How to travel on interstate 95

Benefits of driving the Express Lanes

We can tell you all about the benefits of riding the more than 45 miles of our Express Lanes, but it’s best if you test drive them for yourself. Before hitting the road, here are several perks of driving with us:

Free travel options

All you need is three or more people in your car with your E-ZPass® Flex set to HOV mode. Not to mention, motorcycles ride toll-free and don’t need an E-ZPass®.

Comfortable cruising

Get where you need to go faster and safer on our Lanes. Enjoy a more predictable trip knowing you’ll be moving at highway speeds.

Safety service on standby

Help isn’t far behind with our Express Assist safety service patrol. It’s our way of lending a helping hand if you run into some bumps while driving on the Express Lanes. You can count on Express Assist to arrive on average in less than 10 minutes to help you out.

New interchanges to choose from

We’ve made improvements along the Beltway, I-395 and I-95 to pave the way for easier driving with more exit options for our customers. View all of your interchange options when driving the Express Lanes.

How dynamic pricing works

The Express Lanes give drivers the option for quicker traveling. While this comes with a price tag (unless you qualify for free travel – more on that under “Travel for free”), it also manages free-flowing travel. This is made possible by our dynamic pricing system.

It’s all about supply and demand

That means we’re able to maintain free-flowing travel by basing toll prices on the number of cars on the road. Don’t forget, we have many entry and exit points, so you can make the call on how long you’d like to travel along the Express Lanes.

Stay up to date on pricing

We’ll keep you in the loop on the rates of the road with overhead signs. And even before hitting the road, you can plug your entry and exit points into the Express Lanes mobile app for an approximate cost of your trip.

Travel for free

1 + 2 = Free

Hop in the pool, the driving is great. Whether you’re slugging or in a vanpool or carpool, all you need is 3 or more people to drive the Express Lanes for free. If you have a headcount of 3 or more in your car, you can ride the Express Lanes for free at any time with your E-ZPass® Flex set to HOV ON.

Play fair or you pay the fare

You should only set your E-ZPass® to HOV ON if you have 3 or more people in your car. Claiming to be HOV when you’re not can increase toll prices for drivers who are paying and playing fair.

If you don’t have 3 in the car you have to pay a toll. Depending on the type of E-ZPass® Flex you have, set your Flex so HOV ON is covered or the line connects to HOV OFF.

Virginia State Police troopers can issue tickets of up to $1,000 to drivers who say they are HOV when they are not. Or, camera technology on the Lanes can spot HOV trips and make sure there are at least 3 people in your car. If there aren’t, charges can apply.

Tips for 395 Express Lanes

If you exit the 395 Express Lanes at the Pentagon or Pentagon City to drop off carpool passengers, you can get back on the Lanes at Eads Street and go to D.C. for free, even if it’s just you in the car. But, you have to get right back on the Lanes and remember to put your Flex in toll mode so a Virginia State Police trooper doesn’t stop you.

The Seminary Road south ramp on the 395 Express Lanes is HOV-only at all times but you need an E-ZPass Flex — so carpoolers, enjoy the road anytime.

How to travel on interstate 95

How long is I-95?

I-95 is 1,919 miles long. It stretches all the way from the Maine – Canada border to Miami, and is comfortably the longest north-south interstate. It is the sixth longest overall, behind five of the interstates that span the country from east to west.

Where does I-95 end?

The two ends of I-95 are in beautiful Houlton, Maine, which is next to the Canadian border, and tropical Miami, Florida, where the interstate ends at Highway 1 in Florida.

Map of I-95

Attractions near I-95:

As it runs straight through the original 13 colonies, I-95 passes by a huge number of amazing historic places, natural parks and fun sights . Because there are simply far too many incredible places to mention, here are a few:

  • Old Port
    Portland, Maine
    Exits: Several including I-295 and Highway 302
  • Salem Witch Trials Memorial
    Salem, Massachusetts
  • Minute Man National Historic Park
    Boston, Massachusetts
  • Plymouth Rock
    Plymouth, Massachusetts
  • Lizzie Borden House
    Fall River, Massachusetts
  • Manhattan
    New York, New York
  • Independence Hall
    Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
  • Historic Downtown Annapolis
    Annapolis, Maryland
  • The Washington and Lincoln Monuments
    Washington, D.C.
  • The Smithsonian Museums
    Washington, D.C.
  • USS Wisconsin and Nauticus Experience
    Norfolk, Virginia
  • Virginia Beach and False Cape State Park
    Virginia Beach, Virginia
  • George Washington’s Boyhood Home
    Falmouth, Virginia
  • Cape Fear Botanical Garden
    Fayetteville, North Carolina
  • Savannah Historic District and Riverfront Area
    Savannah, Georgia
  • St. Augustine Lighthouse & Museum
    St. Augustine, Florida
  • Kennedy Space Center / Merritt Island Wildlife Refuge
    K.S.C., Florida
  • Jungle Island
    Miami, Florida
  • Miami Beach
    Miami, Florida

When was I-95 started and completed?

Like most interstate projects, I-95 was created by joining various highways and toll roads that existed for many decades prior. The concept for I-95 was likely born out of President Franklin Roosevelt’s National Interregional Highway Committee, which was created in April of 1944. Roosevelt even signed a Federal Aid Highway Act in 1944, which established how interstate construction would be funded.

However, the real boost to I-95 and other interstate construction came in 1956, when President Eisenhower signed the National Interstate and Defense Highways Act. This act authorized $25 Billion to add 41,000 miles of interstate construction to work towards a national highway system.

Pieces of I-95 were still under construction until September of 2018, when the last remaining piece in New Jersey completed I-95 from Florida to Canada.

What states does I-95 travel through?

Being on the far eastern side of the nation, Interstate 95 travels through our oldest states. These include:

  • Maine
  • New Hampshire
  • Massachusetts
  • Rhode Island
  • Connecticut
  • New York
  • New Jersey
  • Pennsylvania
  • Delaware
  • Maryland
  • Washington, D.C.
  • Virginia
  • North Carolina
  • South Carolina
  • Georgia
  • Florida

I-95 Major Cities

Many of the largest cities in the United States lie along the I-95 corridor. These include:

Police permission must be obtained before you even start your trip

How to travel on interstate 95

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The police have released the forms needed for interstate and inter-district travel in Movement Control Order (MCO) and Conditional Movement Control Order (CMCO) areas for the duration between 13 to 26 January 2021.

In a statement released on Facebook, PDRM stated that individuals who want to embark on interstate or inter-district travel are required to fill in the MCO Movement Permit Form or CMCO Movement Permit Form to obtain police permission before going for their trip.

The forms can be downloaded from the PDRM Facebook page or official website via the links below:

  • PDRM Facebook – LINK
  • MCO Movement Permit Form – LINK
  • CMCO Movement Permit Form – LINK

The form must be completed in two copies, with both copies submitted to the nearest police station for approval.

Travellers can then show the approved movement permit forms when going through roadblocks.

How to travel on interstate 95

She puts the pun in Punjabi. With a background in healthcare, lifestyle writing and memes, this lady’s articles walk a fine line between pun-dai and pun-ishing.

HOV – Northern Virginia: When and Where

  • I-495 Express Lanes HOV-3
  • I-95 / I-395 Express Lanes HOV-3 reversible lanes
  • I-66 HOV-2
  • Dulles Toll Road HOV-2

I-495 Express Lanes

HOV-3 traffic can use the high-occupancy toll (express) lanes on Interstate 495 for free with an E-ZPass Flex set to HOV mode. Visit www.ExpressLanes.com for details.

I-95 / I-395 Express Lanes

HOV-3 traffic can use the high-occupancy toll (express) lanes on Interstate 95 and Interstate 395 free with an E-ZPass Flex set to HOV mode. Details: www.ExpressLanes.com/395.

I-66 HOV-2

Inside the Beltway

The hours are 5:30 – 9:30 a.m. going east and 3 – 7 p.m. going west, Monday through Friday.

Solo drivers have the option of paying a toll to use the lanes in the peak direction during rush hours.

The lanes remain free for HOV-2+ vehicles (with E-ZPass Flex), buses, motorcycles and emergency response vehicles.

The lanes are free to all during off-peak periods, including weekends.

Outside the Beltway
The far left lane is reserved for HOV-2 heading east in the morning and west in the afternoon.

From: Route 15 in Haymarket
To: Capital Beltway (I-495)
Days: Monday – Friday

  • Going east: 5:30 – 9:30 a.m.
  • Going west: 3 – 7 p.m.

Exit ramps at Monument Drive and Stringfellow Road

  • On weekdays, the ramps are open eastbound to HOV-2 traffic only from 5:30 – 9:30 a.m., and westbound to HOV-2 traffic only from 3 – 7 p.m.
  • The ramps are closed to all traffic from 5 – 5:30 a.m. and 9:30 – 10 a.m. on weekdays for the directional switch.
  • At all other times and throughout the weekend, the ramps are open westbound to all traffic.

I-66 Outside the Beltway will become HOV-3 when the Express Lanes from Gainesville to I-495 open in late 2022.

Dulles Toll Road HOV-2

The far left lane is reserved for HOV-2 going east in the morning and west in the afternoon. Details: http://www.metwashairports.com/tollroad/toll.htm.

From: Route 28
To: The main toll plaza
Days: Monday-Friday

Yes, it definitely will save you time and headache. Also, the scenery onI-81 is beautful, particularly though Virginia.

Suggested route, mileages, directions, and exit numbers:

1. From the intersection of I-78 and I-287 in New Jersey, take I-78 west 104 miles toward Harrisburg, PA. I-78 will merge into I-81 southbound before you get to Harrisburg.

2. Follow I-81 south for 378 miles to its junction with I-77 southbound (exit 72), near Wytheville, VA.

3. Take I-77 south for 262 miles to its terminus at I-26 in Columbia, SC. Take the left exit onto I-26 eastbound, toward Charleston.

Note: As you approach the North Carolina state line on I-77 (about the time you cross the Blue Ridge Pkwy in Fancy Gap, VA) you will go down a steep grade for about 7 miles. Please leave lots of space around trucks, especially in front of them and to the sides.

4. Follow I-26 east for 169 miles to its junction with I-95 southbound (exit 169A).

5. Follow I-95 south for 320 miles to its junction with I-4 westbound (exit 260B) in Daytona Beach, FL.

6. Follow I-4 approximately 80 miles west to Orlando.

Drive safe, and enjoy your trip.

Yes, it definitely will save you time and headache. Also, the scenery onI-81 is beautful, particularly though Virginia.

Suggested route, mileages, directions, and exit numbers:

1. From the intersection of I-78 and I-287 in New Jersey, take I-78 west 104 miles toward Harrisburg, PA. I-78 will merge into I-81 southbound before you get to Harrisburg.

2. Follow I-81 south for 378 miles to its junction with I-77 southbound (exit 72), near Wytheville, VA.

3. Take I-77 south for 262 miles to its terminus at I-26 in Columbia, SC. Take the left exit onto I-26 eastbound, toward Charleston.

Note: As you approach the North Carolina state line on I-77 (about the time you cross the Blue Ridge Pkwy in Fancy Gap, VA) you will go down a steep grade for about 7 miles. Please leave lots of space around trucks, especially in front of them and to the sides.

4. Follow I-26 east for 169 miles to its junction with I-95 southbound (exit 169A).

5. Follow I-95 south for 320 miles to its junction with I-4 westbound (exit 260B) in Daytona Beach, FL.

6. Follow I-4 approximately 80 miles west to Orlando.

Drive safe, and enjoy your trip.

Yes, it definitely will save you time and headache. Also, the scenery onI-81 is beautful, particularly though Virginia.

Suggested route, mileages, directions, and exit numbers:

1. From the intersection of I-78 and I-287 in New Jersey, take I-78 west 104 miles toward Harrisburg, PA. I-78 will merge into I-81 southbound before you get to Harrisburg.

2. Follow I-81 south for 378 miles to its junction with I-77 southbound (exit 72), near Wytheville, VA.

3. Take I-77 south for 262 miles to its terminus at I-26 in Columbia, SC. Take the left exit onto I-26 eastbound, toward Charleston.

Note: As you approach the North Carolina state line on I-77 (about the time you cross the Blue Ridge Pkwy in Fancy Gap, VA) you will go down a steep grade for about 7 miles. Please leave lots of space around trucks, especially in front of them and to the sides.

4. Follow I-26 east for 169 miles to its junction with I-95 southbound (exit 169A).

5. Follow I-95 south for 320 miles to its junction with I-4 westbound (exit 260B) in Daytona Beach, FL.

6. Follow I-4 approximately 80 miles west to Orlando.

Drive safe, and enjoy your trip.

Alternate route for Step 2. Follow I-81 south to exit 114, Christiansburg, head south on Route 8 for 22 miles to the town of Floyd, take a right at the stop light on to Route 221 and go 10 miles, where I will meet you and you can drop of half a dozen hard rolls, (because I haven’t had any since I left LI in 1973 ) then continue along Rt 221 for 19 miles and meet up with I-77. Remember, getting there is half the fun.

Interstate 287 encircles the New York City metropolitan area along three distinct roads. The North Jersey portion provides both a commuter route and bypass from the New Jersey Turnpike (I-95) at Edison west to Somerville and north to Morristown, Oakland and Mahwah. This section of I-287 ties into the New York Thruway mainline (I-87) just across the New York state line at Suffern.

I-87/287 combine east along the New York Thruway to Nyack and across the Hudson River on the Governor Mario N. Cuomo Bridge. Major construction replaced the aging Tappan Zee Bridge, with the new cable-stayed bridge opened to westbound traffic on August 26, 2017, and two-way traffic on October 6, 2017. The new eastbound span opened to traffic on September 12, 2018. 1

For the record, first car on the bridge: 1:36 a.m., Saturday, Aug. 26, 2017. pic.twitter.com/Qm6KZSW56X

Interstate 87 and the Thruway turn south at East Irvington toward Yonkers and The Bronx, New York. Interstate 287 continues east along the often congested Cross Westchester Expressway to Rye and I-95 (New England Thruway) near the Connecticut state line.

Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge

The Tappan Zee Bridge operated for 62 years until 2017. The New York State Thruway Authority managed the $3.98 billion bridge project starting in 2013, when the initial foundational steel piles were driven. Anchored by eight 419-foot high towers, the cable-stayed bridge is the first built across the Hudson River. Tower construction commenced in September 2015, followed by the first road deck panel installation in November 2015. Installation of the 192 stay cables, each orientated at a five degree angle, commenced in July 2016. The final main span tower was completed in December 2016. 1

Looking towards Westchester landing. Rare view at water level pic.twitter.com/PYeorZFEEk

A ribbon cutting ceremony took place for the Governor Mario M. Cuomo Bridge across the Hudson River on August 24, 2017. The span opened initially with four lanes of traffic carrying I-87 & 287 northbound. Work followed to ready the crossing to accommodate southbound motorists while adjacent construction continued on the companion bridge. 2

The original Tappan Zee Bridge, opened in December 1955, was demolished starting first with the approaches. The replacement 3.1-mile long crossing accommodates eight general travel lanes with full shoulders and includes space for a future transit line or busway, and a bicycle/walking path. 2

Interstate 287 in New Jersey is part of High Priority Corridor 63: Liberty Corridor.

Route Information

North End – Rye, NY

South End – Edison, NJ

Total Mileage – 98.72

Mileage

New Jersey – 67.54

Cities – Somerville, Morristown, Pompton Plain, Oakland

New York – 31.18*

Cities – Suffern, Spring Valley, White Plains, Tarrytown, Port Chester

Source: December 31, 2018 Interstate Route Log and Finders List
* – 19.20 miles on I-87

I-287 Annual Average Daily Traffic (AADT)

How to travel on interstate 95

Interstate 87 was proposed separate from the New York Thruway, from the Cross Westchester Expressway north to Brewster, until 1969. An earlier alignment showed the route staying closer to the Hudson River north from Tarrytown.

How to travel on interstate 95

History

The Cross Westchester Expressway opened to traffic in December 1960 at a cost of $50 million. It was initially designated as Interstate 187 in August 1958 and as Interstate 487 when it opened. It was redesignated I-287 in 1961. 2

An eastern extension of Interstate 287 was proposed by Robert Moses to complete the beltway around New York via the Oyster Bay-Rye Bridge. A 6.1 mile long cabled-stayed suspension bridge across Long Island Sound was envisioned to link the east end of I-287 at Rye with an extension of NY 135 (Seaford-Oyster Bay Expressway). A study for the crossing was released by Moses in February 1966. 3

Planning for the Oyster Bay-Rye Bridge halted in 1970. New studies were required following the implementation of stricter environmental legislation by the Federal government in 1970. An Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) was completed in November 1972 for a 16.5 mile roadway, including the span and approaches between I-95 and NY 25 in Syosset. New York State Mileage submitted the mileage for inclusion in the Interstate system under the Federal Highway Act of 1968. 3

Residents in Rye, Oyster Bay and other locations along the proposed corridor organized to counter the bridge and extension of I-287. Their efforts and environmental concerns led to formal cancellation of the crossing by Governor Nelson Rockefeller on June 20, 1973. 3

The cancellation of the Somerset Freeway in North Jersey in 1982, the proposed alignment for Interstate 95 between Lawrenceville and Metuchen, led to an extension of I-287 east from South Plainfield to the New Jersey Turnpike in Edison Township. This segment was previously designated as Interstate 95. AASHTO approved the renumbering on June 26, 1985.

How to travel on interstate 95

How to travel on interstate 95

Traveling 109.65 miles across the state of Maryland, Interstate 95 enters the state alongside Interstate 495 across the Woodrow Wilson Bridge over the Potomac River. The Interstate encircles Washington, DC along the eastern half of the Capital Beltway before resuming a northeastern heading to Baltimore. Through Maryland’s largest city, I-95 takes the tolled Fort McHenry Tunnel, which consists of four two-lane tubes below the waters of Northwest Harbor. Leaving the city, Interstate 95 follows the John F. Kennedy Memorial Highway, which first opened in 1962 as the Northeast Expressway, a toll road connecting Baltimore with the Delaware Turnpike.

The John F. Kennedy Memorial Highway extends east into Delaware along the Delaware Turnpike to Newport. Both the Delaware Turnpike and Maryland John F. Kennedy Highway were primarily opened to traffic on November 14, 1963. The highway was dedicated by President John F. Kennedy on that day as the Northeastern Expressway; as fate would have it, his appearance at the dedication ceremony occurred just prior to his assassination in Dallas, Texas. The highway was renamed in his honor in 1964.

Tolls along Interstate 95 include $4.00 per passenger vehicle at the Fort McHenry Tunnel and $8.00 per passenger vehicle along northbound at the Millard J. Tydings Bridge over the Susquehanna River. These rates went up from $3.00 and $6.00 respectively on July 1, 2013.

No matter where your quest for America’s offbeat treasures takes you, an interstate highway will probably get you there. That leg of the journey is your chance to listen to tunes or daydream. But wait. there’s more going on along that road than you might think.

A Little Planning Can Enhance Your Drive

Our New Book

History in Massachusetts, Virginia, and South Carolina

In Virginia, just north of Richmond, I-95 goes through Spotsylvania County, grazing the Civil War’s bloodiest battle sites — Chancellorsville, Spotsylvania, Wilderness and Fredericksburg. About 100,000 men were killed or wounded in these battles. But here’s the most unusual part: this is where Stonewall Jackson was hit by friendly fire. His left arm was amputated, and buried near the site of the attack. Just his arm. It has its own headstone, which can be found in the Ellwood Family Cemetery in Fredericksburg & Spotsylvania National Military Park about 13 miles west of today’s interstate. After surgery, the rest of Jackson was ported for further care to a more sterile environment but he soon died. His body (minus the arm) is buried at the Stonewall Jackson Memorial Cemetery in Lexington City, Virginia.

In South Carolina, where all you see are trees along the road, the interstate passes through land that holds the remnants of a peculiar story.

A man from Switzerland was intent on starting a village at 33 degree latitude. Jean Pierre Purry was convinced that the perfect living conditions resided at that latitude. It didn’t matter it if was north or south; it didn’t matter what continent it happened to be on. So in 1730, dozens of families followed him to the wilds of what would eventually become South Carolina. Poor soil and malaria cut the experiment short; everyone dispersed to more favorable latitudes. Today all that hints of the episode is a road sign for southbound travelers: Switzerland is at Exit 18 but there’s nothing to see at the exit.

Odd Sights in New Jersey, Philadelphia, and Maine

In New Jersey you come face to face with the ice age. When glaciers grinded south from Canada thousands of years ago, they covered all of New England but stopped right where the Perth Amboy exit is today. You can identify the spot precisely; like a bulldozer, the glacier pushed a ridge of rocks and debris ahead of itself and when it retreated, a hillside called a terminal moraine was left behind. The interstate goes right through that ridge just north of Exit 10 and is marked, by coincidence, with a water tank on the east side of the road atop the hill.

In Philadelphia there is so much to talk about it’s hard to fit it all in. Visible from the interstate is the spire of Christ Church where George Washington and Betsy Ross worshiped. Sparks shot tower, where ammunition for the Revolutionary War was produced, is just feet away from the road. But there’s one thing — clearly seen from the highway — that most travelers never notice. Two-mile long Petty’s Island, to the east in the Delaware River, parallels the road around mileposts 24-25. In the 1800s Pennsylvania was a haven for religious freedom but what some people wanted was the freedom to gamble, which they found in abundance on Petty’s Island. Not only did people row over to the island to gamble but also to duel. It was a lawless and wild place. Today the oil company CITGO owns it and, from the interstate, you can easily see their empty, rusting oil drums.

In Maine, the interstate passes over Kennebec River near MP 134. If you had this vantage point in 1775, you would have seen Benedict Arnold and a thousand soldiers scrambling up the river during the Revolutionary War. The target was Canada; Benedict Arnold intended to support an attack on Quebec. The town of Skowhegan, just a few miles from I-95, proudly speaks of their role in the Quebec Expedition. Arnold and his men camped on an island in the middle of the Kennebec there in the town. A few artifacts from those days were found on the island and today are displayed in their museum.

Stories Behind the Name

Not heading down I-95? Every interstate will give up some secrets with some targeted research. Google Earth is a gold mine for interesting bits of trivia. It turns the traditional “are-we-there-yet?” leg of the trip into “you won’t believe what’s just down the road!”

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Barbara Barnes wrote What’s Great About I-95 as an exciting, totally new concept in travel guides. Perfect for interstate travelers ages 8 – 98, their ride suddenly zips by faster, thought provoking conversations erupt without warning. An odd phenomenon happens; everyone in the car actually looks forward to the next 30 miles! Order from Amazon — What’s Great About I-95

Unless otherwise indicated, all photos by the author