How to make a primer

It’s time to be brutally honest. When I first heard about face primer, I thought, “You’re kidding. One more layer of stuff to put on my face? No way!”

I simply didn’t see the need for it. But I decided to try out a few of them anyway, and the experience left me feeling that face primers were useless. They felt slick, greasy or tacky on my skin, and I was not impressed.

Still, I kept reading and hearing about all the benefits of face primers: they combat shine, they create a smooth base for foundation, they help foundation go on easier and the foundation lasts longer… and so on.

After a year or so, I thought I would give face primers another chance. At that time, I had to reluctantly admit that the one I tried felt pretty good on my skin.

Moreover, my makeup looked darn good at the end of the day even though I’d been out in the vicious heat and had logged a lot of errand-running miles. I had to admit I was impressed.

Primers have continued to improve. There are now many primers that also help us with a variety of skin types and concerns –from dullness to redness to pore issues to dry- or oily-skin issues.

Face primers create a protective barrier over the skin. They are primarily used to even out the skin tone, to smooth the skin’s surface so makeup goes on more evenly and to help makeup last longer.

Think of face primer as you would paint primer for your house: the goal is to apply a smooth base coat (primer) before applying the final coat (foundation).

Here’s a quick rundown of the benefits of using a face primer:

  • Helps your makeup stay flawless and in place longer – and is a real help in extreme weather conditions.
  • Helps foundation glide on more easily and evenly.
  • Absorbs oil to help combat shine later in the day.
  • Helps reduce the look of large pores.
  • Depending on the type of primer, it can help even out the skin tone.
  • Helps fill in lines, wrinkles and other imperfections so you use less foundation.
  • Depending on the type of primer, it can add brightness to the skin.
  • Can help prevent makeup from looking ‘caked on.’
  • Creates a protective barrier over the skin which seals in and protects any treatment products used during your daily skincare regimen.

There are a few other things to point out as well.

Many makeup primers are formulated with silicon-based polymers, like dimethicone, because of their ultra-smoothing effects. But if you struggle with cystic acne or other skin conditions, do a patch test or check with a medical professional since some people report allergic reactions to dimethicone.

There are also many primers that are based on skin-loving ingredients or botanicals, are paraben free and packed with vitamins and minerals. And some primers also have SPF.

I highly recommend requesting samples of various primers from department store makeup counters or from Sephora or Ulta to see which primers feel best on your skin and work best for you.

Many makeup artists recommend applying primer with your fingertips for several different reasons. The warmth from your fingers allows the product to ‘melt’ into your skin and provide natural-looking results.

In addition, applying with your fingers allows you to work the product into your skin, which also gets the blood flowing underneath, helping your circulation.

Another option is to blend some of the primer into your favorite liquid foundation. This will provide sheerer coverage but with some staying power.

Now you may be wondering exactly when you should apply primer during your skincare and makeup routine.

You will always want to put primer on after you complete your skincare routine and before you put on foundation. If you’re using a separate SPF product, your SPF should go on after your moisturizer and before your primer.

So why not pick up a few primer samples and give them a try? Who knows… it may just be the ingredient you need to continue to look flawless when you still have those dancing shoes on at 10 p.m.

Have you tried a face primer under your makeup? What has been your experience with it? Has it worked for you? Would you recommend a face primer to others? Please share your opinion and thoughts below.

[ primer \’pri-mər\ n. 1: a small book for teaching children to read; 2: a small introductory book on a subject; 3: a short informative piece of writing. ] – Merriam-Webster

What is a CIRCL Primer?

A CIRCL primer is a concise, brief summary of a big idea in the field of cyberlearning. Primers are used to build capacity in the field and to give people a sense of cyberlearning’s main themes. They are much appreciated by people who are newer to our community and want to participate more fully.

Primers provide an overview of what has been learned on a big idea topic, but they are not a comprehensive literature review; the authors get to choose the work they think matters most to the audience.

Why Should I Contribute to a Primer?

As an author of a Primer, you’re showcasing your expertise in the area as a thought leader and helping newcomers to the field. You also get to showcase projects you think are doing good work. Primers are featured in our newsletters, on the CIRCL web site, and in social media, and they are also used in NSF-funded outreach activities like proposal-writing workshops. So you get visibility to NSF and the field.

Submit a Primer Idea

Before you submit your idea, please read the (short) Audience, Organization, Tips, and Process tabs above. After you submit your idea, CIRCL staff will contact you to follow up. Your submission can be brief; we’ll set up a time to discuss further and agree on a process to flesh it out.

Who is the Audience for a Primer?

Early career reseearchers, graduate students, teachers, journalists with popular press, and a general education audience. For example:

  • For a proposal writer who is unfamiliar with a particular topic, the primer should provide awareness of relevant prior research and how that body of research is relevant to important challenges.
  • For a developer, the primer should help them decide if this is a knowledge base that could potentially help them with their product.
  • For a policy maker, a primer should give a sense of what prior research has accomplished.

How is a Primer Organized?

The DBIR Primer is a good model. Each primer works from a common set of headers/sections. Not every primer has to have every section. Each section is 1/2-1 page. If you are an expert in the topic area, it shouldn’t take you more than a day to write a primer.

  • Overview (1 page): A high-level summary of the big idea and context needed for the reader to understand the topic.
  • Key Lessons (1/2-1 page): Addresses the questions: What do we know as a result of research? What are lessons learned for designing curriculum and instruction or for designing future research?
  • Issues (1/2-1 page): Raises potential questions that: push boundaries of current knowledge and understanding (i.e. good topics for future research proposals); a developer would have to address in a product; a practitioner would likely end up thinking hard about as they apply the big idea. Likewise, the issues could highlight things a reviewer would ding you for NOT thinking about — you say you are using Big Data, but you haven’t talked about data privacy.
  • Readings (1/2 page): Can be a reference list or pointers to seminal studies.
  • Resources (1/2 page): Where can a reader go to learn more – websites, associations, journals, etc?

Tips for Writing a Primer

  • Minimize Jargon. Keep your sentences short. Aim it at a New York Times level reader.
  • Use contrast. How is the big idea different from a past related idea that everyone would know (an intelligent tutor is different from a drill and practice system because…)
  • The first sentence or two is particularly important. Give the reader a clear sense of the big idea and why it’s important. Don’t start with long winded need statements that tell the reader things they already know about the problems out there or summaries of prior research. Focus on giving a sense of the big idea that this is about — and motivating the reader to read the rest.
  • A little self-promotion (of your projects) is okay, but not much.

Process for Development

  1. Submit a topic to CIRCL using the form in the Overview tab. We will check for appropriateness and make initial recommendations.
  2. CIRCL staff can either interview you (1 hour or less) or you can assemble a small team (1-2 people) to flesh out a first draft and share that with CIRCL.
  3. CIRCL will interactively review the primer with 2-3 additional experts and give feedback on suggested improvements.
  4. Revise and prepare a second draft.
  5. CIRCL will review for style, completeness, etc. and send suggestions for minor improvements.
  6. Prepare a final draft.
  7. CIRCL will publish (with you a author) and promote in social media, at events, etc.

Timeline: This is negotiable. Please discuss with CIRCL.

This post may contain affiliate links.

How to make a primer

How to make a primer

Enjoy these two recipes for a DIY makeup primer. It is simple, inexpensive, and effective to make a DIY face primer at home. You can do this and you should!

Even though I don’t get out as much these days, I still need to run to the grocery store once in a while. My skin tone is naturally uneven, so I do use a bit of powdered make up. I have really oily skin so I usually use a primer of some sort, but not being able to shop for one is difficult. So, I made my own!

DIY Makeup Primer

The easiest way to make a homemade makeup primer for your face is to mix 3 parts of a gel to one part of a powder. While there are several of each to choose from, I made it simple.

Ingredients

  • 1 Tablespoon aloe vera gel
  • 1 teaspoon arrowroot powder

Instructions

  1. Mix the two of these thoroughly and spoon into a wide mouth jar. That’s it!
  2. Apply a small amount of this DIY face primer to your face before using makeup. This will help your face to be less oily and help your makeup last longer.

I add a small amount of my regular makeup so that it is tinted a bit. This also helps to keep your make up looking fresh without being overdone.

Another DIY Face Primer recipe

Here is another DIY makeup primer recipe that doesn’t use aloe vera. I realize that some people can’t use it and that in the warmer weather it can be too moist. Aloe Vera is a humectant, pulling moisture out of the air and helping your skin to not dry out as fast. With my skin that is already oily, an alternative homemade face primer was called for.

Ingredients

  • 2 Tablespoons flaxseeds
  • 1/4 cup hot water
  • 1-2 teaspoons arrowroot powder

Instructions

  1. To make this DIY makeup primer, in a small bowl add the flaxseed to the hot water. Stir well and let sit until cool.
  2. Strain the hulls out of the water, which will become a gel at this point.
  3. Depending on how much water you are left with, follow the recipe above, using 1 teaspoon of arrowroot powder to 1 Tablespoon of gel. Mix thoroughly.
  4. This can be used the same way but should be kept in the refrigerator to retard mold and bacteria.

Adding Essential Oils

You can definitely add essential oils to your DIY makeup primer if you’d like.

Add a few drops of lavender or frankincense essential oils to the gel and mix in well. Because essential oils are oils, they may tend to separate out. If this happens, just mix them in again.

Another alternative is to use an infused water when you make the gel. Normally I would use distilled water, but you could also use a strong “tea” made from lavender flowers, calendula petals, or comfrey leaves. Then use this liquid in place of the water for the second recipe.

Save money and control ingredients by making a DIY face makeup primer!

About Debra Maslowski

Debra is a master gardener, a certified herbalist, a natural living instructor and more. She taught Matt and Betsy how to make soap so they decided to bring her on as a staff writer! Debra recently started an organic herb farm in the mountains of Western North Carolina. You can even purchase her handmade products on Amazon! Connect with Debra Maslowski on G+.

PAID ENDORSEMENT DISCLOSURE: In order for us to support our website activities, we may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this website.

DISCLAIMER: Information on DIY Natural™ is not reviewed or endorsed by the FDA and is NOT intended to be substituted for the advice of your health care professional. If you rely solely upon this advice you do so at your own risk. Read full Disclaimer & Disclosure statements here.

More Posts You’ll Love

Homemade Face Wash: A Natural Face Wash Recipe

This homemade face wash is a natural DIY face wash that works great, is inexpensive, and easy to make. Tailor it to your specific skin type.

Natural Homemade Mosquito/Insect/Bug Repellent

This natural homemade mosquito repellent works for mosquitos, flies, and other insects. Apply your DIY mosquito repellent with confidence.

12 Ways To Lighten & Highlight Your Hair Naturally

Learn how to lighten hair naturally (and add highlights naturally) at home. Using natural hair lightener saves money and keeps hair healthier!

Comments

How to make a primerPaula says

Is there a brand of aloe you recommend and/or where to purchase?

How to make a primerMartha says

I don’t have aloe vera gel, but I make my bbn own. Do I have to keep it refrigerated?

How to make a primerCathleen Caffrey says

What is a make-up primer? It might help if your article explained this at the beginning. As someone who almost never wears makeup, I’m puzzled. I occasionally use tinted moisturizer with sunscreen to even out a blotchy skin. And I sometimes use a totally colorless powder if the blotches are especially bad. My skin used to be oily but is now very dry (I’m 74). If there is a better formula for very dry skin, I’d like to know it.

I’ve tried to find Aloe vera gel to make sanitizer but cannot find any that is not mixed with other ingredients. Puzzling because plain aloe used to be widely available. If you can recommend one or two brands, maybe I can find a local store selling one or both.

About Matt & Betsy

How to make a primer

Matt and Betsy are passionate about living naturally and building a like-minded community focused on the sustainable lifestyle.

DIY Natural is about rediscovering the traditional value of doing things yourself, doing them naturally, and enjoying the benefits. Welcome to the movement! (read more)

If you have a question about a topic that is not covered here, please contact us.

How can I create a primer?

Paste a Primer Sequence

To create a primer, click Primers → Add Primer. , then copy and paste a sequence.

Select the Binding Site (optional)

How to make a primer

Alternatively, you can begin by selecting the desired binding site on your sequence. If you click the mouse and drag to select, the melting temperature of a corresponding primer will be shown. To add the primer at the selected location, go to Primers → Add Primer.

Specify the Selected Strand (optional)

If the primer will be made from a selected binding site, specify whether the Top Strand or Bottom Strand of the selection should be used.

Name the Primer

If desired, type the primer name.

Edit the Description

If desired, type a description. The Description tab is open by default.

Modify the Primer (optional)

If desired, modify the primer to add a 5’ extension or introduce a mutation. There are two options.

One option is to manually edit the primer sequence in the text box.

How to make a primer

The other option is to click in the primer sequence at the location of the change, and then click the Insertions tab. Use the dialog controls to add a desired codon, restriction site, or peptide coding sequence.

View the Binding Sites and Melting Temperature

The number of binding sites and the calculated melting temperature is shown at the bottom of the window. To see a summary of the melting temperature calculation methods, click the blue text at the lower right corner of the dialog.

View the Primer

How to make a primer

Click Add Primer to Template to see the new primer.

If you have a question about a topic that is not covered here, please contact us.

How can I create a primer?

Paste a Primer Sequence

To create a primer, click Primers → Add Primer. , then copy and paste a sequence.

Select the Binding Site (optional)

How to make a primer

Alternatively, you can begin by selecting the desired binding site on your sequence. If you click the mouse and drag to select, the melting temperature of a corresponding primer will be shown. To add the primer at the selected location, go to Primers → Add Primer.

Specify the Selected Strand (optional)

If the primer will be made from a selected binding site, specify whether the Top Strand or Bottom Strand of the selection should be used.

Name the Primer

If desired, type the primer name.

Edit the Description

If desired, type a description. The Description tab is open by default.

Modify the Primer (optional)

If desired, modify the primer to add a 5’ extension or introduce a mutation. There are two options.

One option is to manually edit the primer sequence in the text box.

How to make a primer

The other option is to click in the primer sequence at the location of the change, and then click the Insertions tab. Use the dialog controls to add a desired codon, restriction site, or peptide coding sequence.

View the Binding Sites and Melting Temperature

The number of binding sites and the calculated melting temperature is shown at the bottom of the window. To see a summary of the melting temperature calculation methods, click the blue text at the lower right corner of the dialog.

View the Primer

How to make a primer

Click Add Primer to Template to see the new primer.

How to make a primer

A great base is the beginning of any great makeup look, whether you’re rocking a full face or just a few dabs of concealer. And while a great skin-care regimen can work wonders for making sure your makeup wears flawlessly throughout the day, primer is the real key to getting your makeup to perform the way it should. If you’re not familiar with makeup primers , let us give you a, um, primer. These silky, soft creams and gels are meant to be applied underneath your makeup to guarantee perfect foundation application by filling in fine lines and smoothing out uneven skin texture. Plus, they also keep your makeup looking fresh throughout the day.

Primers have come a long way in the past decade, moving from the makeup artist’s kit to your vanity, and they come in a mind-boggling array of formulas. Keep reading for everything you ever wanted to know about makeup primers, including which one is right for you and how to apply them for maximum benefits.

What Primer Does and How to Pick the Right One

Primers are sort of like insurance for your makeup. Although they often wear many hats — smoothing, concealing, protecting and prepping — their main roles are to keep your makeup on longer and give your skin a smooth, flawless finish. Any fading, bleeding or blotchy behavior that can occur throughout the day can usually be prevented with the use of a little bit of primer under your foundation ( just make sure the ingredients play well together !). Better yet, many primers now are also infused with SPF, so they help keep your skin protected from UV rays while lending radiance.

For application, try a priming brush like the NYX Professional Makeup High Glass Face Primer Brush that can help you evenly distribute the product all over the face.

In this article, I will explain how to easily prepare PCR stock primers and how to dilute them into a working primer solution.

Mastering qPCR

A video tutorial on how to dilute new qPCR primers can be found in our Mastering qPCR course
>>Use code 20QPCR to get 20% off o C until the time comes.

Before you start, here are some general tips when working with PCR primers:

  • Make sure you work in a DNA-free environment. Preferably in a PCR preparation hood. This is to avoid contamination of your stock and working primer solutions.
  • Use PCR-grade water (DNase- and RNase-free) to reconstitute and dilute your primers.
  • Use filter pipette tips to prevent contamination via pipetting.

To prepare primers for PCR, just follow these two simple steps:

1. Reconstitute your stock primers

First things first, you should briefly (approximately 30 seconds) centrifuge your primers to pull all of the lyophilised powder to the bottom of the tube. Otherwise, if the powder is stuck in the lid while opening the tube, you could potentially damage your primers.

Next, you need to reconstitute your primers with PCR-grade water to make a 100 μM stock solution. But how much water do you need to add? The amount of PCR-grade water to add depends on the number of nanomoles (nmoles) for that oligo primer. This can usually be found on the tube itself or the primer sheet supplied with the order.

For every 1 nmoles, add 10 μL of PCR-grade water.

For example, if a primer states 19.4 nmoles, then add 194 μL of PCR-grade water.

Mix the solution by vortexing to reconstitute the primers. Store primer stocks at -20 o C.

2. Make a working primer solution

You should never use the stock primers directly into a PCR because they are so concentrated. Working from one tube is also a bad idea. It only takes a bit of contamination to creep in to the tube and you will have to re-order the primers again.

Therefore, it is best practise to create working solutions that are of lower concentrations. The concentration of choice for the working primer solution is totally user-determined. The most common concentration for a working primer solution is 10 μM.

To make a 10 μM working primer solution, follow these steps:

  • Add 10 μL of primer stock solution to an RNase- and DNAse-free tube.
  • Add 90 μL of PCR-grade water.
  • Mix by vortexing.

Aliquot and store working primer solutions at -20 o C. Avoid excessive freeze-thawing of working primers.

After conducting the preliminary steps – the actual steps to reloading primers is in this video. After some practice – you will develop your own techniques.

Making homemade primers utilizing the H48 primer formula. You can substitute one of many primer recipes with the one of your choice.

Marshall’s documentation on some of the many variations follows:
http://www.aardvarkreloading.c. om/resources/Homemad

How to make a primer

You call out a 10 part Alcohol to 1 part shellac. Can one substitute a thinned polyurethane instead; of shellac or will Polyurethane and it’s thinners contaminate the H48 or other primer mixtures causing them to not fire?

How to make a primer

Did you make a die for seating the anvil? Or, did you use an off the shelf die; if so what is it?

How to make a primer

Take a sizing die (by Lee) and put the platform that fits into the shell holder. I used a 9mm but a 223 would work better. I then installed a 9mm die (the seater die) in one of those inexpensive single stage presses but I installed it upside-down. I like it because the curve of the seater die seems to straighten out the legs of the anvil when it’s not quite installed properly (which is most of the time).

Like any blank canvas, your face requires a primer product on the surface before adding colors. A primer not only keeps the makeup longer but cover up large pores, wrinkles and absorb excess oil. Using a primer may seem like an extra step in your makeup routine, but it’s crucial if you want your makeup to stay fresh for longer and best looking.

Most of the primers contain silicone which smooths the skin and makes a barrier between your skin and foundation. In DIY makeup primers, glycerine or aloe vera gel is used which makes the skin tacky for makeup. The best thing is that you make this primer by mixing products that you already have in your makeup bag. This way you’re only using products that work for you. Follow these methods to make your own primer at home:

How to make a primer

Recipe #1:

  • Aloe Vera gel, use pre-packaged
  • Moisturizer
  • Your favorite foundation for tint (optional)
  • Face Powder (optional, for matte effect)
  • Witch hazel (optional, for acne prone skin
  • An empty container for storage/ washed old cream jar

Mix 1 tbsp moisturizer, 1 tbsp aloe vera gel, 1/4th tbsp foundation, few drops of witch hazel and a pinch of powder. With powder, you can control how matte or dewy you want the primer to be. Mix everything with the back of a spoon and store in an airtight container.

How to make a primer

Recipe #2:

  • 1 part glycerine and 3 parts water

Combine glycerine and water in a small spray bottle. Shake well and spray on your face before applying makeup.

  • Another easy way to instantly prime your face is by mixing a few drops of glycerine in your moisturizer. This will leave your face a bit tacky, making it perfect to put on makeup.