How to call the czech republic from the united states

Calling Czech Republic from outside the country
– The country code for the Czech Republic is 420.
– To call the Czech Republic from outside the country, dial the international access prefix, then “420,” and then the nine-digit Czech number.

To call our office from the U.S. dial: 011-420-773-103-102
When calling from UK dial: 00-420-773-103-102
When calling from Ireland dial: 00-420-773-103-102
When calling from Australia dial: 0011-420-773-103-102
When calling from Singapore dial: 001-420-773-103-102

Calling Within the Czech Republic

– Now that most people in Prague have mobile phones, working phone booths are harder to find.
– If you can’t find a working booth on the street, the telephone office of the main post office is the best place to try.
– There are no regional or area codes in the Czech Republic.
– Numbers that start with the first three digits running from 601 to 799, however, are mobile phones and the charge may be correspondingly higher.
– When calling a Czech number from within the Czech Republic, do not use the country code or any prefixes; simply dial the nine-digit number.

Calling Outside the Czech Republic

– A call to the United States or Canada, for example, would begin 00-1, followed by the U.S. or Canadian area code and number.
– International Operator (133004)
– International Directory Assistance (1181)

Calling and DATA Cards

There are 3 mobile operators in the Czech Republic – O2, T-Mobile and Vodafone. You can purchase a SIM with calls-only or DATA-only services or a combination of both. All listed operators have their shops in shopping mall Palladium (Náměstí republiky 1, Praha 1) and store staff speak English. They can help you activate the card on the spot if you ask.

– Mobile operators have different offers of Data-only SIM cards (O2 1,5 GB for 299 CZK, T-Mobile 0,5 GB for 200 CZK, Vodafone 1,5 GB for 400 CZK)

The United States established diplomatic relations with the Czech Republic in 1993 after then-Czechoslovakia split into two separate independent republics. Previously, the United States recognized Czechoslovakia in 1918 and maintained an embassy in Prague. The Czech Republic made integration into Western institutions its chief foreign policy objective in the first years after communism. Relations between the United States and the Czech Republic are excellent and reflect our common approach to the many challenges facing the world.

The Czech Republic is a member of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and the European Union (EU) and is an important and reliable ally in promoting U.S. interests. Our countries have worked together to strengthen security, promote economic development and democratic values, and defend basic human rights. We continue to collaborate on energy security. The United States looks to the Czech Republic as a partner in regions around the world, including Afghanistan as part of NATO’s Resolute Support Mission, Iraq as part of Operation Enduring Freedom and the Global Coalition to Defeat ISIS, and Syria where the Czechs serve as U.S. protecting power.

U.S. Assistance to the Czech Republic

U.S. security assistance programs for the Czech Republic seek to strengthen Czech capabilities, enhance interoperability with U.S. and NATO forces, and provide opportunities for professional and technical education of military officers and noncommissioned officers, civilian leaders, and other specialists.

Bilateral Economic Relations

The Czech Republic is a member of the European Union. The U.S. economic relationship with the EU is the largest and most complex in the world, and the United States and the EU continue to pursue initiatives to create new opportunities for transatlantic commerce.

The United States and the Czech Republic have a bilateral investment treaty. Successive Czech governments have welcomed U.S. investment, and the United States has been one of the Czech Republic’s top non-EU investors. Leading sectors for U.S. exports to and investment in the Czech Republic include automotive parts and equipment, energy, franchising, information technology, medical equipment, and scientific equipment. The Czech Republic participates in the Visa Waiver Program, which allows nationals of participating countries to travel to the United States for certain business or tourism purposes for stays of 90 days or less without obtaining a visa.

The Czech Republic’s Membership in International Organizations

The Czech Republic and the United States belong to a number of the same international organizations, including the United Nations, NATO, Euro-Atlantic Partnership Council, Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe, Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, International Monetary Fund, World Bank, and World Trade Organization. The Czech Republic also is an observer to the Organization of American States.

Bilateral Representation

The Czech Republic maintains an embassy in the United States at 3900 Spring of Freedom Street, NW, Washington, DC 20008; tel. (202) 274-9101.

More information about the Czech Republic is available from the Department of State and other sources, some of which are listed here:

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I have lived in Prague for over a month now; Now that I’m settled in and got to know my surroundings better, I have definitely noticed the differences between life in The Czech Republic vs life in The United States.

In the United States, Americans can always be seen running around with coffee in their hand. They also usually rush when they’re eating their meals (I myself, am guilty of this). Here, in the Czech Republic, I haven’t seen any of that. I have noticed that Czechs like to sit down in cafes and enjoy their coffee. They take their time eating at restaurants too.

In the US, I feel like there’s a bit of a stress culture. Everyone is working overtime and feels constantly stressed. They’re running around from place to place. But in the Czech Republic, everyone seems more relaxed and easy going. It’s a very different pace of life. I’ve also noticed that some of the stores that are near my accommodation are closed on the weekend (this isn’t the case near the tourist spots, however).

The public transportation systems in Prague is really efficient. If I miss the tram I can just wait for the next one and it only takes me less than 15 minutes and more than one tram can take me to my destination. If I don’t want to use a tram, I can also use the metro or catch a bus instead. In the United States, we mostly really on driving to get us to where we need to be (which leaves me at a loss because I don’t drive).

Much to my chagrin, water is more expensive than beer in Prague. You get charged at restaurants for water. Back at home, I drink tons of water. I would buy bottled water all the time or drink filtered water. In Prague, I had to learn to get used to bringing my own bottle and filling it up. (I ended up buying 5 liters of water but eventually, I got over it and started drinking tap water.)

Regarding prices, everything in Prague is much cheaper than it is in the US. However, according to one of my professors, it’s cheaper because Czechs tend to make a lot less money than those in the US.

I’ve noticed that when entering a store, it’s polite to greet the shopkeeper. In the US, we usually rush in, get what we need, and leave without saying a word. I myself have had to get used to saying “Dobrý den” when I enter a shop.

The one major difference that I’ve noticed is that even though the Czech Republic has a lot of religious imagery most Czechs aren’t religious. In fact, a majority of Czechs are atheist. This is a huge contrast to the US, where most Americans claim to be Christian.

I will admit that in the beginning, I definitely suffered from culture shock. But I’ve really enjoyed my time here and I look forward to getting to know Czech culture more.

How to call the czech republic from the united states

The exact name of the country commonly known as the Czech Republic has changed a number of times throughout its lifespan. When Czechoslovakia was dissolved in 1993, the term “Czech Republic” (Czech: Česká republika) was chosen to describe the state. In the past, other shorter words such as Čechy had been rejected, as they were not seen as an inclusive term by those residing outside of the area of the country known as Bohemia. The Czech term Česko has been used for quite some time as a short form of saying the Czech Republic. Czechia is simply the English translation of this short form.

Adoption of the Name “Czechia”

Contrary to popular belief, “Czechia” is not in fact a new word. The first use of the Latin form Czechia was in 1841 followed by subsequent uses in 1856 and 1866. The use of Czechia was recommended by an official Czech body in 1993 after the dissolution of Ceskoslovakia. However, the term Czechia has not historically been supportive by authorities. Some criticized the sound of the name while others argued that it was not inclusive to people in Moravia and the Silesia.

There have been strides made in the quest to confirm Czechia as the official short form name. On April 14, 2016, Czechia was adopted as the official short name of the country. It entered into the United Nations UNTERM and UNGEGN databases on July 5, 2016. Maps on Google showing the Czech Republic were replaced with Czechia instead in January 2017. The term Czechia is intended to stand in for the Czech Republic in the same way that “Britain” is to “Great Britain” and “Ireland” is to the “Republic of Ireland”. It is unclear how strongly the name will catch on in the near future.

PLEASE NOTE: United States may span multiple time zones. We are using the America/Denver time zone. For more accuracy, choose specific cities for each location. For example, compare Fargo, ND to Czech Republic with Bethel, AK to Czech Republic.

Current time

United States 8:19 PM on Tuesday, Oct 26, 2021

Czech Republic 4:19 AM on Wednesday, Oct 27, 2021

Map from United States to Czech Republic

More trip calculations

Meeting planner for United States and Czech Republic

Unfortunately, there aren’t any times that overlap between your normal working hours and theirs. The best we can do with the meeting planner is to expand the range to cover from 8:00 AM to 6:00 PM your time (United States).

To schedule a conference call or plan a meeting at the best time for both parties, you should try between 8:00 AM and 10:00 AM your time in United States. That will end up being between 4:00 PM and 6:00 PM in Czech Republic. The chart below shows overlapping times.

Schedule a phone call from United States to Czech Republic

If you live in United States and you want to call a friend in Czech Republic, you can try calling them between 11:00 PM and 3:00 PM your time. This will be between 7AM – 11PM their time, since Czech Republic is 8 hours ahead of United States.

If you’re available any time, but you want to reach someone in Czech Republic at work, you may want to try between 1:00 AM and 9:00 AM your time. This is the best time to reach them from 9AM – 5PM during normal working hours.

UTC-6 hours UTC+2 hours
United States Czech Republic
8:00 AM 4:00 PM
8:30 AM 4:30 PM
9:00 AM 5:00 PM
9:30 AM 5:30 PM
10:00 AM 6:00 PM

United States

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Czech Republic

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Time difference

Travelmath provides an online time zone converter for places all over the world. You can enter airports, cities, states, countries, or zip codes to find the time difference between any two locations. The calculator will automatically adjust for daylight saving time (DST) in the summer. You can use it as a meeting planner or a scheduler to find the best time to make international phone calls. World time zones have a positive or negative offset computed from Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), or Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). UTC has uniform seconds defined by International Atomic Time (TAI), with leap seconds announced at irregular intervals to compensate for the Earth’s slowing rotation. The tz database or zoneinfo database uses the closest city, rather than the more common Eastern, Central, Mountain or Pacific time zones in the United States. Countries often change their daylight saving rules, so please help us stay current by letting us know if you find any pages that need updates.

If you lived in United States instead of Czech Republic, you would:

live 1.0 years longer

In Czech Republic, the average life expectancy is 79 years (76 years for men, 82 years for women) as of 2020. In United States, that number is 80 years (78 years for men, 82 years for women) as of 2020.

be 39.2% more likely to be obese

In Czech Republic, 26.0% of adults are obese as of 2016. In United States, that number is 36.2% of people as of 2016.

make 68.5% more money

Czech Republic has a GDP per capita of $35,500 as of 2017, while in United States, the GDP per capita is $59,800 as of 2017.

be 51.7% more likely to be unemployed

In Czech Republic, 2.9% of adults are unemployed as of 2017. In United States, that number is 4.4% as of 2017.

be 55.7% more likely to be live below the poverty line

In Czech Republic, 9.7% live below the poverty line as of 2015. In United States, however, that number is 15.1% as of 2010.

pay a 80.0% higher top tax rate

Czech Republic has a top tax rate of 22.0% as of 2017. In United States, the top tax rate is 39.6% as of 2016.

have 39.3% more children

In Czech Republic, there are approximately 8.9 babies per 1,000 people as of 2020. In United States, there are 12.4 babies per 1,000 people as of 2020.

be 6.3 times more likely to die during childbirth

In Czech Republic, approximately 3.0 women per 100,000 births die during labor as of 2017. In United States, 19.0 women do as of 2017.

be 2.0 times more likely to die during infancy

In Czech Republic, approximately 2.6 children die before they reach the age of one as of 2020. In United States, on the other hand, 5.3 children do as of 2020.

spend 10.7% less on education

Czech Republic spends 5.6% of its total GDP on education as of 2016. United States spends 5.0% of total GDP on education as of 2014.

United States: At a glance

United States (sometimes abbreviated US or USA) is a sovereign country in North America, with a total land area of approximately 9,147,593 sq km. Britain’s American colonies broke with the mother country in 1776 and were recognized as the new nation of the United States of America following the Treaty of Paris in 1783. During the 19th and 20th centuries, 37 new states were added to the original 13 as the nation expanded across the North American continent and acquired a number of overseas possessions. The two most traumatic experiences in the nation’s history were the Civil War (1861-65), in which a northern Union of states defeated a secessionist Confederacy of 11 southern slave states, and the Great Depression of the 1930s, an economic downturn during which about a quarter of the labor force lost its jobs. Buoyed by victories in World Wars I and II and the end of the Cold War in 1991, the US remains the world’s most powerful nation state. Since the end of World War II, the economy has achieved relatively steady growth, low unemployment and inflation, and rapid advances in technology.

How big is United States compared to Czech Republic? See an in-depth size comparison.

More quality of life comparisons

The statistics on this page were calculated using the following data sources: The World Factbook, Internal Revenue Service, Financial Administration of the Czech Republic.

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Join the Elsewhere community and ask a question about United States. It’s a free, question-and-answer based forum to discuss what life is like in countries and cities around the world.

Please note: The Department of State assumes no responsibility or liability for the professional ability or reputation of, or the quality of services provided by, the entities or individuals whose names appear on the following lists. Inclusion on this list is in no way an endorsement by the Department or the U.S. government. Names are listed alphabetically, and the order in which they appear has no other significance. The information on the list is provided directly by the local service providers; the Department is not in a position to vouch for such information.

While significant differences do exist between American and Czech medical systems, many outdated misconceptions and fears about post-communist medical systems may still linger. A run-down of some of the most important attributes is listed below:

The Czech medical system is no longer entirely socialized. It is partially government-run and partially private, and there are a number of Western trained doctors now operating in Prague. Some of their numbers can be found in the referrals part of this section.

While medical facilities may seem worn and outdated to the average American, the staff does maintain a standard of cleanliness (for example, many require that you wear disposable shoe coverings in the hospitals).

The Czech philosophy of medical care and the doctor-patient relationship tend to be more European in approach. That is, the doctor will be less likely to share information about the patient’s condition with the patient than is generally the case in the U.S. This is a cultural difference and not a deficiency in medical care.

The Czech medical system is very segmented. There is no one central emergency room, and so emergencies are often sent to the facility which treats the specific medical condition (i.e., broken noses are sent to the ear, nose and throat facility rather than one central emergency room). Also, it is not uncommon to find closed doors (where you would knock or ring for service) rather than an open nursing station.

DISCLAIMER: This list of medical providers is provided solely as information for American citizens. It is not meant to be exhaustive or definitive, nor does it represent either a guarantee of competence or endorsement by the Department of State or the American Embassy.

Payments

Foreigners who use Czech medical facilities are expected to pay for their care. The U.S. Embassy in Prague cannot guarantee payment or otherwise take financial responsibility for the medical care of private citizens. MEDICARE does not cover overseas treatment. While credit cards may be accepted at some locations, insurance cards are usually not accepted in lieu of payment.

Generally, patients who have overseas insurance coverage should expect to pay the bill and then seek reimbursement from their insurance company. Contact your health insurance company directly to find out if your policy includes overseas coverage.

If you lived in Czech Republic instead of United States, you would:

be 28.2% less likely to be obese

In United States, 36.2% of adults are obese as of 2016. In Czech Republic, that number is 26.0% of people as of 2016.

live 1.0 years less

In United States, the average life expectancy is 80 years (78 years for men, 82 years for women) as of 2020. In Czech Republic, that number is 79 years (76 years for men, 82 years for women) as of 2020.

be 34.1% less likely to be unemployed

In United States, 4.4% of adults are unemployed as of 2017. In Czech Republic, that number is 2.9% as of 2017.

be 35.8% less likely to be live below the poverty line

In United States, 15.1% live below the poverty line as of 2010. In Czech Republic, however, that number is 9.7% as of 2015.

pay a 44.4% lower top tax rate

United States has a top tax rate of 39.6% as of 2016. In Czech Republic, the top tax rate is 22.0% as of 2017.

make 40.6% less money

United States has a GDP per capita of $59,800 as of 2017, while in Czech Republic, the GDP per capita is $35,500 as of 2017.

be 84.2% less likely to die during childbirth

In United States, approximately 19.0 women per 100,000 births die during labor as of 2017. In Czech Republic, 3.0 women do as of 2017.

be 50.9% less likely to die during infancy

In United States, approximately 5.3 children die before they reach the age of one as of 2020. In Czech Republic, on the other hand, 2.6 children do as of 2020.

have 28.2% fewer children

In United States, there are approximately 12.4 babies per 1,000 people as of 2020. In Czech Republic, there are 8.9 babies per 1,000 people as of 2020.

spend 12.0% more on education

United States spends 5.0% of its total GDP on education as of 2014. Czech Republic spends 5.6% of total GDP on education as of 2016.

Czech Republic: At a glance

Czech Republic is a sovereign country in Europe, with a total land area of approximately 77,247 sq km. At the close of World War I, the Czechs and Slovaks of the former Austro-Hungarian Empire merged to form Czechoslovakia. During the interwar years, having rejected a federal system, the new country’s predominantly Czech leaders were frequently preoccupied with meeting the increasingly strident demands of other ethnic minorities within the republic, most notably the Slovaks, the Sudeten Germans, and the Ruthenians (Ukrainians). On the eve of World War II, Nazi Germany occupied the territory that today comprises the Czech Republic and Slovakia became an independent state allied with Germany. After the war, a reunited but truncated Czechoslovakia (less Ruthenia) fell within the Soviet sphere of influence. In 1968, an invasion by Warsaw Pact troops ended the efforts of the country’s leaders to liberalize communist rule and create “socialism with a human face,” ushering in a period of repression known as “normalization.” The peaceful “Velvet Revolution” swept the Communist Party from power at the end of 1989 and inaugurated a return to democratic rule and a market economy. On 1 January 1993, the country underwent a nonviolent “velvet divorce” into its two national components, the Czech Republic and Slovakia. The Czech Republic joined NATO in 1999 and the European Union in 2004.

How big is Czech Republic compared to United States? See an in-depth size comparison.

More quality of life comparisons

The statistics on this page were calculated using the following data sources: The World Factbook, Internal Revenue Service, Financial Administration of the Czech Republic.

question_answer HAVE A QUESTION? ASK THE COMMUNITY

Join the Elsewhere community and ask a question about Czech Republic. It’s a free, question-and-answer based forum to discuss what life is like in countries and cities around the world.