How to apply eye drops in a parrot’s eye

Eye drops can help with allergies, dry eyes, and infections. However, it’s important to use them correctly, which is easier said than done.

“Putting in eye drops is not an easy feat,” because of the eyes’ natural reflex to close and prevent foreign objects from getting in them, says Benjamin Bert, MD, an ophthalmologist at MemorialCare Orange Coast Medical Center in Fountain Valley, California.

Here are the steps you can take to choosing the right type of eye drops for your condition and using them correctly for maximum effect.

Types of eye drops

There are three common types of eye drops:

  • Artificial tears: Artificial tears are the most common type of eye drop. They are designed to lubricate the eye. Different brands have different active ingredients, but in general artificial tears are safe and available over-the-counter, Bert says. Some are formulated specifically for use with contacts, and are labelled as such with the word “contacts” prominently displayed on the front of the bottle.
  • Red eye drops: Some of these eye drops, like Visine, use the drug tetrahydrozoline to reduce the size of the blood vessels in the eye to reduce redness. While they’re safe for occasional use, using them for more then 2-4 days in a row can actually lead to increased redness in the eye, Bert says.
  • Antibiotic and antibacterial eye drops: These prescription eye drops are used to treat infections like conjunctivitis. They usually require a prescription.

How to use eye drops correctly

Don’t feel embarrassed if you have difficulty using eye drops, says Bert. After all, it’s our natural tendency to want to keep stuff out of our eyes, not deliberately put something in.

But if you follow these steps, it should make the process of using eye drops a bit easier:

Prepare the eye drops

Before you get started, Bert recommends doing the following:

  1. Read the instruction on your eye drops.
  2. Lay out a clean work surface, like a fresh towel, where you can minimize dirt or other debris getting on your hands or the eye drop container.
  3. Wash your hands with soap and water to avoid introducing any irritants to your eye.
  4. Set your expectations: Only a fraction of what you drop into the eye will stay there and that’s ok — the drops are formulated with that in mind.
  5. Remove contact lenses. Unless you’re using lubricating drops designed for use with contact lenses, it is usually a good idea to remove your contact lenses before using eye drops and use glasses instead while your eyes are irritated. If you will be reinserting your contact lenses, wait at least 10 minutes after putting the drop in.
  6. Remove the cap to the eye drops.

Put the eye drops in

When you apply the drops, aim to keep the tip of the eye drop container one inch away from your eye, Bert says. With that in mind:

  1. Hold the eye drops with your dominant hand.
  2. Lean your head back slightly at roughly a 45-degree angle.
  3. Using your non-dominant hand, gently pull down the lower lid of your eye.
  4. Look up toward the ceiling.
  5. With the tip of the dropper directly over your eye, squeeze one drop; some may find it easier to have the drop fall into the “pocket” between the eye and the lower eyelid, which is created when the lower eyelid is pulled down.
  6. Blink out the excess solution.

It’s normal for extra solution to come out of your eye. When the drop hits your eye and you blink, the solution is spread over your entire eye. Only a small amount needs to remain there to be effective, Bert says. Because of that, there’s no need to keep your eye closed.

If you missed your eye entirely, it’s always ok to apply a second drop, Bert says. Just wipe the spilled drop away with a damp washcloth.

Another way to put in eye drops

Since your eye is biologically designed to blink in order to keep any foreign objects out, applying eye drops in the manner outlined above can be difficult. Dropping directly into the eye can also put you on edge.

“Sometimes, it’s that sensation of the drop hitting the surface of the eye that produces anxiety,” Bert says.

If this sounds like you, then there is an alternative way to apply eye drops that may seem less invasive:

  1. Wash your face to remove any dirt.
  2. Lean your head back toward the ceiling.
  3. Apply the drops to the corner of your eye, where the eye meets the nose. It’s ok for the drops to touch the skin — in fact, they probably will.
  4. Blink. As you blink, the drops will roll into your eye.
  5. Gently wipe away any excess drops on your skin.

The bottom line

Using eye drops can be frustrating, but remember:

  • Only a fraction of the drop needs to remain in your eye.
  • Trying different approaches is ok.
  • It is natural for your eye to try to keep the drops out — it’s a way of protecting the eye.
  • Don’t use someone else’s eye drops, as they may have been contaminated; don’t offer your eye drops for someone else to use.
  • Avoid transmitting an eye infection from one eye to the other with your own hands or a contaminated eye dropper.
  • Don’t use expired eye drops.
  • If the eye drop causes irritation or other discomfort, do not continue to use it without your eye doctor’s guidance.
  • If the eye drop does not relieve the symptom for which you are seeking relief, see your eye doctor.

If you still struggle to get your eye drops in, ask a trusted friend or family member to help, or see if your eye doctor has any tips.

Thanks for emailing that article!

How to apply eye drops in a parrot's eye

I offer this piece of advice to my patients. It is helpful to acknowledge that some patients have a strong reflex that makes them blink at even the thought of the drop hitting their eye.

I suggest lying down flat, face up. Close your eye. Place the drop outside of the lid in the corner of the eye near the nose. As you open your eye, the drop will roll in. Then close the eye again. Don’t blink. Keep the eye closed for a few minutes.

Can eye drops really cause significant side effects?

The tears of the eye drain through a small canal into the nose. The inside of the nose is lined with nasal mucosa, which is vascular – it has many blood vessels.

When you put drops in your eye, the drops can become “pumped” into the tear system if you blink. Once in contact with the vascular nasal mucosa, relatively rapid absorption of drugs into the bloodstream can occur. The drops can act as a systemic “bolus” – an infusion of the drug into the bloodstream.

To minimize systemic effects and maximize local absorption into the eye, simply keep the eyelid gently closed for a few minutes after putting drops in.

So then, if your eye is closed, how do you know the time is up? You can use a cooking timer. Or, consider that most popular songs are 2-3 minutes long. Have the radio on when you put in your drops. After two songs, you can open your eye.

Many patients have found this a good alternative to punctual occlusion.

Article by Andrew G. Iwach, MD, Associate Clinical Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of San Francisco and a faculty instructor at the California Pacific Medical Center Department of Ophthalmology.

How to apply eye drops in a parrot's eye

Avian Eye Disorders

Birds can suffer from many different eye disorders. They can be due to an eye injury, or possibly an infection to the area. Occasionally, eye disorders are symptoms of another underlying medical problem. Therefore, if your bird has an eye problem, it should be considered serious and you should consult a veterinarian to rule out any major internal disease.

Symptom and Types

Conjunctivitis, a common eye disorder, is usually caused by bacteria and can be identified as red and swollen eyelids, and may lead to photosensitivity (avoidance of light) in the bird. Conjunctivitis is also a symptom of many other medical problems, including respiratory infections.

Uveitis causes an inflammation of the inner parts of the eye. However, it is commonly associated with symptoms of other internal diseases in the bird. This particular disorder needs to be treated quickly to avoid cataracts from forming.

Cataracts develop in the bird’s eye when there is a deficiency in vitamin E, an infection with encephalomyelitis, or even from continuous exposure to some artificial lights.

Marek’s disease is a particular type of eye disorder that is caused by a viral infection. This medical condition can lead to irregularly shaped pupils, iris problems blindness, and can progress into cancer. Vaccination can prevent this eye disorder from occurring. However, a bird that is already infected with the virus, cannot be cured.

Avian Pox is another eye disorder which is found in birds, and is due to a viral infection. Though it is a generalized disease, the eye symptoms include swelling of the eyelids with blister-like formations, and partial or total loss of vision. However, the eyeball is not affected by the infection and the vision usually returns after the infection is treated.

Causes

Many eye disorders are caused by bacterial infections (i.e., salmonella). This particular bacteria causes both conjunctivitis and ophthalmitis — inflammation with pus in the eyeball and conjunctiva — and possible blindness. In addition, salmonella is contagious and often spread from parent to your bird, or genetically through the egg yolk.

Fungal infections of the eye can also lead to bird eye disorders, usually because of moldy feed. One common fungi, Aspergillus, infects the bird’s respiratory system, but can also affect brain and eyes. The infected eye will show yellow plaques under the eyelid. The eye will also have inflammation, and if left untreated, this infection can result in severe eye damage.

Vitamin deficiency is another cause of eye disorders in birds. For instance, a deficiency in vitamin E in the parent can lead to the birth of a blind chick. And vitamin A is required for proper pigmentation and tearing of the eyes. To prevent such deficiencies, give your bird commercial feed.

Treatment

If your bird show signs of discomfort or symptoms of any eye disorder — such as the eyes close, swell, become red, discharge a substance, or blink more than usual — be sure to get the bird checked by the veterinarian for immediate treatment. Antibiotic eye drops or other medicines can help in dealing with the eye disorder at an early stage.

Prevention

Prevention of certain types of eye disorders are dependent on the symptoms found in the bird. But, timely medical intervention can save the bird from suffering, as well as any serious eye damage.

By Amy Hellem; reviewed by Gary Heiting, OD

Eye drops are used to treat a wide variety of conditions — including glaucoma, eye infections, allergies and dry eyes.

In some cases, applying eye drops (or “eyedrops”) properly is essential to preserving your vision and protecting your eyes.

Whether you need one drop per day or 10, there’s a right way and a wrong way to put eye drops in your eyes.

Your eye doctor or pharmacist may give you instructions that are specific to the prescription eye drops you need. But in most cases, the proper technique for applying eye drops is the same, whether you are using prescription or over-the-counter formulas that you can purchase without a prescription.

Failing to learn how to correctly put drops in your eyes not only can defeat the purpose of having them, it also can get expensive. Each time you miss your eye and have to use more drops than you should, it costs you money — potentially a lot of money in the case of some prescription eye drops.

Putting in eye drops: Step-by-step

Wash your hands with soap and water; then dry them with a clean towel.

If you are wearing contact lenses, remove them. The only exception is if you are using eye drops that are specifically formulated to remoisten your contacts or if your doctor advised you to use the drops in this manner.

Remove the dropper cap and look closely at the tip to make sure it’s not cracked or otherwise damaged. Do not touch the tip.

Either lie down or tilt your head back and look up at the ceiling. Concentrate on a point on the ceiling, keeping your eye wide open.

Place one or two fingers on your face about an inch below your eye; gently pull down to create a pocket between your lower eyelid and your eyeball.

Use your other hand to hold the eye drop bottle, pointing the tip downward. Resting your hand on your forehead may help steady it.

Hold the bottle close to your eye (about an inch away). Be careful not to let the dropper touch your eye or eyelashes, since this can introduce bacteria and other organisms into the eye drops in the bottle

Squeeze lightly to instill one drop inside your lower lid.

Remove your hands from your face, gently close your eyes and tilt your head down for a few seconds. Try not to blink, as this can force some of the drop out of your eye before it has had a chance to be absorbed.

To keep as much of the drop on your eye as possible, press lightly on the inner corner of your eyelid, next to your nose. By pressing at this point, you will enable the eye drop to remain on the surface of your eye longer. (It also will help reduce the funny taste you might get in your mouth after applying certain eye drops.)

Use a clean tissue to absorb and wipe away any drops that spill out of your eye and onto your eyelids and face.

If you are using eye drops on both eyes, repeat this procedure for the second eye.

Replace the cap of the bottle and screw it on securely. Never wipe the dropper tip with anything, as this may contaminate the drops.

Wash your hands to clean away any stray eye drops.

If you need to use more than one eye drop

Sometimes, you may be prescribed more than one type of medicated eye drop.

If you apply the drops too quickly in succession, they may spill out of the eye and not be absorbed properly, reducing the therapeutic effect.

If you need to put a second eye drop in the same eye, wait at least five minutes. This will give time for the first drop to be fully absorbed and create more space for the second drop on the eye.

If you use both a medicated eye drop and a lubricating eye drop on the same eye, many doctors prefer that you start with the prescription eye drop first and apply the artificial tears about 10 minutes later.

Practice with artificial tears

A little practice can help you master the task of putting eye drops in your eyes.

Purchase a package of preservative-free artificial tears to use for practice. (Using a preservative-free formula eliminates the risk of you being allergic to preservatives found in many artificial tears.)

Also, choose a product formulated for mild dry eyes — these drops aren’t as thick as those made for moderate or severe dry eyes, which can temporarily blur your vision.

Ask a friend to coach you while you are practicing. In particular, have them help you position the applicator at the proper distance and location above your eye, so the drops fall directly on the surface of your eye or in the space between your eye and your lower eyelid.

In less time than you might think, you will become a pro at applying eye drops.

Also, it’s a good idea to keep a supply of preservative-free artificial tears on hand. These drops can help relieve discomfort associated with computer eye strain and are soothing at other times when your eyes feel dry or tired.

Learning how to apply eye drops to your dog’s eyes is an important skill to have, especially if they really don’t like you doing it.

Learn some techniques, tips and tricks to help you medicate your dog’s eye without a battle!

How to apply eye drops in a parrot's eye

how to apply dog eye drops

My final question today is from Catalina, who says, “Hi, I have a question. My friend is having a really hard time to apply eye drops to her Pug. Can you run through how to do this so that the Pug doesn’t get too stressed ‘cause she’s already running away and hiding every time as soon as she sees the drops and won’t even accept treats. She has to take them every day for the rest of her life. So, can you help?”

How to give a challenging dog eye drops

Get your vet to demonstrate

Try different eye drops

Get used to handling with positive reinforcement

Explore alternative treatment options

Get your vet to demonstrate

To start with I’m going to suggest you to ask the vet or nursing team to demonstrate how they are applying the drops. It may be that they’ve got some specific tricks that this dog is going to get on well with.

Even just seeing and being shown how to handle the medication and how to hold the eye open and hold the dog’s head can be really helpful. It is tricky and it does take a little bit of practice.

It’s definitely a situation where having a few more hands to help is beneficial because one person can help hold the head still and open the eye while the other person can administer the eye drops. It’s something that you can do by yourself, but like I say, it does take a little bit of practice so ask your vet or nursing team for a demonstration.

Try different eye drops

The next thing to suggest is to see if there are any alternative topical medication options. Either a different drug, a different type of drug, or a different consistency.

You might find that actually having a liquid drop is easier than applying a gel, or vice-versa. Some people prefer gels to liquid drops and your dog might also prefer a change in the product.

Warm the medication

Next up is to warm up the drops in your pocket before applying them.

So very often, certainly with long-term medications, they might need to be kept in the fridge. Applying cold drops to the eye can be quite an uncomfortable or strange sensation. So warming them in your pocket before actually applying them might help make them a little bit more comfortable for your dog’s eye.

Get your dog used to handling

We really need to try and get an association between having treats, and having a good experience, with having the eye drops administered.

Start by giving tiny treats that you know your dog will like. Then move on to giving treats while touching your dog’s cheek or their chin. So not handling their eyes, not trying to administer any medication, but just getting used to being given treats while they’re being handled.

Slowly work your way closer to the eye. Then start supporting the head a little bit more firmly. Start holding the head while you’re giving treats. Again, maybe not handling the eye specifically, but giving treats, holding the head and opening the eye again without administering medication.

Hopefully this won’t take too long, but it might take a couple of weeks before your dog is comfortable with this. You’ll need to be certain that this isn’t going to be a problem which will depend a bit on why the drops are being given in the first place.

Once a dog is happy with this handling, start applying the eye drops, all the while trying to distract them with treats. You can even do one eye at a time, have a half-hour break, and then administer drops in the other eye.

And hopefully if we take this step-wise approach, the dog will get used to having the eye medication, will actually learn to associate it with having treats, and it will no longer be a battle.

How to apply eye drops in a parrot's eye

Alternative treatment options

If we’ve done all those things, so we’ve tried different consistency medication, we’re warming it up, we’re trying to give treats, and you’re still really struggling to give eye medication to your dog then you really need to have an honest chat with your vet.

You need to let them know and then you need to talk about any other alternative treatment options.

I don’t know why this eye needs constant medication and lifelong medication, but you need to ask, are there any alternative treatments that might work? Are there any surgeries even that might be beneficial?

We shouldn’t be ashamed of admitting that your really struggling. Our pets, be they dog or cat, often don’t let us do everything that we would like them to let us do or everything that we really ideally would need to do. But, there are often other ways. There are often other things that we can do to try and treat the same condition.

So be open with your vet. Don’t be ashamed or don’t think that they’ll think less of you, as being a bad owner or anything like that. I can only help my patients and help my clients if I know that they’re struggling. So be open with your vet and have a chat with them.

Together you can come up with a treatment strategy that will suit you and your dog!

The above is a transcript taken from “The Dr Alex Answers Show”.

If you would like me to answer any question you have about your pet’s health, simply fill in this form and I’ll try and get you the information that you need. It’s that simple!

Thanks for emailing that article!

Is there a “best technique” for getting my glaucoma medication eyedrops in my eyes?

There are two issues with getting the eye drop where you want it: inside the eyeball. The first is getting the drop from the container onto the surface of the eye. The second issue is getting the drop from the surface of the eye to the inside of the eye where it will work to lower the eye pressure.

First, you will increase the chances that a single drop hits the eye if you lie down flat with your face up. Only one drop is needed, not two, even if the bottle says, “one drop or two.” Gently pull your lower lid down to increase the amount of eyeball showing, bring the bottle about an inch above the eye surface (hold the bottle as vertical as possible), then gently squeeze the bottle until you see or feel the drop hit. Be careful not to touch the bottle to your eye as this can transfer bacteria to the bottle tip.

Next, to maximize effectiveness and minimize systemic side effects, use the 2-minute eyelid closure technique combined with closure of the tear drainage system:

How to apply eye drops in a parrot's eye

Once the drop is on the eye, do not blink your eye or move it around to spread the drop. Instead, gently close your eyes just once, place the pad of your most sensitive finger at the inside corner of the eyelid by the nose and press gently.

Leave the eyelids closed and the finger pressing gently for 2 full minutes. Studies have shown that it takes 2 full minutes for the drop to completely penetrate the surface of the eye to get inside. Put the cap back on the bottle, with eyes still closed. The closed eyelids and pressure on the tear drainage duct avoids unwanted systemic side effects from the potent eyedrop drugs by preventing the drop from getting inside the nose where it could enter the bloodstream rapidly.

After two minutes, the drop is fully absorbed into the eye. You can now put a different drop in, if you use more than one drop.

Article by Bradley Schuster, MD, a glaucoma specialist at Kaiser Permanente, Denver, CO and Assistant Clinical Professor at the University of Colorado, Health Sciences Center.

  1. White, William L. et al. Effect of Blinking on Tear Elimination as Evaluated by Dacryoscintigraphy. Ophthalmology 1991; 98: 367-369.
  2. Fraunfelder, FT. Extraocular fluid dynamics: how best to apply topical ocular medication. Trans Am Ophthalmol Soc 1976;74:457-87
  3. Zimmerman, Thom J, et al. Improving the therapeutic index of topically applied ocular drugs. Arch Ophthalmol 1984; 102:551-3
  4. Sharir, Mordichai et al. Nasolacrimal Occlusion Improves the Therapeutic Index of Antiglaucoma Medications. J Assoc for Academic Minority Physicians. 1994; 5:62-7.

Thanks for emailing that article!

How to apply eye drops in a parrot's eye

Related Media

Prescription eye drops for glaucoma help maintain the pressure in your eye at a healthy level and are an important part of the treatment routine for many people.

Always check with your doctor if you are having difficulty.

Remember:

  • Follow your doctor’s orders.
  • Be sure your doctor knows about any other drugs you may be taking (including over-the-counter items like vitamins, aspirin, and herbal supplements) and about any allergies you may have.
  • Wash your hands before putting in your eye drops.
  • Be careful not to let the tip of the dropper touch any part of your eye.
  • Make sure the dropper stays clean.
  • If you are putting in more than one drop or more than one type of eye drop, wait five minutes before putting the next drop in. This will keep the first drop from being washed out by the second before it has had time to work.
  • Store eye drops and all medicines out of the reach of children.

How to apply eye drops in a parrot's eye

Steps For Putting In Eye Drops:

  1. Start by tilting your head backward while sitting, standing, or lying down. With your index finger placed on the soft spot just below the lower lid, gently pull down to form a pocket.
  2. Look up. Squeeze one drop into the pocket in your lower lid. Don’t blink, wipe your eye, or touch the tip of the bottle on your eye or face.
  3. Close your eye. Keep closed for three minutes without blinking.

Optional: Gently press on the inside corner of your closed eyes with your index finger and thumb for two to three minutes (to keep the drops from draining into your throat and getting into your system).

Blot around your eyes to remove any excess.

If you are still having trouble putting eye drops in, here are some tips that may help:

If Your Hands Are Shaking:

Try approaching your eye from the side so you can rest your hand on your face to help steady your hand.

If shaky hands are still a problem, you might try using a 1 or 2 pound wrist weight (you can get these at any sporting goods store). The extra weight around the wrist of the hand you’re using can decrease mild shaking.

If You Are Having Trouble Getting The Drop Into Your Eye:

Try This. With your head turned to the side or lying on your side, close your eyes. Place a drop in the inner corner of your eyelid (the side closest to the bridge of your nose). By opening your eyes slowly, the drop should fall right into your eye.

If you are still not sure the drop actually got in your eye, put in another drop. The eyelids can hold only about one drop, so any excess will just run out of the eye. It is better to have excess run out than to not have enough medication in your eye.

Having Trouble Holding Onto The Bottle?

If the eye drop bottle feels too small to hold (in cases where a dropper isn’t used and the drop comes directly from the bottle), try wrapping something (like a paper towel) around the bottle.

You can use anything that will make the bottle wider. This may be helpful in some mild cases of arthritis in the hands.

Assistive devices are available to help you put in your eye drops.

By Amy Hellem; reviewed by Gary Heiting, OD

Eye drops are used to treat a wide variety of conditions — including glaucoma, eye infections, allergies and dry eyes.

In some cases, applying eye drops (or “eyedrops”) properly is essential to preserving your vision and protecting your eyes.

Whether you need one drop per day or 10, there’s a right way and a wrong way to put eye drops in your eyes.

Your optician or pharmacist may give you instructions that are specific to the prescription eye drops you need. But in most cases, the proper technique for applying eye drops is the same, whether you are using prescription or over-the-counter formulas that you can buy without a prescription.

Failing to learn how to correctly put drops in your eyes can not only defeat the purpose of having them, it can also get expensive. Each time you miss your eye and have to use more drops than you should, it costs you money — potentially a lot of money in the case of some prescription eye drops.

Putting in eye drops: Step-by-step

Wash your hands with soap and water; then dry them with a clean towel.

If you are wearing contact lenses, remove them. The only exception is if you are using eye drops that are specifically formulated to remoisten your contacts or if you’re advised to use the drops in this manner.

Remove the dropper cap and look closely at the tip to make sure it’s not cracked or otherwise damaged. Do not touch the tip.

Either lie down or tilt your head back and look up at the ceiling. Concentrate on a point on the ceiling, keeping your eye wide open.

Place one or two fingers on your face about an inch below your eye; gently pull down to create a pocket between your lower eyelid and your eyeball.

Use your other hand to hold the eye drop bottle, pointing the tip downward. Resting your hand on your forehead may help steady it.

Hold the bottle close to your eye (about an inch away). Be careful not to let the dropper touch your eye or eyelashes, since this can introduce bacteria and other organisms into the eye drops in the bottle

Squeeze lightly to instill one drop inside your lower lid.

Remove your hands from your face, gently close your eyes and tilt your head down for a few seconds. Try not to blink, as this can force some of the drop out of your eye before it has had a chance to be absorbed.

To keep as much of the drop on your eye as possible, press lightly on the inner corner of your eyelid, next to your nose. By pressing at this point, you will enable the eye drop to remain on the surface of your eye longer. (It also will help reduce the funny taste you might get in your mouth after applying certain eye drops.)

Use a clean tissue to absorb and wipe away any drops that spill out of your eye and onto your eyelids and face.

If you are using eye drops on both eyes, repeat this procedure for the second eye.

Replace the cap of the bottle and screw it on securely. Never wipe the dropper tip with anything, as this may contaminate the drops.

Wash your hands to clean away any stray eye drops.

If you need to use more than one eye drop

Sometimes, you may be prescribed more than one type of medicated eye drop.

If you apply the drops too quickly in succession, they may spill out of the eye and not be absorbed properly, reducing the therapeutic effect.

If you need to put a second eye drop in the same eye, wait at least five minutes. This will give time for the first drop to be fully absorbed and create more space for the second drop on the eye.

If you use both a medicated eye drop and a lubricating eye drop on the same eye, many doctors (GP) prefer that you start with the prescription eye drop first and apply the artificial tears about 10 minutes later.

Practice with artificial tears

A little practice can help you master the task of putting eye drops in your eyes.

Purchase a package of preservative-free artificial tears to use for practice. (Using a preservative-free formula eliminates the risk of you being allergic to preservatives found in many artificial tears.)

Also, choose a product formulated for mild dry eyes — these drops aren’t as thick as those made for moderate or severe dry eyes, which can temporarily blur your vision.

Ask a friend to coach you while you are practicing. In particular, have them help you position the applicator at the proper distance and location above your eye, so the drops fall directly on the surface of your eye or in the space between your eye and your lower eyelid.

In less time than you might think, you will become a pro at applying eye drops.

Also, it’s a good idea to keep a supply of preservative-free artificial tears on hand. These drops can help relieve discomfort associated with computer eye strain and are soothing at other times when your eyes feel dry or tired.