How to write a salary negotiation letter

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Investing in yourself and being confident in the value you bring to your role can allow you to successfully negotiate the specifics of your salary. Whether you’re negotiating salary for a new position or asking for a raise, there are a few aspects to consider so you can secure fair compensation. In this article, we share some salary negotiation examples you can use when faced with a new job offer or impending promotion.

How to show you’re a strong candidate

Most salary negotiation processes start early. In the interview stage, you can secure a strong first impression with the hiring manager, leading to a stronger salary negotiation conversation later on. Here are some best practices when preparing for an interview for future salary negotiation success:

1. Be confident

Show confidence when describing how your skills and experience can be useful to the team. Describe specific examples of how you use your skills to demonstrate expertise in the area. Having confidence in yourself will likely transfer to the hiring manager.

2. Organically talk about your background and knowledge

The whole point of interviews is to give you the platform to speak about your accomplishments, your professional background and the knowledge you’ve gathered through previous roles. When you can naturally talk about all of this, it’s something that’s already in the hiring manager’s mind when you are in the negotiation process.

3. Display passion for your work

Demonstrating a passion for your work shows the employer that you genuinely care about doing a great job. You’re more likely to work well with team members when you want to succeed. During the interview, explain any career achievements to demonstrate your work ethic, and describe why you chose your career path.

Examples of salary negotiation scripts

is a normal part of the hiring process. You want to make sure that you receive fair compensation for your background in the industry. Speaking to the hiring manager about this shows you are serious about the role, the company and yourself. The conversation you have with an employer who offers you a role can vary depending on the situation. Here are examples of salary negotiation scripts you can use for some different scenarios:

Start with a counteroffer.

Review other offers.

Consider the entire compensation package.

Ask for raises and promotions.

Start with a counteroffer

Salary negotiations should be positive experiences you have with your new employer. Instead of accepting the first salary offer you’re given, start the negotiation process based on research and market values.

“Hi, Carol. Thank you so much for the offer. I am happy to hear that you want to bring me on to the team, and I’m excited to get started. However, I was hoping we could discuss my compensation. I’ve researched the industry we are in and the current market value. Combined with my qualifications and experience, I would be most comfortable accepting a salary of $65,000 for this role.”

Review other offers

When considering the move to a new role, you may apply for multiple positions and get multiple offers. Carefully consider each offer, the job responsibilities, the commute and any other factor that could alter your decision. If there are a couple of positions that you’re considering, it’s acceptable to mention the competition to the other employer to aid in your salary negotiation tactics.

“Thank you, Jose. I really appreciate the offer and I’m excited about the possibility of being part of your team. As you are aware, I have been discussing job opportunities at other companies and I have received an offer of $65,000 elsewhere. Would you be able to amend your offer to get me closer to this salary?”

Consider the entire compensation package

Salary negotiation should factor in benefits. The entire compensation package

involves base pay (either hourly or salary), paid time off, performance bonuses and sign-on bonuses. It can also include the ability to work remotely, a benefit that could improve work-life balance. Consider negotiating benefits if the employer can’t offer you a higher salary.

“I understand that the best you can offer for this role is $60,000. I can accept that with a compensation package that includes one extra week of vacation and the potential to revisit my salary 90 days after being hired. If this is agreeable, I would be eager to accept this role.”

Ask for raises and promotions

Asking for a raise and promotion at your current place of employment is a natural part of any career path. Once you have established yourself in your role, it’s common to want to grow with the company. It’s likely that you have attended training sessions, learned about the company, invested in retirement options and accrued vacation time.

“I have really enjoyed my time working at Global Marketing, Inc. I have spent these last two years learning analytics and SEMRush, and I’ve met my goals to grow our click-through rate to 3%. Therefore, I’d like to discuss a salary raise to more closely match the industry standard for my role and the skills I have acquired since being hired. I’m requesting for my salary to be raised to $65,000.”

Tips for salary negotiation

There are certain approaches you can take throughout the hiring process to stand out from other candidates. Keep the following tips in mind when negotiating your salary:

Familiarize yourself with industry salary trends.

Know the salary range of the job you’re applying for.

Take the time to think.

Show excitement and commitment.

Familiarize yourself with industry salary trends

Perform some preliminary research on industry salary trends before your interview. After speaking to the hiring team, you should have a more complete idea of your responsibilities. The industry you’re working in matters—the same job in different industries may have different salary expectations. Use salary research tools

to learn more about average compensation in your area.

Know the salary range of the job you’re applying for

Review the job description to see if the employer listed the salary or a range for the position. Remain within that range to demonstrate your knowledge of the industry standards.

Take the time to think

Salary negotiations set the tone for your career with the new company. To ensure you and the employer settle on a fair salary, take time to consider the initial offer before negotiating. Hiring managers typically give you at least a day and up to one week to review the terms of the offer before accepting it or negotiating.

Show excitement and commitment

When negotiating a salary, it is important to show the excitement you have for the role and the commitment you’ll give the company if you can come to an agreement. Display excitement in your tone while demonstrating commitment through your language.

Be open

The process of salary negotiation should be a conversation between you and the hiring manager or human resources representative. It’s an open forum for both sides to discuss their needs and come to a conclusion that is beneficial to everyone. It is best practice to show you are open to considerations and willing to continue discussions.

6 tips to help you ask for a raise

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This is the year to ask for a raise.

According to a report by The Conference Board, salary increase budgets in 2022 are expected to be 3.9% – the highest rate since 2008.

Though negotiating your salary seems intimidating, Andres Lares, the managing partner of the Shapiro Negotiations Institute, told FOX Business that it’s important for people to ask for a raise, so they don’t miss out in the long run.

Lares said that some studies have estimated an average salaried employee who doesn’t ask for raises could miss out on as much as $500,000 to $1 million over the course of their career.

There are a lot of factors that go into that estimate, including potential missed investments with compound interest and missed roles and opportunities at a higher level that could lead to a higher salary, Lares said.

If you haven’t asked for a raise in several years, Lares said there’s even more incentive to ask for a raise now.

“If you made $50,000 today and you made $50,000 five years ago, if you just look at cost of living increases, you’re making less than $50,000 now,” Lares said.

If you’re planning to ask for a raise this year, here are some negotiating tips from Lares.

Negotiate over more than one thing at a time

To make your salary negotiation more productive and collaborative, don’t only discuss your pay, Lares said. When people only discuss pay, negotiations become fixed sum and aren’t collaborative, he said.

Without asking for anything “outlandish,” employees should bring their job title, remote work options, 401k contributions, paid time off and health insurance to the table, as well as their salary.

“You’ve now, all of a sudden, put five or six different things on the table and that allows you to collaborate to a solution that works for everyone,” Lares said.

Have empathy

“If you take a step back and you think of it empathetically, when you approach, it sounds so different,” Lares said, encouraging people to think about why your company might not give you a raise.

Lares said an empathetic conversation with a manager could look something like saying: “I know that you’re swamped with hiring and I know that 2021 wasn’t a good year with COVID-19, I think we’re kind of all more optimistic now and so, I kind of held off bringing this up, because I wanted to be sensitive to that, but I do think it’s time… And so, I’d like to ask for a salary raise from $52,000 to $57,000.”

How to write a salary negotiation letter

When you negotiate your salary, make sure to bring more than just your salary to the negotiating table. (iStock)

“It’s a totally different ballgame and the person is now on your side, they want to help you,” Lares said. “It’s kind of like, OK, let’s work together to figure this out. This person has thought of me, they’re empathetic.”

He added: “I think there’s an underestimation of how that approach is so impactful.”

Script out the conversation

Lares said it’s important to script out what you’re going to say and how you’re going to react to certain things that could come up during your conversation with your manager or HR rep.

Though you don’t have to write down everything, Lares said it’s important to think through what you’re planning to ask for, the reasons you have that justify those requests and what you’ll say if, for example, your manager tells you it’s not a good time to talk about a raise.

“If you scripted that out, you might have thought through the concept of [responding with]: ‘OK, so now’s not a good time, when would be a better time to approach this again?’” Lares said. “Rather than your natural instinct [which] might be: ‘Oh, OK, I totally get it, thanks very much.’”

How to write a salary negotiation letter

Script out your conversation before negotiating your salary, so you have more confidence and can prepare yourself for the conversation. (iStock)

Scripting also helps you to be more precise and gives you the chance to vet what you’re going to say before you say it.

“The biggest impact is you’re a lot more confident,” Lares said. “So at the moment, you almost feel like you’ve almost had that conversation before, right, you’ve thought through if they say, ‘No, we can’t do that,’ how you’re going to respond.”

“The prep doesn’t take that long, but it really goes a long way,” Lares added.

Have both your minimum walkaway and your goal salary in mind

With empathy and preparation in mind, Lares said it’s important to know two numbers before you start negotiating: your walkaway, or the least amount you would take, and your highest, reasonable goal.

Having both numbers in mind can help you stay on track during negotiations and not get too focused on your walkaway amount.

“If you only have your walkaway, your mind only has that number and you’re likely going to gravitate toward it,” Lares said. “It’s a psychological piece as much as anything.”

Make sure you can justify what you’re asking for

Even though your employer will likely go down from your initial offer, Lares said you don’t want to ask for too much right off the bat.

Instead, you want to make sure you’re asking for “as much as you can reasonably justify,” based on your research on job sites that have listed salaries for similar positions, Lares said.

“Not only is [your salary] really sensitive, but also, you’re going to continue working with this person, or that could be your boss, or that could be your HR manager. So if you’re asking for a lot, that ‘it doesn’t hurt to ask’ isn’t necessarily true, especially when it’s sensitive,” Lares said.

Even though you may not have to justify your salary right off the bat, Lares said you should know your reasons for asking what you want, in case your employer asks where your request is coming from.

“You’d better have a good, compelling reason that, if you were asked, you could point to,” Lares said.

Know when to ask

Lares said it’s important to be aware of how – and how often – you’re asking for a raise.

“If an employee’s asking me every quarter, every six months for a raise, that’s a big problem,” Lares said. “And so you don’t want to do that and be ridiculous.”

You got a job offer. A great position. Actually, you have always dreamed of this particular job, and you made a great effort to prepare for your interview in the company–an effort that has eventually paid off. You did great. They are impressed. Everything seems perfect, but one thing is missing : The salary offer is not that great. It is worse than you expected. Actually it is quite horrible…

What should you do in this case? Should you simply reject their offer? Or should you try to negotiate a better salary, writing a letter after the interview? But how to write such a letter? To whom should you address it? And how to make sure that it won’t close your doors to the company forever? I will try to answer the questions in this article.

Main parts on an excellent letter

Let’s have a look at three principal parts that should not be missing on your letter.

First part: Praise and pleasantries

In the beginning of your writing you should thank the employer for offering you a job. You should emphasize how happy you are to get the chance to work for their company. Such a simple introduction can look like the following paragraph:

Dear Mr. Xxx,
I am really pleased to receive a job offer of (name of the position) from your company. Your corporate values and goals, as well as your personal skills and experience, left a strong impression in my memory. I thought about your offer for quite a while, and believe that I would utilize my skills and contribute to the prosperity of your company, becoming an asset for your team. But before we can move on, I would like to discuss a few details of the offer.

How to write a salary negotiation letter

Second part: Say what you want to change, and give them a good reason to change it

Do not waste waste many lines with pleasantries. At the end of the day, they know that you do not write them just to say thank you, or tell them how great they are…

Come to the point. Mention the things you would like to change, and try to give them a good reason for considering your suggestions.

You offer a basic annual salary of $50,000. According to the information on (an online source, ideally with a clickable link), the average salary for this position in this city is above $58,000. I believe that $60,000 would correspond better with the experience and knowledge I can bring onboard.

I have earned $56,000 in my previous job, and though salary is not my main motivation, I would like to earn at least the same salary in my new job. Please consider $60,000 as the basic salary.

Special Tip : Download a great sample letter in one page long PDF, and use it as your reference anytime when you’d negotiate your starting salary:

How to write a salary negotiation letter salary negotiation letter, PDF

Third part: Confirming your interest and closing the letter

At the end of your letter, it is important to leave the door open for further negotiation–give them a chance to respond. Tell the employer that you are open for discussion, that your letter is not a yes-no proposition. Stress your intentions to deal with the problem quickly, so you can start working for them and help them prosper.

I believe I can help you pursue your company goals with great success. Please, let me know what you think about my suggestion. I am open for a discussion, and I am looking forward to hear from you soon, so we can discuss the salary offer, and come to a consensus together.

Best Regards
(Your name and contact details)

Address the letter to the right recipient … and wait

Do not forget to address the letter to the right person – the manager who gave you an initial offer, or the person who led the interview with you (typically this will be the same person, but if one of them is higher in the hierarchy of the company–a decision makes–you should address your letter to them).

Then you should wait for their response. Be patient. Wait at least for a couple of days. If they really want to hire you, they will come back, with a better offer… And if they do not come back, give them a call, or try your chances in another job interview…

Continue your preparation with Interview Penguin, and sign a coveted job contact:

  • Salary negotiation tips – Basic rules you should remember when negotiating a salary in your interview (or afterwards)
  • Interview questions and answers – Great answers to 15 most common interview questions, such as what motivates you, why should we hire you, what are your strengths, etc.
  • How to negotiate salary over the phone – Simple and practical guide that will help you get the most out of your opportunity.

How to write a salary negotiation letter? In a joint survey of 20, George Mason University and Temple University discovered that offers were made through salary negotiations that resulted in a $ 5,000 increase. This article will give an overview of how to write a salary negotiation letter.

How to write a salary negotiation letter

Anyone who has a job offer but is frustrated with starting pay can feel free to negotiate more wages.

The right way to offer higher pay is to research your industry to see if your level of standard pay is higher.

If your new position qualifies for higher pay, you may find it appropriate to write a reputable salary negotiation letter to the company.

Determine the average salary for the job you are offered. A good source for most industries is the Professional Outlook Handbook, a publication by the Federal Government’s Bureau of Labor Statistics. Other sources include business libraries and industrial associations.

Conduct online research using keywords related to your industry. If possible, search for other, similar companies.

Also, individual employers – who are not working to recruit companies – generally have a good idea about pay rates.

Start writing your letter to the organization. Use a traditional alphabetical-character format. Type the letter in the best available stationery and try for a page length.

Prepare the letter for regular mailing, no transmission via email. For serious communication like this, it is best not to be like a business, casual or informal.

Since this is a special situation, you can ask for expert help in composing and typing the letter.

Address your letter to the hiring manager or company official who has signed the offer letter. Do your best to convey a respectful and positive tone throughout the letter.

Start by expressing your thanks for the offer and say that you are very interested in the position. Retrieve the organization’s salary offer and make your professional offer in a professional way.

For example, you could say something like, “Although I appreciate your offer, I’d like to discuss the possibility of higher pay.”

This is the time to tell your case. Quote the average salary for a position and how their offers are limited. Provide an example of why you qualify for higher wages by industry standards.

Don’t give a reason why you need more money. Just focus on the aspects of the business and avoid your personal life.

Close the letter by summarizing your counter offer. Say that you are looking forward to reaching an agreement with the organization so that you can accept the job offer and start working. Request a meeting to discuss more pay.

Offer to call the address three business days later to make an appointment. Get excited about starting work for the organization and mention that you have specific goals you want to achieve as you get started.

Alert

Salary negotiations are not for everyone. If you are in a difficult financial situation, you may not be at risk of losing a job offer. It is better for you to focus on earning less-than-ideal fees and earning future raises.

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How to write a salary negotiation letter

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How to write a salary negotiation letter

If you’ve ever wanted a raise or promotion at work, you’re not alone. According to a CNBC report, 49% of workers in the United States got a pay raise in 2019. If you’ve recently been offered a new job, have been given new responsibilities, or have been at a company for many years, you may have considered asking your boss for an increased salary.

Though this may seem like an uncomfortable conversation to have, it’s an important one. The first thing you should do in this process is write a salary negotiation letter. Keep reading to learn how to write the best letter or e-mail to help get you that raise.

Determine Your Contact

Before you waste your time writing your salary negotiation e-mail to the wrong person, consider who will actually be in charge of your salary. If you’re negotiating a new job offer, you probably want to go with the hiring manager or recruiter, not the person at the top of your company.

If you have been at your job for a while, go to your direct manager. Don’t go above them first, as they could see this as a slight towards them, which will not help your chances.

Set the Professional Tone

Your e-mail should be precise and professional. Have a professional subject line and introduction. Describe your accomplishments at the company and how much you value them. Then, mention the last time you had a salary review, and suggest an in-person or phone meeting to discuss your salary further.

If it’s a new job, illustrate how excited you are for the opportunity and how your experience and assets lead you to want to discuss your salary offer further.

Do Your Research

You want your boss to know that you care about their company, and you wouldn’t just ask for some random number. When you have your meeting, describe what the job market is for your position and how much someone with your experience in your area would normally get.

Don’t forget to tally up all of your responsibilities and wins for the company, so you can provide proof for why you deserve that raise if asked. You can even print out pay stubs, either from your company or using a pay stubs maker, so that you can have your current salary wages on hand.

Write a Follow-Up

When you’re meeting is over, consider writing a follow-up e-mail if you haven’t heard any news from your boss within a few days. Again, keep it professional and precise. Mention your previous meeting, and provide any details that were discussed.

Suggest that you can talk about it further if desired, and thank them for their time. You can be sure that your request will be given more attention if you are persistent.

Salary Negotiation Letter Tactics

Before you write your salary negotiation letter, make sure you know exactly what you want to say. Do your research beforehand, so you can be confident that you can answer any question with facts.

Know your worth, but be open-minded and listen to your manager or boss for what they need too. Don’t be afraid to negotiate further, and you will soon have the salary that you desire. If you’d like more tips like this, check out our catalog of articles!

Writing a salary negotiation counter offer letter is all about producing a well-balanced negotiation. Once you receive an offer, it’s likely you’ll be thrilled and want to readily accept the position on the spot.

  • Salary Negotiation Counter Offer Letter [Free Sample]
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However, it’s in your best interest to ensure that you’re fairly compensated for the position.

If the offered compensation or salary isn’t what you expected, constructing this kind of letter will necessitate that you take a sensible approach that won’t jeopardize your job proposal in any way.

Primary Points In Counter Offer Letters

A job proposal counter offer letter is the secret to getting a better job offer overall. Most hiring managers are open about negotiating the details surrounding a particular position.

Therefore, if you feel that the specifics or compensation of your potential employment aren’t fair based on your previous experience and what you can offer the organization overall, consider writing this kind of letter.

Essentially, your counter proposal letter should ideally address a number of primary points, some of which may include:

  • Thank the company for their job proposal
  • Ask for more negotiations
  • Clearly point out what aspects of the contract you would like to negotiate
  • Ask for the hiring manager’s response to your subsequent negotiations and your conditional statements

Job Proposal Counter Offer Letter Format

The general outline of your job proposal counter letter should ideally follow the same format as a traditional business letter for best results.

Be sure to include the date, name, and work address of the individual with whom you wish to negotiate along with a professional greeting as well.

At the very minimum, your letter should consist of three paragraphs. However, the overall length will depend on the number of aspects of the position you are negotiating. In truth, there’s not an actual standard format for this kind of letter.

The following paragraph guide and sample letter will help you get your letter going in the right direction and hopefully lead you to a successful end result.

Paragraph #1:

  • Politely convey your appreciation for the job proposal
  • Establish a tone by remaining sincere and direct
  • Express your keen interest in working for their organization
  • State how you can positively impact the company and emphasize your best selling points

Paragraph #2:

  • Point out the first part of the job proposal you want to negotiate
  • Name your counter offer
  • Justify your counter offer with plausible research facts and statistics and your desire for fair compensation

Optional Paragraphs

If you have more than one point you want to negotiate concerning the job proposal, use one paragraph per point you want to make within your job offer counter letter.

It’s best to avoid putting every point of the negotiation into just one paragraph in a job proposal rejection letter.

Address one aspect of the job proposal in each. Once you’ve addressed each aspect you want to negotiate, you’re ready to write the final paragraph of your letter.

The Final Paragraph

  • Use modesty and respect when negotiating your requests
  • Restate how you can be an asset to the organization
  • Express how much you are looking forward to working for their company
  • If you’re comfortable with it, ask for a face-to-face negotiation or simply request a written reply if you are not

Here is a sample counter offer letter you can use:

Sample Counter Offer For Higher Salary

Jane Myers
123 Anywhere Road
Center City, IL 61081

February 16, 2021

To:
James Jones
Hiring Manager
Belford Hospital
123 Hospital Drive
Center City, IL 61081

Thank you for graciously offering me the position for Medical Staff Administrator at Belford Hospital. I am very pleased and honored to be given the chance to fulfill the position and flattered that you’re considering me as a top candidate.

Before I join your elite team, I am hoping to negotiate a somewhat higher salary base. While your salary offer is generous, I am looking for an annual salary of $56,000. I truly believe this dollar amount is more reflective of my current skills and past experience, which includes a full 12 years in the medical management field.

How to write a salary negotiation letter

Salary Negotiation Counter Offer Letter (Format & Example)

A salary negotiation letter has one main purpose. It’s written formally to request the salary you believe you deserve based on your experience and work background. These letters are written when a potential employee feels that the salary offered is too low. Salary negotiation letters can be used in nearly any industry and can be beneficial in a formal or more casual workplace setting.

When you write a salary negotiation counter-offer, it’s important to stay professional. This letter is your opportunity to provide relevant information as to why you feel like the offered salary should be adjusted. A counter-offer means that you’ve already been in negotiations which shows that you likely need to provide examples and specific information to back up your claims. Many salary negotiation letters are used to request a meeting to further discuss the offer. Be sure to stay positive and don’t bring up anything that could be misconstrued as negative towards the company or your would-be employers.

When writing this type of letter, several important points include getting your desired salary. You can briefly list your achievements to include specific information on why you believe your salary offer should be raised. A counter-offer can include data that compare your salary to others in the same field to provide backup evidence on your worth based on your performance against others who do the same job in the same industry as you. A salary counter-offer letter can also be used simply to request a meeting on the subject.

Your counter-offer letter can include a brief summary of other communications you’ve had with your would-be employers that are directly related to adjusting your salary offer. Don’t feel hesitant to include specific information and examples about why you believe your counter-offer should be accepted. Salary negotiations can make some potential employees feel uncomfortable. But you shouldn’t. This is your opportunity to talk about the success you’ve had and to provide reasons why you’re valuable enough to the company to earn those higher wages.

If you include information comparing yourself to others in your field as evidence to negotiate your salary, don’t speak about those people in a negative way. Keep your letter neutral towards others so as not to give off a bad impression of yourself. Don’t include information that talks about how you personally feel entitled to a raise in your salary offer. Keep your information directly related to job performance and leave out personal stories or anything about needing the extra money.

The tone of this type of letter should be formal and positive. Don’t include any information that could be misconstrued as negativity towards the company you want to work for. It’s also important to write your letter with a positive tone which will help your case and show that you’re reasonable and will be a good employee who keeps a positive attitude.

Salary Negotiation Counter Offer Letter (Format)

This format letter can help you write your own salary negotiation counter-offer letter. Simply fill in the brackets with your personal information. Be sure to use standard letter formatting, which includes aligning the date on the right of the page.

I enjoyed our meeting on . Thank you for offering me the position at

I enjoyed meeting the team and seeing how your company runs on a day-to-day basis. I believe I would fit in well with the others in the department.

Before I make a final decision, I was hoping to meet with you so we could further discuss the benefits package and salary offered to me. I think it would be appropriate to give you some more information on my background and experience in the field which I believe will make me a valuable asset to

Thank you for considering me for this position. I hope to speak with you again soon.

Sample Salary Negotiation Counter Offer Letter

The following is a sample letter that can give you an idea of information to include in your salary counter-offer letter. Remember, this is a formal letter, so appropriate letter formatting should be used.

Alison Evans – Social Media Manager

Dear Jason Lewis,

Thank you for offering me the position of Social Media Manager for D&J Advertising.

I thoroughly enjoyed my time meeting with you. It gave me a good idea of how your company runs and I feel like I would be a great fit for your team.

I would appreciate having a follow-up meeting with you to discuss the offered salary and benefits package. I believe that my experience in the field of Social Media Management and my time spent at previous employers doing similar positions warrants further discussion before I make a final decision.

Thank you very much for your consideration. I hope to hear from you soon regarding these matters.

Salary Negotiation Counter Offer Letter (Word Template)

A salary negotiation counter offer is your opportunity to advocate for yourself. It’s important to include information that tells your superiors why you deserve a salary increase. Keep your tone positive and give specific examples of your work performance. This is also an appropriate time to include information that compares your salary to others who perform the same job in your field. Most importantly, keep it professional and brief.

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Learn how to write a counter offer for higher salary. Use our sample counter offer for higher salary as a template for your letter.

  • 5 Tips On How To Decline A Job Offer With A Letter
  • How To Negotiate Salary After Job Offer (The Right Way)
  • How To Negotiate Salary: Asking For More Money After A Job Offer

salary negotiation Counter Offer For Higher Salary sample

Jane Myers
123 Anywhere Road
Center City, IL 61081

To:
James Jones
Hiring Manager
Belford Hospital
123 Hospital Drive
Center City, IL 61081

Thank you for graciously offering me the position for Medical Staff Administrator at Belford Hospital.

I am very pleased and honored to be given the chance to fulfill the position and flattered that you’re considering me as a top candidate.

Before I join your elite team, I am hoping to negotiate a somewhat higher salary base. While your salary offer is generous, I am looking for an annual salary of $56,000.

I truly believe this dollar amount is more reflective of my current skills and past experience, which includes a full 12 years in the medical management field.

I hope we can set up a meeting in order to negotiate my salary at your earliest convenience.

I am available all week and can be reached on my cell phone at (444) 444-4444 or by email at [email protected]

Again, thank you so much for this great opportunity and I look forward to finalizing the negotiations in the near future.

Job offer negotiation letter example. You have received a good job offer but the salary is not what you asked for or expected.

How to write a salary negotiation letter

A well written salary negotiation email or letter can turn the situation around and help you get the offer you want.

Negotiating a job offer is a perfectly acceptable practice and research indicates that as many as 4 out of 5 companies are prepared to negotiate compensation

Adapt the sample salary negotiation letter to meet your own job offer requirements.

Sample Job Offer Negotiation Letter

Your Name
Your Address
City, State, Zip code
Your Phone Number
Your Email

Mr Brian Jones
Human Resources Director
XYZ Company
City, State, Zip Code

I want to thank you for your job offer of (position) from XYZ Company. The position and areas of responsibility are an excellent fit with both my skills set and my career goals. Your company’s exciting growth plans would provide me with the opportunity to make a significant contribution in a challenging environment.

Before providing you with a formal acceptance I would like to discuss the base salary you have offered. The X position demands a high level of commitment that I am fully prepared to give. However, based on the value I can bring to the company coupled with salary data for this type of position, I must request that you re-look at your starting offer of $X. The annual salary range for a (position) in our industry falls between $X and $X and I believe an offer of $X would be more consistent with my qualifications, experience and the industry norms.

Again, thank you for your offer and I look forward to your response. I am confident that we can reach a mutually satisfactory agreement that will allow me to start with XYZ as soon as possible.

11 Essential Job Offer Negotiation Letter Tips

  • address your letter to the person who signed your job offer letter
  • start by thanking the employer for the job offer
  • be positive about the company and job
  • highlight your enthusiasm for the position
  • state clearly what you would like to change in the job offer
  • justify your request for a higher salary
  • do your salary research properly. Get help with salary research resources at salary negotiations
  • give valid supporting data for the changes you want
  • clarify that you are open to further discussion and negotiation
  • restate your motivation to start the job as soon as possible under the right conditions
  • convey a respectful tone throughout the salary negotiation letter

A job offer negotiation letter or salary negotiation email, also known as a counter-proposal, clarifies your position and justifies your salary request with facts and figures.

If your arguments are realistic, you should be able to persuade the employer to adjust the offer appropriately.

Frequently asked questions about the salary negotiation email

What should I put as the subject line for the email?

Keep your subject line generic. Good subject line examples include:

Job Title – Job Offer

Thank You for the Job Offer – Your Name

Your Name – Job Offer

Is it better to negotiate in person?

Negotiating in person can be nerve wracking and makes some people feel very uncomfortable. It is often easier to put it in writing.

The advantage of sending an email is that you have a record of your salary negotiations. It also provides the employer with time to think about your proposal before having to respond.

How long should I wait for a response to my email?

You need to give the employer some time to consider your proposal and to confer with the necessary staff members before responding. The starting date of the new job should also be factored in.

After a reasonable time it is acceptable to send a follow up email asking for a date by which you can expect their response.

Follow up after a job offer negotiation email

Subject: Job Offer Follow Up – Your Name

I know how busy you must be, but I recently sent you an email regarding the Job Title offer you made to me. I would like to kindly ask if you could provide me with any information regarding a possible review of the compensation package, as discussed in my email of Date.

I am very enthusiastic about both the position and the opportunity to join such an excellent company and would like to come to a mutual agreement as soon as possible. Please let me know when we can further discuss the compensation for this position.

Can I negotiate the job title?

Your job title is part of your compensation package as it often indicates your level within the organization and the value you bring to the company. Your job title can also impact on your feelings of self-worth and job satisfaction. If you feel that the job title is not representative of your value or your level of responsibility and this is of significant importance to you, you can negotiate it as part of the broader job offer.

Before approaching the job title negotiation do some research to find out how your industry refers to employees in a similar role. It is advisable to have a specific alternative job title to refer to when proposing a change of job title.

When approaching a job title negotiation or writing a job offer negotiation letter consider the following:

  • What would I like to change about my job title and why?
  • How would a different job title benefit the company?
  • How would a different job title benefit my job performance

“I note that the job title is Supervisor which is rather generic, could we look at a more specific title to accurately reflect my role in the organization?”

“I believe that the job title Sales Assistant does not adequately reflect my previous level of experience and the responsibilities involved in this role. I would like to propose a title of Sales Coordinator for this position”

One thing is to be offered a job you love another is that offer coming with a salary package that is reasonable. Some job offers come with a package that is below expectation. The way out is to use the negotiation route to ask for a compensation that will befits your skill sets and needs. The truth is that some employers offer this low pay to test the waters to know if the employees know their worth, if you know that your flair and skills are worth than what is offered then you would need to negotiate for a higher pay. So instead of feeling helpless or feeling intimidated that the offer will pass you by, let the employer know your worth by writing a salary negotiation email and see how it goes.

A salary negotiation email is therefore, an email that is written by a candidate to a hiring officer or potential employer to discuss about a salary rise for a offered work position. This letter is mostly sent out when an offer made by a potential employer to a would-be employee or an employee of a company doesn’t suit the person. As the name implies the essence of the letter will be to seek for a better compensation or pay rise from the employer. Even an existing employee of a company can write this letter as well to get a raise to equate the employee progress and success in the present position,

Writing an effective Salary negotiation email will need you following some basic rules and having the right information that will bring positive effects to your request. The below writing tips should be a guide for you when trying to get your Salary negotiation email efficiently written.

  • As usual start your email with a subject line that will give at a first glance what your letter is all about. Make it a lot catchier to attract fast attention of either the hiring manager or employer
  • Have a salutation that in addition has the full name of the interviewer, employer or hiring manager
  • Open the first paragraph with some words of appreciation for the job you were offered. Thank the hiring manager for deeming you worthy of the position and for the time and effort taken through-out the hiring process
  • Then take the next paragraph to mention the purpose of the letter, state the reason for your negotiation, you can reiterate on your skills and qualifications
  • The last paragraph should be you stating your interest to have the job but the salary should be augmented
  • Appreciate the recipient once again and sign off with your first and last name

Below are the Salary negotiation email samples

Subject line: salary negotiation

I’m so grateful for the offering me a job as a protocol officer and Bata Fancy company. I appreciate it and know I will be an outstanding personality in the job role as well as in the team. As I had mentioned already, my 8 years experience in the job role as endowed me with the needed knowledge and skills to be able to work in the field with ease and the end result is always mind-blowing.

Before fully accepting this job offer I want to bring to your notice the proposed payment offer that comes with this job role. As you are aware I have handled different leadership roles in this sector so I’m well vested to handle things when it comes to protocol. I was able to increase productivity up to 40% in my previous place of work and this help to raise our revenue rate from the 40% rate I met to 70%. So with my skill sets and track record I feel that you salary offering to me is on the low side. I will like to have a slight increase at least. I wouldn’t mind a salary range of $150,000 to $200,000 annually.

I’m sure that my expertise and work ethic will be of a great benefit to the overall growth of the company. I’m already thrilled about being a part of Bata Company; please help make it a reality by acceding to my request. Thank you a lot.

Subject line: salary questioning

Thank you again for offering me the position of a marketer at express merchant bank. I’m confident that I will be the radical change that the marketing departments have been looking for. My 7 years of hard work in this sector has given me the needed skills and experience to conquer the marketing hurdles and bring in more customers for firms.

But before I can accept this offer I will like us to revisit the issue of the compensation that comes with this job. Without sounding rude or ungrateful but I want to state that the salary scale for this job is really low for me. I have worked in this field and I know how draining it can be but I do enjoy it because I have all that it takes to tackle its hurdles. I have been able to singlehandedly in my previous office brought in more than the ¾ of the customers that transacted with it; I’m here to do same.

So with my proven skill sets and expertise I feel that a salary around $120,000 and $180,000 would be a lot better. I’m confident that my work ethic and experience will help increase the success of the company. So please reach me whenever you need information for this job role.

Conclusion

When you are offered a poor pay for a job you love the rule of thumb is to ask the hiring manager or employer for a revised pay rise. If a payment is offered that isn’t up to par with your level of expertise, skills and training it is good to negotiate with the employer. The right way is to write a Salary negotiation email to the employer or hiring manager. The information that is needed to be written in this letter as been outlined above and the samples are given so that you can review and adopt them for your use.

How to write this letter:

1 Thank the reader for extending the job offer. Express confidence in the management, company or other aspects of the offer.
2 State that you want a better salary. Mention the salary you want if you feel it appropriate. Identify the factors that you feel warrant a higher salary, such as education or experience.
3 Confirm that you will make significant contributions to the success of the organization.
4 Reaffirm your strong interest in the job offer. Assure the reader that a resolution is possible and that you want to accept the challenges of the position.
5 Indicate how you will make your next contact.

Guides

Sometimes the salary offered does not meet your expectations. This letter will state your case clearly, preparing the way for further discussion. Keep the tone positive, confident, and respectful.

Example Letter #1

Thank you for extending me the offer of employment as the Director of Human Resources for the Doe Company. The opportunity to talk to you and the other executives has been enlightening and enjoyable. The company’s growth plans are exciting and challenging.

After considerable thought, I am concerned about the salary you offered. It is lower than I anticipated. Since I have had extensive experience in all aspects of the Human Resource functions (technical recruiting, compensation, employee relations, benefits administration, employment and organizational development), I feel I will be a great asset to you. My thorough knowledge of the numerous federal and state laws and regulations which affect the company will also aid you.

I do want to accept this position but feel that we need to discuss the salary further. I will call in a few days to set up an appointment with you.

Thank you again for the offer. I am sure we can reach an agreement.

Example Letter #2

I appreciate your offering me the position of Section Head of Shipping at Doe. I look forward to working with you.

Unfortunately the salary you offered me is lower than I feel I can accept. I have had eight years of experience in Shipping during which I completely redesigned my current employer’s shipping process. This saved over $200,000 in the past two years. I am confident that I can achieve significant savings for Doe with no loss of efficiency. Under these circumstances I feel that your salary offer should be increased by 10%.

I am sure that we can come to a mutually satisfactory arrangement. I will be in Springfield next Wednesday and would like to meet with you to discuss this. I will call to arrange a time for us to meet.

Example Letter #3

I was delighted to receive your offer of a position as office manager at Doe. I was very impressed by the friendly yet professional attitude of all the staff and I look forward to joining your team.

I regret to say that I was disappointed by the salary you offered. Although I have been out of the work force for some years, I feel I am worth more than an entry-level salary. I have worked extensively on a volunteer basis on the school and community level and have held several responsible positions during this time. These include City PTA President, School Carnival Chair for two years, and Fund-raising Chair for the new library. I feel that this experience should qualify me for a salary of $30,000 per year.

I work well with people and am able to motivate those who work under my direction. I am sure that these skills will be very valuable to Doe. I would like to discuss this with you further and will call to set up an appointment.

Example Letter #4

Thank you for extending me the position of sales representative. I am eager to become a part of your sales team and have the opportunity to work toward making a real contribution in this company. Armed with an array of qualifications, I am sure that I will be able to fulfill all required duties and obligations. Please know that I am ready to give my best efforts to this position.

As I stated in my application and in our interview, I am flexible in considering offers regarding the terms of my employment. I have evaluated your current offer, however, and feel that further negotiations are necessary. I propose that we take another look at the salary you offered me in order for you to better take into account my skills, education, and experience.

I am greatly interested in working for your company, as I believe this position will help me develop my current strengths and capabilities, as well as develop new ones. I look forward to developing a long-term relationship with your organization, but I require a salary that is in harmony with my credentials and sufficient to meet my personal needs. Let us get together and reconsider your offer. I am confident that we can reach a figure that is satisfactory to both of us.

Write Your Letter Step-by-Step

Thank the reader for extending the job offer. Express confidence in the management, company or other aspects of the offer.

Use this sample counter offer letter as a template for your formal notification.
Last updated on January 17th, 2019

Writing a job proposal counter offer letter is all about producing a well-balanced negotiation. Once you receive an offer, it’s likely you’ll be thrilled and want to readily accept the position on the spot.

However, it’s in your best interest to ensure that you’re fairly compensated for the position. If the offered compensation or salary isn’t what you expected, constructing this kind of letter will necessitate that you take a sensible approach that won’t jeopardize your job proposal in any way.

​ A job proposal counter offer letter is the secret to getting a better job offer overall. Most hiring managers are open about negotiating the details surrounding a particular position.

​ Therefore, if you feel that the specifics or compensation of your potential employment aren’t fair based on your previous experience and what you can offer the organization overall, consider writing this kind of letter.

Essentially, your counter proposal letter should ideally address a number of primary points, some of which may include:

  • Thank the company for their job proposal
  • Ask for more negotiations
  • Clearly point out what aspects of the contract you would like to negotiate
  • Ask for the hiring manager’s response to your subsequent negotiations and your conditional statement ​

​ The general outline of your job proposal counter letter should ideally follow the same format as a traditional business letter for best results. Be sure to include the date, name, and work address of the individual with whom you wish to negotiate along with a professional greeting as well. ​​

At the very minimum, your letter should consist of three paragraphs. However, the overall length will depend on the number of aspects of the position you are negotiating. In truth, there’s not an actual standard format for this kind of letter.

​The following paragraph guide and sample letter will help you get your letter going in the right direction and hopefully lead you to a successful end result.

Paragraph #1:

  • Politely convey your appreciation for the job proposal
  • Establish a tone by remaining sincere and direct
  • Express your keen interest in working for their organization
  • State how you can positively impact the company and emphasize your best selling points

​ ​​ Paragraph #2:

  • Point out the first part of the job proposal you want to negotiate
  • Name your counter offer
  • Justify your counter offer with plausible research facts and statistics and your desire for fair compensation ​

Optional Paragraphs

If you have more than one point you want to negotiate concerning the job proposal, use one paragraph per point you want to make within your job offer counter letter. It’s best to avoid putting every point of the negotiation into just one paragraph in a job proposal rejection letter.

Address one aspect of the job proposal in each. Once you’ve addressed each aspect you want to negotiate, you’re ready to write the final paragraph of your letter.

The Final Paragraph

  • Use modesty and respect when negotiating your requests
  • Restate how you can be an asset to the organization
  • Express how much you are looking forward to working for their company
  • If you’re comfortable with it, ask for a face-to-face negotiation or simply request a written reply if you are not

Here is a sample counter offer letter you can use:

​Sample Counter Offer Letter
Name of Candidate
Address of Candidate
City, State, Zip Code

Name of HR person
Name of Company
Address of Company
City, State, Zip Code

Dear Name of HR person,

Thank you for graciously offering me the position for [Name of Position] at [Name of Company]. I am very pleased and honored to be given the chance to fulfill the position and flattered that you’re considering me as a top candidate.

Before I join your elite team, I am hoping to negotiate a somewhat higher salary base. While your salary offer is generous, I am looking for an annual salary of [$56,000].

​I truly believe this dollar amount is more reflective of my current skills and past experience, which includes a full 12 years in the medical management field.

I hope we can set up a meeting in order to negotiate my salary at your earliest convenience. I am available all week and can be reached on my cell phone at [(555) 123-4444] or by email at [[email protected]].

Again, thank you so much for this great opportunity and I look forward to finalizing the negotiations in the near future.

Name of Candidate Signature
Name of Candidate Printed

A salary negotiation email/letter is written to negotiate for better pay. If you have received a job offer, but you aren’t comfortable with the salary offered, the best way is to write a letter or email to negotiate for an increase in the salary. You will be amazed to discover that most employers will negotiate though most candidates never try to ask for better pay, they reject the offer.

To get a better salary for the new position, you must know how to craft an effective email/letter. You might lack the words and tactics to ask for a better salary. You can easily achieve your desired goal if you rely on a sample/template.

What to include in a salary negotiation email/letter

Introduction

Start by appreciating the employer for selecting you to be the best among the many interviewees. This is the best way to negotiate for your salary. The employer will be happy to know you are interested in the position.

In the letter/email, you can now state your counteroffer. Base your argument on facts. Before writing the letter/email, embark on research to establish prevailing rates for individuals who have similar qualifications in the industry.

Do not forget to include your experience and what you will offer to the company as you negotiate for the salary. Remember to be professional besides using polite language to ask for better pay.

Conclusion

Conclude the email/letter by thanking the employer once more for the offer and being optimistic that they will accept your counteroffer. Also, reiterate your wish to work for the company.

Salary Negotiation Letter Format

Dear [name of recipient]

I write this letter to appreciate the job offer as [state the position] in [Company name]. This position and your company’s development plan are in line with my career goals and a perfect match for skill s and experience. I desire to offer my contribution to make [company name] a leader in this industry as I advance my career.

But before I formally accept the offer, I would like us to revisit the salary offer. I recognize that the position is highly demanding and I am fully committed to offering my best. However, based on my experience, skills and industry norms, I request you to reconsider the salary offer of [state the amount]. The salary range for such a position in the industry ranges from [state the range]. I was earning [amount] in my previous company, and I will not be comfortable to work for a lower amount considering my experience and skills.

I look forward to a satisfactory offer that will appeal to both parts soon. Once again thank for the offer. I look forward to becoming part of the dedicated team of staff at [company name].

Salary Negotiation Email Format

Dear recruiting manager,

I appreciate your offer as [state the [position] at [company name]. This position fits perfectly with my career goals and aspirations. Besides, I will be glad to be part of the company’s growth.

But before accepting the offer, kindly allow me to revisit the compensation package. Based on my experience, skills, and achievements in my past employers I request you reconsider your salary offer of [amount].

The industry annual salary range for the position is between [state the range]. I consider an offer of [amount] to be appropriate considering my experience, skills and what I can do for the company.

Once an again, thank you for the offer. I eagerly wait for a positive response.

Salary negotiation is one of the important aspect during job interview. Before expecting a particular amount of pay you have to know the worth of that job and how much salary that job is getting in market. Once you have a clear idea about that then you can negotiate your salary. There are so many cases where employees need to write a salary negotiation letter to their employer. Here you can find salary negotiation letter sample and you can use it for your salary negotiation purpose.

Salary negotiation is important when you have two or more job offers in your hand, when you think you have more experience in that field and in order to cover expenses of living cost.

Salary Negotiation Letter Sample When There Are Other Job Offers

The Manager, Bangalore

ABC Company Ltd.

Thank you for offering me marketing executive position at ABC Company Ltd. The position and areas of responsibilities are an excellent fit with my skill set and career goals.

Here I would like discuss about the compensation before I can accept the job offer. While ABC company ltd is my first preference, I have received other job offers which are offering me more compensation. The highest offer which I got was 25000 Rs from XYZ company ltd.

I’ m very interested in ABC company ltd and I Would happily accept if you could match the pay which I am getting from XYZ company ltd. Again thank you for your offer and I look forward to your response.

Salary Negotiation Letter Sample When To Match The Living Cost

The Manager, Hyderabad

ABC Company Ltd.

I’m excited to relocate to Bangalore and ready to join with our new team.

Here I would like to bring your kind notice that Bangalore has higher cost of living when compared to Hyderabad and I have not seen any sign that my compensation will change for relocating. When compared to Hyderabad the cost of living in Bangalore is 15% high.

So I request you to please adjust my salary to cover the relocation expenses at Bangalore and if it is not possible please provide my an alternate solution so that we come to a mutual agreement.

Hope above two salary negotiation letter samples will be useful for you and you can use this templates as salary negotiation emails.

Salary negotiation is one of the most important thing which you need to dicuss with your current employer or the one you are planning to join in the recent times.

While you have worked for sometime it is important to take remuneration which justofoes your work and expereince and also it is very necessaaryt o be paid what youd eserve or else underpaid employees lose the value.

Be polite while discusing and try to get the best you think your deserve.

Salary Negotiation Email samples

Salary Negotiation Email Sample 1

I am excited to be offered the [Position] job at [Company].

As mentioned, my normal base salary is ($_______). This depends on the normal yearly salary scope of ($_______ to $_______) for this activity, just as [2–3 capabilities/abilities or outline of major past achievements]. This is debatable relying upon variables, for example, open doors for profession movement and preparing programs.

Much obliged to you again for your offer. I anticipate talking with you further soon.

Salary Negotiation Email Sample 2

I’m amped up for the possibility of joining your group at [Company Name] as the [Position Title].

With my aptitudes and rundown of major past achievements, I am sure that I will accomplish incredible outcomes for [Company Name]. Be that as it may, I might want to talk about base salary before I sign the offer.

As indicated by my examination, the normal salary for practically identical situations in the [work location] region is in the average salary run. I might want to propose drawing the offer nearer to [proposed salary] in accordance with my abilities and the requests of this position.

Much obliged to you again for your offer. I anticipate talking with you again soon.

Salary Negotiation Email Sample 3

I am eager to be offered the situation of [Position Title] at [Company].

In any case, before signing your offer, I’d prefer to talk about the base salary for this position. Despite the fact that [Company] is my first decision, I’ve gotten another employment proposition with a higher base salary ($______).

I’m excited about the possibility of joining your group and would cheerfully acknowledge your offer in the event that you could coordinate this base salary. I comprehend that this figure might be over your arranged spending plan, yet I’m adaptable and ready to discover an answer that works for the two of us.

Much obliged to you again for your offer. I anticipate talking with you again soon.

Salary Negotiation Email Sample 4

I genuinely make the most of my job as “Position Name” here at “Company Name”. Over the previous year, I have increased a lot of experience working with “Manager’s Name” and the Marketing group. Not just have I had the chance to expand on my range of abilities, I’ve had the option to carry extra information to the table, remembering my work for the ongoing rebranding venture.

As my job has adjusted since my underlying recruit, I am writing to demand a gathering to talk about my present pay. I esteem my situation inside the group and I anticipate carrying extra knowledge to our future undertakings.

I would cherish the chance to meet with you to examine a salary increment. Unquestionably let me know when you may be accessible. I value your thought.

Salary Negotiation Email Sample 5

Dear “Name of Receiver”,

Much obliged to you such a great amount for offering me the job of “Position name” for “Organization Name”. With my experience, I’m certain I can contribute an extraordinary arrangement both to the group and to the organization overall.

As you most likely are aware, I have a solid arrangement of work from my past fifteen years in the this business. While I am thankful for your underlying salary offer, I couldn’t want anything more than to examine a number that may better mirror my range of abilities and experience.

Unquestionably let me know whether you’re available to the thought, and anticipate associating.

Name of the sender

Salary Negotiation Email Sample 6

I needed to catch up on our gathering a week ago with respect to my salary. During our discussion, we concurred that my position required a more prominent remuneration given the extent of work and my expert experience. We talked about a potential scope of $000 to $000, which is perfect for me pushing ahead.

I would be glad to return to the discussion on the off chance that you have further inquiries concerning my solicitation. Once more, I genuinely value your time and thought.

Salary Negotiation Email Sample 7

Dear Mr. Selection representative,

Much obliged to you for offering me the Assistant Sales Director position. I want to communicate again that I am so eager to start working for your organization.

Before I can acknowledge nonetheless, I would like to bring up the discussion about about the matter of remuneration. As we examined in the meetings, I have two a greater number of long periods of experience and formal preparation than you required part of the set of working responsibilities.

I have likewise exhibited my capacities in my last situation at my past organization by expanding deals in my division by 25% and by and by handled a few multi-million dollar deals. With my aptitude, a satisfactory salary would fall in the scope of $103,000-$112,000, somewhat higher than your idea of $94,000.

I can absolutely observe a future for myself at the organization, and I’m certain that I can bring a ton of significant worth. I realize that we can go to a common concession to an adequate salary.

Much obliged to you for your time,

Salary Negotiation Email Sample 8

Much obliged to you for offering me the business position. I’m amped up for Company Z and the commitment I can make here.

In any case, I might want to talk about remuneration before I can acknowledge the offer. While Company Z is my first decision, I have gotten other employment bids that are offering me more pay. Truth be told, the most elevated offer is $7000 more than the idea from here with four extra excursion days from Company Y.

I’m keen on Company Z and I would joyfully acknowledge whether you could coordinate what the other organizations are offereing. I comprehend that not all things can be practiced, yet I’m willing to be adaptable and locate a decent arrangement. I’m certain that I can make important commitments to the organization, and I trust we can go to a shared understanding.

Use this salary negotiation email template to discuss your compensation and benefits package with potential hires.

When extending a job offer to a candidate, be prepared for salary negotiations. Depending on the candidate’s qualifications, how hard it is to fill this role and your budget, you could be open to negotiating higher compensation and/or a better benefits package with your best candidate.

The following salary negotiation email sample template will give you an idea of how to re-address salary and benefits with potential hires. You can customize this template to include compensation, bonuses and perks you’re willing to offer.

Email subject line: [Company_name] Job Offer / Job Offer from [Company_name]

We are pleased you’re considering our job offer for the [Job_title] position. We’ve discussed your requests with the Head of [e.g. Engineering] department and our Finance team and we’ve decided to extend our initial offer with:

  • A [e.g. 5%] increase in the annual compensation to a new [mention the new salary] salary
  • A signing bonus of $X
  • Flexibility to work from home two days/week or commute reimbursement
  • Company stock options
  • Re-negotiation of compensation and benefits package after an early performance review [e.g. six months after start date]

Please consider the above offer and reply by [date.] In the meantime, if you have any questions, feel free to contact me at [provide contact details.]

How to write a salary negotiation letter

Negotiating your salary: Writing a counter offer

Congratulations on the job offer! Should you accept or try to negotiate? If you’re reading this, according to the Center for Professional Success, the first thing you should know about providing a counter offer is that you should have already received a job offer.

How to write a salary negotiation letterIf you have been put in the position of being asked “What are your salary and other consideration requests?” either be prepared with an answer that is somewhat above your actual expectations, or explain that you are not ready to state that until you know more about the office, its patient load, its financial outlook and your expected role in the position. You should know these things in order to provide a reasonable salary range or to fully consider the offer the employer is putting forward.

There are three options available to you once an offer is extended: accept the offer as is, decline the offer, or submit a counter offer. Submitting a counter offer can be the most stressful option.

The window for negotiating a counter offer is small, but it can have a large impact on your final pay. Here are some steps to take before submitting your counter offer.

Research the position. Know the salary range you should expect. Make sure to factor in the location of the practice and, if possible, try to find historical information on the employer’s salary range. Ask questions about patient load, salary calculation, the practice finances and the like. Use this information, along with your own needs and wants, to establish your own best alternative to a negotiated agreement (often called BATNA). This is the goal toward which you are aiming when you start to negotiate, and you’ll do better if you have it foremost in your mind.

When the offer is extended, first thank the interviewer and be sure to express interest and excitement in the job. Let them know that this is a major decision that will require careful thought and ask them how long you have to consider the offer.

Maintain gratitude in negotiations. The conversation should be cordial not a battle. If not handled with tact, presenting a counter offer could cause the employer to change their opinion of you and to rescind the offer.

Consider asking for a salary or terms that are slightly better than you will accept. How does that saying go? “Shoot for the moon. Even if you miss, you’ll be among the stars.” Justify your salary expectations by playing to your attributes. Remind them of your experience, education, your willingness to grow the practice, the revenue you will bring in, and solutions you can provide.

Be prepared for a refusal to negotiate or an offer lower than your ask. The offer may be firm. If the offer is below your minimum, be open to walking away from the offer. This is where having your BANTA in mind helps. You won’t get caught up in the negotiation and be tempted by slight concessions that still don’t raise the offer to the level of your basic needs.

After an agreement is reached, get the offer in writing. Also important, don’t ask for anything more after the negotiations are over, it may sour the relationship or lose you the job offer.

ADA member, Dr. Colleen Greene, has generously shared a counter offer letter template to use in your salary negotiations. Good luck!

Disclaimer. This document is not intended to provide either legal or professional advice, and cannot address every federal, state, and local law that could affect a dentist or dental practice. We make no representations or warranties of any kind about the completeness, accuracy, or any other quality of the information in the above piece. Nothing here represents advice or opinion as to any particular situation you may be facing; for that, it is necessary to consult directly with a properly qualified professional or with an attorney admitted to practice in your jurisdiction for appropriate legal or professional advice. To the extent the above includes links to any web sites, the ADA intends no endorsement of their content and implies no affiliation with the organizations that provide their content. Nor does the ADA make any representations or warranties about the information provided on those sites, which we do not control in any way.

PON – Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School – https://www.pon.harvard.edu

Team-Building Strategies: Building a Winning Team for Your Organization

Discover how to build a winning team and boost your business negotiation results in this free special report, Team Building Strategies for Your Organization, from Harvard Law School.

When considering how to negotiate salary, job candidates sometimes make decisions that go against their best interests. Research suggests guidelines for effective salary negotiation.

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How to write a salary negotiation letter

The question of how to negotiate salary seems to preoccupy negotiators more than any other negotiation topic—and with good reason, considering how dramatically even a small salary increase can impact our lifetime earnings. The following three salary bargaining tips from leading negotiation experts will help you gain more from your new-job negotiations.

Get Out of Your Own Way

In job and salary negotiations, we sometimes “get in our own way,” write Deborah M. Kolb and Jessica L. Porter in their book Negotiating at Work: Turn Small Wins Into Big Gains (Jossey-Bass, 2015). We may fail to recognize opportunities to negotiate, focus only on our weaknesses, and make the first concessions in our own heads before the negotiation even begins. These internal dialogues are where the first concessions in the negotiation are made, write Kolb and Porter.

Kolb and Porter suggest ways to address the question of how to negotiate salary. Begin by gathering information so that you will feel that what you are asking for is defensible. Prepare to explain the value you would bring to the organization. Develop alternatives to the current negotiation to increase your flexibility at the table, and remember that the other party’s alternatives may be less attractive than yours.

In addition, examine your vulnerabilities and plan ahead to compensate for them. For example, if you are insecure about a gap in your work history, think about the important things you were doing during that time and prepare to share them with enthusiasm.

How to write a salary negotiation letter

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Consider the Context

Large, established companies often measure job candidates against well-defined job categories with a set range of salaries. In addition, you may negotiate compensation with recruiters or human-resources personnel rather than with your future boss. In this environment, when determining how to negotiate salary, try to figure out what pay category someone with your education level and experience would receive, then build a case for a salary at the high end of that range.

If an interviewer asks you to name your price, do you know how should you respond? In their book 3-D Negotiation (Harvard Business School Press, 2006), David Lax and James Sebenius recommend making a “non-offer offer,” or a statement that could anchor the discussion in your favor without seeming extreme.

Suppose your research suggests that you would most likely fall into the $70,000 to $80,000 pay range, but the next-highest category seems within reach. Rather than saying, “I think I deserve $80,000,” consider saying, “Correct me if I’m wrong, but I’ve heard that people like me typically earn $80,000 to $90,000.” Notice that this statement is not a demand. Yet due to the powerful impact of the $80,000-to-$90,000 “anchor”—a reference point that may or may not be relevant to the discussion—it could very well steer the numbers toward your upper goal.

Now consider how you might adjust your salary negotiation strategy to a start-up that is recruiting you to become its third employee. You obviously won’t be shuttled off to the HR department, nor will your salary be determined by existing pay scales. In this case, you may have more latitude to structure a creative package that includes stock options.

Adapt Your Style for Maximum Success

Individual differences in negotiating style determine how to negotiate salary and what we achieve, Michelle Marks of George Mason University and Crystal Harold of Temple University found in a study published in the Journal of Organizational Behavior.

The researchers surveyed 149 professional employees who had been hired in the previous three years about their negotiations for their current position, including their attitudes toward negotiation and risk, their negotiation strategies and outcomes, and their level of satisfaction with the process of negotiating for their jobs.

The researchers identified five types of negotiating strategies: collaborating (engaging in problem solving to reach the best possible outcome for both sides); competing (trying to maximize one’s own outcomes with little concern for others); accommodating (putting the other party’s concerns first); compromising (trying to reach middle ground); and avoiding (dodging negotiation altogether).

Independent of the power the applicants had at the table, choice of negotiation strategy turned out to be the critical factor in determining effective salary negotiation. Those who chose to negotiate salary, rather than accepting the offer on the table, increased their starting pay by an average of $5,000, primarily by using competing and collaborating strategies. Those who behaved competitively did better than those who focused on collaboration, but collaborators were more satisfied than competitive bargainers with the negotiation process. By contrast, compromising and accommodating strategies were not linked to salary gains.

The study’s authors conclude that it pays to negotiate assertively for a salary increase. They also encourage employers to recognize that giving employees wiggle room to bargain up their starting pay could help create a more satisfied and productive workforce.

When determining how to negotiate salary, what strategies have you used?

Landed that dream job?

Salary not quite what you expected?

Don’t fret; negotiating your salary is more common than you think and is a frequent practice in many workplaces!

A study found that 84% of those who negotiated received a higher salary. Whether you decide to write an email or a formal letter to negotiate your salary, it is essential to be polite, straightforward, and upfront about your salary expectations.

So, let’s take an in-depth look at Job Offer Negotiation to get you the salary you deserve.

How to write a salary negotiation letter

Why Should You Negotiate Your Salary?

Although it may seem intimidating and uncomfortable to have been offered that perfect job and already be challenging the salary offer, do it! Here’s why…

A survey found that 70% of managers expect their employees to negotiate their salary and benefits. Think about it: if you accept a starting salary 10% lower than your expectations and the US salary increase is 3% annually, which has been the same for the last ten years, it could take you over two years to recoup those earnings!

How to write a salary negotiation letter

Sample Salary Negotiation Letter

So, let’s have a look at an example to find out how to diplomatically and politely get the salary you think you deserve:

    Your Name Your Address City, State, Zipcode Your Phone Number Your Email 04/06/20XX Mr. John Smith Human Resources Manager Company Z City, State, Zip Code Dear Mr. Smith

Thank you for offering me the position of Social Media Manager for Z. I am excited and optimistic about my future with the company and feel I have a lot to offer the team. My nine years of experience in PR Marketing and my flare for social media will be a great asset.

Before I accept this offer, I would like to discuss the base salary and reiterate the unique skills and experience I mentioned in our interview. During my six years at my last company, I built up social media platforms, expanded reach and views to hundreds of thousands of new followers, and created quirky and punchy content for them.

How to write a salary negotiation letter

I have researched salary data for this type of position, and I politely request you reconsider your offer of $X. The salary offered for this job is usually between $X and $X. Due to my ambitious plans, experience, and qualifications, I would be looking at a salary of between $X and $X.

Thank you once again for the job offer, I can envision a future for myself at the company, and I look forward to coming to a mutual agreement on a fair salary.

[your first and last name]

Job Offer Negotiation Tips

    Address the email to the person that offered you the job Show praise and thanks for getting the job Include enthusiasm and excitement for the position BE CONFIDENT (even if you don’t quite feel it) Check out how much your job is worth and what other companies are paying. Keep it clear why you are requesting a higher salary Explain the reasons why you believe you are eligible for a higher salary Be firm but open to further discussion and negotiation Keep a polite tone throughout the email or letter

How to write a salary negotiation letter

How Do I Prove My Worth?

First of all, don’t request above and beyond your worth, but putting your argument forward clearly and straightforwardly should be able to persuade your new employer to meet your salary expectations! You might be thinking, how do I prove I am worth a higher salary?

    It is essential to research specific jobs sites such as Indeed or Payscale and check how much other companies are paying for similar job roles Point out your essential experiences in your email and how your knowledge will be of higher value to the team because of XYZ Reference back to your interview and why the employer wanted you to begin with Sell yourself! Show yourself to be a likable person and state your achievements with pride

Be confident; after all, you got the job out of probably more than a handful of other candidates. You have been offered this job offer for a reason, and your employer may even appreciate your negotiating skills!

If Meryl Streep can do it, you can too!

Speaking about her offer for The Devil Wears Prada, she said: “The offer was in my mind slightly, if not insulting, and not perhaps reflective of the actual value I would add to the project. There was a ‘goodbye moment,’ and then they doubled the offer. Amazingly, I was 55, and had just learned, at a very late date, exactly how to deal on my own behalf.” Variety Magazine, June 2016

Why Email?

Good question! You can see why some people may believe that negotiating a job offer in person could seem more personable. However, email is an excellent way to compose yourself, gain all the best points of your argument, and clearly state what is needed to be said. After all, speaking about large sums of money to a stranger can be daunting!

The best part? You can do this from the comfort of your own home, and it gives you a record of your correspondence with the future employer, as well as giving them time to think about their response!

What Should I Put As The Subject?

Keep it simple, something like:

Job title – Name

Social Media Manager Job Offer – Name

Use the same subject line the employer used in the job offer.

How to write a salary negotiation letter

The Wait Is Too Long?

Be sure to give your future employer a little time before responding to your email. They, too, need time to consider the proposal and discuss it with their team before agreeing to a salary.

That’s not all… there could be a few emails of negotiating back and forth before an agreement. If your start date is near, it would be appropriate to follow up with a friendly email asking for a rough date when they will respond to your salary request.

Looking for Some Great Jobs?

And if you happen to have a criminal record, you may be interested in the Best Part Time Jobs for Felons, the Best Jobs for Felons, or even the Best Medical Jobs for Felons.

Plus, if it’s nearly time for your next interview, then you can’t go wrong by investing in a good book such as Interview Like A Pro or the excellent Answering Tough Interview Questions For Dummies. However, the site also contains comprehensive guides on answering common interview questions such as Why Do You Want to Work Here?, Answering Tell Me About Yourself in Interview, Why We Should Hire You? or the always tricky How to Answer What is Your Greatest Strength!

Final Thoughts

Writing a salary negotiation email can be tricky. It is nerve-wracking to ask for more money, especially if it’s your first time doing so in the next career step. However, remember that old saying, if you don’t ask, you don’t get. Keep it straightforward, polite, and believe in yourself.

The very best of luck with the negotiation of your job offer!

2 Non Effective Examples
& 1 Example of an Effective Letter

Probably you’re scratching your head of how to write a price negotiation letter, since you’ve been hit by a price quote from your supplier that is higher than your budget.

In this article you will find 2 actual examples of how NOT to write a negotiation letter, followed by an example of how the letter should be written. Finally we dissect the letter to 6 steps that you can use in the future for all your price negotiations.

Are you in rush? Then download the free Out-Negotiating Suppliers Free Report/White Paper here which includes the example shown in this article plus shows effective strategies that you can use to negotiate with suppliers & get a better price without being a pain in their back!

Example 1: How NOT to Write a Price Negotiation Letter

Here’s an actual email (for all purpose an email is a letter nowadays), which we received from one of our clients, asking for a better price than we quoted. (Of course names have been changed to protect the confidentiality)

Thank you for your proposal. Our company reviews your bid and found high. Therefore, you are requested to submit a revised bid.

We also have reviewed your comments and result with the followings:

The payment will be in accordance with the Contract Terms & Conditions as stated in Paragraph 2 of Schedule B.

Moreover, please be advised if you have any inquiry or question, send it by e-mail no later than October 21.

Regards,
James Belushi

As you may imagine the reply to this price negotiation letter (email) was something along the line that the price quoted was the best price. After that a second price negotiation letter (email) followed, as below:

Example 2: How NOT to Write a Price Negotiation Letter

Please be advised that our offer is $175,500 (your bid – 10%).

Kindly be advised that we need your reply by Monday October 25.

Morgan Freeman
Contract Specialist
Contracts Unit

Again this email received a similar reply to the previous one, with the end result that the supplier got the contract at the quoted price.

Example 3: of How to Write an Effective Price Negotiation Letter

Let’s write now a price negotiation letter that is more effective for price negotiations.

Thank you for your proposal. We sincerely appreciate the effort that you have put in submitting such a comprehensive proposal for our company.

We do understand that you would have spend considerable time and resources to come up with this proposal which outlines in details how you are going to provide what we need.

I and my team reviewed the whole proposal in detail, and overall we are happy with it. At the same time there’s one fundamental issue which will probably stop us from giving this contract to you.

Our Vice President has given us a specific budget for this contract. He also has instructed our contracts team to get another 3 quotes from other suppliers, with a view to have a competitive pricing quoted.

On my side I managed to convince him that we should hold on from getting quotes from other suppliers, since in the past you have done a very good job. I promised him that we are going to get this contract within the budget that he gave. He agreed to this, but if we cannot get your proposed price within our budget, then we would have to open this to another 3 suppliers.

Again I personally would love to have you as our supplier. But to do this we would need your price to better than what you have quoted in your initial proposal. Your price should be 9% lower at a final price of USD 177,500.

If you cannot offer this price, I’m afraid that we would have to look at getting other suppliers for this job.

Again I hope and trust to get your acceptance of this offer from our side. I trust you understand that in the past we have been loyal clients to you and I am sure that in the future your flexibility in your offer should result in future work for you and your organization.

Looking forward to hearing from you by 27 October.

Morgan Freeman
Contract Specialist
Contracts Unit

6 Steps to Follow When Writing a Price Negotiation Letter

Let’s quickly dissect the letter written above, so that you have a template for writing future letters.

  1. Have a positive, polite & professional tone throughout the letter. The whole letter is positive and professional. If the vendor cannot accommodate the discount asked by the client, then the client nicely outlines the possible course of action he needs to take.
  2. Praise the Vendor The first 3 paragraphs of this letter do exactly that, by praising the vendor for the comprehensive proposal.
  3. Explain your Position This is highlighted in the second part of the letter above where we outline the Vice President’s budget cap, how the Contracts Specialist would like to work with the supplier etc. Here usually some suppliers would make up many stories. However it’s best to simply tell the truth and leave the ‘tales’ out of such letters.
  4. Ask for an Odd Number Discount When you ask for a discount always go on the odd numbers, 3, 6, 7, 9 % and so on. Never ask for 5/10/15 % and so on. When you ask for an odd number it shows that you have carefully evaluated the proposal of the supplier and considered your budget. If your industry operates on low margins it would be fine to go on 2.5%, 3.5% and so on.
  5. Let the supplier Know what would happen if he will not negotiate on price. In our case we mentioned that we would have to open this to another 3 suppliers.
  6. State past business given to the supplier & possible future business. Be careful that when you indicate the prospect for future business you are non-committal as you do not know whether you will be able to give future business or not. Whenever in doubt, simply refer to past business as a possible trend for future business.

Negotiating the salary in an offer letter can be a tenuous process for both parties. Here’s a salary negotiation counter offer letter sample.

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How to write a salary negotiation letter

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Salary negotiations tend to be the most intimidating part of the hiring process– sometimes for both parties. There are many things to take into account when talking to candidates regarding compensation.

It is imperative that you perform all negotiations prior to a formal offer letter being accepted. In addition to ensuring that both the candidate and your company are pleased with the outcome, there are also legal implications and general guidelines to take into account.

Here are some do’s and don’ts, as well as a salary negotiation counter offer letter sample.

Be honest and clear about what salary you are able to offer.

Try to offer compensation in other ways if you are unable to fulfill the salary requested. These things can include offering health benefits, proposing a reward program involving salary increases upon reaching preset milestones or offer a more flexible work schedule and remote opportunities.

If you made a mistake in your initial offer letter, be sure to immediately clarify, and be transparent about the fact that you made a mistake. You don’t want the candidate to think you maliciously changed the numbers on the offer.

Don’ts

Don’t change or rescind an offer after it has been accepted without first seeking legal counsel.

Don’t make promises you cannot fulfill. This is likely to cost you a valuable employee when their expectations are not met.

Don’t ask candidates what their salaries were at their last jobs. Many states have made discussions of past salary illegal. Past salary discussion bans are currently in place in the following states. (If you reside in one of these states, check with your local government, as some states have only included certain counties.)

While sometimes it’s necessary to change your initial salary offer in order to obtain top talent, other times it simply won’t be possible to accommodate their counter offers.

At times it is necessary to be firm with your offer. When a prospective employee pushes the envelope farther than you feel is appropriate, don’t be afraid to set clear boundaries. Be sure to do so before any offer has been accepted.

Now that you have the basics, here is a salary negotiation counter offer letter sample.

I am pleased to accept your counter offer with the following modifications.

You have requested an annual salary of $105,000. Though I feel you are an exceptional candidate for the position of Account Manager, I must adhere to the average salary in the market today. In fact, I am willing to offer a salary at the high end of the spectrum of $90,000.

Please take into consideration my offer and respond at your earliest convenience. I hope to bring you on the team, as I feel you are an exceptional fit.

Finding a good candidate is more than just finding a qualified person for the job. Often times locating a prospective employee who has realistic expectations, and who will also find satisfaction in the position is equally as important as their resume. Taking the time to properly navigate through salary negotiations and position expectations is imperative for a positive outcome.

PON – Program on Negotiation at Harvard Law School – https://www.pon.harvard.edu

Team-Building Strategies: Building a Winning Team for Your Organization

Discover how to build a winning team and boost your business negotiation results in this free special report, Team Building Strategies for Your Organization, from Harvard Law School.

Bargaining skills in wage and salary negotiation

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How to write a salary negotiation letter

For a new employee, salary negotiation can be intimidating, but it’s one of the most important difficult conversations to have at the beginning of your career. For a new employee, successfully negotiating a salary offer up by $5,000 could make a huge difference over the course of her career. A 25-year-old employee who enters the job market at $55,000 will earn about $634,000 more over the course of a 40-year career (assuming annual 5% raises) than an employee who starts out at $50,000. But not everyone negotiates for a higher pay when offered a job, and some who do are dissatisfied with the final outcome.

How to write a salary negotiation letter

Claim your FREE copy: Salary Negotiations

In a 2009 negotiation research study, researchers Michelle Marks of George Mason University and Crystal Harold of Temple University surveyed 149 professional employees who had been hired in the previous three years – specifically, tenure-track faculty at a university and part-time MBA students – about their wage negotiations for their current position.

The participants were questioned about their attitudes toward negotiation and risk, their negotiation strategies and outcomes, and their level of satisfaction with the wage negotiation process. In addition, their degree of of power in negotiation was measured based on their work experience, other job offers, and knowledge of the organization’s past salary offers.

Salary Negotiation Skills: Five Negotiation Strategies for Employees Negotiating Wages

The researchers identified five types of negotiating strategies:

Salary Negotiation Tip #1. Collaborating (engaging in problem solving to reach the best possible outcome for both sides);

Salary Negotiation Tip #2. Competing (trying to maximize one’s own outcomes with little concern for others);

Salary Negotiation Tip #3. Accommodating (putting the other party’s concerns first);

Salary Negotiation Tip #4. Compromising (trying to reach middle ground); and

Salary Negotiation Tip #5. Avoiding (dodging negotiation altogether).

Independent of the power the applicants had at the table, choice of negotiation strategy turned out to be a critical factor in determining the size of the salary increase that the participants negotiated.

Different Negotiation Styles: Collaboration versus Competition

In the study, those who chose to negotiate salary, rather than avoiding negotiation and accepting the offer on the table, increased their starting pay by an average of $5,000 primarily by using competing and collaborating bargaining strategies. Those who behaved competitively at the negotiation table did better than those who focused on collaboration, but collaborators were more satisfied than competitive bargainers with the negotiation process.

Different Negotiation Strategies: Risk-Averse and Risk-Taking Strategies at the Bargaining Table

By contrast, compromising and accommodating strategies were not linked to salary gains. Participants who were risk averse were less likely to negotiate a salary, and when they did, they had an accommodating style that left them feeling dissatisfied with their results.

Female participants in Marks’ and Harold’s study were no less likely than male participants to negotiate their salaries; however, the men negotiated higher salaries than the women did. Interestingly, among participants who faced a competitive opponent, women responded more competitively than did men, suggesting that women may be more likely to adapt to their counterparts’ negotiating style when putting their salary negotiation skills to practice.

Based on their results, the negotiation researchers conclude that it pays to negotiate assertively for a salary increase upon being offered a job. They also encourage employers to recognize that giving employees wiggle room to bargain up their starting pay could help create a more satisfied, productive workforce. We add the caveat that if you don’t have a competing job offer, you should negotiate with caution, since there’s always a chance bargaining may cause the employer to revoke the offer that’s on the table.

Great Negotiators Earn More Money

The context of salary negotiations is one area where negotiators tend to assume that any gains made come at the expense of the other party, and vice versa. Yet when we start looking at “salary negotiations” as “job negotiations,” we realize this doesn’t have to be the case.

Think of the myriad issues available to add to the discussion when you are engaging in a job negotiation. When negotiating salary, what tradeoffs could you make to get a higher offer? Maybe you could offer to take on added responsibilities, make tradeoffs on benefits, or look for other ways to add value to the employer. The employer should be happy to accept a tradeoff that leads to no net financial loss to the organization.

In salary negotiations, the best negotiators share information and ask questions. The more information you can provide about what you value (without revealing your bottom line), the better equipped you and the other party will be to identify new issues to discuss. And the more questions you ask, the more you will learn about what the other party values. This type of information exchange will put you in a good position to claim as much money and other value as possible for yourself.

Have any of these tips helped you with salary negotiation? Let us know in the comments.

How to write a salary negotiation letter

It’s not surprising that many people aren’t comfortable asking for more money once their job search has ended and they have an offer in front of them. If the salary is reasonable, they don’t want to jeopardize the opportunity now that they’ve gotten this far.

But as the 2022 Salary Guide From Robert Half points out, hiring has reached or even exceeded pre-pandemic levels in many markets. On top of that, there’s a shortage of skilled professionals, which is increasing competition for top talent and driving up salaries.

If you have specialized skills and an impressive resume, you could be leaving money on the table if you don’t negotiate a salary offer.

Most hiring managers will give you the opportunity to do some thinking about the offer and won’t expect an immediate answer. So, do it! Here are eight tips for how to negotiate a salary that can help you tactfully and confidently ask for what you want.

1. Become familiar with industry salary trends

You need to enter a salary negotiation as informed as possible. Information is your strongest ally. To get a current, realistic view of the compensation landscape in your field, consult the Robert Half Salary Guide. You’ll find the going rate for your position and experience level, and can adjust national figures for your geographic area.

Pay particular attention to the “hottest jobs” and “most in-demand skills” sections of the Salary Guide. You can respond more confidently if you find you’re in the running for one of those hot jobs. The employer may be having a tough time finding someone with enough skills and experience, and that opens the door to negotiate higher pay.

2. Build your case

Once you receive the salary offer, don’t just counter with a higher number. Even if your research supports it, you’ll be more successful if you explain why you feel you deserve more. Highlight your strengths, detailing all the extras the firm would get from someone with your track record.

Before negotiating, jot down concrete examples of how your skills and experience will benefit your new company’s bottom line. Possessing certifications or specialized technical skills, for example, can enhance your ability to do the job, so don’t fail to mention them. By tying your strengths to the role you’ll be taking on, you’ll make a solid case for why you should be paid more than the initial offer.

3. Tell the truth

Complete honesty is paramount when negotiating salary. There’s no better way to see your offer withdrawn than having a hiring manager find out you invented a competing job offer or inflated your salaries from past jobs.

4. Factor in perks and benefits

Salary negotiations often include some give-and-take on employee perks and benefits. It may be less costly than a bump in salary for the employer to give ground on extra vacation days, flexible hours or, especially today, a work-from-home schedule.

Consider what’s valuable to you and what would make an offer more attractive. If you’re considering multiple offers, remember to directly compare health insurance coverage, retirement savings plans and other benefits to make an informed decision. Also factor in perks such as professional development opportunities with the potential employer.

5. Practice your delivery

This may sound like overkill to some people, but it’s a good idea to ask a friend or mentor to practice with you the conversation you’re likely to have with the hiring manager. The ideal partner is someone from the corporate world — a business-savvy person who can coach you on projecting confidence and answering unexpected questions. Running through your delivery several times can make you feel more sure of yourself heading into the salary discussion.

6. Know when to wrap it up

A reasonable employer won’t withdraw an offer just because you tried to negotiate. But dragging out the salary negotiation can frustrate the hiring manager and start out your relationship on a sour note. If the company can’t meet your requirements after a few discussions, respectfully withdraw and focus on opportunities that better match your compensation expectations.

7. Get everything in writing

Once you and the hiring manager settle on a compensation package, ask for written documentation. Besides the salary amount, it should include any special arrangements, such as a signing bonus or allowance for moving expenses, and a job description and a list of responsibilities for your new role. Ensure the document is signed by both you and the employer. Some companies may provide this automatically as part of an employment contract, but if not, request some type of informal documentation.

8. Stay positive

Remember that most managers don’t love negotiating, either. Your future employer is not your adversary. Keeping your tone positive while negotiating salary and perks will help you more effectively navigate these discussions.

If you’d like to get a better starting salary offer, you have to ask for it. Job seekers too often accept the first number that’s put on the table. But whether the economy is strong or uncertain, employers are eager to bring on team members with specialized skills and expertise that can help them the most. Homework, tact and confidence are the keys to your success.