How to discuss barack obama

A support Blog for Barack Obama. Here we discuss Barack Obama and Democrat issues. Let’s vore Barack Obama.

Wednesday, October 22, 2008

Barack Obama

I’m voting for Barack Obama this November 4th for President of the United States. What follows in this article are 7 of the many reasons I am voting for Obama and not John McCain.

1. Obama was against the Iraq war from the start. Very few politicians had the integrity and the judgment to know that the Iraq war was a mistake before it began. John McCain certainly did not. McCain was one of the many politicians who thought Iraq would be a short easy war and that American soldiers would be “greeted like liberators” in Iraq.

2. Obama will lower taxes for people making less than $111,645 per year (that includes me, unfortunately!) more than John McCain will. McCain has been running many misleading advertisements which make the claim that Obama is raising taxes across the board. That is not true. Obama is only raising taxes for the very rich and for corporations (who have not paid their fair share of taxes.)

For 90% of Americans, Obama’s plan will bring lower taxes than McCain’s will. This is an important fact not only because of the lower taxes that most Americans will pay but also because it speaks to McCain’s lack of integrity. McCain continues to run disingenuous ads which claim a vote for Obama is a vote for higher taxes.

3. Obama is pro choice and will nominate pro choice judges for the Supreme Court. McCain has said he will be a “pro life President.” Nobody is pro-abortion. It’s not the role of the government to tell a woman what she can do with her own body.

If you believe in a woman’s right to choose it is essential that you support Barack Obama as it’s very likely the next President will be nominating 2 to 3 Supreme Court Justices. If McCain is the one nominating those judges, it’s very possible that Roe V. Wade could be reversed.

4. Foreign policy. Obama showed he had far superior foreign policy judgment with his stance on Iraq. The things he said about the Iraq war before it had even begun all turned out to be true. We need a President who has judgment and the ability to know when and where to strike. The shoot first ask questions later cowboy mentality of the Bush/Cheney administration would be made even worse by McCain who, as Pat Buchanan put it, would make “Cheney look like Gandhi.”

5. International respect. George W. Bush has been a humongous embarrassment for Americans. People all over the world now think of Americans as morons. Barack Obama is already loved all over the world. He is a brilliant speaker who understands the nuance of how to converse with people from different cultures. He’s preferred in Europe over McCain by enormous margins. Obama as President would instantly make America popular again.

6. Health care. While I do not believe that Obama’s health care plan is the universal plan that our country really needs, it is a good step towards a better plan and it will help to lower overall health care costs. McCain’s approach would hurt more than help. There would be even more people without health care with McCain as President.

7. Energy. While McCain is harping on the ridiculous non-issue of off shore drilling because he knows it plays well to the many uneducated voters in this country, it is Obama who has a real plan for energy independence. McCain’s off shore drilling plan would only help to make extremely rich oil companies even more rich. It would not lower gas prices.

How to discuss barack obama

With the former president recently making public comments triggering to the radical left — including that all that hashtag “woke” activism isn’t actually activism — The Washington Post felt compelled to give Americans on the left side of the aisle a little more “perspective” on the man whose legislative legacy Donald Trump has almost completely wiped out. The reason Democratic presidential candidates have been struggling so hard to figure out how to discuss Barack Obama, David Swerdlick writes for the Post, is that Obama isn’t what they think he is.

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“Perspective: Democratic presidential candidates still can’t figure out how to talk about the most popular figure in their party, [Swerdlick] writes, and there’s a simple reason,” the Post tweeted Sunday. “Barack Obama is a conservative.”

As Swerdlick highlights, Obama has tweaked some of his fellow progressives in recent public comments about the flawed assumptions and approaches of Democrats and their supporters.

“This idea of purity and you’re never compromised and you’re always politically woke and all that stuff, you should get over that quickly,” the former president told a group of young activist at an Obama Foundation Summit in Chicago in late October. “The world is messy. There are ambiguities. People who do really good stuff have flaws.”

As if that wasn’t enough to outrage the permanently outraged, Obama added a sobering reality check to those increasingly steering the party toward more overtly socialist policies: The Democratic presidential candidates would be wise to come back more to the center because “[t]his is still a country that is less revolutionary than it is interested in improvement.”

It’s becoming increasingly clear, writes Swerdlick, that the leading Democratic contenders “can’t quite figure out how to talk about the most popular figure in their party,” which poses a major problem because he “casts a long shadow over the 2020 primary campaign”:

Preserving Obama’s legacy is the heart of former vice president Joe Biden’s pitch to voters — which has allowed his rivals to mark him as complacent. More left-leaning candidates, such as Sen. Elizabeth Warren (Mass.), say the next president needs to do more to push for health-care reforms and combat income inequality — but lately, she’s struggling to sell her proposals. Onetime Obama Cabinet secretary Julián Castro has ripped his former boss’s record on immigration and deportation. Meanwhile, South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg raced to have a reporter correct a story that misquoted him citing “failures of the Obama era.” Sen. Kamala Harris (Calif.) said in Wednesday’s debate that it’s crucial to “rebuild the Obama coalition” because “that’s the last time we won.” Picking and choosing which parts of Obama’s tenure to embrace, and how firmly to embrace them, has become a delicate game in the primary season.

So why are they struggling to much to frame both their praise and criticism of The One? Because none of them have accepted what Swerdlick believes to be the hard truth about Obama.

“It’s because the former president, going back at least to his 2004 Senate race, hasn’t really occupied the left side of the ideological spectrum,” he insists. While he was of course no Republican, “Obama never dramatically departed from the approach of presidents who came before him.”

“There’s a simple reason: Barack Obama is a conservative,” Swerdlick declares. His “evidence,” that while Obama embraced left-wing positions like the Paris climate accords, Dodd-Frank, pro-choice policies, and same-sex marriage (after opposing it), his “constant search for consensus” ultimately made him be “conservative” on key domestic initiatives, like Obamacare and gun control, and foreign policy…

The underlying concept for his signature legislation, the Affordable Care Act, with its individual mandate, was devised by the right-wing Heritage Foundation and first implemented at the state level by Mitt Romney, then the Republican governor of Massachusetts. Obama wanted to protect Americans from the effects of a prolonged recession, so he agreed, in one of his defining votes as a senator, to a bailout of banks — and as president, he prioritized recovery over punishing bankers for their role in the financial crisis. In his first inaugural address, he affirmed the power of the free market “to generate wealth and expand freedom.”

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Until the Sandy Hook tragedy in 2012, Obama studiously avoided any push for gun control. Indeed, in his first term, he signed laws that loosened restrictions on bringing firearms to national parks and on Amtrak. Though cast as a “dithering” peacenik who led “from behind,” he stuck with his thesis that the imperative “to end the war in Iraq is to be able to get more troops into Afghanistan,” and he prosecuted a drone war in Somalia, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Yemen.

Obama was a “conservative” in the end, suggests Swerdlick, because he “believes, fundamentally, that the American model works — even if it hasn’t been allowed to work for everyone.”

With the former president recently making public comments triggering to the radical left — including that all that hashtag “woke” activism isn’t actually activism — The Washington Post felt compelled to give Americans on the left side of the aisle a little more “perspective” on the man whose legislative legacy Donald Trump has almost completely wiped out. The reason Democratic presidential candidates have been struggling so hard to figure out how to discuss Barack Obama, David Swerdlick writes for the Post, is that Obama isn’t what they think he is.

“Perspective: Democratic presidential candidates still can’t figure out how to talk about the most popular figure in their party, [Swerdlick] writes, and there’s a simple reason,” the Post tweeted Sunday. “Barack Obama is a conservative.”

Perspective: Democratic presidential candidates still can’t figure out how to talk about the most popular figure in their party, @Swerdlick writes, and there’s a simple reason.

Barack Obama is a conservative. https://t.co/45gsMfhQ2c

As Swerdlick highlights, Obama has tweaked some of his fellow progressives in recent public comments about the flawed assumptions and approaches of Democrats and their supporters.

“This idea of purity and you’re never compromised and you’re always politically woke and all that stuff, you should get over that quickly,” the former president told a group of young activist at an Obama Foundation Summit in Chicago in late October. “The world is messy. There are ambiguities. People who do really good stuff have flaws.”

As if that wasn’t enough to outrage the permanently outraged, Obama added a sobering reality check to those increasingly steering the party toward more overtly socialist policies: The Democratic presidential candidates would be wise to come back more to the center because “[t]his is still a country that is less revolutionary than it is interested in improvement.”

It’s becoming increasingly clear, writes Swerdlick, that the leading Democratic contenders “can’t quite figure out how to talk about the most popular figure in their party,” which poses a major problem because he “casts a long shadow over the 2020 primary campaign”:

Preserving Obama’s legacy is the heart of former vice president Joe Biden’s pitch to voters — which has allowed his rivals to mark him as complacent. More left-leaning candidates, such as Sen. Elizabeth Warren (Mass.), say the next president needs to do more to push for health-care reforms and combat income inequality — but lately, she’s struggling to sell her proposals. Onetime Obama Cabinet secretary Julián Castro has ripped his former boss’s record on immigration and deportation. Meanwhile, South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg raced to have a reporter correct a story that misquoted him citing “failures of the Obama era.” Sen. Kamala Harris (Calif.) said in Wednesday’s debate that it’s crucial to “rebuild the Obama coalition” because “that’s the last time we won.” Picking and choosing which parts of Obama’s tenure to embrace, and how firmly to embrace them, has become a delicate game in the primary season.

So why are they struggling to much to frame both their praise and criticism of The One? Because none of them have accepted what Swerdlick believes to be the hard truth about Obama.

“It’s because the former president, going back at least to his 2004 Senate race, hasn’t really occupied the left side of the ideological spectrum,” he insists. While he was of course no Republican, “Obama never dramatically departed from the approach of presidents who came before him.”

“There’s a simple reason: Barack Obama is a conservative,” Swerdlick declares. His “evidence,” that while Obama embraced left-wing positions like the Paris climate accords, Dodd-Frank, pro-choice policies, and same-sex marriage (after opposing it), his “constant search for consensus” ultimately made him be “conservative” on key domestic initiatives, like Obamacare and gun control, and foreign policy…

The underlying concept for his signature legislation, the Affordable Care Act, with its individual mandate, was devised by the right-wing Heritage Foundation and first implemented at the state level by Mitt Romney, then the Republican governor of Massachusetts. Obama wanted to protect Americans from the effects of a prolonged recession, so he agreed, in one of his defining votes as a senator, to a bailout of banks — and as president, he prioritized recovery over punishing bankers for their role in the financial crisis. In his first inaugural address, he affirmed the power of the free market “to generate wealth and expand freedom.”

Until the Sandy Hook tragedy in 2012, Obama studiously avoided any push for gun control. Indeed, in his first term, he signed laws that loosened restrictions on bringing firearms to national parks and on Amtrak. Though cast as a “dithering” peacenik who led “from behind,” he stuck with his thesis that the imperative “to end the war in Iraq is to be able to get more troops into Afghanistan,” and he prosecuted a drone war in Somalia, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Yemen.

Obama was a “conservative” in the end, suggests Swerdlick, because he “believes, fundamentally, that the American model works — even if it hasn’t been allowed to work for everyone.”

  • 28 May 2021, 0:06
  • Updated : 28 May 2021, 7:32
  • Invalid Date,

MARCUS RASHFORD shared an incredible chat with President Barack Obama discussing the power young people have to make a difference in society.

The Manchester United striker and 44th United States president met on a Zoom call.

How to discuss barack obama

They discussed the importance of giving back to your local community and the positive impact of reading, as well as other themes from the former commander in chief’s latest book, A Promised Land.

And the pair also spoke about some of their shared experiences, including being raised by single mothers.

The forward, who is set to feature for England at Euro 2020, said: “It’s quite surreal isn’t it?

“I’m sitting in my kitchen in Manchester, speaking to President Obama. But, immediately, he made me feel at ease.

“It wasn’t long before I realised just how aligned our experiences as children were in shaping the men you see today – adversity, obstacles and all.

“I genuinely enjoyed every minute of it. When President Obama speaks, all you want to do is listen.”

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President Obama added: “A lot of the young people I meet – including Marcus – they’re ahead of where I was when I was 23.

“They’re already making changes and being positive forces in their communities.”

Rashford, 23, last year spearheaded a prominent campaign to tackle child food poverty in the UK during the coronavirus pandemic and forced the Government into two huge U-turns regarding free school meals.

It led to 1.7million vulnerable children being supported by a £520m Government scheme and other projects have helped deliver 130m meals.

He has also launched a food education and cooking project for children, Full Time Meals, as well as his own book club.

Rashford was awarded an MBE for his remarkable efforts and lauded by all areas of the British public.

The conversation, which was moderated by broadcaster and author June Sarpong and organised by Penguin Books, will be released in full on Penguin UK’s YouTube channel at 2pm on Friday.

Read our Football live blog for the very latest news from around the grounds

Obama and 41 Other US Presidents Descended from British King John?

How to discuss barack obama

Might Barack Obama and nearly all US presidents descended from King John? A seventh-grader thinks so:

In the genes? Seventh grader says bloodlines of 42 of 43 U.S. Presidents link back to King John of England

Californian’s genealogy project links majority of commander-in-chiefs to Magna Carta signer. Finds out she’s related to President Obama to boot.

The above was also reported in a UK article (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2183858/All-presidents-bar-directly-descended-medieval-English-king.html#ixzz22jRAICEB). The UK article mentioned that all US presidents, except Martin Van Buren, seem to have been connected to King John. At this point in time, it is hard to know if this conclusion is completely accurate as it does not seem to have had a lot of official review.

If true, it certainly shows an interesting connection between the old royal family of Britain and the top rulers of the USA.

King John himself apparently was not that into Catholicism (nor probably the Bible) as the following suggests:

John’s lack of religious conviction has been noted by contemporary chroniclers and later historians, with some suspecting that John was at best impious…Contemporary chroniclers catalogued his various anti-religious habits at length, including his failure to take communion, his blasphemous remarks, and his witty but scandalous jokes about church doctrine, including jokes about the implausibility of the Resurrection. They commented on the paucity of John’s charitable donations to the church…Financial records show a normal royal household engaged in the usual feasts and pious observances – albeit with many records showing John’s offerings to the poor to atone for routinely breaking church rules and guidance. (King John of England. Wikipedia, viewed 08/06/12)

So, apparently it this British ruler who many US presidents descended from.

Some items of possibly related interest may include:

How to discuss barack obama

President Obama delivers remarks at the Clinton Global Initiative in New York, N.Y. September 23, 2014. (by Paul Morse / Clinton Global Initiative)

The courage of Berta Soler, the leader of Cuba’s Ladies in White who endure harassment and arrest to win freedom for the Cuban people.

The determination of Russians in Moscow and St. Petersburg, speaking up for the rule of law and human rights in their country.

The hope of young Palestinians in Ramallah, dreaming of building their future in a free and independent state.

“It is the civil society leaders who, in many ways, are going to have the more lasting impact,” President Obama said. “Because as the saying goes, the most important title is not ‘president’ or ‘prime minister’; the most important title is ‘citizen.'”

Speaking to the Clinton Global Initiative in New York, NY, President Obama explained how the voice of one citizen can remind us why a civil society is so essential:

Citizens remind us why civil society is so essential. When people are free to speak their minds and hold their leaders accountable, governments are more responsive and more effective. When entrepreneurs are free to create and develop new ideas, then economies are more innovative, and attract more trade and investment, and ultimately become more prosperous.

When communities, including minorities, are free to live and pray and love as they choose; when nations uphold the rights of all their people — including, perhaps especially, women and girls — then those countries are more likely to thrive. If you want strong, successful countries, you need strong, vibrant civil societies. When citizens are free to organize and work together across borders to make our communities healthier, our environment cleaner, and our world safer, that’s when real change comes.

“It is citizens — ordinary men and women, determined to forge their own future — who throughout history have sparked all the great change and progress.”

A citizen is a powerful force for change. That is why more and more governments are doing what they can to silence them — from Russia to China to Venezuela and more. “This growing crackdown on civil society is a campaign to undermine the very idea of democracy. And what’s needed is an even stronger campaign to defend democracy,” the President said.

To carry that campaign forward, he announced a series of new steps the United States will take to protect and promote the strength of civil societies across the globe:

  1. All federal departments and agencies will now consult and partner more regularly with civil society groups. They will oppose efforts by foreign governments to dictate our assistance to civil society or to restrict freedoms of peaceful assembly, association, and expression.
  2. We will create new innovation centers for civil society groups to use to network and access knowledge, technology, and funding they need to put their ideas into action. The first six initial centers will be located in Latin America, Sub-Saharan Africa, in the Middle East, and in Asia.
  3. The U.S. will expand support and funding for Community of Democracies to better coordinate the diplomacy and pressure we exert to fight against laws that restrict civil society.
  4. We will increase our support for society groups across the board, from emergency assistance to legal assistance to technical support. The Treasury Department will finalize regulations so it is easier and less costly for foundations to make grants overseas.

The realities of America’s national security present imperfect choices, forcing the U.S. to work with governments that do not fully respect the universal rights of their citizens in order to protect the safety and security of Americans. “But that does not mean that human rights can be simply sacrificed for the sake of expediency,” the President said.

So although it is uncomfortable, although it sometimes causes friction, the United States will not stop speaking out for the human rights of all people, and pushing governments to uphold those rights and freedoms. We will not stop doing that, because that’s part of who we are, and that’s part of what we stand for.

“When your governments may try to pass oppressive laws, we’ll try to oppose them. When they try to cut off your funding, we’re going to try to give you a lifeline. And when they try to silence you, we want to amplify your voice.”

“If, amid all the restrictions, and all the pressure, and all the harassment, and all the fear, if they try to tell you that the world does not care and that your friends have forsaken you, do not ever believe it,” President Obama said. “Because you are not alone. You are never alone.”

In the darkest hours of our trials, President Obama urged all to remember the words of Dr. King: “The arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends towards justice.”

The reason we support civil society is because we have seen in this country of ours that it does, in fact, bend toward justice. But it does not do so on its own. It does so because there are hands of ordinary people doing extraordinary things every single day and they pull that arc in the direction of justice.

That’s why we have freedom in this country. That’s why I’m able to stand before you here today. And that’s why we will stand with them tomorrow.

Barack Obama Is A Conservative Says Washington Post, With Obama recently making public comments triggering to the radical left including that all that hashtag “woke” activism isn’t actually activism,The Washington Post felt compelled to give Americans on the left side of the aisle a little more “perspective” on the man whose legislative legacy Donald Trump has almost completely wiped out.

The reason Democratic presidential candidates have been struggling so hard to figure out how to discuss Barack Obama, David Swerdlick writes for the Post, is that Obama isn’t what they think he is.

Perspective: Democratic presidential candidates still can’t figure out how to talk about the most popular figure in their party, @Swerdlick writes, and there’s a simple reason.

Barack Obama is a conservative. https://t.co/45gsMfhQ2c

Now As Swerdlick highlights, Obama has tweaked some of his fellow progressives in recent public comments about the flawed assumptions and approaches of Democrats and their supporters.

However “This idea of purity and you’re never compromised and you’re always politically woke and all that stuff, you should get over that quickly,” the former president told a group of young activist at an Obama Foundation Summit in Chicago in late October.

“The world is messy. There are ambiguities. People who do really good stuff have flaws.” As if that wasn’t enough to outrage the permanently outraged, Obama added a sobering reality check to those increasingly steering the party toward more overtly socialist policies:

The Democratic presidential candidates would be wise to come back more to the center because “[t]his is still a country that is less revolutionary than it is interested in improvement.”

As we speak; It’s becoming increasingly clear, writes Swerdlick, that the leading Democratic contenders “can’t quite figure out how to talk about the most popular figure in their party,” which poses a major problem because he “casts a long shadow over the 2020 primary campaign”: Preserving Obama’s legacy is the heart of former vice president Joe Biden’s pitch to voters — which has allowed his rivals to mark him as complacent.

More left-leaning candidates, such as Sen. Elizabeth Warren (Mass.), say the next president needs to do more to push for health-care reforms and combat income inequality — but lately, she’s struggling to sell her proposals.

Onetime Obama Cabinet secretary Julián Castro has ripped his former boss’s record on immigration and deportation. Meanwhile, South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg raced to have a reporter correct a story that misquoted him citing “failures of the Obama era.” Sen. Kamala Harris (Calif.) said in Wednesday’s debate that it’s crucial to “rebuild the Obama coalition” because “that’s the last time we won.”

Picking and choosing which parts of Obama’s tenure to embrace, and how firmly to embrace them, has become a delicate game in the primary season. So why are they struggling to much to frame both their praise and criticism of The One? Because none of them have accepted what Swerdlick believes to be the hard truth about Obama.

MORE THOUGHTS ON BARACK OBAMA IS A CONSERVATIVE ACCORDING TO WASHINGTON POST

Also “It’s because the former president, going back at least to his 2004 Senate race, hasn’t really occupied the left side of the ideological spectrum,” he insists.

While he was of course no Republican, “Obama never dramatically departed from the approach of presidents who came before him.” “There’s a simple reason: Barack Obama is a conservative,” Swerdlick declares. His “evidence,” that while Obama embraced left-wing positions like the Paris climate accords, Dodd-Frank, pro-choice policies, and same-sex marriage (after opposing it), his “constant search for consensus” ultimately made him be “conservative” on key domestic initiatives, like Obamacare and gun control, and foreign policy…

Futhermore, the underlying concept for his signature legislation, the Affordable Care Act, with its individual mandate, was devised by the right-wing Heritage Foundation and first implemented at the state level by Mitt Romney, then the Republican governor of Massachusetts.

Obama wanted to protect Americans from the effects of a prolonged recession, so he agreed, in one of his defining votes as a senator, to a bailout of banks — and as president, he prioritized recovery over punishing bankers for their role in the financial crisis.

In his first inaugural address, he affirmed the power of the free market “to generate wealth and expand freedom.” Until the Sandy Hook tragedy in 2012, Obama studiously avoided any push for gun control.

Indeed, in his first term, he signed laws that loosened restrictions on bringing firearms to national parks and on Amtrak.

Though cast as a “dithering” peacenik who led “from behind,” he stuck with his thesis that the imperative “to end the war in Iraq is to be able to get more troops into Afghanistan,” and he prosecuted a drone war in Somalia, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Yemen.

Obama was a “conservative” in the end, suggests Swerdlick, because he “believes, fundamentally, that the American model works — even if it hasn’t been allowed to work for everyone.” truely speaking.

Barack Obama Is A Conservative Says Washington Post,

How to discuss barack obama

With the former president recently making public comments triggering to the radical left — including that all that hashtag “woke” activism isn’t actually activism — The Washington Post felt compelled to give Americans on the left side of the aisle a little more “perspective” on the man whose legislative legacy Donald Trump has almost completely wiped out. The reason Democratic presidential candidates have been struggling so hard to figure out how to discuss Barack Obama, David Swerdlick writes for the Post, is that Obama isn’t what they think he is.

“Perspective: Democratic presidential candidates still can’t figure out how to talk about the most popular figure in their party, [Swerdlick] writes, and there’s a simple reason,” the Post tweeted Sunday. “Barack Obama is a conservative.”

Perspective: Democratic presidential candidates still can’t figure out how to talk about the most popular figure in their party, @Swerdlick writes, and there’s a simple reason.

Barack Obama is a conservative. https://t.co/45gsMfhQ2c

As Swerdlick highlights, Obama has tweaked some of his fellow progressives in recent public comments about the flawed assumptions and approaches of Democrats and their supporters.

“This idea of purity and you’re never compromised and you’re always politically woke and all that stuff, you should get over that quickly,” the former president told a group of young activist at an Obama Foundation Summit in Chicago in late October. “The world is messy. There are ambiguities. People who do really good stuff have flaws.”

As if that wasn’t enough to outrage the permanently outraged, Obama added a sobering reality check to those increasingly steering the party toward more overtly socialist policies: The Democratic presidential candidates would be wise to come back more to the center because “[t]his is still a country that is less revolutionary than it is interested in improvement.”

It’s becoming increasingly clear, writes Swerdlick, that the leading Democratic contenders “can’t quite figure out how to talk about the most popular figure in their party,” which poses a major problem because he “casts a long shadow over the 2020 primary campaign”:

Preserving Obama’s legacy is the heart of former vice president Joe Biden’s pitch to voters — which has allowed his rivals to mark him as complacent. More left-leaning candidates, such as Sen. Elizabeth Warren (Mass.), say the next president needs to do more to push for health-care reforms and combat income inequality — but lately, she’s struggling to sell her proposals. Onetime Obama Cabinet secretary Julián Castro has ripped his former boss’s record on immigration and deportation. Meanwhile, South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg raced to have a reporter correct a story that misquoted him citing “failures of the Obama era.” Sen. Kamala Harris (Calif.) said in Wednesday’s debate that it’s crucial to “rebuild the Obama coalition” because “that’s the last time we won.” Picking and choosing which parts of Obama’s tenure to embrace, and how firmly to embrace them, has become a delicate game in the primary season.

So why are they struggling to much to frame both their praise and criticism of The One? Because none of them have accepted what Swerdlick believes to be the hard truth about Obama.

“It’s because the former president, going back at least to his 2004 Senate race, hasn’t really occupied the left side of the ideological spectrum,” he insists. While he was of course no Republican, “Obama never dramatically departed from the approach of presidents who came before him.”

“There’s a simple reason: Barack Obama is a conservative,” Swerdlick declares. His “evidence,” that while Obama embraced left-wing positions like the Paris climate accords, Dodd-Frank, pro-choice policies, and same-sex marriage (after opposing it), his “constant search for consensus” ultimately made him be “conservative” on key domestic initiatives, like Obamacare and gun control, and foreign policy…

The underlying concept for his signature legislation, the Affordable Care Act, with its individual mandate, was devised by the right-wing Heritage Foundation and first implemented at the state level by Mitt Romney, then the Republican governor of Massachusetts. Obama wanted to protect Americans from the effects of a prolonged recession, so he agreed, in one of his defining votes as a senator, to a bailout of banks — and as president, he prioritized recovery over punishing bankers for their role in the financial crisis. In his first inaugural address, he affirmed the power of the free market “to generate wealth and expand freedom.”

Until the Sandy Hook tragedy in 2012, Obama studiously avoided any push for gun control. Indeed, in his first term, he signed laws that loosened restrictions on bringing firearms to national parks and on Amtrak. Though cast as a “dithering” peacenik who led “from behind,” he stuck with his thesis that the imperative “to end the war in Iraq is to be able to get more troops into Afghanistan,” and he prosecuted a drone war in Somalia, Pakistan, Afghanistan and Yemen.

Obama was a “conservative” in the end, suggests Swerdlick, because he “believes, fundamentally, that the American model works — even if it hasn’t been allowed to work for everyone.”