How to connect a psp to a wireless network

The PlayStation Portable (PSP) is a gaming device created and promoted by Sony Computer Entertainment. It is one of the most popular handheld gaming devices today. It was the first handheld gaming device to use an optical disc format for storage – Universal Media Disc (UMD). UMD can store a maximum of 1.8 GB in dual layer and 900 MB in single layer mode. The first PSP was released in 2004, and another version, PSP Go, was released in October 2009. A budget model was announced in 2011.

Apart from gaming, the PSP offers multiple features such as web browsing, RSS feeds, Skype, Internet radio, PlayStation Network, viewing of UMD movies and other videos, viewing of photos and so on. Most people don’t even know their PSP can be connected to the Internet. The process of setting up the connection is very simple. If you have a WiFi Internet connection –be it secured or unsecured–a connection can be easily established and you can browse the Internet on your Sony PSP.How to connect a psp to a wireless network

How to Connect a PSP to the Internet

The Infrastructure Mode in PSP enables users to connect to the Internet through Wireless Access Points (WAP). The WAP can be a wireless router setup at home, or a hotspot (airports, hotels, schools, shopping malls and coffee shops). To connect to the Internet, the PSP should have system software version 2.0 or higher.

WPA2 is a specific type of network encryption used to protect the information being transmitted over wireless Internet networks. In order to connect your computer to a WPA2 network, you need to provide a unique password. If you’re attempting to connect your Sony PSP to the network you will still have to provide that password to get the device connected. This is accomplished via a manual configuration of the PSP’s network settings.

  • WPA2 is a specific type of network encryption used to protect the information being transmitted over wireless Internet networks.
  • In order to connect your computer to a WPA2 network, you need to provide a unique password.

Turn on your PSP. Select the first option from the console’s main menu, labelled “Settings.”

Highlight and select “Network Settings.”

Select “Infrastructure Mode.” This indicates to the console that, instead of connecting to another PSP console (like you would in ad-hoc mode), you are instead connecting to a wireless network.

Select the “New Connection” option. Select “Scan.” Locate the name of your WPA2 wireless network. Select it with “X.”

Select “WPA-PSK (AES)” from the “WLAN Security Setting” menu. “WPA-PSK (AES)” is the official name of WPA2. Type in the password for your wireless network and select “Next.”

  • Select “Infrastructure Mode.”
  • Select it with “X.”
  • Select “WPA-PSK (AES)” from the “WLAN Security Setting” menu. “

Choose the “Easy” connection option. Specify a name for your wireless network on the PSP and select “Save.” Your PSP is connected to the WPA2 wireless network.

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I had such a touch time connecting my PSP to my wireless router that i thought i’d share the process for anyone else with the same hardware. The process should be similar for other Netgear wireless routers.

Netgear WGR614 Wireless Router Config

You first need to configure your router. You do this via a webpage, which is probably http://192.168.0.1/, depending on your setup. Default username and password are admin/password.

Select ‘Wireless Settings’ from the menu.

SSID, region and channel don’t matter, but make sure mode is set to ‘g and b’ or ‘b only’.

Select WEP security, Open system, and 64 bit.

128 bit is more secure, but 64 bit makes it easier to enter your wep key into your PSP.

In the ‘key 1’ box, enter a 10 digit hexidecimal string (contains 0-9, a-f). You’ll need this when you configure your PSP.

Select ‘LAN IP Setup’ from the menu.

Make sure your router is enabled as a DHCP server (it is by default).

PSP (Playstation Portable) Config

Go to the home screen of your PSP, scroll to the left (‘settings’) and the bottom (‘network settings’).

Select Infrastructure mode, then create a new connection. Give it a name then on to the next screen.

Select ‘Scan’ to find your network. It should figure out you want WEP on.

Type in your WEP key from before – this bit takes ages for the 128 bit key, but not too bad for the 64 bit.

This video includes instructions on how to get your PlayStation Portable (PSP) onto the BGSU wireless network.

Set-up Your Connection

1. Go to Network Settings under the PSP settings menu.
2. Select the “Infrastructure Mode” and press X.
3. Under “Select a connection to edit”, choose “New Connection” and press X.
4. Now you will enter the connection name. Then press X.
5. Using the D-pad, name the connection “bgsu” then select Enter and press X.
6. Now the connection is named “bgsu”. Select it and press >.
7. Under WLAN Settings, choose to “Enter Manually” and press >.
8. The SSID screen will come up next. Select the empty space underneath “SSID” and press X.
9. Using the D-pad, type in “bgsu” then select Enter and press X.
10. Under WLAN Security Setting select “None” and press >.
11. Under Address Setting select “Custom” and press >.
12. Next, set the IP Address Setting to “Automatic” and press >.
13. The DNS Setting should also be set to “Automatic”. After this is done, press >.
14. Under Proxy Server, choose “Do Not Use” and press >.
15. Under Internet Browser, select “Start” so that the browser will be started after connection to the access point. Now press >.
16. This screen will show your Settings List, press the > button after looking over the list.
17. You are now done setting up your connection. Press the X button to save your settings.

Test Your Connection

18. Once your save has been completed, select “Test Connection” and press X.
19. Your PSP will now test your connection by connecting to the access point, obtaining an IP address and starting your internet browser.
20. If all settings are correct, you should see a screen like the one below confirming the connection.

Log in the BGSU Network

21. To log in, fill out your BGSU username and password and select the “Log In” button.
22. You will then see a black “bluesocket” screen within your internet browser.
23. Lastly, use the Square button and either the L1 or R1 butt

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havin a few problems connecting my psp to my wireless network ive got every think entered correct (i think) but when i try to connect it connects to the access point and then it comes up exchanging key information after a min or 2 i get a error message, the key information exchanged timed out. can some help me solve this please

oh if it helps im trying to connect to a philips wireless router
thanks

s1hastie

Banned
  • Aug 2, 2006
  • #2

havin a few problems connecting my psp to my wireless network ive got every think entered correct (i think) but when i try to connect it connects to the access point and then it comes up exchanging key information after a min or 2 i get a error message, the key information exchanged timed out. can some help me solve this please

oh if it helps im trying to connect to a philips wireless router
thanks

shay0

Distinguished Member
  • Aug 3, 2006
  • #3

wallzy

Novice Member
  • Aug 3, 2006
  • #4

shay0

Distinguished Member
  • Aug 3, 2006
  • #5

Well, I tried downloading the firmware update from numerous places on the web and it was corrupt each time. I even borrowed a mate’s PSP & memory card to check my card and download the file to his card/PSP, without any luck.

In the end, I had to do the unthinkable and turn off encryption on my router until the file had downloaded via wireless Desperate times = desperate measures, but it works peachy now, no matter what the encryption level! This has since been tested on 3 different routers, all using different levels of encryption and worked each time

I’m baffled: on my Sony PSP, when I try to connect to the network, it says that there are no access points detected. What shall I do?

I’m surprised by how often I see this question submitted or added as a comment on other Sony PSP discussions, actually. I think that the problem here is that a lot of Sony PSP owners aren’t necessarily the geeky computer contingent that the Sony marketing team believes us to be.
To a computer savvy person, you say “wireless network” and they instantly know that we’re talking about an 802.11 or “wi-fi” network and that they require both a physical network connection — a modem, cable model, DSL line, etc — and what’s called a “wireless base station” that communicates with all the wireless devices and relays their network requests onto the physical network connection.
In our offices, for example, we have a cable modem line that plugs directly into a wireless base station. It’s having both of those that give you a wireless network connection: If you have either alone, you’ll either have a network connection but no way to connect to it wirelessly, or a wireless local network that isn’t actually hooked up to the Internet at large.
On the Sony PSP unit, it supports wireless networking with its built-in wifi network capabilities, and now with the 2.0 firmware update, it also includes a reasonably powerful Web browser, but just as you can’t watch a movie without a UMD or memory stick, you can’t actually use the PSP to connect to the Internet without finding a local wireless network to join.
And that’s where you are: If you’re seeing “no access points” displayed, it’s because you aren’t within range of a wireless wifi network. Make sense?
Now, it turns out that there are two basic types of wireless networks that a PSP can connect to: an “open” network and a network that has what’s called a Wireless Encryption Password, or WEP. The latter is a bit safer from the geek perspective, but if you’re just plugging in to grab a download, can be more of a hassle because you need to find out the network password and enter it on your PSP so you’ll be allowed on the network.
An open network, one that doesn’t have any password requirement, is riskier for regular computer usage, but a ton easier for us Sony PSP fans wanting to get onto the Internet.
As a result, my recommendation is to check out some of your local coffee shops, computer stores, and even small business centers or hotels to see if you can find an open network to use. Our office is around the corner from a popular Irish pub, for example, that has an open wifi network, so you could indulge and play on your PSP while sipping a nice cold Guinness, even! 🙂
I hope that helps clear up this common point of confusion with the Playstation Portable and its networking capabilities.

Response by poster: Just to clear this up: I have a wireless router already, it’s already connecting computers further away than Young Flabdablet’s bedroom, and it’s doing WPA because my laptop’s running a crappy D-Link wireless card driver that doesn’t support WPA2.

I would rather put a physical limit on where he is able to connect the PSP to the network (the room with wired Ethernet outlets) than adopt a wireless solution needing active administration, but if there’s nothing readily available that lets me do this, I may just give up and do the MAC filtering thing instead.
posted by flabdablet at 5:06 AM on August 31, 2007

Instead of using a key, we have no password, but have our router set up only to allow devices whose MAC addresses are registered. You could configure your router to do this and allow all your computers on, but not your kid’s computers except for the PSP.

nb: He can surf the internets on the PSP, so look out there. I think there are parental controls you can use for the PSP.
posted by By The Grace of God at 9:05 AM on August 31, 2007

Response by poster: I know he can surf the Internet on the PSP. That’s precisely why I only want him able to do that in a public area in the house. I have no wish to make the Internet frustrating and useless to him with a crapflood of false positives from some idiot content filter, so I won’t be installing "parental controls". It seems to me that the only parental control that ever actually works properly is random parental eyeballs. I’m perfectly happy with the results of that policy so far.

If the only way he can connect to the Internet is with a bit of wire, then I don’t have any admin task to do beyond what I’m already doing for his PC (which is in the computer room, not in his bedroom): occasionally look at what’s on his screen. If I hand him the WPA passphrase and enable wireless access, and use router settings of whatever kind to control access to that, then I have to Do Something every time he wants to log on, and remember to Do Something Else every time he takes the PSP away for non-network play.

Which is why I wanted to find out whether it’s possible to set up a PSP network connection that’s physically tethered to the PSP with good old-fashioned wire.

So far I’m getting the impression that it isn’t.

My router is a Billion 7402VGP, and it has MAC blacklisting and whitelisting, as well as packet filter that can apply time schedules to selected source IP addresses, and a DHCP server that can fix an IP address to a given MAC; I could fiddle and fartarse about with that and get my false sense of security that way. But the wired connection is so much simpler and more foolproof.
posted by flabdablet at 7:00 PM on August 31, 2007

flab: your monitoring style is extremely laudatory.

How about getting a long lanyard and connecting the psp to the desk or something in the computer room? Even if you didn’t have the monitoring reason, the fact that it’s NOT HIS PSP is a good reason to have it lanyarded, for safety.
posted by By The Grace of God at 4:20 AM on September 1, 2007

Response by poster: By gum, you might have something there. I won’t go the lanyard, because I don’t want to make the computer room the only place he can use the PSP, just the only place he can browse the web at home. But you’ve helped me see that it’s not necessarily a network cable I need; anything that guarantees the PSP is present in the computer room would do.

So I’ll hang a longish USB cable off my headless Linux box, and put a script on that box that tells the router to whitelist the PSP’s MAC when it’s plugged in, and unlist it when it’s disconnected.

If he can work out how to do MAC spoofing on a PSP, he doesn’t need me protecting him from the Internet 🙂
posted by flabdablet at 8:43 AM on September 1, 2007