z’s. It isn’t unusual for students to sleep in class and there are many reasons why. A general lack of sleep and motivation to do well in school, coupled with subjects that are not entirely interesting and teachers who do not hold our attention, are just a few of the reasons why students decide to sleep in class.

One of the main reasons students fall asleep in class is because they do not get enough sleep at night. A combination of going to bed too late and early start times for school makes it hard for teenagers to get enough sleep to function, so can you blame them for napping? With school, homework, extracurricular activities, and trying to have a good social life with family and friends, it can be pretty difficult to get eight hours of sleep before waking up at seven in order to make it to school on time. Have you seen the “Triangle of College” meme? In short, high school life, like college life, requires you to choose between social life, sleep, and school work.

Taken from College Memes

Unfortunately, you can only have two sides of the triangle at any given time, so sometimes students try to make up for this by sleeping in class.

Another big reason for students sleeping in class is the way teachers present information in class. No offense to you teachers, I mean, we appreciate you, but you can be boring. The way that classes are taught nowadays – notes, assignment, quiz, feedback, test, repeat – is not exactly the most exciting way to do things. Students like to do fun activities with their friends while learning about the subject. Now, I know it’s kind of hard to find an activity to do that relates to Pre-Calculus, but switching up the way things are taught and using different activities in class will help with keeping students awake. When giving students notes or assignments, teachers should try to make them a little more interesting or fun, such as ending a lecture with a competitive game like Kahoot to practice what you know. Switching it up will keep us engaged.

Last, one of the biggest issues with falling asleep in class is that many students are not motivated to do well in school. To some students, they just don’t care what grades they get. It’s actually a big problem today, kids just don’t care. A little motivation, which might come in the form of rewards can go a long way and might push the students to try in class. Getting parents involved and having more personal relationships with teachers can also help give the students a good reason to try harder.

Education is hugely important to a student’s ability to become independent, and yet, today, students aren’t getting the most out of it. The importance of education is lost on students who are sleeping in class, and there are things that we can do to keep students awake during school hours. Later start times, competitive or fun activities, and more motivation and push might keep students’ heads off their desks.

Now, let’s just hope that you didn’t fall asleep while reading this article…

How to sleep in class

Posted By: Mack Lee September 3, 2012

Mack Lee, DiY/Guides Section Editor

At IMSA, sleep deprivation will cause the need to sleep in class. This guide provides some tips on how you can sneak a few extra minutes of sleep in class. Don’t waste your time drifting to sleep and closing your eyes every half-second. If you need to sleep, sleep.

Disclaimer: If you get caught, Acronym staff is not responsible for your consequences. This article is for entertainment purposes only. Use at your own discretion/risk. It could be detrimental to your grade.

Difficulty Levels from 1-4 (From least difficult to most difficult)
-Difficulty is measured by the chance of successful execution

Risk = Low, Medium, High
-Risk is measured by the chance of being caught

Note: For all techniques, to avoid being compromised, do not sleeptalk, sleepwalk, or snore. In addition, make sure your neighbor won’t tell on you!

Technique 1 (One-handed Visor)
Materials: None
Difficulty Level: 4
Risk: Medium

1.) Pick a spot in the classroom in which the teacher does not move behind you or next to you (the edges work well)

2.) Place your hand on your forehead as if you were frustrated (with your elbow on the table), and tilt it to an angle so that you cannot see the teacher’s eyes.

3.) If you can’t see them, they can’t see you

Make sure you cannot see their eyes. To do this, test each eye by closing the other.

4.) Make sure you have good head support

When sleeping, your head will sometimes slip and move around while you sleep. Avoid this by bracing your elbow sturdily.

Technique 2 (Two-handed Visor)
Materials: Handout and/or notebook, pencil
Difficulty Level: 3
Risk: Low

1.) Repeat step 1 from technique 1

2.) Place your elbows on the table, interlock your hands, and place them on your forehead with your thumbs on your temples. You’re essentially making a visor with both your hands. Make sure you cannot see the teachers’ eyes. Look down at your paper

3.) Make sure your elbows will not slip off the table and use step 4 from Technique 1

4.) Move your hands towards the back of your head while maintaining the lack of eye contact so it does not look obvious.

Technique 3 (The Wall)
Materials: None
Difficulty Level: 3
Risk: Medium

1.) Sit somewhere in the classroom where the teacher only sees you from one side

2.) Take one hand and place it vertically on your cheek (the side that the teacher usually sees you from). Move it forward until you cannot see the teachers’ eyes. If needed, place the second hand on the other side for a different effect. You are shielding your eyes from the side, similar to the visor in Techniques 1 and 2.

3.) Test each eye by closing one and seeing if you can see the teachers’ eyes

Technique 4 (Chillin’)
Materials: Dark Sunglasses
Difficulty Level: 1
Risk: Low

Depending on the teacher, make sure this teacher will allow you to wear sunglasses in-class.

1.) Sit up straight and look like you are looking at the teacher.

Technique 5 (Laptop Freak)
Materials: Laptop
Difficulty Level: 2
Risk: High

1.) Place your laptop open in front of you

2.) Make sure the teacher will not see you as he/she walks around the classroom

3.) Place your chin onto the touchpad or under the keyboard

4.) Don’t let your head slip and catch up on sleep!

Technique 6 (Brave Soul)
Materials: None
Difficulty Level:

*PASSIVE AGGRESSION WARNING*

Have you ever fallen asleep in class? Or have you ever stayed up all night to finish an assignment; but more realistically you stayed up all night to finish watching that current season of your show on Netflix. Do not lie to me, I know. Well, besides sleeping in class and staying up all night watching Netflix, why is being tired bad for your education?

I will be using a journal article by Shelley D. Hershner and Ronald D Hershner, titled “Causes and consequences of sleepiness among college students”. When you mess up your sleep schedule, you mess up your circadian rhythm. What is your circadian rhythm? Well, the circadian rhythm is the body’s natural “clock” that tells you when to sleep and when to wake up, when to eat. Essentially, the circadian rhythm is responsible for regulating many physiological responses. The circadian rhythm can be affected by a number of things. Sunlight and temperature are a couple of environmental causes that can change your circadian rhythm. “Many college students are sleep deprived because they go to sleep late and wake up for classes or employment before adequate sleep is obtained. Two primary processes govern how much sleep is obtained, the homeostatic sleep drive and the circadian rhythm” (Chervin and Hershner, 2014). College students are at a high risk for this due to the amount of homework and studying they are assigned (Like having to research and type up three to four blogs per week, among other assignments and exams). The poor college students are assigned so much homework that they are too stressed to start it, and when they start it they are working all night long. This throws off their sleep schedule and in turn causes them to be tired in class (If they even wake up to go to class).

There are two theories that contribute to the relationship between sleep and memory processing; the Dual Process Theory, and the Sequential Processing Theory. The first theory mentioned in the article is called the “Dual Process Theory”. “The dual process theory maintains that certain types of memory are dependent on specific sleep states, such that procedural memory (knowing how) may be dependent on REM (rapid eye movement) sleep and declarative memory (knowing what) on NREM (non-REM) sleep” (Chervin and Hershner, 2014). REM sleep occurs about 90 minutes after you fall asleep, and its duration is about 10 minutes. REM sleep is truly important to complete fully. If REM sleep is interrupted it can cause feelings of depression, fatigue, and confusion. This can affect how a student learns, because they might not be able to fully understand what is being taught in class that day. And if it persists, then the student will eventually start falling behind and not be able to make connections between topics that intertwine with each other. The second theory that is mentioned in the article is the “Sequential Processing Theory”. “The sequential processing theory suggests that memories require an orderly succession of sleep stages, ie, memory formation may be prompted by slow-wave sleep and consolidated by REM sleep” (Chervin and Hershner, 2014).

Students often end up having to rely on substances to help them sleep, and substances that help them stay awake. Substances that students use to help them fall asleep are typically melatonin in pill form (melatonin: natural hormone that the body secretes to help aid sleep), or marijuana, or even alcohol. Prolonged use of these substances throws off the body’s homeostatic state, and eventually depend on these substances to help fall asleep. Substances that people use to help stay awake are usually caffeine, and (a small percentage) even use hard drugs such as cocaine. The effects of prolonged use of these substances creates the same effect, and the body starts to rely on them to stay awake. A negative factor for sleep is the use of technology while laying in your bed. The technology use creates a connection of alertness to the bed, and eventually causes you to encounter troubles sleeping. A good way to avoid this would be to not use technology in the bed before sleeping.

“A student’s GPA is not just an indication of learning, but instead involves a complex interaction between the student and their environment. Intelligence, motivation, work ethic, personality, socioeconomic status, health problems, current and past school systems, course load, academic program, and test-taking abilities all may influence GPA” (Chevrin and Hershner, 2014). While GPA is not directly connected to learning, it is connected to how you can regurgitate information and apply it to the assignment or exam for your classes. Being tired will drive down your ability to learn and remember information, resulting in lower performance in class; ultimately driving down your GPA.

Hershner, S. Chevrin, D. (2014). Causes and consequences of sleepiness among college students

Dr. Mercola. (2014). Study: Interrupted Sleep May Be as Harmful as No Sleep at All

How to sleep in class

Sleeping in class is a problem that can cause your grades to suffer. If you are an adult or a teenager who falls asleep at school, make it a priority to get on a better sleep schedule.

Problems with Sleeping in Class

If you are so tired that you’re constantly nodding off, sleeping in class will be common. You probably know the drill: you sit down and start to relax, your eyes grow heavy, you decide to shut them for a moment, and the next thing you know you’re in dreamland. While this problem might not seem serious, the implications of missing classroom lectures and assignments are big ones.

Sleeping during class can cause your grades to suffer and make you less likely to be respected by teachers and fellow students. While it might seem funny at the time to snooze at your desk, the person you’re hurting the most is yourself. Classrooms naps can also distract other students who might be sitting next to you or staring at you and the teacher who is trying to direct the class.

Here are just a few of the consequences:

  • You might miss a test date that has been rescheduled
  • You might miss an important lecture
  • Your grades overall will start to suffer
  • Your classmates and teacher will take you less seriously
  • Your snoring might be a disruption to the class
  • You might make it a habit to nap in class and sleep less at home
  • Class might end early and you might be left behind

End Classroom Naps

Besides the obvious answers of getting more sleep at night and keeping a regular bedtime schedule, a few things can help you avoid sleeping while in class. Make sure if you try these tips that they are allowed at your school:

  • Chew gum
  • Eat something sugary or suck on hard candy
  • Doodle in a notebook
  • Try tensing and relaxing your muscles
  • Take a nap or close your eyes before class, if possible
  • Wiggle your fingers or toes or rotate your ankles
  • Ask a friend to tap you on the shoulder
  • Go to class slightly hungry, rather than right after eating

Why Do People Sleep in Class?

It’s hard to deny that there is something about sitting in a classroom and listening to a lecture that causes sleepiness. The human body is also apt to crave afternoon naps as a way to recharge. Class time is also notoriously relaxing as much of the time you are asked to simply show up and listen. This type of activity lends itself to feeling permission to get some shuteye.

Take Active Classes

In a class that is fast-paced and gives you constant reasons to engage and response, you will be much less likely to fall asleep or want to sleep. Ways to stop classroom sleeping mean giving students the opportunity to participate and be rewarded for their listening skills. Here are some ways to do this for students:

  • Take classes that require classroom participation
  • Sign up for small classes, rather than be lectures
  • Schedule classes that require more listening skills in the morning when you are more likely to be alert
  • Sit in the front row
  • Seek out teachers who have high energy and vocal variety
  • Have someone you can be accountable to for staying awake
  • Have an energy drink or caffeine before class

Get More Sleep

Above all, see your sleepiness during the day as an indication that you have to get more sleep at night. Change your sleep habits and make sleep more of a priority. Things will change and you will be able to stay alert and active during any class.

Posted Nov. 30, 2015, 9:29 a.m. by Nicolaus Jannasch View–>

How to sleep in class

We’ve all been there. You’re sitting in class and a wave of exhaustion crashes over you. Your eyelids start to drop, and even though you’ll need these notes tomorrow, you can’t seem to keep watching the board.

Suddenly. your eyes snap open! The teacher is standing right in front of your desk and has politely tapped you on the shoulder. Classmates are giggling and the whole room is looking at you. It’s so embarrassing … but five minutes later your eyes begin closing again and you’re back to fighting to stay awake.

Unfortunately falling asleep in class is all too common. Here’s how to avoid falling asleep in class so that you can skip out on these uncomfortable episodes.

1. Sleep outside of class.

Maybe the class is boring, but perhaps the real reason you’re falling asleep is because you didn’t get the rest you needed last night. It’s easy to let the hours slip by as you scan YouTube videos or run through the latest season of “Game of Thrones,” but if you’re up until 3 a.m. every night, you’ll drop dead the next day.

Build up quality sleep habits. Get used to getting at least eight hours of sleep each night. With a full eight hours of sleep, you’re much less likely to pass out in class.

2. Skim the chapter before class.

This tip can help you improve your grades and it will also help you stay awake. By skimming the material you prime your brain to be more interested in what your teacher has to say.

Even with just a quick look at the chapter your teacher is going to discuss, your brain will pick up small pieces of information. While you wouldn’t know enough to pass a test, these little pieces stay in your short-term memory. When your teacher goes over a point that you remember even a little bit about, it has the effect of jolting your brain awake, as if it’s shouting ‘Hey, I’ve seen this before!’

3. Sit in the front of the room.

I used this trick in college whenever I didn’t get enough sleep, and it will work for you as well in high school. Being physically closer to the teacher, and in a place where they can see you clearly, is great motivation to stay awake and even participate in class.

As a quick note, on days when I had almost no sleep at all, sitting in the front of the room backfired when I actually fell asleep! With the teacher lecturing just a few feet in front of me, I’m sure it was pretty obvious.

4. Bring a bottle of water with you.

Staying hydrated is very important when you need to be alert. When you don’t drink enough water, your body doesn’t function as well as it could.

How to sleep in class

I would like to follow you up the long stairway again & become the boat that would row you back carefully. (Margaret Atwood, “Variations on the Word Sleep”)

I was a teenage insomniac. Except for a handful of times when I sleepwalked to the kitchen and made myself a peanut butter sandwich, bedtime meant boredom, then exasperation as my brain replayed scenes from the day: failed jump shots, unrequited crushes, perceived slights, and unsatisfactory hair.

At school, I zombied in and out of consciousness. One time I dozed in the middle of second period until the high school science instructor shouted, “Finley! Wake up! My monotone getting to you?” Mr. Smith shouldn’t have taken my sleepiness personally, but I wish that one of my teachers had inquired about my sleep habits. It might have saved me from two decades of undiagnosed sleep apnea.

What the Studies Say

Because consciousness is a prerequisite for learning, academic performance suffers from sleep deprivation. Even when kids are awake, the condition impairs concentration and cognitive functions. Additional effects include depression, increased appetite and weight gain, accidental injuries, and susceptibility toward nicotine dependence, among other problems.

Based on Russell Foster’s frequently-cited research showing that adolescents naturally tend to stay up later and sleep in longer, Mokkseaton High School, in the United Kingdom, changed its start time from 8:50 to 10:00AM, resulting in significant improvements in academics and attendance. When school start times were delayed as part of Finley Edwards’ study of North Carolina middle-grades students, standardized test scores were raised, especially among students with less than average academic skills. One way to narrow the achievement gap, Edwards suggests, might be a policy of starting middle and high school later.

From a number of articles on the subject, I compiled a checklist of common factors that contribute to teens chronically sleeping in class:

  • Staying up too late (often attributed to games, TV, or social media)
  • Working the night shift
  • Suffering from health issues or sleep disorders: sleep apnea, restless leg syndrome, or narcolepsy
  • Being bored with the pace of class activities
  • Traumatizing parent-child relations or other troubling experiences
  • Being too hungry

How Much Sleep Is Enough?

Nine or more hours of sleep are sufficient for most adolescents, according to multiple authorities, while anything under eight hours is not enough. Only eight percent of teens report that they receive enough sleep (PDF). Even more at risk are adolescents who physically mature more quickly because of their inherently lower sleep drive (PDF). For more information about sleep drive and alertness, check out Harvard Medical School’s short interactive tutorial on the subject.

Waking Them Up and Keeping Them Active

Here is one way to compassionately wake a student. Preoccupy the rest of the class with a think-pair-share, and while everyone is distracted, lightly touch the sleeper’s arm. To help her stay awake, suggest she get a drink of water, stretch in the back of the room, or sit with her back against a cold wall.

When students start to space off, switch to an activity that requires movement.

  • Have students briefly engage in a role-play.
  • Use Jennifer Gonzales’ inspired Chat Stations, in which students stand and discuss prompts located in different parts of the room. After a few minutes, rotate the small groups to the next station.
  • Try a new activity from Edutopia’s Game-Based Learning: Resource Roundup.

Short energy breaks, or energizers, can enhance alertness and reduce stress. The list below features my favorites:

1. In the team Bubble Blow Challenge (PDF), groups work cooperatively to get as many bubbles as possible from point A to point B. The team bubble blower is the only group member prevented from moving from point A. After each round, teams are given 60 seconds to consider alternative tactics.

2. In Question Ball, students stand in a circle. When the facilitator bounce-passes a ball to someone, the receiver asks a peer a question. “Your house is burning and you can retrieve only one object. What do you carry to safety?” Then the ball is returned to the facilitator who passes it to someone in the circle who hasn’t had a chance to ask or answer a question. This continues until everyone has spoken.

3. In What Is the Adverb? from 100 Ways to Energise Groups, a student volunteer is sent into the hall while the rest of the class agrees on an adverb, such as painfully, tensely, suspiciously, sadly, selfishly, etc. When the volunteer returns to the room, she commands peers to do various actions “in that way.” Examples:

  • Distribute papers that way.
  • Simulate holding up a bank that way.
  • Greet a friend that way.
  • Scrutinize someone’s shoe that way.

The round ends when the volunteer correctly identifies the adverb.

And If the Sleeping Continues?

Assuming you’ve a) had a conversation with the classroom sleeper about why she can’t stay awake; b) notified the child’s parents about which days and how often you’ve observed the problem; and c) that your lessons incorporate variety and movement; send these sleep hygiene routines to the caregiver if the problem persists. Meanwhile, make sure that your classroom (especially for those meeting earlier in the day) is well lighted to increase alertness, using natural light if possible. If you have any other suggestions, please post them in the comments section.

How to sleep in class

I would like to follow you up the long stairway again & become the boat that would row you back carefully. (Margaret Atwood, “Variations on the Word Sleep”)

I was a teenage insomniac. Except for a handful of times when I sleepwalked to the kitchen and made myself a peanut butter sandwich, bedtime meant boredom, then exasperation as my brain replayed scenes from the day: failed jump shots, unrequited crushes, perceived slights, and unsatisfactory hair.

At school, I zombied in and out of consciousness. One time I dozed in the middle of second period until the high school science instructor shouted, “Finley! Wake up! My monotone getting to you?” Mr. Smith shouldn’t have taken my sleepiness personally, but I wish that one of my teachers had inquired about my sleep habits. It might have saved me from two decades of undiagnosed sleep apnea.

What the Studies Say

Because consciousness is a prerequisite for learning, academic performance suffers from sleep deprivation. Even when kids are awake, the condition impairs concentration and cognitive functions. Additional effects include depression, increased appetite and weight gain, accidental injuries, and susceptibility toward nicotine dependence, among other problems.

Based on Russell Foster’s frequently-cited research showing that adolescents naturally tend to stay up later and sleep in longer, Mokkseaton High School, in the United Kingdom, changed its start time from 8:50 to 10:00AM, resulting in significant improvements in academics and attendance. When school start times were delayed as part of Finley Edwards’ study of North Carolina middle-grades students, standardized test scores were raised, especially among students with less than average academic skills. One way to narrow the achievement gap, Edwards suggests, might be a policy of starting middle and high school later.

From a number of articles on the subject, I compiled a checklist of common factors that contribute to teens chronically sleeping in class:

  • Staying up too late (often attributed to games, TV, or social media)
  • Working the night shift
  • Suffering from health issues or sleep disorders: sleep apnea, restless leg syndrome, or narcolepsy
  • Being bored with the pace of class activities
  • Traumatizing parent-child relations or other troubling experiences
  • Being too hungry

How Much Sleep Is Enough?

Nine or more hours of sleep are sufficient for most adolescents, according to multiple authorities, while anything under eight hours is not enough. Only eight percent of teens report that they receive enough sleep (PDF). Even more at risk are adolescents who physically mature more quickly because of their inherently lower sleep drive (PDF). For more information about sleep drive and alertness, check out Harvard Medical School’s short interactive tutorial on the subject.

Waking Them Up and Keeping Them Active

Here is one way to compassionately wake a student. Preoccupy the rest of the class with a think-pair-share, and while everyone is distracted, lightly touch the sleeper’s arm. To help her stay awake, suggest she get a drink of water, stretch in the back of the room, or sit with her back against a cold wall.

When students start to space off, switch to an activity that requires movement.

  • Have students briefly engage in a role-play.
  • Use Jennifer Gonzales’ inspired Chat Stations, in which students stand and discuss prompts located in different parts of the room. After a few minutes, rotate the small groups to the next station.
  • Try a new activity from Edutopia’s Game-Based Learning: Resource Roundup.

Short energy breaks, or energizers, can enhance alertness and reduce stress. The list below features my favorites:

1. In the team Bubble Blow Challenge (PDF), groups work cooperatively to get as many bubbles as possible from point A to point B. The team bubble blower is the only group member prevented from moving from point A. After each round, teams are given 60 seconds to consider alternative tactics.

2. In Question Ball, students stand in a circle. When the facilitator bounce-passes a ball to someone, the receiver asks a peer a question. “Your house is burning and you can retrieve only one object. What do you carry to safety?” Then the ball is returned to the facilitator who passes it to someone in the circle who hasn’t had a chance to ask or answer a question. This continues until everyone has spoken.

3. In What Is the Adverb? from 100 Ways to Energise Groups, a student volunteer is sent into the hall while the rest of the class agrees on an adverb, such as painfully, tensely, suspiciously, sadly, selfishly, etc. When the volunteer returns to the room, she commands peers to do various actions “in that way.” Examples:

  • Distribute papers that way.
  • Simulate holding up a bank that way.
  • Greet a friend that way.
  • Scrutinize someone’s shoe that way.

The round ends when the volunteer correctly identifies the adverb.

And If the Sleeping Continues?

Assuming you’ve a) had a conversation with the classroom sleeper about why she can’t stay awake; b) notified the child’s parents about which days and how often you’ve observed the problem; and c) that your lessons incorporate variety and movement; send these sleep hygiene routines to the caregiver if the problem persists. Meanwhile, make sure that your classroom (especially for those meeting earlier in the day) is well lighted to increase alertness, using natural light if possible. If you have any other suggestions, please post them in the comments section.

Persona 5

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User Info: MvUyDk1e8s9

User Info: vocedelmorte

User Info: MvUyDk1e8s9

@vocedelmorte I got everything possible in the first playthrough except Futabas lines and a hostage situation.

The random person, does it exclude people at level 10 already?

User Info: MvUyDk1e8s9

User Info: MvUyDk1e8s9

User Info: vocedelmorte

does it exclude people at level 10 already?

User Info: NextGenCowboy

It is completely random. It will be anyone, including people at 10, or people like Sun, who does not even take points into account.

The 3 notes can be used to great effect early. Hanging with Sojiro is 2 notes, dreaming about him is 3. But the rng makes it hardly worth the effort.

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User Info: JLazarillo

It’s worth noting that you get the maximum load-out of tools from crafting them in class, and there are a few books that are still good to read in NG+ to unlock date spots or improve minigame performance.

User Info: MvUyDk1e8s9

It’s worth noting that you get the maximum load-out of tools from crafting them in class, and there are a few books that are still good to read in NG+ to unlock date spots or improve minigame performance.

Classroom crafting sessions are super for making Reserve Ammo, since the requirements are kinda severe, getting triple yield is super helpful.

I don’t think my rank with Morgana is high enough for anything but the basics right now, just finished the 3rd palace. But ill keep that in mind for the future.