How to customize the windows 10 start menu

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

Are you bored of seeing an old Start Menu again and again? Then it’s time to bring some changes at least to Start Menu as of now. So, in this guide, you will learn 2 different ways to get or install new Windows 10 Start Menu.

Meanwhile, The new Windows 10 Start menu has been redesigned and is full of the fluent design language of Microsoft, but it does take some time to actually get new tiles and tricks. The improved Start menu is reportedly part of some A / B testing introduced in Windows 10 Build 20161 and does not all Windows Insiders get it.

The company explains the transition as’ a more elegant design that eliminates the solid color backplates behind the logos in the app list and adds the tiles with a white, partially transparent backdrop. This style provides a stunning stage for your devices, especially the Office and Microsoft Edge Fluent Style icons, as well as the revamped icons for built-in apps like Calculator, Mail, and Calendar that Microsoft began rolling out earlier this year.

However, The new Start Menu is available in the Dev channel for those using Windows 10 build 20161. However, unfortunately, not all users who have built 20161 can view the new start menu, as Microsoft uses the A / B test method.

Method 1. Install New Start Menu From Insider Program

Since the new Start menu is still being tested, it is only available in the Dev channel for people running Windows 10 build 20161. But it is not necessary to install the right operating system. Microsoft conducts A / B checks, and the redesigned start menu is available to only a subset of insiders.

Step 1. Press Windows + I to open Windows Settings and click Update & Security.

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

Step 2. Click the Windows Insider Program on the left-hand side pane.

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

Windows Insider Program

Step 3. Click Get started and then click Link an account.

Step 4. Select your account type and click Continue.

Step 5. Select Dev Channel, click Confirm and click Confirm again on the next page.

Step 6. Click Restart Now.

Step 7. Once your PC restart, go to Settings > Update & Security > Windows Update.

Step 8. Click Resume updates or Check for updates.

Step 9. Now you have to wait for a while. Because it will take some time to download and install Windows 10 Insider Preview 20161.1000 (rs_prerelease)

Step 10. When downloaded and installed, now simply click Restart now.

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

The new Windows Start menu should be available now. Open the Start menu and check for Windows programs including Office tiles to validate this. When these systems have strong colors in comparison to the Start menu, you have a new Start menu.

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

Windows 10 Start Menu

Method 2. Get New Start Menu on Windows 10 Using ViveTool

In the second method, you need to use a third-party tool called “ViVeTool“. ViVeTool is an open-source tool created by two well-known Windows enthusiasts, Rafael Rivera and Albacore. ViVeTool can enable hidden features in Windows, which exist in the OS by hidden by Microsoft and/or under the A/B testing.

Step 1. Download ViveTool and extract it on the desktop with folder name ViveTool.

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

Step 2. Open Command Prompt as an administrator and if you’re prompted click Yes.

Step 3. Now, head to c:\Users\rezaf\Desktop\ViveTool using cmd.

Step 4. Type in the following command:
ViVeTool.exe addconfig 23615618 2

Step 5. Press enter and restart your computer. when Windows loads you should be able to see the new Start menu.

Wrapping Up

That’s it. This is how you can get or install a new Windows Start menu on Windows 10 PC. First check the Windows Insiders Program, link your account and if you’re eligible then you can install a new start menu from here. Meanwhile, if you can’t find the new Start menu then use ViVeTool.

Jul 24, 2020
Comment

The Start menu on Windows 10 goes through small changes every now and then. Its design, after the terrible run it had with Windows 8/8.1, has now settled on something that most users like. It has two different versions; the traditional Start menu, and the Start screen. Between these two versions, most Windows 10 users can find something they like. They said, many still look to change the Windows 10 Start menu to their liking.

Change Windows 10 Start menu

There are lots of different ways you can change the Windows 10 Start Menu;

  • Switch to Start Screen.
  • Remove the Apps list and keep the tiles.
  • Remove all tiles, and keep the app’s list.
  • Change the color and layout of the Start menu.
  • Change the entire Start menu theme

1. Switch to Start Screen

The Start Screen is meant to be used on tablets and it’s what’s left of the Start menu that was introduced in Windows 8/8.1. Desktop users can enable it if they want.

  1. Open the Settings app.
  2. Go to the Personalization group of settings.
  3. Select the Start tab.
  4. Turn on the ‘Use Start full screen’ switch.
  5. Tap the Start button on the keyboard, or click it on the taskbar to open the Start Screen.
  6. Tap the button again to close the Start screen.

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

2. Remove the apps’ list and keep tiles

The apps’ list can be removed from the Start Menu. It will remain accessible via a tab but it won’t make the Start menu any wider than it has to be. The tiles you can keep.

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

  1. Open the Settings app.
  2. Go to the Personalization group of settings.
  3. Select the Start tab.
  4. Turn the ‘Show app list in the Start menu’ switch off.
  5. Open the Start Menu and click and drag the right edge to reduce its width.

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

3. Remove all tiles, and keep the app’s list

If you don’t like tiles and prefer to use the apps’ list and its speed dial to find and open apps, you can set the Start menu up without tiles.

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

  1. Open the Settings app.
  2. Go to Personalization>Start.
  3. Turn the ‘Show app list in the Start menu’ switch on.
  4. Open the Start menu, and right-click a group of tiles.
  5. Select ‘Unpin group from Start’.
  6. Repeat for all tiles/tile groups

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

4. Change the color and layout of the Start menu

The color of the Start menu can be set to almost anything but the color you set for it will also be set for taskbar and the Action center. As for the layout, you can select different tile sizes, and arrange them any way you want.

  1. Open the Settings app.
  2. Go to Personalization>Colors.
  3. Enable the ‘Start, taskbar, and action center’ option under Show accent color on the following surfaces.
  4. Scroll back up, and select a color from the swatches, or click ‘Custom color’ and pick the one you want to use.
  5. To change the tile size, right-click a pinned tile and go to Resize. Select one of the listed tasks.
  6. You can drag and drop the tiles anywhere you want to move and change their layout.

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

5. Change the entire Start menu theme

The previous customizations we’ve covered have been tame and used built-in features that Windows 10 has. If you’d like to change the look of the Start menu completely, say make it resemble the Start menu that Windows 7 had or that Windows XP had, there are apps that you can install.

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

  1. Download OpenShell. It is the ported version of ClassicShell that is under active development. Install the app.
  2. Go to the app’s settings and select the Start Menu Style tab.
  3. Select the style you want to use.
  4. Go to the Skin tab. Select a skin or look online for skins to modify the Start Menu.

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

Conclusion

The Start menu can be customized in lots of different ways. If you stick to just tiles, you can create groups and arrange them so that they’re easy to use. If you’re looking for more drastic UI changes, you can look for skins that go with the Open Shell Menu app.

Applies to

In Windows 10 Pro, WindowsВ 10 Enterprise, and WindowsВ 10 Education, version 1703, you can use a provisioning package that you create with Windows Configuration Designer to deploy a customized Start and taskbar layout to users. No reimaging is required, and the Start and taskbar layout can be updated simply by overwriting the .xml file that contains the layout. The provisioning package can be applied to a running device. This enables you to customize Start and taskbar layouts for different departments or organizations, with minimal management overhead.

If you use a provisioning package to configure the taskbar, your configuration will be reapplied each time the explorer.exe process restarts. If your configuration pins an app and the user unpins that app, the user’s change will be overwritten the next time the configuration is applied. To apply a taskbar configuration and allow users to make changes that will persist, apply your configuration by using Group Policy.

Before you begin: Customize and export Start layout for desktop editions.

How Start layout control works

Three features enable Start and taskbar layout control:

The Export-StartLayout cmdlet in Windows PowerShell exports a description of the current Start layout in .xml file format.

To import the layout of Start to a mounted Windows image, use the Import-StartLayout cmdlet.

You can modify the Start .xml file to include or create an .xml file just for the taskbar configuration.

In Windows Configuration Designer, you use the Policies/Start/StartLayout setting to provide the contents of the .xml file that defines the Start and taskbar layout.

Prepare the Start layout XML file

The Export-StartLayout cmdlet produces an XML file. Because Windows Configuration Designer produces a customizations.xml file that contains the configuration settings, adding the Start layout section to the customizations.xml file directly would result in an XML file embedded in an XML file. Before you add the Start layout section to the customizations.xml file, you must replace the markup characters in your layout.xml with escape characters.

Copy the contents of layout.xml into an online tool that escapes characters.

During the procedure to create a provisioning package, you will copy the text with the escape characters and paste it in the customizations.xml file for your project.

Create a provisioning package that contains a customized Start layout

Use the Windows Configuration Designer tool to create a provisioning package. Learn how to install Windows Configuration Designer.

When you build a provisioning package, you may include sensitive information in the project files and in the provisioning package (.ppkg) file. Although you have the option to encrypt the .ppkg file, project files are not encrypted. You should store the project files in a secure location and delete the project files when they are no longer needed.

Open Windows Configuration Designer (by default, %systemdrive%\Program Files (x86)\Windows Kits\10\Assessment and Deployment Kit\Imaging and Configuration Designer\x86\ICD.exe).

Choose Advanced provisioning.

Name your project, and click Next.

Choose All Windows desktop editions and click Next.

On New project, click Finish. The workspace for your package opens.

Expand Runtime settings > Policies > Start, and click StartLayout.

If Start is not listed, check the type of settings you selected in step 4. You must create the project using settings for All Windows desktop editions.

Enter layout.xml. This value creates a placeholder in the customizations.xml file that you will replace with the contents of the layout.xml file in a later step.

Save your project and close Windows Configuration Designer.

In File Explorer, open the project’s directory. (The default location is C:\Users\user name\Documents\Windows Imaging and Configuration Designer (WICD)\project name)

Open the customizations.xml file in a text editor. The section will look like this:

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

Replace layout.xml with the text from the layout.xml file, with markup characters replaced with escape characters.

Save and close the customizations.xml file.

Open Windows Configuration Designer and open your project.

On the File menu, select Save.

On the Export menu, select Provisioning package.

Change Owner to IT Admin, which will set the precedence of this provisioning package higher than provisioning packages applied to this device from other sources, and then select Next.

Optional. In the Provisioning package security window, you can choose to encrypt the package and enable package signing.

Enable package encryption – If you select this option, an auto-generated password will be shown on the screen.

Enable package signing – If you select this option, you must select a valid certificate to use for signing the package. You can specify the certificate by clicking Browse and choosing the certificate you want to use to sign the package.

Click Next to specify the output location where you want the provisioning package to go when it’s built. By default, Windows Imaging and Configuration Designer (ICD) uses the project folder as the output location.

Optionally, you can click Browse to change the default output location.

Click Next.

Click Build to start building the package. The provisioning package doesn’t take long to build. The project information is displayed in the build page and the progress bar indicates the build status.

If you need to cancel the build, click Cancel. This cancels the current build process, closes the wizard, and takes you back to the Customizations Page.

If your build fails, an error message will show up that includes a link to the project folder. You can scan the logs to determine what caused the error. Once you fix the issue, try building the package again.

If your build is successful, the name of the provisioning package, output directory, and project directory will be shown.

  • If you choose, you can build the provisioning package again and pick a different path for the output package. To do this, click Back to change the output package name and path, and then click Next to start another build.
  • If you are done, click Finish to close the wizard and go back to the Customizations Page.

Copy the provisioning package to the target device.

Double-click the ppkg file and allow it to install.

Applies to

In WindowsВ 10 Pro, Enterprise, and Education, you can use a Group Policy Object (GPO) to deploy a customized Start and taskbar layout to users in a domain. No reimaging is required, and the layout can be updated simply by overwriting the .xml file that contains the layout. This enables you to customize Start and taskbar layouts for different departments or organizations, with minimal management overhead.

This topic describes how to update Group Policy settings to display a customized Start and taskbar layout when the users sign in. By creating a domain-based GPO with these settings, you can deploy a customized Start and taskbar layout to users in a domain.

When a full Start layout is applied with this method, the users cannot pin, unpin, or uninstall apps from Start. Users can view and open all apps in the All Apps view, but they cannot pin any apps to Start. When a partial Start layout is applied, the contents of the specified tile groups cannot be changed, but users can move those groups, and can also create and customize their own groups. When you apply a taskbar layout, users will still be able to pin and unpin apps, and change the order of pinned apps.

Operating system requirements

In Windows 10, version 1607, Start and taskbar layout control using Group Policy is supported in WindowsВ 10 Enterprise and WindowsВ 10 Education. In Windows 10, version 1703, Start and taskbar layout control using Group Policy is also supported in WindowsВ 10 Pro.

The GPO can be configured from any computer on which the necessary ADMX and ADML files (StartMenu.admx and StartMenu.adml) for WindowsВ 10 are installed. In Group Policy, ADMX files are used to define Registry-based policy settings in the Administrative Templates category. To find out how to create a central store for Administrative Templates files, see article 929841, written for Windows Vista and still applicable in the Microsoft Knowledge Base.

How Start layout control works

Three features enable Start and taskbar layout control:

The Export-StartLayout cmdlet in Windows PowerShell exports a description of the current Start layout in .xml file format.

To import the layout of Start to a mounted Windows image, use the Import-StartLayout cmdlet.

You can modify the Start .xml file to include or create an .xml file just for the taskbar configuration.

In Group Policy, you use the Start Layout settings for the Start Menu and Taskbar administrative template to set a Start and taskbar layout from an .xml file when the policy is applied. The Group Policy object doesn’t support an empty tile layout, so the default tile layout for Windows is loaded in that case.

To learn how customize Start to include your line-of-business apps when you deploy WindowsВ 10, see Customize the Windows 10 Start layout.

Use Group Policy to apply a customized Start layout in a domain

To apply the Start and taskbar layout to users in a domain, use the Group Policy Management Console (GPMC) to configure a domain-based Group Policy Object (GPO) that sets Start Layout policy settings in the Start Menu and Taskbar administrative template for users in a domain.

The GPO applies the Start and taskbar layout at the next user sign-in. Each time the user signs in, the timestamp of the .xml file with the Start and taskbar layout is checked and if a newer version of the file is available, the settings in the latest version of the file are applied.

The GPO can be configured from any computer on which the necessary ADMX and ADML files (StartMenu.admx and StartMenu.adml) for WindowsВ 10 are installed.

The .xml file with the Start and taskbar layout must be located on shared network storage that is available to the users’ computers when they sign in and the users must have Read-only access to the file. If the file is not available when the first user signs in, Start and the taskbar are not customized during the session, but the user will be prevented from making changes to Start. On subsequent sign-ins, if the file is available at sign-in, the layout it contains will be applied to the user’s Start and taskbar.

For information about deploying GPOs in a domain, see Working with Group Policy Objects.

Use Group Policy to apply a customized Start layout on the local computer

You can use the Local Group Policy Editor to provide a customized Start and taskbar layout for any user who signs in on the local computer. To display the customized Start and taskbar layout for any user who signs in, configure Start Layout policy settings for the Start Menu and Taskbar administrative template. You can use the Start Menu and Taskbar administrative template in User Configuration or Computer Configuration.

This procedure applies the policy settings on the local computer only. For information about deploying the Start and taskbar layout to users in a domain, see Use Group Policy to deploy a customized Start layout in a domain.

This procedure creates a Local Group Policy that applies to all users on the computer. To configure Local Group Policy that applies to a specific user or group on the computer, see Step-by-Step Guide to Managing Multiple Local Group Policy Objects. The guide was written for WindowsВ Vista and the procedures still apply to WindowsВ 10.

This procedure adds the customized Start and taskbar layout to the user configuration, which overrides any Start layout settings in the local computer configuration when a user signs in on the computer.

To configure Start Layout policy settings in Local Group Policy Editor

On the test computer, press the Windows key, type gpedit, and then select Edit group policy (Control panel).

Go to User Configuration or Computer Configuration > Administrative Templates >Start Menu and Taskbar.

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

Right-click Start Layout in the right pane, and click Edit.

This opens the Start Layout policy settings.

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

Enter the following settings, and then click OK:

Select Enabled.

Under Options, specify the path to the .xml file that contains the Start and taskbar layout. For example, type C:\Users\Test01\StartScreenMarketing.xml.

Optionally, enter a comment to identify the Start and taskbar layout.

If you disable Start Layout policy settings that have been in effect and then re-enable the policy, users will not be able to make changes to Start, however the layout in the .xml file will not be reapplied unless the file has been updated. In Windows PowerShell, you can update the timestamp on a file by running the following command:

Update a customized Start layout

After you use Group Policy to apply a customized Start and taskbar layout on a computer or in a domain, you can update the layout simply by replacing the .xml file that is specified in the Start Layout policy settings with a file with a newer timestamp.

Windows users can choose to apply a customized Start layout to their computer by replacing the .xml file with a new one that has the latest timestamp. The file is specified in the Start Layout policy settings. Follow the instructions given in the post to get started.

Customize Windows 10 Start layout

The layout changes can be deployed easily by overwriting the .xml file that contains the layout. No reimaging is required for this purpose. To apply a customized Start layout on the local computer via Group Policy Object (GPO) do as follows.

  1. Go to User Configuration.
  2. Choose Administrative Templates.
  3. Select Start Menu and Taskbar.
  4. Switch to the right-pane.
  5. Right-click Start Layout.
  6. Select Edit to open Start Layout policy settings.
  7. Check Enabled option.
  8. Specify the path to the .xml file under the Options heading that contains the Start and Taskbar layout.
  9. Add a comment.

Please note that the method creates a Local Group Policy that applies to all users on the computer.

Press Win+R in combination to open the Run dialog box.

Type ‘gpedit.msc’ in the empty field of the box and hit Enter.

When the Group Policy Editor opens, go to the User Configuration entry.

Then, choose the Administrative Templates folder and expand it.

Select Start Menu and Taskbar folder to display sub-folders under it.

Choose Notifications sub-folder.

Switch to the right-pane and under Setting headings, scroll down to Start Layout entry.

Right-click the entry and choose the Edit option to open the Start Layout policy settings.

Here, check the Enabled option.

Under the Options window, specify the path to the .xml file that contains the Start layout. For example, C:\Users\Test01\StartScreenMarketing.xml.

When done hit the OK button then choose the Apply button.

After you make the changes to the layout as described above, the Group Policy will import and apply the updated Start Menu layout the next time any of the users of log on.

Date: March 17, 2021 Tags: Start Menu

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Anand Khanse is the Admin of TheWindowsClub.com, a 10-year Microsoft MVP (2006-16) & a Windows Insider MVP. Please read the entire post & the comments first, create a System Restore Point before making any changes to your system & be careful about any 3rd-party offers while installing freeware.

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Customize the Windows 10 Start menu with these tips.

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

You can easily customize the Windows 10 Start menu.

Screenshot by Lance Whitney/CNET

Are you unimpressed with the Windows 10 ($147 at Amazon) Start menu? If you have yet to embrace its colorful tiles and menus, then you’re missing out, especially if you have a Windows tablet or touchscreen laptop . (If you’ve been holding out on updating your computer, you can still learn how to download Windows 10 free here.) With a bit of customization, you can form the Start menu into something useful.

Quickly, let’s break down how the Start menu is organized. It’s divided into three sections.

  • The narrow panel on the left features icons for important menu items that vary depending on your settings (more on this later), including your account, settings, and power options. These icons are unlabeled by default, but if you need help figuring out which is which, you can tap or click the menu button at the top of this section (looks like three horizontal lines) to reveal labels for each icon.
  • The center (but still mostly left) panel houses a list of all your applications, starting with those you recently added at the top and then an alphabetical
  • The large panel on the right contains the colorful tiles in sections labeled as Create, Play, Explore and so on.

Now that you know the lay of the Start menu land, let’s get to the ways in which you can customize it.

Learn smart gadget and internet tips and tricks with our entertaining and ingenious how-tos.

Customize the far-left panel

The far-left panel of the Start menu can have a minimum of two icons (your account icon and the power options icon) and a maximum of 12 icons. You can customize the icons that appear by opening the Settings menu and going to Personalization > Start > Choose which folders appear on Start. Here, you can toggle on/off the following icons: File Explorer, Settings, Documents, Downloads, Music, Pictures, Videos, HomeGroup, Network and Personal folder.

Full-screen Start or not

The full-screen Start menu is the default menu if you’re using a tablet, while the partial-screen Start menu is the default if you have a desktop or laptop. If you want the full-screen experience on a PC, go to Settings > Personalization > Start and toggle on Use Start full screen. And on a tablet, you can go to Settings > System > Tablet mode and choose which mode — desktop or tablet — you want your device to start in.

Change the color

To change the color of your Start menu, Start screen, taskbar and window borders, go to Settings > Personalization > Colors > Show color on Start, taskbar, and action center. Turn this option on and pick the accent color you’d like to use from the options above. If you’d like your Start menu to be transparent-ish, you can also turn on Make start, taskbar, and action center transparent.

Pin and unpin tiles

To pin an app to the right panel of the Start menu as a tile, find the app in the center-left panel of the Start menu and right-click it. Click Pin to Start, or drag and drop it into the tile section of the Start menu. To unpin a tile, right-click the tile and click Unpin from Start.

Move and resize tiles

To resize a tile, right-click on it and use Resize option to pick a size. Depending on the tile/app, you will be able to choose small, medium, wide or large. Most tiles will only be able to be sized to small or medium, but native Windows apps such as Edge or Maps will be able to be sized to wide or large. To move a tile, click or tap it, hold it, and drag it to another part of the Start menu.

Go wide

If your Start menu is starting to feel crowded, you can make it wider by going to Settings > Personalization > Start and toggling on Show more tiles.

Create Start menu folders

Even with an extra-wide Start menu, it can start to feel cluttered if you have added a bunch of tiles to it. As with the thumbnails littering your desktop, you can organize Start menu tiles into folders. Just drag on tile on top of another tile to create a folder of like-minded tiles. It’ll feel very familiar to iPhone ($599 at Apple) owners who pride themselves on their neat and orderly collection of app folders, though there’s no jiggling involved.

Edit the tile sections

In Windows 10 (like Windows 8/8.1), you can divide your live tiles into different categories. To create a new category, click a tile, hold it and drag it to the bottom of the Start menu until a solid bar shows up. Drop the tile below this bar, and your tile will end up in its own little section, which you can name.

Posted October 8, 2014 by Lê Hoàng in Windows 10

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

With the release of Windows 10, Microsoft decided to bring back the Start menu that many users complained about missing in Windows 8. However, the new Start menu also includes an area for live tiles which work similarly to the ones in the old release of Windows. Using the steps in this tutorial, you can customize the Start menu to suit your needs and workflow.

1. Click the Windows logo at the bottom left of the screen to open the Start menu. Alternatively, you can open it by pressing the Win logo on your keyboard.

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

2. When the Start screen appears, you will see a grid of live tiles on the right size. If you right-click on one of them, you will see several options including: Unpin from Start, Pin to taskbar, Uninstall, Resize, and Turn live tile off. Under Resize, there are several sizes from which to choose: small, medium, wide, and large. As soon as you choose the size, the chosen tile will be changed and moved accordingly. The size of the Start menu will increase or decrease to adapt to the change, if necessary.

To move a tile, long-click on it, then drag it to the desired location. If there is a tile in that location, it will be moved to a slot nearby.

Un-pinned apps can still be found in the app list.

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

3. To pin a program to the Start menu, right-click on it, and choose Pin to Start. If it is a Metro app, you will see a live tile. Otherwise, the tile will contain the app’s icon.

How to customize the windows 10 start menu

4. The Start menu can be resized to several predefined shapes as seen in the examples below. Resizing the Start menu is similar to resizing a normal app’s window. All you have to do is move the mouse to the top edge, and then drag it down until it resizes to the shape that you want.

These two commands will make the Start Menu persistent for all user accounts in Windows 10.

The first time you log into a new user account in Windows 10, you’ll find the Start Menu filled with seemingly random items you most likely won’t have use for. Sure, you could remove those items manually and add the ones you actually want, but that takes time. Worst of all, if you create a new user account, that account’s start menu will be just as bloated as when you created your first account. Luckily there’s an easy fix to this annoying dilemma.

Here’s how you can make the customized Start Menu persistent for all future accounts on your PC:

1. Log into the computer with an Administrator account.

2. Customize the Start Menu to your liking. To remove an item, just right-click on it and then choose to Unpin from Start. To add an item, search for it, then right-click on it and choose to Pin to Start.

3. Search for Windows Powershell, then right-click on it and choose “Run as administrator.” If the User Account Control window pops up, select “Yes.”

4. In the Powershell window, first type in this command (or you can just copy it below and paste it in):

Export-Startlayout -path C:\Windows\Temp\SMenu.xml

and press Enter.

5. Then, type in this command (or copy and paste it):

Import-StartLayout -LayoutPath C:\Windows\Temp\SMenu.xml -MountPath $env:SystemDrive\

and press Enter.

That’s it! From now on, when you create a new user account on the same computer, that account’s Start Menu will consist of the same items as the current account’s.