How to play the c major chord on guitar

This lesson is all about the A minor scale. There are three types of minor scales and we shall take a look at all of them here. They are the natural, melodic and harmonic minor scales.

A Natural Minor Scale

Let’s start with the A natural minor scale. This scale consists of the pitches, A, B, C, D, E, F and G. It has no sharp or flat notes.

Note Intervals

  1. Tonic: A is the 1st note of the A natural minor scale.
  2. Major 2nd: B is the 2nd note of the scale.
  3. Minor 3rd: C is the 3rd note of the scale.
  4. Perfect 4th: D is the 4th note of the scale.
  5. Perfect 5th: E is the 5th note of the scale.
  6. Minor 6th: F is the 6th note of the scale.
  7. Minor 7th: G is the 7th note of the scale.
  8. Perfect 8th: A (one octave higher) is the 8th note of the A natural minor scale.

Here’s the A minor scale on the treble clef.How to play the c major chord on guitar

Here’s the A minor scale on the bass clef. How to play the c major chord on guitar

Here’s the Am scale on piano.How to play the c major chord on guitar

Scale Degrees of Am Scale:

  1. Tonic: A
  2. Supertonic: B
  3. Mediant: C
  4. Subdominant: D
  5. Dominant: E
  6. Submediant: F
  7. Subtonic: G
  8. Octave: A

The relative major key for the key of A minor is C major. A natural minor scale/key consists of the same notes as its relative major. The notes of the C major scale are C, D, E, F, G, A and B. As we’ve seen, the A natural minor uses these same notes, except that the sixth note of the major scale becomes the root note of its relative minor.

The formula for forming a natural (or pure) minor scale is W-H-W-W-H-W-W. “W” stands for whole step and “H” stands for half step. To build an A natural minor scale, starting on A, we take a whole step to B. Next, we take a half step to C. From C, a whole step takes us to D. Another whole step takes us to E. From E, we go up a half step to F. From F, we take a whole step to G. Lastly, one more whole step returns us to A, one octave higher.

Fingerings of the A Minor Scale on Piano

What are the fingerings for the A minor scale? They are as follows:

  • Notes: A, B, C, D, E, F, G, A
  • Fingerings (Left Hand): 5, 4, 3, 2, 1, 3, 2, 1
  • Fingerings (Right Hand): 1, 2, 3, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

Thumb: 1, index finger: 2, middle finger: 3, ring finger: 4 and pinky finger: 5.

Video: How to Play the A Minor Scale

Chords In The Key of A Minor

Let’s now take a look at the chords in the key of A minor.

  1. Chord i: A minor. Its notes are A – C – E.
  2. Chord ii: B diminished. Its notes are B – D – F.
  3. Chord III: C major. Its notes are C – E – G.
  4. Chord iv: D minor. Its notes are D – F – A.
  5. Chord v: E minor. Its notes are E – G – B.
  6. Chord VI: F major. Its notes are F – A – C.
  7. Chord VII: G major. Its notes are G – B – D.

Video: Chords in the Key of A Minor

A Harmonic Minor Scale

Let’s now take a look at the A harmonic minor scale.

To play a harmonic minor scale, you simply raise the seventh note of the natural minor scale by a half-step as you go up and down the scale. For example:

Natural A Minor Scale = A – B – C – D – E – F – G – A

Harmonic A Minor Scale = A – B – C – D – E – F – G# – A

The formula for forming a harmonic minor scale is W-H-W-W-H-W 1/2-H. (Whole step – half step – whole step – whole step – half step – whole step and a 1/2 step – half step.)

Harmonic Minor Scale Intervals

  1. Tonic: The 1st note of the A harmonic minor scale is A.
  2. Major 2nd: The 2nd note of the scale is B.
  3. Minor 3rd: The 3rd note of the scale is C.
  4. Perfect 4th: The 4th note of the scale is D.
  5. Perfect 5th: The 5th is E.
  6. Minor 6th: The 6th note is F.
  7. Major 7th: The 7th note is G#.
  8. Perfect 8th: The 8th note is A.

Here’s a diagram of the A harmonic minor scale on piano.

How to play the c major chord on guitarA Harmonic Minor Scale

Here’s the A minor scale (harmonic) on the treble clef.How to play the c major chord on guitar

Here’s the A minor scale (harmonic) on the bass clef.How to play the c major chord on guitar

A Melodic Minor Scale

For the melodic minor scale, you raise the sixth and seventh notes of the natural minor scale by a half step as you go up the scale and then return to the natural minor as you go down the scale. The notes of the A melodic minor scale ascending are: A – B – C – D – E – F# – G# – A. The notes of the A melodic minor scale descending are: A – B – C – D – E – F – G – A (A natural minor scale).

The formula for a melodic minor scale is whole step – half step – whole step – whole step – whole step – whole step – half step. (W-H-W-W-W-W-H). The descending formula is the natural minor scale formula backwards.

A Melodic Minor Scale Intervals:

  1. Tonic: The 1st note of the A melodic minor scale is A.
  2. Major 2nd: The 2nd note of the scale is B.
  3. Minor 3rd: The 3rd note of the scale is C.
  4. Perfect 4th: The 4th note of the scale is D.
  5. Perfect 5th: The 5th note of the scale is E.
  6. Major 6th: The 6th note of the scale is F#.
  7. Major 7th: The 7th note of the scale is G#.
  8. Perfect 8th: The 8th note of the scale is A.

Here’s a diagram of the A melodic minor scale on piano (ascending).

How to play the c major chord on guitarA melodic minor scale (ascending)

Here’s the scale on the treble clef (ascending).How to play the c major chord on guitar

Here’s the scale on the bass clef (ascending).How to play the c major chord on guitar

Remember that for the melodic minor scale, when descending, you play the natural minor scale.

In this short guitar lesson, we’ll be looking at how to play C Major on Guitar. The C Major chord is a very common chord and is often one of the first chords that beginners learn when first starting to play guitar.

We will cover 3 ways of how to play C major on guitar that start off for beginners and then a couple of more difficult ways to play C major if you are a slightly more advanced guitarist.

What notes are in the c major chord?

The C major chord is what we call a triad chord. A triad, as the name suggests, is made up of 3 notes. In a major triad, the chord is build using the 1st, 3rd & 5th note of the corresponding scale. (In musical terms we usually use Roman Numerals to indicate the note of the scale i.e. I, III &V).

If you aren’t familiar with the major scale then don’t worry too much about it right now, you don’t have to know it to get playing. But I’d recommend having a quick look at my major scale lesson, as it always helps to know what we’re playing.

The C major scale consists of the notes C, D, E, F, G, A, B, so the I, III & V notes that we need for our C major chord would be the notes C, E & G.

How To Play C Major on Guitar

OK, so now let’s look at 3 ways that we can play the C major chord on guitar. These increase in difficulty as we go, so don’t worry about being able to play them all straight away if you’re a beginner. Just be aware that we have many ways that we can play the same chord.

Open C Chord

The first method that we will look at for how to play C major on guitar, is the open C chord. It’s called an open chord because when we play the chord, we leave some of the strings open, meaning that we don’t fret the strings.

This is the most common way to play the C major chord on guitar and is the first way that most people learn to play it.

For the open C major chord we use our 1st finger on the 1st fret 2nd string, our middle finger on the 2nd 4th string, and our 3rd finger on the 3rd fret 5th string. As the diagram shows, we don’t play the 6th string and the 1st & 3rd strings are open, hence the term open chord.

Partial Barre (A Shape)

The second method of how to play C major on guitar is the Partial Barre chord, this shape can also be referred to as the ‘A shape’ as it’s actually a moveable shape. But don’t worry too much about that for now.

When we use the term ‘barre’ in guitar, it means that we use one of our fingers to form a barre across some or all of the strings.

Playing a barre chord is often a big hurdle for beginners. This chord uses a partial barre, so it’s a bit more difficult than the open chord, but not as difficult as a full barre chord.

When playing the partial barre chord, we use our 1st finger to form a barre across the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th & 5th strings and then use our 3rd finger to barre the 2nd, 3rd & 4th strings.

The trickiest part of this chord is getting the barre on your 3rd finger so that it plays the three strings but doesn’t mute the thinnest string. You may need to just experiment with your finger position until you find the right position for you.

Full Barre Chord

The last method of how to play C major chord on guitar is the full barre chord. As I mentioned earlier, barre chords are often a major hurdle for beginner guitarists, but once you can play them it opens up so many other doors for your playing.

If you haven’t tried barre chords before or are new to them, have a look at my How to play barre chords lesson for some useful tips.

So as the name suggest, in this method we will be using a full barre chord (or E shape chord) which uses a barre across all six strings. We then use our remaining fingers to make the rest of the shape. If you are familiar with the E chord, you will recognise that it’s exactly the same shape.

We place our barre across all the strings using our index finger on the 8th fret.

Conclusion

OK, so there you have it, you now have 3 ways of how to play C major on guitar. If you are a beginner then I’d recommend just using the open C major chord at first, but don’t be afraid of giving the other methods a try too. You will only get better by practicing.

I hope you found this how to play C major on guitar post useful, please feel free to drop me a message if you have any questions,

Start playing some of the most popular songs in music history.

In this article, we’re going to take a look at the C Major chord. The open C chord shape (along with the A, G, E, and D major chord shapes) is one of the five foundational chord shapes in guitar. We’re going to examine how to play this popular chord along with a few variations so you can start playing some of the most popular songs in music history.

How to Play the C Chord on Guitar

Let’s take a look at how to play one of the most frequently used chords in guitar playing. In fact, it’s used so often that it is often referred to as the C “shape.”

Here’s how to play it:

  • – Index finger on the 1st fret of the B (2nd) string
  • – Middle finger on the 2nd fret of the D (4th) string
  • – Ring finger on the 3rd fret of the A (5th) string

How to play the c major chord on guitar

Strum five strings down from the A string.

If you happen to strum that low E string, don’t worry about it. That note is still part of the C major chord (C-E-G). As you get more comfortable playing it you should be able to mute the 6th string with the edge of your ring finger.

Another way to play the C chord is in the 3rd position. The chord starts with the bass note on the 3rd fret, which is why this is called the 3rd position, and iIt takes a different finger placement up the neck of your guitar.

Here’s how to play a barred C chord in the 3rd position:

  • – Index finger on the 3rd fret of the A (5th) string
  • – Middle finger on the 5th fret of the D (4th) string
  • – Ring finger on the 5th fret of the G (3rd) string
  • – Pinky finger on the 5th fret of the B (2nd) string

How to play the c major chord on guitar

Strum four strings down from the A string.

Passing the Barre

A somewhat more challenging way to play C major is by using a barre chord in the 8th position. They are called barre chords (or bar chord) because you use one finger to press down on multiple strings.

The other version has a different form that starts on the 8th fret. Here’s how to play the C barre chord in the 8th position:

  • – Index finger: 8th fret of the low E (6th) string
  • – Index finger: 8th fret of the B (2nd) string
  • – Index finger: 8th fret of the E (1st) string
  • – Ring finger: 10th fret of the A (5th) string
  • – Pinky finger: 10th fret of the D (4th) string

How to play the c major chord on guitar

Strum 6 strings down from the low E string

C Chord Variation for the Acoustic Players

There’s one more version worth looking at that works great on the acoustic guitar: Cadd9. It’s played like this:

  • – Index finger: 2nd fret of the D (4th) string
  • – Middle finger: 3rd fret of the A (5th) string
  • – Ring finger: 3rd fret of the B (2nd) string
  • – Pinky finger: 3rd fret of the E (1st) string

Notice anything about this version? It looks almost exactly like the G Major open chord version except the middle finger and index finger have each moved down one string. C and G chords are frequently played in the same chord progression, so if you substitute the Cadd9 for a C Major chord you can switch between a C and G with almost no finger movement. Plus, playing a Cadd9 sounds a little fancier than a regular C.

Which Version Should You Play?

The reason for learning more than one form of the same chord is to give yourself different tonal options and to minimize movement around the neck. Compare the C open version versus the barred version on the 8th fret. Even though they are built on the same notes, the tone isn’t quite the same. The open version uses open strings, so it sounds a bit warmer and rings out longer. The barred version sounds higher and thinner.

Having options also reduces movement. You don’t want to jump around the neck constantly. If a C chord follows a G chord in the progression, you don’t want to play an open G and then move up to the 8th position to play the C. Because the C open version is so close to the G open version it makes more sense to minimize your finger movements.

Songs that Use the C Chord

It should come as no surprise that since the C chord is one of the five major chord shapes that it would show up in a lot of songs. You may not be aware of it, but you’ve heard this chord countless times. Here’s a short list of songs that feature the C chord:

Pop Songs

Several classic pop songs make use of the C chord, including the international hit Dream Baby by Roy Orbinson and the standard, Daydream Believer by the Monkees.

It’s also featured in the catchy rhythm of “One Love” by Bob Marley & The Wallers and the new wave synth pop of “My Best Friend’s Girl” by the Cars.

A more recent example includes the mega-hit “Viva La Vida” by Coldplay.

Rock Songs

Beatles fans hear it every time they turn up “She Loves You”. It even shows up in the metal scene, like on the power ballad Alone Again by Dokken.

It’s also featured in the upbeat dance rhythm of “Last Nite” by the Strokes and used throughout “Tonight, Tonight” by the Smashing Pumpkins.

Country Songs

One of the most well-known country songs of all time, “Ring of Fire” by Johnny Cash, uses the C chord prominently.

Now that you have the C shape stored in your chord bank, it’s time to start tackling some of the other foundational shapes.

We’re going to learn a variation of the C Major chord for guitar today. I like to call it a funny C chord. If you’ve played a folk-style C chord and you see this one, it might look funny to you.

Learning The C Chord on Guitar

How to play the c major chord on guitar

If you know the G Major chord already, start by forming that chord shape. From there you’ll simply move your middle and index fingers up one string. Your middle finger will be on the 3rd fret, 5th string. Your index finger will move to 2nd fret, 4th string.

If you don’t know the G Major chord yet, here’s how to form a C chord on guitar:

1st String – pinky on 3rd fret

2nd String – ring finger on 3rd fret

3rd String – open

4th String – index finger on 2nd fret

5th String – middle finger on 3rd fret

6th String – (not played)

Your hand should look like this:

How to play the c major chord on guitar

You can mute the 6th string with your middle finger. Roll or angle it just enough so it just barely touches the 6th string. Play around with positioning until you get it where it needs to be.

If you look closely at the image, you can see my middle finger barely touching the low E string.

If you’d like a review of how to read a chord diagram check this short lesson.

Why Start With The Funny C Chord?

Most of the time I encourage students to start with traditional fingering for the basic chords. This is one of the few exceptions. Why?

It’s Easy To Change to G

Perhaps the best reason to use this version is that you can change to and from G Major easily. You’ll see this version of the C chord mostly in the key of G. G is one of the most common keys on the guitar.

You’ll often play the G chord, C chord, and D chord together. This version of the C chord is the easiest to change between the G chord and the D chord.

It Has A Modern Sound

Most modern songs in the key of G actually use this version of the chord. It adds a little more color and excitement to a chord progression than a standard folk-style C Major.

Also known as Cadd9 or Cadd2

The technical name of this is the Cadd9. You might also see it referred to as a Cadd2. They’re two names for the same thing. The ‘2’ and ‘9’ in a key are the same note, just an octave up. Don’t get too hung up on the music theory part.

How To Practice The C Chord

To practice this chord we’re going to use a great muscle memory technique.

  • Form the C chord, press down the strings, and release your hand and shake it out.
  • Count to 5 and form the chord again. This time strum the C chord a time or two. Make any adjustments you need to.
  • Press your fingers down just a little more, then release.

After you do this a few times:

  • Count to 3 and form the C chord. Strum, press down, and release.

If you do this for even just a few minutes a day you’ll have it down in no time!

What do you think about this funny C Major chord? If you know the Folk style C Major chord, which do you prefer? Let me know in the comments!

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Tomas Michaud is an American born guitarist and music educator with a French Canadian heritage. He first developed the Starland Guitar System in 1982 when his 9 year old daughter asked him to teach her guitar. Since then he’s founded the Starland School of Music in the SF Bay Area, and RealguitarSuccess.com.

When he’s not making guitar instruction videos or creating more music to record (currently 7 CDs including Beauty and Fire) he’s riding his bike along the beach with his dog Marco Polo or traveling to interesting places with his lovely wife Pui.

Updated: March 8, 2021

In today’s lesson, we are going to learn how to play the C Major guitar chord.

The C major chord is one I teach my students early on since it is easy to play, has a nice full sound and it sets the easiest starting point for learning music theory. C major is also one of the 6 main guitar chords beginners should learn.

C major is a great key to learn early as there are no sharps or flats in the key of C. More on that in a bit.

How to Play the C Major Guitar Chord

How to play the c major chord on guitar

If the above chart is foreign to you, check out our lesson on How to Read Guitar Chord Diagrams.

For the C Major guitar chord, you want to strum every string except for the low E string.

C Major Chord Fingering:

  • Third (Ring) Finger on the third fret of the A string
  • Second (Middle) Finger on the second fret of the D String
  • First (Index) Finger on the first fret of the B String

How to play the c major chord on guitar

Focus on bending your fingers into an arch and only playing the strings with your fingertips to avoid muting strings that should be ringing out.

This chord is an early introduction to reach skills and requires a little more stretching of the third finger than you may be used to. It’s okay if it takes some time, just stick with it and focus on your hand shape.

How to play the c major chord on guitar

C sharp major is a cheery sounding chord that you might recognize from songs by U2 and Ed Sheeran. Thankfully, it’s not too tough to pick up on.

Here are the notes, positions, and songs to learn C sharp major. Here are five methods for playing it correctly:

E-Shape C# chord

The E-shape refers to the fact that, apart from the barred finger, your other fingers will be forming the regular E major chord.

How to play the c major chord on guitar

  • Use your 1st finger to press down all 6 strings on the 9th fret.
  • Place your next (2nd) finger on the 10th fret of the 3rd (G) String.
  • Move your 3rd finger on string 5 (A) and your 4th to string 4 (D). Both go on the 11th fret.
  • Strum down all 6 strings.

A-Shape C# chord

Like the E-shape chords, the A-shape barre chord means that you form the standard A major chord with your index finger barred on a particular fret.

This chord is on a lower fret on the guitar, producing a deeper sound. Going from the 9th to the 4th fret, the A shape C# chord is good for jazzier songs.

How to play the c major chord on guitar

  • Press down Strings 1-5 (E-A) of the 4th fret.
  • Place your 2nd, 3rd, and 4th finger on the 6th fret.
  • Move the 2nd finger to String 4 (D), 3rd to 3 (G), 4th to 2nd (B).
  • Strum from Strings E to A.

3 Finger C# chord

The position of your fingers in this progression makes it easy to avoid hitting muted chords.

How to play the c major chord on guitar

  • Place your 1st and 2nd finger on the 1st fret. 1st finger goes to string 3 (G), 2nd to string 1 (E).
  • Move your 3rd finger on the 2nd fret, string 2 (B).
  • Strum strings 3 to 1 (G to E), keeping the last 3 strings muted.

Straight Line C# chord

One version of C sharp major lets you put 3 fingers on the same fret.

How to play the c major chord on guitar

  • Find the 6th fret.
  • Place your fingers as desired over string 4 to 2 (D to B).
  • Strum only the strings you’re holding.

2-Finger C # Major

If you want the simplest C # Major to begin with, try this 2-note method.

How to play the c major chord on guitar

  • Put your 1st finger on the 1st fret, 3rd String (G).
  • 2nd finger to the 2nd fret, 2nd String (B).
  • Strum only the strings you have down (B and G).

Theory

Most people know the C# chord as Db instead. They’re what we call enharmonic chords, meaning they produce the same sound. But depending on your song, you might find it easier to notate the chord one way or another.

The root, 3rd, and 5th notes of this guitar chord are C#, E#, and G#. Their pattern is one fret up from a standard C chord. Contrast that with C# Minor, which has a sequence of C#, E, G#.

We enjoy the C# chord for upbeat rock n roll songs. You can find it in hit bebop or jazz-rock songs like The Girl from Ipanema.

Songs in Key of C# Major

Although we know C sharp major from jazz songs, it’s the key of several contemporary rock songs. See below for a shortlist of C# major songs you might recognize:

  • Mr. Brightside by The Killers.
  • Broken Strings by Jim Morrison.
  • Sweet Child O’ Mine by Guns N’ Roses.
  • Jesus of Suburbia by Green Day.
  • I’m Still Standing by Elton John.
  • Thnks fr th Mmrs by Fall out Boy.

Some of the most common progressions from C sharp major go to F# major or G# major after. But with several combinations of C sharp to try, you could get creative with this chord.

Try next:

Last Updated on February 12, 2021 by Liam F. Admin

When starting to learn guitar, the first thing recommended by all guitar teachers is learning some basic chords. So, In this lesson, I will show you, how you can play the c major chord on the guitar and will also help you in getting familiar with its different positions and how to play them.

The open c major chord is easy to play as it requires only three fingers to hold the chord but its other positions can seem a little hard for a newbie.

Open C Major Chord ( How do you hold C chord )

As you can see in the image, the open c major chord has only 3 notes and the notes are C, E, G. Here C is the root note, E is the 3rd note and G is the 5th note.

To hold c major chord simply follow the instruction below:-

  1. Place your 3rd finger on 3rd fret of 5th string
  2. Place your 2nd finger on 2nd fret of 4th string
  3. Place your 1st finger on 1st fret of 2nd string.

Make sure there is enough gap between all the finger placement and none of your fingers are touching other strings. If so the sound produced will be not clear. Now you can strum or pluck the strings and you will be amazed by the sound. Congrats on learning your first chord.

C Bar Chord ( on 3rd fret )

How to play the c major chord on guitar

As you can see in the image, this is the first position of C bar chord. This chord can be little difficult to play if you are a newbie but as you practice the finger placement more and more you can easily master it.

Follow the instruction to hold it properly.

  1. Place your 1st finger on the 3rd fret and bar it.
  2. With your 3rd finger again bar the 5th fret of 2nd, 3rd and 4th string.

If you are trying it for the first time, the sound will not come out clear but as I said with time and practice it will seem easy to play this chord.

C Bar Chord – ( on 8th fret )

How to play the c major chord on guitar

This is the most common c bar chord played by most of the guitarists. It can be tricky for you if you are just starting out in guitar but practice makes it all easy.

Follow the instruction to hold it.

  1. Place your 1st finger on the 8th fret and bar it completely.
  2. Place your 2nd finger on the 9th fret of 3rd string.
  3. Place your 3rd finger on the 10th fret of 5th string.
  4. Lastly, place your 4th finger on the 10th fret of 4th string.

C Bar Chord – ( on 5th fret )

How to play the c major chord on guitar

Don’t get intimated by this position of C bar chord. It is not that hard as it looks. To hold this chord, it needs a lot of stretching between fingers and it’s good.

  1. Place your 1st finger on the 5th fret of 2nd, 3rd and 4th string and bar it.
  2. Place your 2nd finger on 7th fret of 5th string.
  3. Place your 3rd finger on 8th fret of 6th string.
  4. Lastly place your 4th finger on 8th fret of 1st string.

The sound and tonality of the chord is beautiful and as you play it you will know.

C chord – 5th position

How to play the c major chord on guitar

This position of C chord is similar to open D chord and it is played on the 10th fret. This chord can be used as essentials in solos and riffs.

  1. Place your 1st finger on the 10th fret of 4th string.
  2. 2nd finger on 12th fret of 3rd string.
  3. 3rd finger on 12th fret of 1st string.
  4. Lastly 4th finger on 13th fret of 2nd string.

Conclusion

Now that you have all the 5 position of C chord you can use it whenever it is necessary. Try to practice and memorize all the position. The more you practice the harder chords, the more you will unlock the fret board.

On this page, you’ll learn two chord shapes—first, the most common and important way to play the chord, plus an easier version you can use, even if you’re brand new to the guitar.

The C Major Chord

In this most common version of the C Major chord, we’re going to use three fingers, and strum the top five strings.

Here’s a video to walk you through it, with a diagram below to show you where to put your fingers:

How to play the c major chord on guitar

Practice tips:

  • This chord requires that you stretch a little bit more with the third finger. Just make sure that, eventually, you can get that third finger right behind the third fret.
  • Another thing to keep in mind is that you really need to arch your fingers when playing this chord. Use the very tip of the finger so that we don’t mute an adjacent string, and get a dead, buzzy sound.

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How to play the c major chord on guitar

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How to play the c major chord on guitar

How to play the c major chord on guitar

How to play the c major chord on guitar

Practice and Memorize the C Major Shape

A great way to memorize the C major shape is to practice with an on-off drill.

  1. Start by placing your fingers on the strings, in the C major shape.
  2. Count to four, strumming on each beat.
  3. Then, take your fingers off the strings for four beats.
  4. Put your fingers back on, and repeat.

Taking your fingers off and on again in this way will help your brain memorize the shape, while the four beats give you time to place your fingers.

When you’re ready, try the same technique, but switch back and forth between C and another chord, like the G chord.

One Finger Version

If you’re just getting started, in your first few days of playing, here’s an easy, one-finger version to help you get started.

It has all the same notes as the more common version, but the sound isn’t quite as rich or as full.

All you need to do is put your first finger on the first fret of your second string, and then strum the thinnest three strings. That’s it!

How to play the c major chord on guitar

Once you’re comfortable with this version, try learning the more common, fuller sounding version above.

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How to play the c major chord on guitar

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