How to identify an adjective

PM visits New York Stock Exchange, holds roundtable with CEOs of int’l firms

Vietnamese Prime Minister Pham Minh Chinh (C) visits the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) (Photo: VNA) In his meeting with NYSE leaders, the Vietnamese PM expressed his pleasure to visit the largest stock exchange in the world in terms of market capitalisation, and thanked them for the warm welcome and the privilege to ring the bell to end the trading session of May 16. PM Pham Minh Chinh meets with representatives of NYSE (Photo: VNA) PM Chinh stressed that Vietnam is cracking down on the violations of a few unscrupulous investors in the country’s stock markets to ensure its security, transparency, and sustainable development. He asked the NYSE to cooperate and share experience in developing an effective, sustainable stock market in Vietnam as well as realising the country’s ambition to successfully build a regional-level financial centre, foster the win-win partnership between the NYSE and Vietnamese agencies and companies, contributing to the development of the … [Read more. ] about PM visits New York Stock Exchange, holds roundtable with CEOs of int’l firms

PM visits New York Stock Exchange, holds roundtable with CEOs of world leading firms

Vietnamese Prime Minister Pham Minh Chinh held a working session at the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE) on May 16 (local time) as part of his trip to the US. In his meeting with NYSE leaders, the Vietnamese PM expressed his pleasure to visit the largest stock exchange in the world in terms of market capitalisation, and thanked them for the warm welcome and the privilege to ring the bell to end the trading session of May 16. PM Pham Minh Chinh meets with representatives of NYSE (Photo: VNA) PM Chinh stressed that Vietnam is cracking down on the violations of a few unscrupulous investors in the country’s stock markets to ensure its security, transparency, and sustainable development. He asked the NYSE to cooperate and share experience in developing an effective, sustainable stock market in Vietnam as well as realising the country’s ambition to successfully build a regional-level financial centre, foster the win-win partnership between the NYSE and Vietnamese … [Read more. ] about PM visits New York Stock Exchange, holds roundtable with CEOs of world leading firms

Techcombank adopts Salesforce technology to drive digital transformation and customer engagement

The initial deployment of Salesforce Financial Services Cloud across Techcombank’s network of over 5,000 frontline staff, represents the first of its kind cloud CRM implementation in the Vietnamese banking industry. An early adopter and pioneer of new technologies, standards, and solutions, Techcombank is recognized as one of the most innovative and digitally-forward banks in Vietnam. Guided by its vision of “Change banking, change lives”, the Bank continues to lead the digital transformation of the financial industry, in order to launch innovative offerings to Vietnamese consumers at speed and scale. Before working with Salesforce, Techcombank was using an in-house customer relationship management (CRM) system. The Bank recognized that there was untapped potential to integrate data and lead generation processes, and leverage real-time insights to help Techcombank’s relationship managers deliver seamless, differentiated experiences to customers. By deploying Salesforce … [Read more. ] about Techcombank adopts Salesforce technology to drive digital transformation and customer engagement

Vietnamese delegation to attend ADSOM and ADSOM+ in Cambodia

The Vietnamese delegation was welcomed by General Mao Vibol, Deputy Director of the General Department of Policy and Foreign Affairs of Cambodia at the airport. The same day, the Vietnamese deputy defense minister had a bilateral meeting with heads of Cambodian and Singaporean delegations ahead of ADSOM and ADSOM+. At the meeting with Director of the General Department of Policy and Foreign Affairs of Cambodia General Nem Sowat, the two sides highly appreciated the bilateral defense cooperation over the past time, especially the success of the 5th Vietnam-Cambodia Defense Policy Dialogue and the freshly-ended first Vietnam-Cambodia Border Defense Friendship Exchange. They affirmed that these activities have contributed to popularizing the traditional friendship between the two countries to their people and troops. The heads of the two delegations agreed that in the coming time the two sides will closely coordinate to effectively carry out contents in the defense cooperation plan … [Read more. ] about Vietnamese delegation to attend ADSOM and ADSOM+ in Cambodia

Timor Leste win 2nd medal, VN bag gold in 10,000m

With a Vietnamese flag in his hand, Felisberto de Deus celebrates after winning the second silver medal for Timor Leste. VNA/VNS Photo Hoàng Linh Hoàng Hồ HÀ NỘI — Felisberto de Deus, with a Vietnamese flag in his hand, waved at the fans cheering on his second silver medal at this year’s Games. One day after the historic SEA Games silver in the men’s 5,000m event, Deus continued to make Timor Leste proud with another medal in the men’s 10,000m. The two silvers that Deus won are also the only medals of the Timor Leste delegation so far. Massive effort helped the East Timorese finish second, behind only Vietnamese veteran Nguyễn Văn Lai who completed his golden double with a time of 32:17.34. It was the second gold for the 35-year-old runner and the second time Lai surpassed Deus, the first time being in the 5,000m. In the 800m heptathlon event, a superb performance by Nguyễn Linh Na bagged Việt … [Read more. ] about Timor Leste win 2nd medal, VN bag gold in 10,000m

Vietnamese students champion international environmental competition

A team of three Vietnamese high school students has won an international prize on environmental sustainability. Team ‘Adorbsies’ of three Vietnamese high school students has won the first prize of an international environmental competition. From left: Adorbsies member Lương Anh Khánh Huyền, Trần Quỳnh Anh, Bùi Tú Uyên. Photos courtesy of the team Bùi Tú Uyên, Lương Anh Khánh Huyền and Trần Quỳnh Anh brought home US$100,000 from the Earth Prize competition, an initiative of the Switzerland-based Earth Foundation that encourages students to address environmental issues. Beating more than 650 teams across 114 countries and territories, the three girls’ idea of creating biodegradable menstrual pads from dragon fruit peel won the hearts of the judges for its practicality. “This was a very difficult choice for The Earth Prize Adjudicating Panel to make; but Team Adorbsies’ project is an idea turned into a solution that can make a genuine difference,” said Rina … [Read more. ] about Vietnamese students champion international environmental competition

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Adjectives are words that describe nouns within sentences. They usually answer questions that someone might have about the noun, such as “What kind?” “How many?” and “Which one?” Because adjectives appear in a few places within a sentence, you can usually spot an adjective by checking certain places. Depending on the form of the adjective, it may also have a suffix, such as -ish, -ous or -ful, which can make it easy to identify adjectives that are not used in a sentence.

How to identify an adjective

Tip: Keep in mind that there can be more than one adjective in a sentence. For example, a sentence that reads, “The shy, brunette girl smiled,” “shy” and “brunette” are adjectives.

What is an Adjective

An adjective is a word that describes or modifies a noun. In simple terms, it is a describing word. They describe qualities such as size, color, type, and number.

An adjective can be used after or before a noun. The adjectives that follow the noun are known as predicate adjectives. The adjectives that precede the noun are known as attributive adjectives.

Here, step by step we will explain how to identify an adjective in a sentence.

How to Identify an Adjective in a Sentence

Step 1: Identify the Nouns

Since an adjective’s main task is to modify a noun, adjectives are always placed before or after a noun. So it is important to identify the noun first. Just look for words that name people, places, or things.

Jane bought a new dress .

Rita slept in my old room .

Twelve students passed the final exam .

Step 2: Look at Nearby Words

Now that you have identified the nouns check if there are any words nearby that describe or modify the nouns.

Note: Attributive adjectives are placed directly in front of the noun. But, predicative adjectives are not placed directly after the noun. When the adjective follows the noun, there is always a state verb between them.

Jane bought a new dress .

Rita slept in my old room .

Twelve students passed the final exam .

Step 3: Use Questions to Recheck

Adjectives answer the following questions about the noun:

  • Which?
  • What kind of?
  • How many?

See if the words you have identified as adjectives answer any one of these questions. If they can answer these questions, they are without a doubt adjectives.

Jane bought a new dress.

What kind of dress? a new dress

What kind of bag? a red bag

Rita slept in my old room.

Which room? my old room

Twelve students passed the final exam.

Which exam? final exam

How many students? twelve students

How to identify an adjective

Comparative vs Superlative Forms

Adjectives can also occur in the form of comparatives and superlatives. Comparative and superlative adjectives are easier to identify because of their unique structure.

Comparative adjectives take the ending er or use the word more before the adjective.

Jean is prettier than her sister.

She is more beautiful than her mother.

Superlative adjectives take the ending est or use the word most before the adjective.

Jane is the prettiest girl in the room.

She is the most beautiful woman I’ve ever seen.

Examples of Adjectives

You can use the above-explained methods to identify the adjectives in the following sentences.

  1. The pretty girl is riding her bicycle.
  2. Fifteen students were absent from class.
  3. The short girl laughed at the new teacher.
  4. The old professor has two daughters.
  5. What is the shortest route to the maternity hospital?
  6. Gladys is a rich woman.
  1. pretty
  2. fifteen
  3. short, new
  4. old, two
  5. shortest, maternity
  6. rich

About the Author: Hasa

Hasa has a BA degree in English, French and Translation studies. She is currently reading for a Masters degree in English. Her areas of interests include literature, language, linguistics and also food.

Last Updated on October 2, 2020 by Ralph Nyadzi

With the below points in mind, never again will you find it difficult to identify an adjective in a sentence .

The first thing you need to know is that almost any word can perform the function of an adjective in the English sentence.

What this means is that it is not only words traditionally known to be adjectives that function as adjectives in sentences.

How to easily identify an adjective

It is most likely that any word with at least one of the following characteristics is an adjective.

1. Words which qualify nouns within a noun phrase are generally adjectives e.g. native son, country music, indigenous people, awesome remarks, basic idea, cold weather, social media.

2. Words built from other words with the following endings are usually (not always) adjectives

– ic – metallic, pathetic, fantastic, futuristic, academic, oceanic

– some – troublesome, unwholesome, irksome, worrisome

– ous – generous, fabulous, enormous, dangerous, spacious

– ate- unfortunate, compassionate,

– ful – fanciful, joyful, dreadful, woeful, thankful, regretful,

– ive – massive, corrosive, abusive, restive, imaginative, compulsive

– ish – yellowish, foolish, childish, feverish

– ble – unbelievable, valuable, unpalatable, contemptible

– ar – lunar, cellular, popular, polar, rectangular

– ed/en – individualized, forgotten, endangered, computerized

– al – natural, artificial, conjugal, marital, facial, optional

– ian/ean/an – Indian, herculean, European, African, Australian

3. Adjectives usually answer the question: Which kind? or Which?

To identify an adjective, therefore, you can help yourself by asking these questions.

Consider the example below.

  • I live in a presidential palace.

Question: In which kind of palace do you live?

Answer: Presidential palace.

“Presidential” thus qualifies/specifies “palace” and is, therefore, an adjective.

4. Some hyphenated compound words are adjectives

Another simple way to identify an adjective is to look out for hyphenated compound words within a noun phrase. You may go ahead to ask and answer the question which/which kind? just to be sure.

Here are some examples of compound words functioning as adjectives.

  • die-hard criminal,
  • state-of-the-art mansion,
  • up-and-coming musician

5. An adjective can be replaced by another adjective.

In that case the grammatical correctness of the sentence as a whole does not change.

  • This is a family property.

“Family” in the above example can be said to be an adjective because other well-known adjectives like cheap, new, valuable and so on can replace it in the sentence.

The words in bold below are adjectives

(a) Attempted murder

(b) Clinical psychologist

(c) Obvious insolence

(d) Underlined words

So now you know.

Next time you need to identify an adjective in a sentence, use the above characteristics of adjectives to your advantage.

Adjectives are describing words. Here are a few tips to identify adjectives.

An adjective can exist in three forms: the positive, the comparative and the superlative. The word is probably an adjective, if you can add -er or -est to it. Or, if you can use more or most in front of it. The following words are all adjectives.

  • Short / shorter / shortest
  • Kind / kinder / kindest
  • Soft / softer / softest
  • Nice / nicer / nicest
  • Fat / fatter / fattest
  • Beautiful / more beautiful / most beautiful
  • Tragic / more tragic / most tragic

Adjectives can also be used with degree modifiers like very, quite or pretty.

  • I am very happy.
  • He is quite handsome.
  • That was a pretty disgusting experience.

Adjectives can be immediately followed by nouns.

  • That was a difficult situation. (Here the adjective difficult goes in front of the noun situation.)

Exercise

Identify the adjectives in the following sentences.

1. She is a nice person.

2. Suman has such a sweet voice.

3. Megha is perhaps the most industrious woman I know.

4. Krishna is cleverer than most boys his age.

5. Amar has won a prestigious award.

6. Ann has a lovely voice.

Answers

Nice, sweet, industrious, cleverer, prestigious, lovely

June 2, 2019 –

Identify the adjectives in the following sentences.

1. The cake baking in the oven made the whole house fragrant.

It modifies the noun house.

2. The climber dangled in midair, held by a frail rope.

It modifies the noun rope.

3. There was a lot of frantic activity just before the arrival of royal visitors.

It modifies the noun activity.

4. There was always a lot of fraternal affection between the boys.

It modifies the noun affection.

5. The puppy flopped around on the slippery floor.

It modifies the noun floor.

6. The wallpaper had a floral pattern.

It modifies the noun pattern.

7. The shop sells ice-cream in eight different flavors.

Please select 2 correct answers

8. Lack of civilian clothes was the one flaw in our escape plan.

9. The hot coals made a fizzle as they hit the water.

It modifies the noun coals.

10. That was a flagrant abuse of his authority.

11. This new medication fills an urgent need.

Please select 2 correct answers

12. Our final meeting for the season is next Wednesday.

Please select 2 correct answers

Answers

1. The cake baking in the oven made the whole house fragrant. (Adjective – fragrant)

2. The climber dangled in midair, held by a frail rope. (Adjective – frail)

3. There was a lot of frantic activity just before the arrival of royal visitors. (Adjectives – frantic, royal)

4. There was always a lot of fraternal affection between the boys. (Adjective – fraternal)

5. The puppy flopped around on the slippery floor. (Adjective – slippery)

6. The wallpaper had a floral pattern. (Adjective – floral)

7. The shop sells ice-cream in eight different flavors. (Adjective – eight, different)

8. Lack of civilian clothes was the one flaw in our escape plan. (Adjectives – civilian, one, escape)

9. The hot coals made a fizzle as they hit the water. (Adjective – hot)

10. That was a flagrant abuse of his authority. (Adjective – flagrant)

11. This new medication fills an urgent need. (Adjectives – new and urgent) 12. Our final meeting for the season is next Wednesday. (Adjectives – next and final)

ELISSA HANSEN

VOCAB

Adjectives, as everyone learned in grammar school, are describing words. Knowing that gives you a good start as you identify adjective phrases since once you find an adjective, you have found an adjective phrase. All that’s left is figuring out which words the adjective governs. Knowing where adjective phrases appear can help you pinpoint the entire phrase.

Explore this article

  • Adjective Phrase Forms
  • Noun Modifiers
  • In the Predicate
  • Opening Adjectives

1 Adjective Phrase Forms

Adjective phrases are grammatical units that make up part of a sentence’s syntax. Each adjective phrase includes only one adjective, but English has several possible forms for adjective phrases. They can be as short as a single adjective, such as “blue.” They can combine one or more adverbs with an adjective as in “quite ill” and “very carefully painted.” They can combine an adjective with a prepositional phrase such as “unhappy about the game,” and finally, they can consist of an adjective governing a verb phrase as in “pleased to meet you.” These forms can also combine. For example, the adjective phrase “eager to get away from him” is headed by the adjective “eager,” which governs the infinitive “to get away,” which in turn governs the prepositional phrase “from him.”

Vocabulary Builder

2 Noun Modifiers

An adjective phrase functions as a noun modifier when it comes right before the noun that it describes. “Gray duck” is a simple example with the adjective phrase “gray” modifying the noun “duck.” When more complex adjective phrases act as noun modifiers, they are hyphenated. For example, “ready-to-wear clothing” consists of a noun, “clothing,” modified by an adjective that governs an infinitive, the adjective phrase “ready to wear.” If multiple adjectives modify a noun, each adjective is its own adjective phrase: “Old, forgotten book” has two adjective phrases, “old” and “forgotten.”

3 In the Predicate

Adjective phrases that come after the main verb and aren’t simply modifying a noun can serve two functions. Predicate adjectives describe a sentence’s subject, as in the sentence “The earthquake was devastating.” The adjective phrase “devastating” modifies the sentence’s subject, “earthquake.” Predicate adjectives follow “linking verbs,” which are forms of “to be” such as “was” or “is,” sensory verbs such as “feels” and a few other verbs such as “become” and “appear.” Adjective phrases that follow main verbs can also be object complements, describing direct objects as “red” describes “nails” in the sentence “She painted her nails red.”

4 Opening Adjectives

Finally, adjective phrases can introduce a sentence. These “opening adjectives” modify the sentence’s subject, but unlike adjective phrases that act as noun modifiers, they don’t immediately precede the noun. In the sentence “Bold and brave, the knight set forth,” the two adjective phrases “bold” and “brave” modify the subject, “knight.” In contrast, if they were used as noun modifiers, the sentence would read “The bold and brave knight set forth.” Opening adjectives are always followed by commas.

references

  • 1 The Linguistic Structure of Modern English; Laurel J. Brinton and Donna M. Brinton
  • 2 Introduction to the Grammar of English; Rodney Huddleston

About the Author

Elissa Hansen has more than nine years of editorial experience, and she specializes in academic editing across disciplines. She teaches university English and professional writing courses, holding a Bachelor of Arts in English and a certificate in technical communication from Cal Poly, a Master of Arts in English from the University of Wyoming, and a doctorate in English from the University of Minnesota.

A history sheeter convicted in 2013 for raping a five-year-old girl in the neighbourhood, was released in 2018 early for good behaviour in jail.

I have below questions about this sentence, specifically use of word convicted.

Has the word convicted been used in the above sentence as an adjective or a past tense verb?

Can we use convict instead of convicted as an adjective?

A history sheeter convicted for raping a five-year-old girl in the neighborhood

How to identify this sentence if it is is convicted or was convicted.

2 Answers 2

It is a case of ellipsis–

A history sheeter (who was) convicted in 2013 for raping a five-year-old girl in the neighborhood, was released in 2018 early for good behaviour in jail.

who was is ellipted and convict is used as a verb in this case. You cannot use convict instead of convicted

The quote comes from a Times of India news report. As such, it uses Indian English which has some differences from Standard English (the common features of English as used in Britain, the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, and by other native English speakers of European descent). For instance, I don’t know what a “history sheeter” is, nor can I work it out from the context. However, that doesn’t affect my recognition of the part of speech for “convicted”.

I’ll answer your second question first because it’s easier. Convict is only a verb or a noun, so you can’t use it as an adjective.

In English, adjectives usually come before the noun they modify: “a happy man”, or they follow a verb after a noun: “a man was happy“. There are exceptions to this rule, but it’s a good rule of thumb. In this case, “convicted” is only an adjective before the noun.

Now on to your first question: is it an adjective or the past tense form of the verb “to convict”? The sentence can be simplified down to:

A history sheeter was released.

Everything before “was” is a clause acting as the subject:

A history sheeter convicted in 2013 for raping a five-year-old girl in the neighbourhood

This can be illustrated by using two sentences:

The next sentence is about a history sheeter convicted in 2013 for raping a five-year-old girl in the neighbourhood. He was released in 2018 early for good behaviour in jail.

Now it is clear that “a history sheeter convicted in 2013 for raping a five-year-old girl in the neighbourhood” is not an independent sentence, but a sub-clause that can be replaced by the pronoun “he” once it is in context.

It means “a history sheeter who was convicted . “, with “who was” removed by ellipsis. So, the entire verb phrase is “was convicted”. “Convicted” is the past participle of “to convict”, which is identical to the simple past tense form, but two conjugated forms can’t appear without something else in between.

The sub clause “[who was] convicted in 2013 for raping a five-year-old girl in the neighbourhood” is acting like an adjective here, but appearing after the noun.

So, why can’t “convicted” be an adjective the same way as “I was contented yesterday”? This is because “to be verbed” is a passive construction. The man was convicted by someone else; someone convicted the man. Once someone has been convicted, they can’t be “unconvicted”. The Oxford definition of “convicted” is:

Having been declared guilty of a criminal offence by the verdict of a jury or the decision of a judge.

It’s like having a broken leg. The leg can’t break itself, some external force must do it. Even after the leg has healed, it was still broken at some point in the past. So the man can’t be both convicted in 2013, and not convicted afterwards, which the adjective would suggest if it was used.

Many adjectives do have exactly the same form as the past particle of many verbs, so it can be tricky to identify which is which. You need to identify the underlying grammar ( which may be difficult because of ellipsis or other idiomatic grammar) and also the meaning and use of the word in question. You won’t be able to tell whether a different word is an adjective or a past participle by the grammar alone.

What is an adjective?

Adjectives are words that describe the qualities or states of being of nouns: enormous, doglike, silly, yellow, fun, fast. They can also describe the quantity of nouns: many, few, millions, eleven.

Adjectives modify nouns

Most students learn that adjectives are words that modify (describe) nouns. Adjectives do not modify verbs or adverbs or other adjectives.

In the sentences above, the adjectives are easy to spot because they come immediately before the nouns they modify.

The technical term for an adjective used this way is predicate adjective.

Uses of adjectives

Adjectives tell the reader how much—or how many—of something you’re talking about, which thing you want passed to you, or which kind of something you want.

Three and white are modifying flowers.

Often, when adjectives are used together, you should separate them with a comma or conjunction. See “Coordinate Adjectives” below for more detail.

Degrees of comparison

Adjectives come in three forms: absolute, comparative, and superlative. Absolute adjectives describe something in its own right.

Comparative adjectives, unsurprisingly, make a comparison between two or more things. For most one-syllable adjectives, the comparative is formed by adding the suffix -er (or just -r if the adjective already ends with an e). For two-syllable adjectives ending in -y, replace -y with -ier. For multi-syllable adjectives, add the word more.

Superlative adjectives indicate that something has the highest degree of the quality in question. One-syllable adjectives become superlatives by adding the suffix -est (or just -st for adjectives that already end in e). Two-syllable adjectives ending in -y replace -y with -iest. Multi-syllable adjectives add the word most. When you use an article with a superlative adjective, it will almost always be the definite article (the) rather than a or an. Using a superlative inherently indicates that you are talking about a specific item or items.

Coordinate adjectives

Coordinate adjectives should be separated by a comma or the word and. Adjectives are said to be coordinate if they modify the same noun in a sentence.

But just the fact that two adjectives appear next to each other doesn’t automatically mean they are coordinate. Sometimes, an adjective and a noun form a single semantic unit, which is then modified by another adjective. In this case, the adjectives are not coordinate and should not be separated by a comma.

In some cases, it’s pretty hard to decide whether two adjectives are coordinate or not. But there are a couple of ways you can test them. Try inserting the word and between the adjectives to see if the phrase still seems natural. In the first sentence, “this tattered and woolen sweater” doesn’t sound right because you really aren’t talking about a sweater that is both tattered and woolen. It’s a woolen sweater that is tattered. Woolen sweater forms a unit of meaning that is modified by tattered.

Another way to test for coordinate adjectives is to try switching the order of the adjectives and seeing if the phrase still works. In the second sentence, you wouldn’t say “No one could open the silver old locket.” You can’t reverse the order of the adjectives because silver locket is a unit that is modified by old.

Adjectives vs. adverbs

As mentioned above, many of us learned in school that adjectives modify nouns and that adverbs modify verbs. But as we’ve seen, adjectives can also act as complements for linking verbs. This leads to a common type of error: incorrectly substituting an adverb in place of a predicate adjective. An example you’ve probably heard before is:

Because “feel” is a verb, it seems to call for an adverb rather than an adjective. But “feel” isn’t just any verb; it’s a linking verb. An adverb would describe how you perform the action of feeling—an adjective describes what you feel. “I feel badly” means that you are bad at feeling things. If you’re trying to read Braille through thick leather gloves, then it might make sense for you to say “I feel badly.” But if you’re trying to say that you are experiencing negative emotions, “I feel bad” is the phrase you want.

It’s easier to see this distinction with a different linking verb. Consider the difference between these two sentences:

“Goober smells badly” means that Goober, the poor thing, has a weak sense of smell. “Goober smells bad” means Goober stinks—poor us.

When nouns become adjectives and adjectives become nouns

One more thing you should know about adjectives is that, sometimes, a word that is normally used as a noun can function as an adjective, depending on its placement. For example:

Guide is a noun. But in this sentence, it modifies dog. It works the other way, too. Some words that are normally adjectives can function as nouns:

In the context of this sentence, homeless is functioning as a noun. It can be hard to wrap your head around this if you think of adjectives and nouns only as particular classes of words. But the terms “adjective” and “noun” aren’t just about a word’s form—they’re also about its function.

Adjective usage advice

We’ll end with a few words about adjectives and style. It’s one thing to know how to use an adjective; it’s another to know when using one is a good idea. Good writing is precise and concise. Sometimes, you need an adjective to convey exactly what you mean. It’s hard to describe a red sports car without the word “red.” But, often, choosing the right noun eliminates the need to tack on an adjective. Is it a big house, or is it a mansion? A large crowd, or a throng? A mixed-breed dog, or a mutt? A dark night, or just . . . night? Always remember to make every word count in your writing. If you need an adjective, use it. But if it’s not pulling its weight, delete it.

Adjective FAQs

What is an adjective?

An adjective is a word that describes the traits, qualities, or number of a noun.

What are examples of adjectives?

Descriptive words like “beautiful,” “smooth,” or “heavy” are all adjectives, as are numbers ( “twelve eggs”).

What is the difference between adjectives and adverbs?

Adjectives modify nouns, while adverbs modify adjectives and other adverbs. For example, in the phrase “very funny movie,” funny is an adjective describing the noun movie , and very is an adverb describing the adjective funny .

Can adjectives modify adverbs?

Adjectives can only modify nouns, not adverbs. Only adverbs can modify other adverbs.

How to identify an adjective

How do you tell if a word is a noun verb or adjective?

How do you determine if a word is a noun? If a word is a noun:
It can directly follow articles (a, and, the) or quantity words (some, a lot, ten). (Nouns usually use an article, but not always.)
It can be pluralized.
It can be used in the pattern: article + adjective + noun.

How do you identify a verb and adjective? Verb: a word or phrase that describes an action, condition or experience e.g. ‘run’, ‘look’ and ‘feel’. Adjective: a word that describes a noun e.g. ‘big’, ‘boring’, ‘pink’, ‘quick’ and ‘obvious’.

What is difference between verb and adjective? Verbs & Adjectives:

How do you tell if a word is a noun verb or adjective? – Related Questions

What is difference between verb and noun?

A noun is a part of a speech that refers to a person, place, or thing. On the other hand, a verb is a part of a speech referring to some action, experience, or condition. Nouns may be the subject or object in a sentence whereas verbs form the main part of the predicate.

What is the difference between a verb and adverb?

An adverb is a verb that has gone into advertising. The main difference between verbs vs. adverbs is that verbs are action words, and adverbs are description words. Verbs state the action performed by a noun, while adverbs provide more information about how that action is performed.

How do you identify the verb form?

Learning how to identify verbs in different forms is important for locating verbs in a sentence. Let’s conjugate the verb “think” through all it’s forms: infinitive = to think, past tense = thought, present tense = think, past participle = have thought, present participle = am thinking.

What is verb and adverb give examples?

Verbs are action words. For example, some common English verbs include: ‘to walk’, ‘to swim’, ‘to talk’, ‘to watch’, ‘to try’, ‘to make’, ‘to read’ and ‘to examine’. Adverbs are words that add more detail and describe verbs. Common English adverbs include ‘quickly’, ‘slowly’, ‘cleverly’, ‘carefully’, ‘greedily’.

Can a word be both a verb and an adjective?

Although there are eight parts of speech, many words can be used as more than one part of speech. This is also true for verbs. Verbs can be used as adjectives depending on their function and usage in a sentence.

What is a verb give 5 examples?

These verbs include: start, leave, change, live, stop. Auxiliary verbs are also known as helping verbs and are used together with a main verb to show the verb’s tense or to form a question or negative. Common examples of auxiliary verbs include have, might, will.

Can a word be both a noun and a verb?

Yes, it’s true. A word can be both a noun and a verb. In fact, there are many words that can be used to name a person, place, or thing and also describe an action.

How do you use the same word as a verb and a noun?

If the sentence demands it you can use the same word as a noun and a verb repeatedly. To check if a word in the sentence is a noun you could try using the words ‘the’, ‘an’ or ‘a’ before the word and see if it still makes sense.

Can a verb be used as a noun?

Sometimes in English, a verb is used as a noun. When the verb form is altered and it serves the same function as a noun in the sentence, it is called a gerund.

Is should a verb or a noun?

should. / (ʃʊd) / verb. the past tense of shall : used as an auxiliary verb to indicate that an action is considered by the speaker to be obligatory (you should go) or to form the subjunctive mood with I or we (I should like to see you; if I should be late, go without me)See also shall.

Is love a noun or a verb?

love (noun) love (verb) love–hate (adjective)

Is played a verb or noun?

play (verb) play (noun) play–by–play (noun) played–out (adjective) playing card (noun)

Is a helping verb and adverb?

Modal helping verbs are: ought(to), may, might, can, could, will, would, shall, should, and must. Adverbs describe a verb, adjective or another adverb. Primary helping verbs are: do, be, and have.

Is has a verb or adverb?

Has is a verb – Word Type.

How do you tell the difference between a noun verb adjective and adverb?

Verbs express actions, occurrences, or states of being, e.g., be, become, bunt, inflate, run. Adjectives describe or modify nouns or pronouns, e.g., gentle, helpful, small. Adverbs describe or modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs, e.g., almost, gently, helpfully, someday.

What is the verb example?

A verb is the action or state of being in a sentence. Verbs can be expressed in different tenses, depending on when the action is being performed. Example: Jennifer walked to the store. In this sentence, the verb is “were.” It shows a state of being that was in the past, so it is a past tense verb.

How do you identify a verb and a noun in a sentence?

More often than not, the verb in the sentence is directly linked to the subject of the sentence. Identify who or what is completing the action in the sentence. In the sentence “She lifts weights,” “lifts” is the verb, and “she” is the noun. In “The dog ran away,” “ran” is the verb, so “dog” is the noun.

It is a dream of every writer to compose coherent, correct, and easy-to-read content. However, the desire may be cut short if the writer lacks a thorough understanding of adjectives and the correct way to use them in any writing. Unfortunately, while there are many online editing tools, very few specialize in perfecting adjectives in writing. As a result, a paper can be free of grammatical errors but still, have incorrect adjectives making it hard to read and delimit the intended purpose. In this respect, our adjective checker contains a special algorithm to detect, highlight and offer correct options to perfect your writing editing for error adjective. Follow the following sections to learn more about how this adjective finder works.

Adjectives in English: Definition, Examples, Types

Adjectives modify or describe pronouns and nouns. For instance, words such as obnoxious, happy, or quick can modify a pronoun or a noun. For example, an obnoxious person, the quick rabbit. In this respect, the pronoun or the noun has added a suffix to create an adjective. For example, beauty is a noun, while beautiful is an adjective.

The following are the different types of adjectives.

  • Possessive adjectives. The possessive adjectives show close association or ownership in a sentence, for instance, their, his, her, its. Their cut was stolen. There is an adjective showing a relationship with the cut.
  • Demonstrative adjectives. Demonstrative adjectives are used in pointing out, clarifying a thing or a person. The demonstrative adjectives are applicable when communicating about two or more things or people in the sentence, and the idea is to differentiate their actions, for instance: These houses are sold while those houses are still in the open.
  • Order adjective. The order adjective modifies a noun, and they vary depending on the following guidelines:
    • Qualifier- for instance, an adjective denoting the purpose of an item
    • Material- for example, plastic or wooden
    • Origin – for instance, Dutch or Greek
    • Colour – such as ash, pink, or red
    • Age – for instance, aged or young
    • Shape – such as oblong, square
    • Size – for instance, petite or gargantuan
    • Number – such as three, few
    • Opinion – for example, priceless, beautiful

How to identify an adjective

How to Identify Adjective in Your Writing

How to identify an adjective in a sentence comes easy through the use of the adjective checker tool. The checker has an interface that offers options for uploading and downloading your document online. It is a click-through process where you input instructions that the software directs. For instance, I can instruct the checker to find adjective in my sentence. Then, the checker skims through the documents, identifying and highlighting the adjectives in the document. It is a whole learning experience since the checker highlights adjective mistakes and provides correct options. At the end of the editing process, how to identify adjective phrases in a sentence becomes simple and straightforward.

How to Fix Sentences with the Wrong Adjective: the Ultimate Guide

The following guide is important to find adjectives in my sentence and subsequently correct the errors.

  • To identify adjective mistakes in the paper, you must learn to understand and correct the common adjective errors.
  • Most importantly, the difference between the cumulative and coordinate adjectives and their formatting rules. For instance, the cumulative adjective takes a special order to describe a pronoun or a noun, like, a reclining new seat.
  • The coordinative adjectives do not take special order while describing a noun or a pronoun, and their punctuation rules are different.
  • Mainly a cumulative adjective follows a particular order which starts by stating the quantity, giving the opinion, describing the size, establishing the age, defining the color, identifying the shape, proving the origin, describing the material, and stating the purpose.
  • We place commas in between the coordinative adjectives but not the cumulative adjectives.

How to identify an adjective

Adjective Checker: Features, Capabilities, How It Works

An adjective checker tool online works to fix sentences with the wrong adjective. The checker guides on how to fix sentences with wrong adjectives by providing correct options that replace the wrong one at one click. Further, the adjective finder in the checker contains accurate algorithms that also correct grammar mistakes in the sentences.

How to identify adjective phrases and find noun verb adjective checker contains valuable features that help in correcting adjective mistakes in a sentence. For instance, the adjective changer software helps change the wrong and replace it with the right one. Also, the checker contains the adjective detector tool that scrolls through the paper identifying and highlighting adjective misuse in the sentences and offers better options to improve on readability.

Amazingly, the adjective to noun converter online perfects the writing to expert levels by editing the sentences and retaining real information. Further, the adjective finder also has the preposition checker functionality that checks and corrects grammar, leaving the document clean and free of grammatical errors.

The adjective clause detector does not autocorrect mistakes, but it offers options for the author to replace what is sensible. It does not mean the corrections are not sensible, but some people would not correct certain errors depending on the nature and form of writing. Therefore, the checker is a guiding tool for the author. The checker specifies how to fix an adjective error and offers valuable options to editing for an error adjective. So is this an adjective detector? Yes, the checker detects adjectives and provides options for creating high-quality content that is readable and transferrable.

Whichever format, whether downloaded or online, the adjective checker tool has the same functionality and delivers identical results. Moreover, in case of any inconsistencies or software issues, the support is 24/7 to listen and respond to your queries.

How to Detect an Adjective: Final Words

An adjective detector tool is a useful software for any writer. It identifies and corrects adjective mistakes that improve the quality of the writing in terms of readability and free of common errors. The adjective finder tool is downloadable to Chrome add-ons. Depending on the urgency and frequency of editing, you can download and install the software in Microsoft Word or check online.

How to identify an adjective

  • What Is A Descriptive Adjective?
  • Examples
  • Rules And Best Practices
  • Improve With Grammar Coach

You can use adjectives to say a lot of different things. Thanks to adjectives, you can tell someone that you had an amazing birthday or that you ate a delicious meal. You can use adjectives to talk about your exciting vacation, your favorite movie, or even your little dog. Adjectives come in many different shapes and sizes, but many of them have something in common: they are used to describe people, places, and things. There are many types of adjectives, but descriptive adjectives are the ones you need when you want to describe something.

How to identify an adjective

What is a descriptive adjective?

A descriptive adjective is an adjective that modifies a noun or pronoun by describing it or expressing its quality.

Take a look at the following sentences:

  • He stood next to the tall woman.
  • The monkeys were very loud.

In these sentences, the words tall and loud are descriptive adjectives. They both describe the nouns they modify and tell us information we can use to describe the things they are referring to. We know that the woman would need a high number to refer to her height, and we know that the monkeys make noise that can be heard from far away.

Now, you might be wondering, “Don’t all adjectives describe the nouns and pronouns they modify?” While it is true that the vast majority of adjectives are descriptive adjectives, some adjectives don’t actually describe the nouns or pronouns that they modify. We refer to these adjectives as limiting adjectives.

The following sentence has an example of a limiting adjective:

  • Hand me that pen.

In this sentence, the word that is an adjective that modifies the noun pen. The adjective that indicates the pen is relatively far away from the speaker. However, the word that doesn’t describe the pen’s qualities or characteristics. We don’t know what the pen looks like, how heavy it is, how large it is, etc. The adjective that is not a descriptive adjective, because it doesn’t give us any information we can use to describe the traits or qualities of the noun it modifies.

List of descriptive adjectives

A great many of the adjectives you will find are descriptive adjectives. As long as an adjective describes or qualifies the noun or pronoun it modifies, it is considered to be a descriptive adjective. The following list gives just a few examples of descriptive adjectives:

  • angry, blue, careful, dry, eager, fast, great, hot, incredible, jumpy, klutzy, little, mighty, nice, outlandish, prim, quiet, rude, special, ticklish, undercover, vicious, wide, young, zesty

Where do you include a descriptive adjective in a sentence?

Descriptive adjectives can be used either before the nouns or pronouns they modify or can be used as the subject complement of a sentence following a linking verb.

  • We played with the cute kittens.
  • The skyscraper was humongous.

Descriptive adjective examples in a sentence

The following sentences have examples of descriptive adjectives. You’ll notice that all of these adjectives tell you something about a the qualities or characteristics of a noun or pronoun.

Example #1

  • I don’t like cold weather. (The adjective cold modifies the noun weather. Cold is a descriptive adjective that qualifies the weather by saying it has a low temperature.)

Example #2

  • Her clothes are really expensive. (The adjective expensive modifies the noun clothes. Expensive is a descriptive adjective that tells us the clothes cost a lot of money.)

Example #3

  • We used red, green, and orange paint. (The adjectives red, green, and orange modify the noun paint. All three of these adjectives are descriptive adjectives that say what color the paint was.)

Descriptive adjective rules & best practices

Grammatically, the most important thing to know about descriptive adjectives is that they come after limiting adjectives in adjective order and after non-descriptive words like articles and numbers. For example, we would say Danny bought some tasty oranges and not Danny bought tasty some oranges. The word some is the limiting adjective, so it precedes the descriptive adjective tasty. As another example, we would say Nicole owns a big dog and not Nicole owns big a dog. The article a precedes the descriptive adjective big.

Most descriptive adjectives can form comparative and superlative adjectives when you want to compare things to each other. For example, you can say that a mouse is small, a flea is smaller, and an amoeba is the smallest of the three. You could also say that a gold watch is expensive, a mansion is more expensive, and a space shuttle is the most expensive item out of all three.

A more complicated grammatical rule comes into effect when you use multiple descriptive adjectives to modify the same noun or pronoun. When we use multiple adjectives, we generally follow a particular adjective order. For example, we are more likely to say Hans owns a small, cheap, German car than Hans owns a German, small, cheap car or Hans owns a cheap, German, small car.

Adjective order is too complex a topic to explain here, so if you’d like to learn more about the ins and outs of the proper order of adjectives, check out our detailed guide to adjective order.

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Slippery, slimy, scrumptious, sugary…adjectives are delightful! Learn how to teach adjectives and apply that knowledge to grammar and writing.

Teaching Adjectives

Our entire language is made up of only eight parts of speech, so each one is critical.

Adjectives are magical in that they transform ordinary nouns and pronouns into vivid mental pictures.

We’ll tell you all you need to know about how to teach adjectives to your students.

How to identify an adjective

What Are Adjectives?

Adjectives are words that modify nouns or pronouns. They can do these three ways: by describing the noun/pronoun (the delectable chocolate), quantifying it (three chocolates or some chocolates), or limiting it (that chocolate).

You can identify an adjective by thinking about the question it answers. An adjective answers one of these questions:

  • What kind?
  • How many?
  • How much?
  • Which?
  • Whose?

How to identify an adjective

Types of Adjectives

Language is complicated, and as you can imagine, you can deep dive into the nitty-gritty of adjectives. Elementary (and even middle school) students don’t need the fine points of linguistics, but they do need to know the basic types of adjectives.

Keep in mind that children do not have the vocabulary of adults. They will benefit from having a running adjective list to provide choices and examples.

Adjectives of Quality

These are the adjectives that answer the question, “What kind?” They are the easiest adjectives to identify because they are the ones connected to our senses. For example, What kind of marshmallow? A toasted, gooey, sugary marshmallow. These three adjectives are adjectives of quality.

Adjectives of Number

Adjectives of number answer the question, “How many?” These could be a specific number, as in, “I ate twelve marshmallows,” or an indefinite number, “I ate some marshmallows.”

How to identify an adjective

Adjectives of Quantity

Adjectives of quantity answer the question, “How much?” Although they seem very close to adjectives of number (and some of them are the same), they specify an amount that is not readily countable. For example, “I got little sleep.” or “I did not drink any cocoa.”

Demonstrative Adjectives

Demonstrative adjectives answer the question, “Which one?” by demonstrating the noun in the question. “I would like that flavor of ice cream, please.”

Possessive Adjectives

Possessive adjectives answer the question, “Whose?” They could be personal pronouns acting like adjectives (“My homework is missing!”) or possessive nouns (“Jose’s dog is hilarious!”)

Articles

These tiny but common words (a, an, and the) are called articles, and they act like adjectives because they limit the noun or pronoun.

How to identify an adjective

Why Teach Adjectives?

Knowing how to select quality adjectives is a writing skill. A noun is basic and vague; adjectives make that noun come alive! The right adjectives can create detailed pictures in the minds of the readers.

Understanding adjectives can also pave the way for foreign language learning. All languages have structure, and though you intuit most of the structure of your native language, you typically need formal instruction to learn another.

Most languages have special spelling and grammar rules that apply to adjectives, so understanding them in English is a jump start to understanding them in Spanish, Latin, or Mandarin.

Fun Ways to Teach Adjectives

Adjectives are a pleasure to teach and learn because they add a creative spark to composition. Why settle for more workbook pages when adjective activities are so enjoyable?

Parts of Speech Virtual Escape Room

Try this fun (and free!) Stormy Night Parts of Speech Virtual Escape Room and let your students practice identifying adjectives, adverbs, nouns, and verbs!

Mad Libs

Every grammar teacher owes the creator of Mad Libs a thank you. You can create a story where you ask for nouns and adjectives. If your students are ready to go deeper, ask for “adjectives of quality,” “adjectives of number,” etc.

Sentence Stretch

Take a basic sentence and spice it up with adjectives. Watch the sentence stretch! You can work on this cooperatively, or each person can stretch the same sentence with vastly different results!

How to identify an adjective

Describe This

Hold up a magazine photo or a funny meme. Ask the student, “What is the basic noun that is the subject of the picture?” Then add adjectives to describe the picture.

Your Cake, Your Way

Food is wonderful to describe because you can use adjectives that draw from all five senses: touch, smell, sight, hearing, and taste. Ask your students to describe their ultimate cake using detailed adjectives. You can prompt them with questions like:

  • What flavor is your cake?
  • What size is it?
  • What does it smell like?
  • What does it taste like?
  • If you stuck your finger in it, what would it feel like?

I Spy

Did you know the game I Spy relies on adjectives? Use various adjectives to indicate objects in the room. Go beyond color to include size and texture. For example, “I spy something smooth,” or “I spy something tiny.”

Adjective Scattergories

Place an object on the table. Set a timer for 2 minutes and have two students (or two teams) write as many adjectives that describe the object as they can. When the timer goes off, run through the list. If both students have the same adjective, it gets crossed off the list. Whoever has the larger number of unique adjectives wins the round.

How to identify an adjective

How to Teach Adjectives to Kids

Stupendous, incredible, spectacular! Your lessons on adjectives are sure to impress your kids. This is one part of speech that is sure to make a splash with these creative adjective activities.

Practice in Recognizing the Parts of Speech

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How to identify an adjective

This exercise will give you practice in recognizing adjectives–the part of speech that modifies (or qualifies the meaning of) nouns. To learn more about adjectives in English, see:

  • Adding Adjectives and Adverbs to the Basic Sentence Unit
  • Practice in Turning Adjectives Into Adverbs
  • Sentence Building with Adjectives and Adverbs
  • Sentence Combining With Adjectives and Adverbs

Instructions

The sentences in this exercise have been adapted from those in two paragraphs of E.L. Doctorow’s novel World’s Fair (1985). (To read Doctorow’s original sentences, go to Ritual in Doctorow’s World’s Fair.)

See if you can identify all the adjectives in these 12 sentences. When you’re done, compare your responses with the answers on page two.

  1. Grandma’s room I regarded as a dark den of primitive rites and practices.
  2. She had two wobbly old candlesticks.
  3. Grandma lit the white candles and waved her hands over the flames.
  4. Grandma kept her room clean and tidy.
  5. She had a very impressive hope chest covered with a shawl and on her dresser a hairbrush and comb.
  6. There was a plain rocking chair under a lamp so she could read her prayer book.
  7. And on an end table beside the chair was a flat box packed with a medicinal leaf that was shredded like tobacco.
  8. This was the centerpiece of her most consistent and mysterious ritual.
  9. She removed the lid from this blue box and turned it on its back and used it to burn a pinch of the leaf.
  10. It made tiny pops and hisses as it burned.
  11. She turned her chair toward it and sat inhaling the thin wisps of smoke.
  12. The smell was pungent, as if from the underworld.

Here are the answers to the Exercise in Identifying Adjectives. Adjectives are in bold print.

  1. Grandma’s room I regarded as a dark den of primitive rites and practices.
  2. She had two wobbly old candlesticks.
  3. Grandma lit the white candles and waved her hands over the flames.
  4. Grandma kept her room clean and tidy.
  5. She had a very impressive hope chest covered with a shawl and on her dresser a hairbrush and comb.
  6. There was a plain rocking chair under a lamp so she could read her prayer book.
  7. And on an end table beside the chair was a flat box packed with a medicinal leaf that was shredded like tobacco.
  8. This was the centerpiece of her most consistent and mysterious ritual.
  9. She removed the lid from this blue box and turned it on its back and used it to burn a pinch of the leaf.
  10. It made tiny pops and hisses as it burned.
  11. She turned her chair toward it and sat inhaling the thin wisps of smoke.
  12. The smell was pungent, as if from the underworld.

See also: Exercise in Identifying Adverbs

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  1. Effective Writing Practices Tutorial
  2. Grammar
  3. Adjective or Adverb

Adjective or Adverb

Adjectives and adverbs are modifying words.

Incorrect: She did good on her exam.

In the sentence above, the verb did is modified by an adjective good, when it should be modified by an adverb well.

Correcting Adjective or Adverb Problems

Correct: She did well on her exam.

Many adverbs are formed by adding a suffix -ly at the end of an adjective:

Change close to closely

Change patient to patiently

Some adverbs and adjectives are, however, identical in form:

Adjectives a rough draft Adverbs play rough
first exam ride first
right hand turn right

An adjective is a part of speech that modifies a noun or pronoun.

Adjectives usually tell what kind, how many, or which about nouns or pronouns.

An adverb is a part of speech that modifies a another adverb, a verb, or an adjective. It is often recognized by the suffix -ly at the end of it.

Adjectives usually describe an action in terms of how, when, where, and to what extent it occurred.

To avoid an error, identify what word the adverb or adjective in question modifies. If the word modified is a noun or a pronoun, use an adjective. If the word modified is a verb, an adjective, or another adverb, use an adverb to modify it.

Sometimes an adverb is confused with an adjective similar in meaning.

Bad or Badly

Bad is an adjective used with linking verbs such as feel, seem, be, look, etc.

Incorrect: I feel badly that he is not taking part in the game.

Correct: I feel bad that he is not taking part in the game.

Badly is an adverb used to modify action verbs.

Incorrect: Sometimes Hollywood romance ends bad .

Correct: Sometimes Hollywood romance ends badly .

Calm or Calmly

Calm is an adjective, and it is used to modify nouns and pronouns. It is also used with linking verbs.

Incorrect: She appeared calmly after the accident.

Correct: She appeared calm after the accident.

Calmly is an adverb that modifies verbs.

Incorrect: She tried to be brave and take the bad news calm .

Correct: She tried to be brave and take the bad news calmly .

Easy or Easily

Easy is an adjective used to modify nouns and pronouns. It is also used with linking verbs.

Incorrect: The assignment looked easily .

Correct: The assignment looked easy .

Easily is an adverb, and it is used to modify verbs.

Incorrect: The players were moving easy around the field.

Correct: The players were moving easily around the field.

Good or Well

Good is an adjective. It is also often used with linking verbs.

Incorrect: It felt well to score an A on the final.

Correct: It felt good to score an A on the final.

Well, when used as an adjective, implies “in good health.” When used as an adverb, well means “expertly.”

Correct: My grandmother looks well even now in her eighties.

Incorrect: My friend plays the piano good .

Correct: My friend plays the piano well . (expertly)

Real or Really

Really is an adverb, and it modifies other adverbs, verbs, or adjectives. It has a meaning of “very.”

Incorrect: Students did real well on the midterm.

Correct: Students did really well on the midterm.

Real is an adjective, and can be used to modify nouns or noun phrases. It has a meaning of “true or genuine.”

Incorrect: Students took a really midterm last week.

Correct: Students took a real midterm last week.

Slow or Slowly

Slow can be used as an adjective and as an adverb. In the first example, slow is an adverb and in the second one, it is an adjective.

Correct: The traffic is moving slow . This is a slow dance.

Slowly is only an adverb. It can replace slow anywhere it is used as an adverb. Slowly also appears in sentences with auxiliary verbs where slow cannot be used.

Incorrect: He has been slow recovering from his knee injury.

Correct: He has been slowly recovering from his knee injury.

Adverb Placement in Sentences

Sometimes, the use of a certain adverb requires the inversion of the subject and the verb. If a sentence begins with a negative adverb or an adverb with restrictive meaning, it must have an inverted word order.

Correct: Never before have I encountered such persistence in a student.

Correct: Seldom do we come across such talent.

Some other adverbs with restrictive meaning that require inversion of the verb and subject are:

  • hardly ever
  • hardly. when
  • in no circumstances
  • neither/nor
  • no sooner. than
  • not only
  • nowhere

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How to can identify an adjective in the sentence and paragraph.

This entry blog will summarise strategies how to identify an adjective in the sentence and also paragraph even if you do not know what the meaning of it. These strategies that I have found for 8 years of learning English, after read ‘The Easy Writer’ which was written by Belmont and Sharkey and also practice Grammar use adjectives from ‘Mywritinglab’. According to Belmont and Sharkey (2009) showed that an adjective usually appears before the noun or pronoun; however, it may appear after the verb to be like: is, are, am, was and were. It makes me think that as I read the sentence, I will identify the noun or pronoun and the verb to be first. After that, I will identify the adjective in that sentence. If I see the sentence has only the noun and pronoun, but it does not have the verb to be; thus, the adjective will only appears before the noun or pronoun, for example, Serious accident happened here 3 hours ago. On the other hand, if I see the sentence has both the verb to be and the noun or pronoun, the adjective will appear after that verb, for instance, He is a good teacher – In these examples, the verb to be is bold type, the noun is underlined , and the adjective is in is italic.

References:

Belmont, W & Sharkey, M 2011,’Simple sentences’, in The Easy Writer: Formal writing for academic purposes, 3 rd edn, Pearson Education Australia, NSW, pp. 7-15.

How to identify an adjective

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Adjective and Adverb Phrases: Hints and Tips [infographic]

  • February 18, 2013
  • Posted by Mila

Even if you do not know what adjective or adverb phrases are, you use them every day. Here is an explanation of what they are, how they work, and how to punctuate them.

How to identify an adjective

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What is an Adjective Phrase?

An adjective describes a noun (person, place, or thing) or a pronoun (he, she, it, and so forth). Adjectives cannot describe other adjectives or verbs.

“Bob’s new chicken is a friendly creature.”

“Bob,” “chicken,” and “creature” are nouns, and “new” and “friendly” are adjectives. For an example of an adjective phrase, simply add more adjectives that further describe the chicken. The new phrase functions just the same as the single adjective.

“Bob’s new chicken is a gentle, friendly, and patient creature.”

Where are Adjective Phrases Placed?

Adjectives and adjective phrases can be either before or after the noun they describe, and a sentence can have several.

“The new, white chicken is friendly and fat.”
“A big, shaggy dog is extremely loving when he is wet and muddy.”

In the latter sentence, the adjective phrases are “big, shaggy” and “wet and muddy.” Do not let the word “extremely” throw you; it is indeed a descriptive word, but it does not describe the word “dog.” “Extremely” is an adverb.

What is an Adverb Phrase?

An adjective and adverb phrase differ in that an adverb modifies verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs. To help remember the difference, the word itself has “verb” inside it, and adverbs tend to end in “-ly.” “Slowly,” “loudly,” and “happily” are all adverbs. The hard and fast rule is that an adverb cannot describe a noun: “dog” cannot be described as “extremely.”

“The dog ran joyously to me.”

This single adverb can easily be changed into an adverb phrase.

“The dog ran joyously and quickly toward me.”
“The chicken ate hungrily and quickly.”
“Swiftly and noisily, Frankie devoured his cheeseburger.”

Remember that the adverb phrase “swiftly and noisily” modifies the word “devoured” and not Frankie, himself.

Where are Adverb Phrases Placed?

Like adjective phrases, adverbs and adverb phrases can come either before or after the word they modify and are quite forgiving in their placement.

“The dog joyously and quickly ran toward me.”
“Joyously and quickly, the dog ran toward me.”
“The dog ran toward me, joyously and quickly.”

Punctuation of the Adjective and Adverb Phrase

If an adjective or adverb phrase is essential to understanding the sentence, it is called “restrictive,” and no comma is needed.

Adjective: “The football was old and dusty.”
Adverb: “Our quarterback throws swiftly and precisely.”

Say these out loud and notice the smooth flow; this can be a hint. In contrast, if there seems to be a natural pause, commas may be needed. “Nonrestrictive” phrases are not necessary to the sentence and generally require commas.

Adjective: “The football, old and dusty, flew through the air.”
Adverb: “Swiftly and precisely, the quarterback threw another touchdown.”

Say them aloud and notice the natural pauses. If a sentence is short, though, or if they would interrupt the flow, commas can sometimes be left out.

Adverbs can get hairy; just remember that the above adverb phrase does not modify the quarterback, himself. Though -ly can be a handy hint, not all of those pesky adverbs end this way. Can you think of any that do not?

English just wouldn’t be the same without them

Are adjectives causing you aggravation? Are you unsure of the difference between adjectives and adverbs? This article will help you make sense of these descriptive words.

What is an adjective?

Adjectives are simply words used to describe or modify nouns (people, places, things) and pronouns (e.g., I, she, he, it, they, etc.) by depicting, quantifying, or identifying them. What can make them confusing is that they don’t always immediately signal to readers that they are adjectives. Luckily, there’s a foolproof method of identifying these tricky descriptors: simply find the noun/pronoun in a sentence and decide if there are any words that describe it. Consider the following example:

Your friend (noun) ripped my football (adjective) jersey (noun)!

While you may be tempted to identify football as a noun (which it most often is), closer inspection reveals that football is actually describing the jersey, telling us what kind of jersey it is, which therefore makes football an adjective. In this case, your is actually an adjective, but we’ll get to that later.

Proper adjective placement

Another signal that a word is an adjective is its placement; it usually precedes the noun/pronoun it modifies. However, this is not always so. When an indefinite pronoun (e.g., something, someone, anybody) is modified by an adjective, the adjective follows the pronoun, as in:

Anyone capable of hating kittens is someone awful.

Learn to list adjectives in a sequence properly

Being able to identify adjectives is one thing, but for those who often make mistakes in English, the order adjectives must follow when listed in a series may be confusing. It can seem arbitrary at first, but there is a basic order you should use:

  1. Determiners: Are articles and other limiters (e.g., a, your, the, five, her).
  2. Observations/Opinions: Describes what is thought about the noun (e.g., pretty, expensive, delicious).
  3. Size: Describes how big or small the noun is (e.g., small, big, tiny, enormous).
  4. Age: Describes how young or old the noun is (e.g., young, old, ancient, new).
  5. Shape: Describes what shape the noun is (e.g., round, square, flat).
  6. Color: Describes what color the noun is (e.g., blue, pinkish, green).
  7. Material: Describes what the noun is made of (e.g., wood, cotton, silver, metal).
  8. Origin: Describes where the noun is from (e.g., American, eastern, lunar).
  9. Purpose/Qualifier: Describes what the noun is used for or what it does (e.g., racing [as in racing car], sleeping [as in sleeping bag]).
  10. The noun: The word that is being described.

It is also important not to overuse adjectives. Two or three well-chosen adjectives are more than sufficient. Consider this sentence: She had an expensive, big, long, blue, cotton, Coleman sleeping bag. While technically correct, the abundance of adjectives should be avoided in favor of something simpler, such as: She had an expensive, blue sleeping bag.

Of course, as with most rules in English, there are exceptions to this order. For example, you may switch opinion and fact (such as size) adjectives for emphasis: He had a big, ugly truck.

Coordinate and non-coordinate adjectives

You may now be wondering how to punctuate adjectives, especially if there is more than one before a noun. There are several easy rules. If the adjectives are coordinate, use commas to separate them. If they are non-coordinate, no commas are needed. There are two simple tests to identify coordinate adjectives:

1. Does the sentence still make sense if you insert and between the adjectives?

He had a big and ugly truck.

2. Does the sentence still make sense if you rearrange the adjectives?

He had an ugly, big truck.

Both sentences still make sense, which means the two adjectives (big and ugly) are coordinate adjectives and a comma should be used. Non-coordinate adjectives will not make sense if you rearrange them or if you insert and between them. Consider this example:

Mark’s two black shirts were in the laundry.

It would not be correct to say:

Mark’s two and black shirts were in the laundry.

Nor would it be correct to say:

Mark’s black two shirts were in the laundry.

In this example, two and black are non-coordinate adjectives, so there is no need to place a comma between them. We also advise against using a comma between the final adjective and the noun being described as this will likely result in an awkward or possibly incorrect sentence. A comma shouldn’t be used if the adjective is modified by another word either:

It was an especially sad movie.

Especially modifies the adjective sad, not the noun movie, so you do not use a comma.

Other types of adjectives to watch for

There are several other types of adjectives you should know:

1. Possessive adjectives: My, your, his, her, their, our, and its.

Your friend ripped my football jersey.

Your is a possessive adjective in this sentence. It describes whose friend ripped the shirt.

2. Demonstrative adjectives: That, those, this, these, and what.

That car is really fast.

In this sentence that modifies car. It tells us which car is really fast.

3. Interrogative adjectives: Which and what.

What medicine does she need to take?

Here, what modifies medicine. It is asking what specific type of medicine is required.

4. Indefinite adjectives: These refer to something identifiable but not specific. Some common indefinite adjectives include all, another, something, none, one, several, and many.

Many people went to the party.

In this sentence, many modifies people, telling us more about who attended the party.

There is much to learn about adjectives, but just remember they generally answer three questions about a noun: How many? What kind? Which ones? If you are still unsure about adjective usage and need a second opinion, try our English academic editing services.

  • I saw a manwho was crying.

The part of the above sentence ‘I saw a man’ can stand alone as an independent sentence because it can give a complete meaning on its own. Such a clause is called the main clause or independent clause. On the other hand, the remaining part of the above sentence ‘who was crying’ cannot stand alone as a sentence because it (as alone part) cannot give a complete meaning. It depends on the main clause to give a complete meaning or sense. Such a clause is called a dependent clause or subordinate clause.

Types of Subordinate Clause

NOUN CLAUSE

A subordinate clause that acts as a noun in a sentence is called a noun clause.

It usually starts with words such as ‘that, what, whatever, who, whom, whoever, whomever’. It acts exactly like a noun either at the place of a subject or an object within a sentence.

  • Whatever we study increases our knowledge.В В (Noun as a subject).
  • What you eat determines your body size.В В В В В В В В В (Noun as a subject).
  • I buy whatever I need. В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В (Noun as an object).
  • Now I realized what you had said. В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В (Noun as an object).

ADJECTIVE CLAUSE

A subordinate clause that acts as an adjective in a sentence is called an adjective clause.

Like an adjective, it modifies (give more information about) a noun or pronoun in the sentence. An adjective clause mostly starts with relative pronouns such as ‘that, who, whom, whose, which, or whose’.

  • I saw a child who was crying .В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В (modifies noun: child).
  • He hates the people who waste time .В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В (modifies noun: people).
  • I watched a movie which amused me a lot .В В В В (modifies noun: movie).
  • The car, which I like , consumes less fuel.В В В В В В В (modifies noun: car).
  • The building, where he lives , consists of many apartments. (modifies noun: building).

ADVERB CLAUSE

A subordinate clause that acts as an adverb in a sentence is called an adjective clause.

Like an adverb, it modifies a verb, an adjective clause, or another adverb clause in the sentence. As a modifier, it gives more information about a verb of the main clause in terms of time, frequency (i.e., how often), condition, cause and effect relation, and intensity (i.e., to which extent).

It usually uses the following subordinating conjunctions:

  • Time: when, whenever, since, until, before, after, while, as, by the time, as soon as
  • Cause and effect: because, since, now that, as long as, so, so that,
  • Contrast: although, even, whereas, while, though
  • Condition: if, unless, only if, whether or not, even if, providing or provided that, in case
  • Call me when you need my help. В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В В(modifies verb: call).
  • Unless you avoid sugar, you can’t lose weight. В В В (modifies verb: lose weight).
  • The patient had died before the doctor came. В В В В В(modifies verb: die).
  • You live a happy life as long as you think positively .В В В(modifies verb: live).
  • I worked in a factory while I was living in London. В В В В В (modifies verb: work).
  • You can succeed in life provided that you are sincere in your work.(modifies verb: succeed).

Adjectives in English! What is an adjective? The following lessons provide you with different types of adjectives and explain how to use them in English sentences with ESL printable infographic.

What are Adjectives?

Adjectives are words that are used to describe (what kind of?) nouns and pronouns and to quantify (how much of?) and identify (which one?) them. In a nutshell, Adjectives are what define nouns and give them characteristics to differentiate them from other nouns. For example:

  • He was wearing a blue shirt.

Here ‘blue’ is an adjective as it is describing the noun ‘shirt’ by answering the question ‘what kind of shirt?’

  • There are seven rooms in the house.

Here ‘Seven’ is also an adjective as it’s telling the quantity/the number of the noun ‘rooms’, answering the question ‘how many rooms?’.

Types of Adjectives

There are different types of adjectives based upon their effect on a noun and what do they tell about the noun. There are five categories of adjectives:

Adjectives of Quality

What are adjectives of quality?

These adjectives are used to describe the nature of a noun. They give an idea about the characteristics of the noun by answering the question ‘what kind’: Honest, Kind, Large, Bulky, Beautiful, Ugly, etc. For example:

  • New Delhi is a large city with many historical monuments.
  • Sarah is a beautiful woman.
  • I’d like you to give me an honest answer.
  • I feel really fat and ugly today.
  • He carried a very bulky package on the bus.

Adjectives of Quantity

What are adjectives of quantity?

These adjectives help to show the amount or the approximate amount of the noun or pronoun. These adjectives do not provide exact numbers; rather they tell us the amount of the noun in relative or whole terms: All, Half, Many, Few, Little, No, Enough, Great, etc. For example:

  • They have finished most of the rice.
  • Many people came to visit the fair.

Adjectives of Number

What are adjectives of number?

These adjectives are used to show the number of nouns and their place in an order. There are three different sections within adjectives of number; they are:

Definite Numeral Adjective

Those which clearly denote an exact number of nouns or the order of the noun.

  • One, Two, Twenty, Thirty-Three, etc. also known as Cardinals.
  • First, Second, Third, Seventh, etc. also known as Ordinals.

Indefinite Numeral Adjective

Those adjectives that do not give an exact numerical amount but just give a general idea of the amount.

  • Some, Many, Few, Any, Several, All, etc.
    E.g.: There were many people present at the meeting.

Distributive Numeral Adjective

Those adjectives that are used to refer to individual nouns within the whole amount.

  • Either, Neither, Each, Another, Other, etc.
    E.g: Taxes have to be paid by every employed citizen.

Demonstrative Adjectives

What are demonstrative adjectives?

These adjectives are used to point out or indicate a particular noun or pronoun using the adjectives: This, That, These and Those.

  • That bag belongs to Neil.
  • Try using this paintbrush in art class.
  • I really like those shoes.
  • These flowers are lovely.

Interrogative Adjectives

What are interrogative adjectives?

These adjectives are used to ask questions about nouns or in relation to nouns, they are: Where, What, Which and Whose.

  • Where did he say he was going?
  • What assignment did I miss out on?
  • Which is your favorite author?
  • Whose pen is this?

In some instances, we find that we need to use more than one adjective to describe a noun in a satisfactory manner. In these cases, commas are used to separate the adjectives but some series of adjectives do not require a comma. Therefore, we need to know the difference between Coordinate and Non-coordinate Adjectives:

Coordinate Adjectives

Are those words which can be re-arranged in the series easily and are still grammatically sound. This kind of series makes use of commas. This series can also insert ‘and’ between them and still be correct.

  • She was a kind, generous, loving human being.
  • She was a generous, loving, kind human being.
  • She was a loving, kind and generous human being.

Here we can see that all three sentences are grammatically correct. In this case, the adjectives only need to be separated by commas.

Non-coordinate Adjectives

These are those adjectives which cannot be rearranged in the series. These do not use commas to separate the adjectives. Also, this kind of series does not make sense if we insert ‘and’ between them.

  • She has two energetic playful dogs.
  • She has playful two energetic dogs.
  • She has energetic and playful and two dogs.

Here we see that only the first sentence makes sense and is grammatically correct. The second and third ones are incorrect. Hence, the sentence uses non-coordinate adjectives and does not need commas.

Comparative and Superlative Adjectives

When we want to compare two or more nouns using adjectives, we use the comparative and superlative forms of the adjective to show the comparison between the nouns.

E.g. Honey is sweet, sugar is sweeter but victory is the sweetest.

In this sentence, we are comparing the three nouns using the positive, comparative and superlative forms of the word ‘sweet’.

How to identify an adjective

Order of Adjectives

There are certain rules regarding the placement of different kinds of adjectives in a sentence. The general order of adjective is:

  1. Determiners
  2. Observations/Quantity and Opinion
  3. Size
  4. Age
  5. Shape
  6. Colour
  7. Origin
  8. Material
  9. Qualifier

Tips for telling adjectives and adverbs apart

Are you constantly confusing adverbs and adjectives? Well, we’re here to cure your confusion for good. Think of adjectives and adverbs as answers to a question. Adjectives generally answer one of three questions about a noun: which one, how many, or what kind? Adverbs, on the other hand, tell us where, why, when, or how something happened.

Two key points to remember

1. Adjectives describe nouns and pronouns

Example: Your hat is old.
(The underlined word hat is a noun. The italicized word old is the adjective that describes the hat.)

Example: It is old.
(If we replace the hat from the previous sentence with it , this time the adjective old is describing a pronoun.)

2. Adverbs describe verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs

Example: He slowly walked to the store.
(The underlined word is walked , and it is a verb. The italicized word is slowly, and it is the adverb that describes how he walked.)

Example: Jenny is clearly annoyed .
(The underlined word annoyed is an adjective because it describes Jenny. The italicized word clearly is an adverb describing annoyed. By this, we mean the adverb clearly describes to what degree Jenny is annoyed.)

Example: He walked very slowly .
(In this case, we know slowly is an adverb because it describes how he walked. However, very is also an adverb, and it modifies or describes how slowly he walked.)

How can I identify adjectives and adverbs?

The above explanations are all well and good, but you might be wondering how you can identify adjectives and adverbs just by looking at a sentence. We’ve established some basic rules:

1. Adjectives, although much simpler to use than adverbs, don’t give off any tell-tale hints that they are indeed, adjectives. The best way to find an adjective is to look for the nouns (people, places, things, or ideas) or pronouns (words that replace nouns) within a sentence and then decide if there are any words that describe the nouns or pronouns. Here’s an example with the nouns italicized:

Your dog ate my baseball hat.

At first glance, you might be tempted to say baseball is a noun, but upon closer inspection, we see that, in this case, the word baseball actually describes the noun hat. Therefore, baseball is an adjective in this sentence.

2. Many adverbs end with the suffix –ly. Searching for words that end in –ly is a good way to find adverbs. Here’s an example:

If you’ll kindly give me my ticket, I’ll be on my way.

You can probably see that the only word ending in –ly is the word kindly. Upon closer inspection, you should realize kindly is describing the verb give, which means kindly is indeed an adverb.

Exceptions

Some words have the same form whether they are used as adjectives or adverbs. Here are some examples:

(Adjective) — That is a fast speedboat.
(Adverb) — He stood up so fast he knocked his chair over.
(Adjective) — The ground was hard.
(Adverb) — They all worked hard to meet the project deadline.

In addition, please note that all adverbs do not end in –ly. Here’s a short list of adverbs that don’t end in –ly:

afterwards, almost, always, even, far, fast, less, more, never, not, often, too, very, and well.

If you’re still not completely sure you know the difference between adjectives and adverbs, or if you’d like to learn more about adjectives and adverbs, check out GrammarCamp, the trusted online grammar course.

Adjectives modify nouns and pronouns; adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs.

Learning Objectives

Distinguish between adjectives and adverbs

Key Takeaways

Key Points

  • Adjectives describe, quantify, or identify pronouns and nouns.
  • Adjectives typically answer the questions how many?;How much?;What kind?; or Which one?
  • Adverbs
    modify verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs.
  • Adverbs commonly describe how, when, or where the action of a verb took place.

Key Terms

  • adjectives: A part of speech that describes, quantifies, or identifies a noun or pronoun.
  • adverb: A part of speech that describes, quantifies, or identifies a verb, adjective, or other adverb.

Adjectives and Adverbs

Have you ever seen a photo of the Great Wall of China? It’s simply enormous. It’s incredibly long, snaking its stony way across the mountains and valleys of Asia, with beautiful towers standing tall every couple of hundred feet. But without modifiers, “the Great Wall” would simply be “the Wall.” We need adverbs and adjectives in order to be descriptive in our writing.

Adjectives, like “great,” “enormous,” “stony,” “long,” and “beautiful,” modify nouns and pronouns. Adverbs, like “simply” and “incredibly,” modify verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs.

Great Wall of China: Without adjectives, “the Great Wall” would just be “the Wall.”

Descriptive words can significantly improve your writing. They enhance the quality of information you provide, making your work more precise. However, you don’t want to overwhelm your reader with unnecessary or excessive description. Try to strike a balance.

Adjectives

Adjectives describe, quantify, or identify pronouns and nouns. Remember, a noun is a person, place, or thing. Pronouns, such as I, me, we, he, she, it, you, and they, take the place of nouns. Adjectives also answer the following questions: What kind? How many? How much? Which one?

Descriptions concerning What kind? offer descriptive details about the noun or pronoun. It may describe physical characteristics or emotions. Here are a few examples: the black car, the angry customer, the fashionable teen.

The questions How many? and How much? refer to quantity of the noun or pronoun being described by the adjective. Quantity can be specific (four ducks) or general (some ducks). Here are some more examples: fourteen cents, a few puppies, several kittens, a dozen books.

Which one? specifically describes which object is being referred to. These are workhorse words like “this,” “that,” “these,” and other words like “them”: that car, this letter, those volunteers.

Adjectives are helpful when additional description is needed for a noun or pronoun. Like adjectives, adverbs can also help add details to your writing.

Adverbs

Adverbs modify verbs, adjectives, and other adverbs. They commonly describe how, when, or where the action of a verb took place. How refers to the manner in which an action occurred. When addresses the time of the action. Where investigates the place or location the action took place. Here are some examples:

  • The boys ran loudly down the stairs. [How did the boys run? Loudly.]
  • We went down later. [When did we go? Later.]
  • He delivered pizza locally. [Where did he deliver? Locally.]

Adverbs can also be used to modify adjectives and other adverbs.

  • The train leaves at a reasonably early hour. [The adverb reasonably modifies the adjective early.]
  • She spoke quite passionately about politics. [The adverb quite modifies the adverb passionately.]

Which Should You Use: Adjectives or Adverbs?

Writers often have a choice in wording a sentence to use either an adjective or an adverb:

  • Adjective: We had a quick lunch.
  • Adverb: We ate lunch quickly.

So, how do you choose when to use an adjective and when to use an adverb? One way to choose is simply to figure out whether the word you want to modify is a noun or a verb. In the first sentence, you are describing the lunch; in the second sentence, you are describing the manner of eating.

A better approach, though, is not to think about the words you could modify but the information you want to convey. You do not need to describe every noun or verb—just the ones whose details are important to the sentence. If you want to emphasize the meal, you would pick the first sentence; if you want to emphasize the act of eating, you would pick the second.

Remember, adjectives and adverbs can be separated by which types of information they provide. Think about the details that are necessary to include, and then choose your modifiers accordingly.

The demonstrative adjectives this/that/these/those, which may also be pronouns, tell us where an object is located and how many objects there are.

This and that are used to point to one object. This points to something nearby, while that points to something “over there.”
Examples: This dog is mine.
This is mine.
That dog is hers.
That is hers.
These and those refer to more than one object. These points to things nearby, while those points to things “over there.”
Examples: These babies have been smiling for a while.
These are mine.
Those babies in the nursery have been crying for hours.
Those are yours.

If the article or the existing discussions do not address a thought or question you have on the subject, please use the “Comment” box at the bottom of this page.

85 responses to “This/That/These/Those: Demonstrative Adjectives and Pronouns”

Is it possible to abbreviate the demonstrative adjective ,,those” with a verb ,,are” like that:
Those’re my…

Could you send me an explanation?

Demonstrative adjectives are not typically used to form a contraction in English. The Chicago Manual of Style’s Rule 5.103 says, “Most types of writing benefit from the use of contractions. If used thoughtfully, contractions in prose sound natural and relaxed and make reading more enjoyable. Be-verbs and most of the auxiliary verbs are contracted when followed by not: are–aren’t; was–wasn’t; cannot–can’t; could not–couldn’t; do not–don’t; and so on. A few, such as ought not–oughtn’t, look or sound awkward and are best avoided. Pronouns can be contracted with auxiliaries, forms of have, and some be-verbs. Think before using one of the less common contractions, which often don’t work well in prose, except perhaps in dialogue or quotations. Some examples are I’d’ve (I would have), she’d’ve (she would have) it’d (it would), should’ve (should have), there’re (there are), who’re (who are), and would’ve (would have). Also, some contracted forms can have more than one meaning. For instance, there’s may be there is or there has, and I’d may be I had or I would. The particular meaning may not always be clear from the context.” The AP Stylebook considers contractions informal and advises against using them excessively. If you are unsure of a contraction, check to see if it is listed in the dictionary.

Indefinite articles is used before singular countable noun.

Is it possible to use Indefinite articles (a,an) before an adjective with Plural or Uncountable noun ?
regards
Al

satya_sson33

Member
  • Mar 13, 2010
  • #1
  • susiedqq

    Key Member
    • Mar 14, 2010
  • #2
  • I bought a knife to cut the vegetables.

    corum

    Banned
    • Mar 14, 2010
  • #3
  • I brought a knife to cut vegetables with. :tick:

    In your sentence, the string of words after ‘brought’, a noun phrase with ‘knife’ being the head, serves as the direct object of ‘brought’. This part does not modify, but complements the verb.

    a knife to cut vegetables with = a knife with which I can cut vegetables

    The infinitive verb phrase (this is the formal definition of “to cut vegetables with”) functions as a postmodifier of ‘a knife’ (not simply ‘knife’). It is an adjectival relative clause in function. You have problem with the stranded preposition, right? It is okay there. It is related to ‘a knife’.

    I brought a knife to cut vegetables [STRIKE]with[/STRIKE]. :tick:

    Different meaning. Here, the infinitive verb phrase provides the reason for your having brought a knife. Reason clause, adverbial.

    I bought a mattress to sleep on = I bought it so that I have something to sleep on.

    I bought a mattress to sleep [STRIKE]on[/STRIKE]. = ?
    I bought it for sleeping.

    satya_sson33

    Member
    • Mar 15, 2010
  • #4
  • I brought a knife to cut vegetables with. :tick:

    In your sentence, the string of words after ‘brought’, a noun phrase with ‘knife’ being the head, serves as the direct object of ‘brought’. This part does not modify, but complements the verb.

    a knife to cut vegetables with = a knife with which I can cut vegetables

    The infinitive verb phrase (this is the formal definition of “to cut vegetables with”) functions as a postmodifier of ‘a knife’ (not simply ‘knife’). It is an adjectival relative clause in function. You have problem with the stranded preposition, right? It is okay there. It is related to ‘a knife’.

    I brought a knife to cut vegetables [STRIKE]with[/STRIKE]. :tick:

    Different meaning. Here, the infinitive verb phrase provides the reason for your having brought a knife. Reason clause, adverbial.

    I bought a mattress to sleep on = I bought it so that I have something to sleep on.

    I bought a mattress to sleep [STRIKE]on[/STRIKE]. = ?
    I bought it for sleeping.

    Ask yourself the question: What does the sentence mean? :up:

    sir, infinitive as adverb has same subject as sentence has or different.

    corum

    Banned
    • Mar 15, 2010
  • #5
  • I can’t think of an example where they are not the same.

    I brought a knife to cut vegetables = I brought; I cut

    satya_sson33

    Member
    • Mar 16, 2010
  • #6
  • I can’t think of an example where they are not the same.

    I brought a knife to cut vegetables = I brought; I cut

    # he paid you $50 to cross the river.

    i have a confusion in that sentence that infinitive has different subject and it is as adverb but sir, when infinitive works like adverb then it has same subject. it used as a adverbial phrase that means ‘the purpose of the subject’?

    he paid you $50 = why did he paid you. to cross the river

    corum

    Banned
    • Mar 16, 2010
  • #7
  • # he paid you $50 to cross the river.

    when infinitive works like adverb then it has same subject.

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    Adverbs are very important in a sentence because they communicate further about the action denoting where, how, when, and the frequency. Therefore, incorrect use of adverbs can distort the meaning or make the content hard to read. Whichever adverb identifier seals the writing by correcting the nouns, adverbs, and verb positions in a sentence, with this tool, you’ll get a verb, adverb, noun, adjective identifier all in one and enjoy quality, expert-level writing.

    Adverb Corrector Overview

    The adverb corrector contains special coded algorithms that input instructions from the user and output in corrections. It is a click-through process that allows the user to edit their documents without reading widely about adverbs. Therefore, there is no worry about the common mistakes regarding the adverbs since the tool is well programmed and frequently updated to offer the best and grammatically correct answers. Furthermore, the tool ensures that common mistakes with spelling, order, and position in the paper are tackled.

    How to identify an adjective

    Unique Features of Adverb Finder Tool

    This tool is designed to offer adverb adjective grammar check, a complete package to excellent sentences if struggling with adverbs. But it is not only an adverb fixer because it provides more guidance on how to find an adverb in a sentence. Therefore, parts of speech analyzer tool is a solution giver and a learning factory for those seeking to understand adverbs and adjectives more.

    The adverb finder tool contains more functionalities, such as part of the speech analyzer that suits any form of writing. The analyzer correctly positions the injections, conjunctions, prepositions, adverbs, and adjectives to improve coherency and readability in the paper.

    The part of the speech analyzer helps position articles and determiners to avoid common grammar mistakes that reduce the quality of the writing whether a native speaker or not, the analyzer completes the equal levels with the grammar experts.

    Adverb Revision: a Quick How-to Guide

    The adverb finder tool that stands out. There are unique features that link to create an excellent piece of writing. For instance, the adverb splice checker correctly positions commas in the sentences to improve readability and drive the message to the audience. So the user inputs instructions and the finder directs the splice checker to skim through the content, correct or put commas in the sentences. The same process happens when instructing the adverb in a sentence checker.

    Allow the finder to check the paper by clicking check instructions, and the software scroll through the content highlighting all the adverbs mistakes in the paper. The advantage of this finder is the inclusion of the adverb, verb, noun, and adjective identifier, making the process straightforward.

    Use the adverb finder tool to identify noun verb adjective adverb app that skim through the document highlighting mistakes and suggesting changes. It is upon the user’s discretion whether to accept the changes depending on the nature of the writing.

    Also, an adverb in a sentence checker within the tool checks the entire sentence to ensure the adverbs are correctly placed to avoid redundancy while improving the quality of the paper. Finally, the adjective identifier works consistently with the parts of the speech analyzer to ensure the corrections are comprehensive, accurate, and verifiable.

    How to Use Adverbs in a Sentence

    An adverb is used in describing an action in a given sentence. Thus, it tells more about the nature of the action. In this regard, avoid adverb errors by correctly identifying them in a sentence. You can use adverbs as phrases in a sentence where both the verbs and subject are not applicable. Prepositional phrases are very applicable in such scenarios, for instance, with, for, to over and under; an example in a sentence is:

    At the beach, they saw dolphins.

    Adverbs come with degrees that can be superlative, comparative, or positive. Generally, comparative adverbs are used for comparing a group of things, while superlatives describe one group or thing that is better than the other. The positive adverbs are the normal adverbs describing a group or one thing. Also, adverbs can take the form of degrees like “good,” “better,” and “best.”

    How to identify an adjective

    Finally, adverbs’ position in a paper is very important. For instance, the connective adverbs, modifying, comparative adverbs all occupy a distinct position in a paper.

    How to fix an adverb in a sentence:

    • Learn how to use an adverb in modifying an adjective. Remember, an adjective provides a more description of a name of a thing, place, or person, and thus, identifying adjectives helps identify the right way of using adverbs.
    • Also, pairing two adverbs together can help in understanding how to avoid their errors in a sentence. Of course, two adverbs can help work in a sentence, but the arrangement is important to avoid common mistakes.
    • Adverbs are very good when starting a sentence in changing the meaning or in the attempt to communicate clearly. Therefore, check whether the adverb can appear at the beginning other than the end.

    Effectivenes of Parts of Speech Analyzer: Final Words

    An adverb finder and adverb phrase finder provides excellent functionality for perfecting your grammar in reading and also writing. The tool contains parts of the speech analyzer, which is updated frequently, and thus it ensures the corrections are grammatically right. Avoid common adverbs, adjectives, nouns, and pronoun errors by adopting the tool for your writing. Also, use the tool to edit the commas and avoid careless mistakes that may delimit the quality of your writing.