How to put on sterile gloves

How to put on sterile gloves

Are you putting your sterile gloves on correctly?

Are you looking at a pair of sterile gloves wondering how you are going to get them on without contaminating them? Have you donned sterile gloves only to get to the last step and realize you have to start over again? It can be a tricky process but you can learn how to quickly don sterile gloves. It just takes practice. We’ve provided you with 10 steps to help you get the process completed without contaminating the gloves.

Step-by-step instructions

  1. Choose the right glove size for your hands
    Your gloves should feel comfortable, and you need to be able to move your hands. Consider taking off jewelry. It may make your gloves feel more comfortable.
  2. Prepare a clean work area
    Wipe surfaces that are not washable and before you place the glove package on the surface.
  3. Wash your hands
    Wash your hands and wrists. Use liquid soap from the dispenser that is required for your specific job application. Do not touch anything or any supplies once you wash your hands.
  4. Open the package
    Open the outer glove package. Place the gloves on a sterile table. The gloves will have an inner wrapping around them. Carefully open the inner wrapper so not to contaminate the gloves. You will see both gloves with cuffs.
  5. Put on the first glove
    Start with your dominant hand. Hold the glove on folded edge which is the cuff. Slip your hand into the glove. Wear the glove keeping your hand flat and your thumb tucked in. Touch only the part of the glove that will be next to your skin. Leave the cuff on the glove folded.
  6. Prepare to put on the second glove
    Slip the fingers of your gloved hand into the other glove only touching the folded cuff. Lift up the second glove.
  7. Put on the second glove
    Pull the glove over your fingers keeping your hand flat. Keep the gloved thumb up and back to keep from touching your bare palm or wrist. Pull the glove over your hand.
  8. Adjusting the gloves
    Adjust each glove to get a snug fit. Reach under the cuffed part to pull up or adjust the gloves.
  9. Avoid touching anything once the gloves are on your hands
    Keep your hands in front of you and above your waist. Don’t touch anything outside of the sterile field.
  10. Start over again if you break the sterile procedure

Remove the gloves, throw them away and get a new package of gloves. Time to start over!

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“Sterile” means free of germs. It is important to use sterile gloves when you do certain things to take care of your child.

Steps to put on sterile gloves

Place the package of sterile gloves in a clean work area.

  • Remove the outer packaging of the sterile gloves. Open the inner packaging as directed. Do not touch anything inside of the package. Step 1 in the picture shows how the gloves look in the package.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water. Dry them well. See “Do you know… Clean hands.”
  • Using your non-dominant hand (the one you do not write with), pick up the glove for your other hand by the cuff. Step 2 in the picture shows how this looks.This glov is for your dominant hand (the one you write with). Be careful to touch just the inside of the cuff and glove. This part will touch your skin when the glove is on your hand.
  • Let the glove hang with the fingers pointing downward. Then slide your dominant hand into the glove with your palm facing up and your fingers open. Step 3 in the picture shows how this looks. Be careful not to touch the package as you put on the gloves.
  • If the glove does not go on straight, wait to adjust it until you put on the other glove. Keep your hands above your waist to make sure they stay sterile.

“Do you know. ” is an educational series for patients and their families.

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  • Use the hand with the glove to slide your fingers under the cuff of the second glove. Step 4 in the picture shows how this looks. Only touch the outside of this glove. This part will not be against your skin when the glove is on your hand.
  • Let the glove hang with the fingers pointing downward. Slide your hand into the glove with the palm up and the fingers open. Step 5 in the picture shows how this looks.
  • Adjust both gloves until they fit properly. Only touch sterile gloved areas.

Questions?

If you have questions about putting on sterile gloves, talk to your child’s nurse or clinical nurse specialist. A nursing coordinator is always here to answer your questions and address your concerns. Call 901-595-3300 and ask for the nursing coordinator. If you are outside the Memphis area, dial toll-free 1-866-2STJUDE (1-866-278-5833), and press 0 when the call connects.

This document is not intended to take the place of the care and attention of your personal physician or other professional medical services. Our aim is to promote active participation in your care and treatment by providing information and education. Questions about individual health concerns or specific treatment options should be discussed with your physician.

St. Jude complies with health care-related federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex.

ATTENTION: If you speak another language, assistance services, free of charge, are available to you. Call 1-866-278-5833 (TTY: 1-901-595-1040).

ATENCIÓN: si habla español, tiene a su disposición servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingüística. Llame al 1-866-278-5833 (TTY: 1-901-595-1040).

تنبيه: إذا كنت تتحدث باللغة العربية فيمكنك الاستعانة بخدمات المساعدة اللغوية المتوفرة لك مجانا. .يرجى الاتصال بالرقم. 5833-278-866-1 (الهاتف النصي: 1040-595-901-1).

“Sterile” means free of germs. It is important to use sterile gloves when you do certain things to take care of your child.

Steps to put on sterile gloves

Place the package of sterile gloves in a clean work area.

  • Remove the outer packaging of the sterile gloves. Open the inner packaging as directed. Do not touch anything inside of the package. Step 1 in the picture shows how the gloves look in the package.
  • Wash your hands with soap and water. Dry them well. See “Do you know… Clean hands.”
  • Using your non-dominant hand (the one you do not write with), pick up the glove for your other hand by the cuff. Step 2 in the picture shows how this looks.This glov is for your dominant hand (the one you write with). Be careful to touch just the inside of the cuff and glove. This part will touch your skin when the glove is on your hand.
  • Let the glove hang with the fingers pointing downward. Then slide your dominant hand into the glove with your palm facing up and your fingers open. Step 3 in the picture shows how this looks. Be careful not to touch the package as you put on the gloves.
  • If the glove does not go on straight, wait to adjust it until you put on the other glove. Keep your hands above your waist to make sure they stay sterile.

“Do you know. ” is an educational series for patients and their families.

Browse By Category
  • Use the hand with the glove to slide your fingers under the cuff of the second glove. Step 4 in the picture shows how this looks. Only touch the outside of this glove. This part will not be against your skin when the glove is on your hand.
  • Let the glove hang with the fingers pointing downward. Slide your hand into the glove with the palm up and the fingers open. Step 5 in the picture shows how this looks.
  • Adjust both gloves until they fit properly. Only touch sterile gloved areas.

Questions?

If you have questions about putting on sterile gloves, talk to your child’s nurse or clinical nurse specialist. A nursing coordinator is always here to answer your questions and address your concerns. Call 901-595-3300 and ask for the nursing coordinator. If you are outside the Memphis area, dial toll-free 1-866-2STJUDE (1-866-278-5833), and press 0 when the call connects.

This document is not intended to take the place of the care and attention of your personal physician or other professional medical services. Our aim is to promote active participation in your care and treatment by providing information and education. Questions about individual health concerns or specific treatment options should be discussed with your physician.

St. Jude complies with health care-related federal civil rights laws and does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex.

ATTENTION: If you speak another language, assistance services, free of charge, are available to you. Call 1-866-278-5833 (TTY: 1-901-595-1040).

ATENCIÓN: si habla español, tiene a su disposición servicios gratuitos de asistencia lingüística. Llame al 1-866-278-5833 (TTY: 1-901-595-1040).

تنبيه: إذا كنت تتحدث باللغة العربية فيمكنك الاستعانة بخدمات المساعدة اللغوية المتوفرة لك مجانا. .يرجى الاتصال بالرقم. 5833-278-866-1 (الهاتف النصي: 1040-595-901-1).

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Wearing sterile gloves is part of aseptic hand hygiene, since the hands can never be sterile Preparation for putting on surgical gloves Gloves are cuffed to make it easier to put them on without contaminating them. When putting on sterile gloves, remember that the first glove should be picked up by the cuff only. The second glove should then be touched only by the other sterile glove. Step 1 Prepare a large, clean, dry area for opening the package of gloves. Either open the outer glove package and then perform a surgical scrub or perform a surgical scrub and ask someone else to open the package of gloves for you.

Step 2 Open the inner glove wrapper, exposing the cuffed gloves with the palms up. Step 3 Pick up the first glove by the cuff, touching only the inside portion of the cuff (the inside is the side that will be touching your skin when the glove is on). Step 4 While holding the cuff in one hand, slip your other hand into the glove.

(Pointing the fingers of the glove toward the floor will keep the fingers open. ) Be careful not to touch anything, and hold the gloves above your waist level. NOTE: If the first glove is not fitted correctly, wait to make any adjustment until the second glove is on.

Then use the sterile fingers of one glove to adjust the sterile portion of the other glove. Step 5 Pick up the second glove by sliding the fingers of the gloved hand under the cuff of the second glove. Be careful not to contaminate the gloved hand with the ungloved hand as the second glove is being put on. Step 6 Put the second glove on the ungloved hand by maintaining a steady pull through the cuff. Step 7 Adjust the glove fingers until the gloves fit comfortably.

Gloves play a dual role in the healthcare environment they act as a barrier to give personal protection and help prevent the transmission of infection. Key Points •Only wear gloves when necessary. •Sterile Latex Gloves should be worn when in direct contact with blood, body fluids, nonintact skin or mucous membranes. •Sterile Glove usage is not a substitute for thorough hand hygiene. •Sterile Latex Surgical Gloves should be changed after every task intended or episode of patient care. •Hands should be washed thoroughly before donning gloves and after gloves have been removed. •It is important to ensure that gloves fit correctly.

Sterile surgeons gloves are expensive and should not be used for noninvasive aseptic procedures where sterile examination gloves would be adequate. •Vinyl gloves are not a satisfactory substitute for latex gloves for contact with blood or blood-stained body fluids. •Gloves should not be washed, or decontaminated using alcohol rubs/gels •Powdered gloves must not be used within the health care setting. Individuals who are sensitised to natural rubber latex proteins and/or other chemicals in gloves need to be tested for latex allergies.

The Health and Safety at Work Act (1974) places a responsibility on employers to provide a safe working environment for employees. The provision of personal protective equipment is included in Health and Safety Executive (1992) regulations. Employers have a responsibility to provide appropriate protective equipment such as gloves, while staff have a responsibility to use the protective equipment to prevent injury or harm.

Abstract

VOL: 101, ISSUE: 29, PAGE NO: 28

Annette Jeanes, MSc, RGN, DipNIC, is consultant infection control nurse at University College Hospitals, London

The Health and Safety at Work Act (1974) places a responsibility on employers to provide a safe working environment for employees. The provision of personal protective equipment is included in Health and Safety Executive (1992) regulations. Employers have a responsibility to provide appropriate protective equipment such as gloves, while staff have a responsibility to use the protective equipment to prevent injury or harm.

Most disposable gloves used in health care are made of latex. However, some individuals develop latex sensitivity, so alternative products should be made available when required and any reactions should be recorded and reported (MDA, 1996).

When is the procedure undertaken?

Gloves should be worn as a protective barrier to prevent contamination of the hands or transmission of micro-organisms from hands during a procedure.

Disposable gloves should be worn when hand contact with blood or potentially contaminated substances is possible. This includes handling dirty equipment and during procedures where hands may become contaminated. In these instances non-sterile procedure gloves are normally used.

Gloves should also be worn during invasive or sterile procedures including surgical procedures and aseptic pharmaceutical preparation. In these instances sterile surgeon or sterile examination gloves are normally used.

It is important to use gloves only when necessary and to remove them when they are no longer required.

Relevant physiology

Irritant contact dermatitis is a common skin irritation associated with glove use. The hands become dry and itchy but recover when glove use is suspended. A range of substances can cause similar symptoms, including soap.

Repeated exposure to substances can produce sensitisation. Some individuals have a genetic predisposition to produce immunoglobulin E (IgE) in response to an allergen. These individuals are ‘atopic’ and may suffer from hay fever, eczema and asthma. In some instances hypersensitivity to latex may develop. There are two main types of hypersensitivity: delayed (type IV) and immediate (type I) (MDA, 1996).

In type IV the allergic response is delayed, occurring several hours after contact. In the acute phase hands become red and painful, itch and small vesicles can appear. Eventually the skin may become dry, thick, cracked and sore. Type IV reactions are usually caused by residues of agents used in the glove manufacturing process and are localised to the area of contact.

In type I the onset is immediate and symptoms may include a raised rash, runny eyes and nose, difficulty in breathing, swelling of eyes, lips and face, and in some cases anaphylactic shock. A type I reaction is normally associated with the protein residues in latex products and causes a generalised systemic reaction.

Preparation

Gloves are available in a range of materials such as natural rubber latex, nitrile, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), neoprene and polythene. Selection depends on intended use. Factors such as resistance to chemicals, need for sterility, sensitivity of staff or patient to latex and duration of the procedure should be taken into account. Some procedures may require ‘double gloving’, particularly when punctures are likely to occur. It is important to know your glove size and ensure it is available and to keep fingernails short and smooth.

The procedure

Techniques for donning sterile and non-sterile gloves differ. In theatre sterile gloves are put on after handwashing and gowning. This procedure is not described here.

The procedure for donning non-sterile gloves does not require strict sterility, although hands should first be washed or cleansed and dried well.

– Take a glove from the dispenser or package. Hold the wrist end of the glove open and ease the fingers of the other hand inside (Fig 1).

– Gently pull the wrist end of the glove while easing the hand into the glove (Fig 2).

– Apply the next glove to the other hand using the same procedure (Fig 3).

– Once the procedure is completed gloves should be removed carefully to avoid contaminating the hands or environment. Take the wrist end of one glove and gently pull the glove down the hand, turning it inside out (Fig 4).

– Continue to grasp the first glove and with the ungloved hand pull the other glove from the wrist so that it too is inside out (Fig 5) and covers the first glove (Fig 6) (Infection Control Nurses Association, 2002).

– Place both gloves in a clinical waste bin.

– Wash your hands. – This article has been double-blind peer-reviewed.

For related articles on this subject and links to relevant websites see www.nursingtimes.net

Keep it clean

NT’s Keep It Clean campaign aims to ensure that nurses have the support they need to fight infection.

It is highlighting the complexities of effective infection control and showing nurses how to observe best practice.

Ingredients for an Artful Life, Home & Family (with a generous scoop of Wisdom stirred in.)

How to put on sterile gloves

With the corona virus being felt worldwide, people are wearing gloves to the supermarket, gloves to pick up mail, gloves to pump gas in their car. If you do use gloves, it’s important to learn how to take them off to avoid spreading the germs you are trying to avoid. In my husband’s case, putting gloves on is an important part of his daily routine.

My husband is a paraplegic. Because he has no feeling from the waist down, he has no bladder control. Six to seven times throughout the day he needs to use a catheter to empty his bladder. This means inserting a foreign object into his body. When doing this, keeping the area as sterile as possible is the goal. That includes wearing gloves as he inserts the catheter. Touching clothes, sink or anything else can lead to contamination and possibly infection such as a urinary tract infection.

He uses a fresh catheter each time, sterilizes the area and always uses gloves. Here is a demonstration of how to put sterile gloves on. It’s important to remember not to touch anything besides the sterilized area once the gloves are on.

After he is finished catheing, he needs to dispose of the gloves. They are one use only. Here he demonstrates show to remove and dispose of the gloves.

It seems simple yet it easy to forget not to touch anything while wearing the gloves or not to contaminate our hands as we remove them. As an extra precaution, wash your hands after the gloves are removed.

PLEASE DISPOSE of your GLOVES in a trash can. Please don’t toss them on the ground for someone else to pick up. Let’s each take responsibility for ourselves!

And remember – wash your hands for 20 seconds. The ABC song is one way to time it. You could also pray the Hail Mary and Our Father.

Stay safe, stay healthy!

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DISCLAIMER: We are not professionals in the medical field. This video is the method that my husband learned from rehab specialists for his personal needs and in no way implies that it will prevent the spread of COvid-19.

By InstaGloves
Post date

Sterile gloves are those that meet the FDA standards and are mostly used for any surgical procedure being carried out. Also, they are better used to protect your arm while performing any medical-related experience, such as forensic, scientific, surgical, automotive, etc. The sterile prevent you from contracting any infection. The sterile gloves are silicone-free and contain no rubber hence comfortable. Ensure you have these gloves when handling any substances that are said to contain an infection, which may harm you.

Most people face challenges on how they can wear sterile gloves once they purchase or given healthcare. More so, they may have been shown the steps to follow but unfortunately forget. If you are one of them and you are not sure how to do it, do not worry as I will show you how easily and efficiently you can wear the gloves without much agony or challenges. Follow every step as given for good results.

Step-By-Step Guide To Wearing Sterile Gloves

To ensure you wear the sterile gloves as recommended by the healthcare provider, please follow the following steps one after the other.

#1. Prepare a clean place where you will work from

The first step to do this is to ensure that your workplace is clean. Remove any person or pets that may interfere with the process. Take a basin full of water and bar soap and wash any washable part in the place or the room. Take a paper towel and dry the area once you are through washing. After doing away with a washable part, wipe any part in the room with a dry cloth to evade the dust. In case you feel like sneezing or coughing, ensure you move out of the place to prevent dirtying it again.

#2. Wash your hands thoroughly

After ensuring your site is clean, now you need to ensure your hands are neat too, Go to a sink or a water tap and ensure that water is flowing. Clean your hand with a bar of soap for about 20 to 30 seconds. Now, rinse your hands point down to the surface than dry with a clean paper towel. You should ensure you close the tap handling the paper towel to prevent getting germs once again. Ensure you don’t touch any place once you have washed the hands, even the doors, as they may contain viruses. Now we go to the next step.

#3. Now open your package

Having cleaned your place and your hands too, now you need to get the sterile glove pack ready to open. First, open the outer wrap of the package. Then take out the inner cover. Ensure that you place the wrapped sterile gloves on the place that you previously cleaned. Never put your sterile gloves on the supply wrapper as it may contain germs. To see the gloves open the inner wrapper and proceed.

#4. Put on the first glove

Use your right hand to grasp the glove on the folded edge of the cuff. Keep your other hand straight and start putting your hand inside? Ensure the thumbs are tucked in and begin pulling the glove on slowly. Ensure that you only touch the part of the glove which is next to your skin. Finish and ensure the cuff on the glove is well folded.

#5. Now put on the second glove

Having put on the first glove, slip its fingers into the folded cuff of other gloves. Take the other glove and put it over your fingers. Ensure that your hand is flat and that the gloved hand does not touch any of your body parts. Now pull your glove slowly until it fits you.

#6. After putting on the gloves ensure you do the following

Do not touch anything apart from the sterile field. Keep your hands in front of you always to prevent getting germs. Now you are good to go.

To conclude, the steps may look a bit tiresome, but I assure you it is effortless while you are at ease. Follow everything that is outlined, and in case you mess in any of the steps highlighted, you need to get a new pack and repeat the procedures once more. Ensure you follow up to your health provider any time you have more challenges doing this.

Sterile procedures are required before and during specific patient care activities to maintain an area free from microorganisms and to prevent infection. Performing a surgical hand scrub, applying sterile gloves, and preparing a sterile field are ways to prevent and minimize infection during surgeries or invasive procedures.

Surgical Hand Scrub

Skin is a major source of microorganisms and a major source of contamination in the OR setting (CDC, 2010). Since skin cannot be sterilized, members of the surgical team must wear sterile gloves. The purpose of the surgical hand scrub is to significantly reduce the number of skin bacteria found on the hands and arms of the OR staff (Kennedy, 2013). A surgical hand scrub is an antiseptic surgical scrub or antiseptic hand rub that is performed prior to donning surgical attire (Perry et al., 2014) and lasts two to five minutes, depending on the product used and hospital policy. Studies have shown that skin bacteria rapidly multiply under surgical gloves if hands are not washed with an antimicrobial soap, whereas a surgical hand scrub will inhibit growth of bacteria under gloved hands (Kennedy, 2013).

Types of surgical hand scrubs

Surgical hand scrub techniques and supplies to clean hands will vary among health care agencies. Most protocols will require a microbial soap-and-water, three- to five-minute hand scrub procedure. Some agencies may use an approved waterless hand scrub product. See Checklist 11 for the steps to follow when scrubbing with medicated soap.