How to lower a1c levels

When you have diabetes, you probably know you should check your blood sugar regularly. Your doctor will also recommend that you take an A1c blood test a few times a year, with a goal of lowering the results to help protect your health. And there’s a lot you can do to move toward meeting that goal.

Unlike a regular blood sugar test, the A1c test measures the amount of sugar that clings to a protein, called hemoglobin, in your red blood cells. The test shows your average blood sugar levels over the past few months, so you know how well your diabetes is under control.

In general, the goal for your A1c is to be lower than 7%. Exactly how much lower will depend on your individual treatment plan. When you take steps to get your A1c in a healthy range, you lower your risk of complications such as nerve damage, eye problems, and heart disease.

Your doctor will let you know the best target for your A1c. How do you get there? Here are a few tactics to try, in addition to taking any medications your doctor prescribes.

Get some new kitchen gear. You’ll want to get a set of measuring cups and a kitchen scale if you don’t already have them. These will help you with your portion sizes. Your blood sugar will go up if you eat more food than your body needs. Keeping servings in check is a good way to reduce your A1c level.

At first, it’s a good idea to measure your food to give you an idea of what healthy portion sizes look like for different foods. That’s where the measuring cups and scale come in handy. You may be surprised at first to see what one serving looks like, especially of high-carb items like cereal, rice, and pasta. But this will help ensure you don’t eat more than you intend to.

Be carb smart. It’s true that carbohydrates affect your blood sugar more than other nutrients you eat. Chances are that if you overdo starchy carbs on a regular basis, your A1c number will start to creep up. But remember, all carbs aren’t a problem. You want ones that have a lot of fiber and nutrients, more than those that just serve up starch.

Tweak your plate. Experts advise filling about half your plate with vegetables that are low in starch, such as carrots, greens, zucchini, or tomatoes. One-quarter of your plate should be a lean protein like chicken or tofu, and the last quarter should be whole grains like brown rice or quinoa.

Make a plan. The guidelines for what to put on your plate give you a lot of flexibility. But even though it sounds simple, you’ll probably be better off if you plan your meals. Why? If you skip set menus and eat on the fly, it’s easy to end up with calorie-dense, high-carbohydrate food choices — like fast food, bagels, and frozen pizza — that will cause your blood sugar and A1c numbers to soar.

Instead, at the start of each week, pencil in a rough plan for what foods you’ll eat at each meal and what groceries you’ll need. This way, you’ll be prepared with plenty of choices that limit post-meal blood sugar spikes. A Mediterranean diet, which is low in saturated fat and high in vegetables and fruit, reliably lowers A1c numbers.

Maybe downsize your weight loss goal. Not everyone with type 2 diabetes is overweight. But if you are, you may not need to drop as much as you think to make a difference in your A1c level.

If you’re overweight, diabetes doctors will often recommend you try to lose just 5% to 10% of your current weight. Here’s why: As you shed extra pounds, the insulin in your body lowers your blood sugar levels more efficiently, which will cause your A1c levels to drop over time. In one study, people with type 2 diabetes who lost 5% to 10% of their body weight were three times as likely to lower their A1c by 0.5%.

You may have a different goal for your weight or other health considerations on your mind. Ask your doctor to help you make a weight loss plan that matches your overall goals.

Rethink your exercise plan. Other than upgrading your nutrition, exercise is one of the most important habit changes you can make to lower your A1c. But don’t just grind it out on the treadmill, or you’ll miss another effective workout: strength training.

No offense to the elliptical machine or your cycling class. You can choose whatever type of exercise you prefer as long as it’s a challenging workout. Both aerobic exercise and resistance (weight) training lower A1c levels if they’re part of a regular routine.

There’s solid science to support how much working out helps you whittle down your A1c level. Since exercise prompts your muscles to take up sugar from your bloodstream, it helps your blood sugar levels drop more quickly after you eat a meal. As you make exercise a regular habit, you’ll see a downward trend in your A1c numbers.

Never miss your meds. You can reliably lower your A1c through diet and exercise. But if your doctor has prescribed medication, such as metformin, miglitol, or insulin, it’s important to take them exactly as prescribed. If you miss doses regularly, your blood sugar numbers may creep up and cause your A1c to rise. But if you follow the medication plan that your doctor recommends and go to every appointment, your blood sugar should stay under control — and your lower A1c number will reflect that. If your goal is to cut down on, or even stop needing, your meds, tell your doctor that you want to work toward that. But don’t stop them on your own.

Be savvy about supplements. Many dietary supplements say they’ll lower your A1c. But there’s not always much research to back that up. Still, some may have promise. These include berberine, made up of extracts from a variety of plants, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an antioxidant that reduces inflammation in your body. Cinnamon may also lower A1c levels over time. As with any supplement, it’s best to check with your doctor first.

Put your plan on repeat. Stick with it and give it time. Since your A1c level reflects your average blood sugar over several months, it’s going to take that long for your A1c to drop. You won’t do everything perfectly, and that’s OK. Just keep moving in the direction you want to go in. And rest assured: Your A1c number will come down, and it’ll be worth it.

Sources

Mayo Clinic: “A1C Test,” “Hyperglycemia in Diabetes,” “Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy Eating Plan.”

Merck Manual: “Formation of Blood Cells.”

National Institutes of Health: “The A1C Test and Diabetes.”

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health: “Carbohydrates and Blood Sugar.”

Joslin Diabetes Center: “Key to Success: Portion Control.”

Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences: “Effect of Vitamin D Supplementation on Reduction in Levels of HbA1 in Patients Recently Diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Having Asymptomatic Vitamin D Deficiency.”

Utah.gov: “How Can You Lower Your A1C To a Healthy Number?”

Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome: “Resistance Exercise Training Lowers HbA1c More Than Aerobic Training in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes.”

American Diabetes Association: “Medication Management: What Are My Options?”

When you have diabetes, you probably know you should check your blood sugar regularly. Your doctor will also recommend that you take an A1c blood test a few times a year, with a goal of lowering the results to help protect your health. And there’s a lot you can do to move toward meeting that goal.

Unlike a regular blood sugar test, the A1c test measures the amount of sugar that clings to a protein, called hemoglobin, in your red blood cells. The test shows your average blood sugar levels over the past few months, so you know how well your diabetes is under control.

In general, the goal for your A1c is to be lower than 7%. Exactly how much lower will depend on your individual treatment plan. When you take steps to get your A1c in a healthy range, you lower your risk of complications such as nerve damage, eye problems, and heart disease.

Your doctor will let you know the best target for your A1c. How do you get there? Here are a few tactics to try, in addition to taking any medications your doctor prescribes.

Get some new kitchen gear. You’ll want to get a set of measuring cups and a kitchen scale if you don’t already have them. These will help you with your portion sizes. Your blood sugar will go up if you eat more food than your body needs. Keeping servings in check is a good way to reduce your A1c level.

At first, it’s a good idea to measure your food to give you an idea of what healthy portion sizes look like for different foods. That’s where the measuring cups and scale come in handy. You may be surprised at first to see what one serving looks like, especially of high-carb items like cereal, rice, and pasta. But this will help ensure you don’t eat more than you intend to.

Be carb smart. It’s true that carbohydrates affect your blood sugar more than other nutrients you eat. Chances are that if you overdo starchy carbs on a regular basis, your A1c number will start to creep up. But remember, all carbs aren’t a problem. You want ones that have a lot of fiber and nutrients, more than those that just serve up starch.

Tweak your plate. Experts advise filling about half your plate with vegetables that are low in starch, such as carrots, greens, zucchini, or tomatoes. One-quarter of your plate should be a lean protein like chicken or tofu, and the last quarter should be whole grains like brown rice or quinoa.

Make a plan. The guidelines for what to put on your plate give you a lot of flexibility. But even though it sounds simple, you’ll probably be better off if you plan your meals. Why? If you skip set menus and eat on the fly, it’s easy to end up with calorie-dense, high-carbohydrate food choices — like fast food, bagels, and frozen pizza — that will cause your blood sugar and A1c numbers to soar.

Instead, at the start of each week, pencil in a rough plan for what foods you’ll eat at each meal and what groceries you’ll need. This way, you’ll be prepared with plenty of choices that limit post-meal blood sugar spikes. A Mediterranean diet, which is low in saturated fat and high in vegetables and fruit, reliably lowers A1c numbers.

Maybe downsize your weight loss goal. Not everyone with type 2 diabetes is overweight. But if you are, you may not need to drop as much as you think to make a difference in your A1c level.

If you’re overweight, diabetes doctors will often recommend you try to lose just 5% to 10% of your current weight. Here’s why: As you shed extra pounds, the insulin in your body lowers your blood sugar levels more efficiently, which will cause your A1c levels to drop over time. In one study, people with type 2 diabetes who lost 5% to 10% of their body weight were three times as likely to lower their A1c by 0.5%.

You may have a different goal for your weight or other health considerations on your mind. Ask your doctor to help you make a weight loss plan that matches your overall goals.

Rethink your exercise plan. Other than upgrading your nutrition, exercise is one of the most important habit changes you can make to lower your A1c. But don’t just grind it out on the treadmill, or you’ll miss another effective workout: strength training.

No offense to the elliptical machine or your cycling class. You can choose whatever type of exercise you prefer as long as it’s a challenging workout. Both aerobic exercise and resistance (weight) training lower A1c levels if they’re part of a regular routine.

There’s solid science to support how much working out helps you whittle down your A1c level. Since exercise prompts your muscles to take up sugar from your bloodstream, it helps your blood sugar levels drop more quickly after you eat a meal. As you make exercise a regular habit, you’ll see a downward trend in your A1c numbers.

Never miss your meds. You can reliably lower your A1c through diet and exercise. But if your doctor has prescribed medication, such as metformin, miglitol, or insulin, it’s important to take them exactly as prescribed. If you miss doses regularly, your blood sugar numbers may creep up and cause your A1c to rise. But if you follow the medication plan that your doctor recommends and go to every appointment, your blood sugar should stay under control — and your lower A1c number will reflect that. If your goal is to cut down on, or even stop needing, your meds, tell your doctor that you want to work toward that. But don’t stop them on your own.

Be savvy about supplements. Many dietary supplements say they’ll lower your A1c. But there’s not always much research to back that up. Still, some may have promise. These include berberine, made up of extracts from a variety of plants, and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10), an antioxidant that reduces inflammation in your body. Cinnamon may also lower A1c levels over time. As with any supplement, it’s best to check with your doctor first.

Put your plan on repeat. Stick with it and give it time. Since your A1c level reflects your average blood sugar over several months, it’s going to take that long for your A1c to drop. You won’t do everything perfectly, and that’s OK. Just keep moving in the direction you want to go in. And rest assured: Your A1c number will come down, and it’ll be worth it.

Sources

Mayo Clinic: “A1C Test,” “Hyperglycemia in Diabetes,” “Diabetes Diet: Create Your Healthy Eating Plan.”

Merck Manual: “Formation of Blood Cells.”

National Institutes of Health: “The A1C Test and Diabetes.”

Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health: “Carbohydrates and Blood Sugar.”

Joslin Diabetes Center: “Key to Success: Portion Control.”

Pakistan Journal of Medical Sciences: “Effect of Vitamin D Supplementation on Reduction in Levels of HbA1 in Patients Recently Diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Having Asymptomatic Vitamin D Deficiency.”

Utah.gov: “How Can You Lower Your A1C To a Healthy Number?”

Diabetology and Metabolic Syndrome: “Resistance Exercise Training Lowers HbA1c More Than Aerobic Training in Adults With Type 2 Diabetes.”

American Diabetes Association: “Medication Management: What Are My Options?”

This article was co-authored by Monica Moreno, MS, RD, LD/N. Monica Moreno is a Registered Dietitian and the Founder, Owner, and Lead Dietitian at Essence Nutrition in Miami, Florida. Monica specializes in nutrition consulting and school and corporate wellness programs. She holds a BA in Linguistics, French, and Teaching English as a Second Language from The University of Florida and an MS in Dietetics and Nutrition from Florida International University. Monica is the dietitian for the Miami Marlins and is the visiting dietitian specialist at Ocean Reef Resort and Club. Monica is a member of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Nutrition Entrepreneurs Dietetics Practice Group, Integrative Nutrition Dietetics Practice Group, Collegiate and Professionals Sports Dietitians Association, and Weight Management Dietetic Practice Group. She was awarded the 2020 Coral Gables Chamber of Commerce Business Woman in Healthcare of the Year award.

There are 18 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

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An A1C test effectively measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. A doctor can measure your A1C levels to diagnose and treat pre-diabetes and diabetes. Lower levels of A1C are associated with lower risks of diabetes-related complications. If you’re diabetic or at risk of becoming diabetic, try some of the tips on this list to lower your A1C levels and start leading a healthier lifestyle today!

How to lower a1c levels

What has your blood sugar been up to lately? Get an A1C test to find out your average levels—important to know if you’re at risk for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, or if you’re managing diabetes.

The A1C test—also known as the hemoglobin A1C or HbA1c test—is a simple blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months. It’s one of the commonly used tests to diagnose prediabetes and diabetes, and is also the main test to help you and your health care team manage your diabetes. Higher A1C levels are linked to diabetes complications, so reaching and maintaining your individual A1C goal is really important if you have diabetes.

What Does the A1C Test Measure?

When sugar enters your bloodstream, it attaches to hemoglobin, a protein in your red blood cells. Everybody has some sugar attached to their hemoglobin, but people with higher blood sugar levels have more. The A1C test measures the percentage of your red blood cells that have sugar-coated hemoglobin.

Who Should Get an A1C Test, and When?

Testing for diabetes or prediabetes:
Get a baseline A1C test if you’re an adult over age 45—or if you’re under 45, are overweight, and have one or more risk factors for prediabetes or type 2 diabetes:

  • If your result is normal but you’re over 45, have risk factors, or have ever had gestational diabetes, repeat the A1C test every 3 years.
  • If your result shows you have prediabetes, talk to your doctor about taking steps now to improve your health and lower your risk for type 2 diabetes. Repeat the A1C test as often as your doctor recommends, usually every 1 to 2 years.
  • If you don’t have symptoms but your result shows you have prediabetes or diabetes, get a second test on a different day to confirm the result.
  • If your test shows you have diabetes, ask your doctor to refer you to diabetes self-management education and support services so you can have the best start in managing your diabetes.

Managing diabetes:
If you have diabetes, get an A1C test at least twice a year, more often if your medicine changes or if you have other health conditions. Talk to your doctor about how often is right for you.

How to Prepare for Your A1C Test

The test is done in a doctor’s office or a lab using a sample of blood from a finger stick or from your arm. You don’t need to do anything special to prepare for your A1C test. However, ask your doctor if other tests will be done at the same time and if you need to prepare for them.

My A1c is high and I need help or suggestions to lower it. I’m feeling so frustrated, please help?!

Without a doubt, knowing how to reduce A1c is incredibly important to your health.

How important? Well, research shows that each 1% reduction in A1c may reduce your risk of:

  • microvascular complications such as neuropathy and retinopathy by 37%
  • heart attack by 14%
  • diabetes-related death by 21%

These are pretty great risk reductions, right?

By getting your A1c levels to a healthy normal range and keeping them there, you will stay in good health long term.

So, let’s talk about how to lower A1c?

How to lower a1c levelsWhat is A1c?

We have covered this in detail in another article over here.

In short, A1c is a blood test that measures your average blood sugar levels over the past 3 months.

The important thing to understand here is what is raising the A1c level, it’s sugar/ carbohydrate in the bloodstream.

A process called glycosylation occurs where sugars (glucose) in your bloodstream attach to hemoglobin (the protein molecule in red blood cells). The average red blood cell lives for around 3 months, so when they do the A1c blood test they are testing ‘glycated hemoglobin’ or in other words, ‘sugar on the blood.’

How To Lower A1c?

Essentially you lower your A1c the same as you lower your blood glucose, through diet, exercise, and lifestyle.

Making diet changes is especially important. In fact, diet can lower A1c as much, if not more than diabetes medications.

Here are the most effective diet changes you can make to lower A1c.

Cut the carbs

If it’s sugar/ carbs that attach to hemoglobin, then it makes sense to cut the amount of carbohydrates you consume, right?

This is one of the fastest, easiest ways to get results – we know because our members are achieving amazing results with this one simple strategy.

“I wanted to see my A1c under 5.7 but my doctor told me that because of the medications I have to take, not to expect that to happen. I got great news today. My A1C is 5.8!! I am so grateful for DMP!”

Reduce or eliminate bread, pasta, rice, potatoes, sweet potatoes, corn, noodles and grain-based foods like crackers and breakfast cereals. These are the highest carbohydrate foods.

Eat whole foods

Processed and packaged foods are just junk and they don’t do your metabolism any favors.

The food philosophy we have here at DMP is to eat as natural as you can, eat whole foods that come directly from nature.

This is very important because it not only reduces blood sugar levels and A1c, but works on the inflammation and metabolic problems that your body has as well. The combination of reduced carbohydrates and a whole foods diet is better than just trying to reduce carbs but still opting for lots of low carb ‘products.’

Eat more vegetables

The key is to eat more vegetables, particularly the type of vegetables that grow above the ground, such as cucumber, lettuce, spinach, zucchini, tomato, green beans, Brussels sprout, cabbage, Asian greens, and the list goes on.

Vegetables contain fiber, minerals, vitamins, polyphenols, and compounds that help nourish the body and lower blood sugar, A1c and inflammation.

Instead of the high carb foods mentioned above, fill your plate with a big selection of fresh vegetables – these are carbohydrates but the good kind you can eat ample portions of.

In 6 weeks my A1c came down from 6.9 to 6.7. All my other labs came into normal range. My doctor is very pleased. Love the meal plans and foods.

Start slow

Cutting carbs is not an easy process for most people so often this means you have to start slow.

For example: If you drink soda, start there and cut that out. After that you can tackle sugar, and then things like bread, rice, potatoes, and pasta.

Basically you’ve got a 3 month window to change your A1c to a better result, so just take it one step at a time.

How will you know your A1c levels are going to be better?

You only have an A1c test every 3-6 months so how will you know if you’re going to get better results at your next test?

The best way is to monitor your daily blood sugar levels, before and after meals. You want to aim to reduce your daily levels and this will be reflected in your A1c test.

How to lower a1c levels

Other Important Strategies That Help Lower A1c

    regularly – aim for a goal of 30 minutes a day but if you currently do nothing, then start with just 5 or 10 minutes and build up from there. Exercise helps the cells in the muscles use sugar from your blood more efficiently.
  1. Drink water – you need to drink plenty of water with diabetes, aim for at least 1.5 liters per day. Water can help regulate blood sugar levels.
  2. Live a healthy lifestyle – lowering A1c levels does take some commitment so this must come from within, a mindset change where you really put yourself a a priority, resist temptation, and focus on permanent changes.
  3. Keep a food diary – this will help you monitor what you eat, when you eat, and how you are feeling.
  4. Keep a cap on stress – stress bumps up blood sugars so don’t stress about your levels or anything else. Work in your circle of influence, meaning focus on what you CAN do and change, don’t focus on or worry about what you can’t change.
  5. Test, test, test – you need to test blood sugar levels regularly so that you can see how foods, life, and other things are affecting your body. Test before and after meals. If you do eat carbs, test before and after so you can actually see how different foods affect your blood sugar levels. This is called monitoring in pairs.

How to lower a1c levels

Conclusion

Making diet and lifestyle changes is a process that often takes people time to achieve.

If you’re looking for the one tip to get the best results fastest, the only thing you need to focus on right now is cutting back the carbs! This in itself will result in dramatic changes.

We encourage people to eat 50-80 grams of carbs per day, or up to a maximum of 100g.

Need help to know what foods to eat and cut the carbs?

You might like our 30 Day Turnaround Program it helps you make the cut gradually with lots of alternatives and food ideas.

How to lower a1c levels

Type 2 Diabetes is essentially a disease of poor lifestyle and dietary habits. Thus, logically this is the condition that can be either prevented, stopped or even partially reversed in many cases just through lifestyle modification and dietary measures.Therefore dietary modifications have to be an essential part of any anti-diabetic program (Fowler, 2007). A1c is the measure of glucose associated with hemoglobin; it shows how well the person is controlling his or her sugar level in blood for last 8 to 12 weeks(Practitioners, n.d.). Thus it is not something that can be brought down overnight, but rather through consistent efforts over the time.

Carbohydrates, Glycemic Index, and Glycemic Load

Before planning a diet plan that helps to bring down blood sugar we got to know some basics. We get most of our energy needs through carbohydrates, which are converted to glucose. Carbohydrates are essential to meet our energy needs. To avoid the high sugar levels in the blood, we have to take the diet which is low in glycemic index, and preferably low in glycemic load. So the question arises that what is glycemic index and glycemic load?

Understanding glycemic index and glycemic load are essential for dietary planning and choosing right kind of food products in diabetics. Glycemic index is measured on the scale of 0 to 100; it tells us how quickly the given food will raise our blood sugar (glucose) after ingestion.Thus foods with higher glycemic index are harmful, and foods with lower glycemic index are right as they only slowly get absorbed and do not raise our blood glucose level in a sharp manner(“About Glycemic Index,” n.d.).Whereas Glycemic Load tell us about the amount of sugar (glucose) in any food, lower glycemic load means lower sugar in a portion of the product(“Glycemic Load,” 2013). How to lower a1c levels

Thus let us look at some of the foods with low glycemic Index(Harvard Health, n.d.).Products with a glycemic index below 50 can be regarded as those with low blood-sugar level raising effect. Food products like tortilla bread, pearled barley, parboiled converted white rice, milk, reduced fat yogurt with fruit, apple, grapefruit, baked beans, black beans, peanuts, carrots, chicken nuggets, have low glycemic index. more information about more commonly used such foods can be found here.

One can search the database at the link provided,to know about the glycemic index of any commonly used products here(“GI Database,” n.d.), thus know how any food product is going to affect the levels of blood sugar.

It has to be noted that glycemic load is also equally important, as some foods may have a high glycemic index but still low glycemic load and thus low sugar content in a given portion. A good example of this being watermelon, it has aglycemic index of 72, that may sound alarming, but due to high moisture content, it has a very low glycemic load. Thus a 120 mg serving of watermelon has a glycemic load of just 4, making it quite healthy for diabetics.

So usually most vegetables would be aright balance of glycemic index and load, one has to be selective with fruits. White meat is low in glycemic index. So are many fiber-rich grains. Eggs are also low in carbs and agood source of high-quality protein.

Control Your Serving Size

One of the easy ways to remember about the balanced diet is to know the rule of hand. Your palm is the amount of proteins that should be in a portion. Your fist tells about the volume of veggies to be included in the food, your cupped hand tells about the amount of carbs to add in the food, and your thumb tells about the amount of fats to add in food(Pinola, n.d.).

It is equally important to eat daily at a fixed time. Cut down on your portion size, and further learn to estimate the size of your portion(Drive, Arlington, & 1-800-Diabetes, n.d.-a; Gibson et al., 2016). It is also a good idea to have big breakfast, but light dinner, as you have the whole day to burn your calories(Drive, Arlington, & 1-800-Diabetes, n.d.-b).

Supplement Your Diet

Once we have understood about what food to eat more, and what less, and how to control our portion sizes, it will be worth looking at some herbs, minerals, and vitamins that can be especially useful in controlling the blood glucose levels. In modern times, the secret to healthy living is, eating well, moving more often, and supplementing the diet with useful elements.

  • Cinnamon: spice, obtained from the bark of the tree has long been known to help with diabetes and at the same time enhance the flavor of various food preparations. Known to lower the blood sugar and help control the cholesterol levels, have an anti-inflammatory effect and antioxidant effect(Qin, Panickar, & Anderson, 2010).
  • Vitamin D: Recently vitamin D has received lots of attention, as it has been shown that most of the diabetics are deficient in this vitamin. Moreover, vitamin D has been demonstrated to increase insulin secretion, help in decreasing insulin resistance, thus helping to lower blood glucose levels in diabetics. Not to mention other metabolic benefits of vitamin D, like helping in the absorption of calcium and making bones stronger(Norman, Frankel, Heldt, & Grodsky, 1980).
  • Chromium: the micro-element, has been shown to decrease the insulin resistance, help insulin to work better. Many clinical trials have demonstrated the beneficial effect of chromium in diabetes and lowering the a1c(Broadhurst & Domenico, 2006).
  • Alpha Lipoic Acid: It is considered to be helpful in tackling the nerve damage in diabetes, and keeping kidneys healthy in the diabetic person(Ziegler et al., 1999).
  • Fenugreek: It has been used as aspice in many cuisines, fenugreek has been long known to help with diabetes, helping decrease the blood glucose levels, and keep cholesterol down to ahealthy Many clinical trials have been done, and most of them have been supportive of its use in diabetes(Kassaian, Azadbakht, Forghani, &Amini, 2009).
  • Ginseng: well-known supplement from Eastern medicine, it has been long known for various health benefits, stimulant and adaptogen has now also been demonstrated to help in lowering blood sugar levels(Xie, Mehendale, & Yuan, 2005).

In modern days non-communicable disease has become amajor reason of morbidity and mortality. However, most of them can be avoided with lifestyle changes, like eating healthy, doing exercise, and using natural supplements.

How to lower a1c levels

Do you have diabetes and you are wondering the best ways in lowering a1c levels naturally? You came to the right place!

People who have diabetes require a significant level of discipline when it comes to medication and lifestyle. This way, they will be able to improve their condition and prevent possible complications.

However, before jumping into the different ways on how to lower a1c levels fast, you need to be familiar first with the A1C test.

What is the A1C Test and How Can I Lower It Overnight?

Do you want to confirm whether you have a diabetes? Then, you need to undergo an A1C test. It is a blood test that screens for diabetes.

An A1C test is also known by other names such as hemoglobin A1C, glycosylated hemoglobin, and glycated hemoglobin. Its result will reflect the average blood sugar level for the past 2 to 3 months.

What do the scores mean?

In an A1C test, the results are reported in the form of a percentage. You need to acquire valuable ideas of what do the scores mean.

  • An A1C levels below 5.7 percent is considered normal.
  • An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 percent signals prediabetes.
  • An AIC levels above 6.5 percent means positive on diabetes.
  • An A1C levels of 7 requires treatment.

How to lower a1c levels

Normal Blood Sugar Range After Meals

If you want to improve the natural ways to lower a1c, you need to monitor your food intake. But, what is the normal sugar level after a meal?

You need to be aware that a healthy blood sugar level should be less than 100 mg/dL after you have not eaten for at least 8 hours. Thus, the range is less than 140 mg/dL 2 hours after a meal.

What are the signs of diabetes?

Did you know that diabetes can be developed even developed even without warning signs? However, below is the list of signs of diabetes.

  • Dry mouth
  • Urine infection or frequent urination, increased thirst or hunger
  • Fatigue including tired feeling and weakness
  • Headaches
  • Blurred vision

How to lower a1c levels

Diabetic Men at Higher Risk for Heart Disease

Heart disease is among the common complications of diabetes and men are known to be at higher risk. Based on a study, men who have type 2 diabetes who are being treated with insulin can develop a higher risk for cardiovascular events including heart attack, stroke, and death.

After getting familiar all about the A1C test, the next big thing for you to learn on how you can reduce and lower a1c levels naturally.

How To Lower A1C Levels Overnight Naturally With Type 1 Diabetes

Having a type 1 diabetes can be devastating. Good thing, there are effective ways of lowering a1c naturally.

Give Up Smoking

Do you still smoke while you are treating your diabetes? It is better for you to quit smoking to ensure that you can lower a1c naturally and even overnight. Also, you have a chance to control your blood sugar, reduce possible cardiovascular complications, lower the risk of kidney complications and improve your blood circulation.

Find An Activity You Enjoy and Become More Active In It

By being active in the things you enjoy, you can reduce a1c naturally. So, think about the activities you love and spend time enjoying it. Thus, you will be able to relieve stress and obtain relaxation.

Lose Some Weight with Active Lifestyle – Reduce Blood Glucose During Exercise

If you have a type 1 diabetes, it is recommended for you to monitor and maintain a healthy weight. You can choose between yoga and gym which are both effective in helping you lose weight while lowering a1c naturally. See to it that you are comfortable with the type of exercise you choose.

Ensure A Good Night’s Sleep

By getting enough sleep overnight, you can naturally lower a1c. This is because when you have poor sleeping habits, your insulin sensitivity and sugar levels are affected. Also, if you have sleep deprivation, there can be increased cortisol levels and decreased the release of growth hormones which are both essential in the blood sugar control.

Have An A1C Level Goal and Stick to A Schedule To Reduce It.

In lowering a1c naturally, you need to have your a1c levels goal to keep your motivation. Also, it is necessary to stick to your schedule. Remember, your blood sugar might rise or fall too much if you do not follow the right meal schedule.

How to lower a1c levels

Essential Oil for Diabetes

When it comes to lowering a1c levels naturally, essential oils are quite useful. You can choose from coriander seed, lemon balm, clove bud, black seed, black pepper, cinnamon, lavender, and many more.

PREVENT AND REVERSE DIABETES USING YOUR FOOD AS MEDICINE

The food you eat have a significant impact on reducing a1c naturally. Certain foods can help you in preventing and reversing diabetes.

Diabetes Diet

You can consult your doctor for you to determine the ideal diabetes diet for you. You have to eat three healthy meals each day and snacks in between to regulate your blood sugar level. Also, you need to eat meals with appropriate portion sizes as well as eat more vegetables.

Cut Back On Carbohydrates

When consider cutting back on carbohydrates, there is a better chance for you to control your blood sugar level, lose weight, and lower a1c naturally. So, you need to be very particular with the food you eat especially to those who have a high level of carb.

High Fiber Foods and Fruits

Another way of lowering a1c naturally is by eating high fiber foods and fruits. These foods can help you in obtaining better blood sugar control. You can take advantage of fruits with skin on it, whole grains, and non-starchy vegetables.

Add Probiotics to Your Diet

Probiotics are known to lower insulin and glucose levels in people with diabetes. L. casei and Lactobacillus acidophilus can help you improve your hyperglycemia and glucose tolerance.

Apple Cider Vinegar

By consuming apple cider vinegar, you will be able to control your blood sugar levels. One study has demonstrated that it can reduce sugar levels.

In ensuring that you can effectively reduce a1c naturally, you need to determine the critical steps as well as the foods you need to take. But, see to it that you have the discipline and follow a fixed schedule. Also, you need to maintain a healthy lifestyle.

It’s important to understand that lowering your A1C levels is a gradual process. Your A1C, unlike your finger-prick glucose test, measures your average blood sugar over a period of 2 to 3 months. That means it can take up to 3 months to notice significant changes in your A1C.

Does fasting help lower your A1C?

Intermittent fasting could be a beneficial option for lowering HbA1c in people with type 2 diabetes, scientists report.

What foods can I eat to lower my A1C?

Here are seven foods that Powers says can help keep your blood sugar in check and make you happy and healthy to boot. Raw, Cooked, or Roasted Vegetables. These add color, flavor, and texture to a meal. Greens. Flavorful, Low-calorie Drinks. Melon or Berries. Whole-grain, Higher-fiber Foods. A Little Fat. Protein.

What supplements can I take to lower my A1C level?

10 Supplements to Help Lower Blood Sugar Cinnamon. Cinnamon supplements are either made from whole cinnamon powder or an extract. American Ginseng. Probiotics. Aloe Vera. Berberine. Vitamin D. Gymnema. Magnesium.

How can I get my A1C down quickly?

Small changes add up, so consider trying some of these strategies to lower your A1C this week. Try Short Sessions of High Intensity Exercise. Shrink Your Dinner Plate. Eat Whole Foods. Get Enough Sleep — But Not Too Much. Get It in Writing.

What fruit should diabetics avoid?

Processing fruits also removes or reduces levels of certain key nutrients, including vitamins and fiber. The National Institute of Diabetic and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) recommends that people with diabetes should avoid fruit juices or canned fruits with added sugar.

Can Apple cider vinegar lower A1C?

Let’s cut right to the chase: apple cider vinegar has shown to reduce blood sugar levels slightly in people with type 2 diabetes and type 1 diabetes, but the results aren’t going to have a tremendous impact on your A1c from ACV alone.

Can you have a high A1C and not be diabetic?

The higher the amount of glucose in the blood, the higher the A1C percentage. A normal A1C measurement is less than 5.7%, while an A1C of 5.7% to 6.4% could suggest prediabetes, and an A1C of 6.5% or higher usually means diabetes.

Will drinking water lower blood sugar?

Drinking water can lower blood sugar levels by diluting the amount of glucose ( sugar ) in the blood stream. Drinking extra water will not dilute your blood sugar levels if you are already fully hydrated. However, being dehydrated can cause blood sugars to concentrate and subsequently rise.

What should I eat for breakfast to lower my blood sugar?

Here are 10 balanced, diabetes-friendly breakfast ideas to help you stay healthy and get on with your day. Breakfast Smoothie With Berries and Greek Yogurt. Whole-Wheat Blueberry Muffins With a Protein-Rich Side. Whole-Grain Cereal With Oatmeal, Egg, and Ground Flaxseed. Vegetarian Eggs and Lentils on Toast.

How do you feel when your blood sugar is too high?

If your blood sugar level is too high, you may experience: Increased thirst. Frequent urination. Fatigue.

Is banana good for diabetic?

Bananas are a safe and nutritious fruit for people with diabetes to eat in moderation as part of a balanced, individualized diet plan. A person with diabetes should include fresh, plant food options in the diet, such as fruits and vegetables. Bananas provide plenty of nutrition without adding many calories.

Why do diabetics have big stomachs?

When we drink beverages sweetened with sucrose, fructose, or high fructose corn syrup, the liver stores this extra sugar as fat, increasing belly fat, Norwood says. The hormones produced by this extra belly fat play a role in insulin resistance, possibly leading to type 2 diabetes.

What is a diabetic belly?

The medical term for the condition your niece’s doctor calls ” diabetic stomach ” is gastroparesis. Diabetes can cause alterations of peristalsis, the normal contractions of the stomach and intestines that move food along the digestive tract.

How can I lower my A1C levels overnight?

Making these healthy changes can help you improve your day-to-day blood sugar management and lower your A1C: Start an Exercise Plan You Enjoy and Do It Regularly. Eat a Balanced Diet With Proper Portion Sizes. Stick to a Regular Schedule, So You Can More Easily Follow Your Healthy Diet and Lifestyle.