How to divide and multiply fractions

The truth is multiplying and dividing fractions are easier than adding and subtracting fractions. It does not require a lot of steps because it only involves multiplying and simplifying.

When multiplying fractions, you take the numerators and multiply them. You also do the same with the denominators. If needed, the final product is then simplified by dividing the numerator and the denominator by their Greatest Common Factor. Dividing fractions is almost the same as multiplying fractions except that you get the reciprocal of the divisor before proceeding to multiplication and then simplifying the quotient if needed. Simplifying fractions will make computation easy.

But what really happens when you multiply or divide fractions?

Multiplying Fractions: How Do You Multiply Fractions?

In whole numbers, multiplication can be thought of as repeated addition. For example, 4\times 3 means adding 3 to itself 4 times:

4\times 3= 3+3+3+3=12

Another example is when we multiply a whole number by a fraction.

This concept is not always the easier method, especially when we multiply fractions. The thing to remember about multiplying fractions is that you are repeatedly increasing part of a whole. This means, unlike multiplying whole numbers, multiplying fractions results in a product that is even smaller than the factors.

\frac<1><2>\times\frac<1> <3>means you are multiplying \frac<1> <2>by less than a whole, in this case, \frac <1>

So that if you have \frac<1> <2>of a rectangle, multiplying it by \frac<1> <3>simply means taking a third of that half.

The result is \frac<1> <6>of the whole rectangle.

Another way to look at it is by dividing \frac<1> <2>of the rectangle into 3 equal parts and describing the result in relation to the whole rectangle.

Always remember that if you are multiplying proper fractions, your product will be smaller than the two factors.

Dividing Fractions: How Do You Divide Fractions?

In whole numbers, for example, 15\div3 means how many 3 goes into 15. The answer is 5 because there are 5 sets of 3 in 15. The same goes for dividing fractions. You want to know how many parts can go into a given fraction.

Let’s use the same fractions in the multiplication example so you can differentiate the two operations.

\frac<1><2>\div\frac<1><3>= This means how many \frac<1> <3>of a whole can you get from \frac<1> <2>.

The rectangle is divided in half with a red line. The broken blue lines divide the same rectangle into three to represent thirds. So that by taking half of the rectangle, you get \frac<1> <3>and half of the second \frac <1>

\frac<1><2>\div\frac<1><3>=\frac<3> <2>or 1\frac<1> <2>(of the third)

To solve \frac<1><2>\div\frac<1> <3>without drawing the fractions

Step 1: Get the reciprocal of the divisor

\frac<1> <3>is the divisor and its reciprocal is \frac<3> <1>.

Step 2: Change the operation from division to multiplication

Step 3: Multiply the fractions.

Do not forget to simplify your product by their GCF if needed.

Multiplying and Dividing Fractions are easy especially once you’ve mastered the basic facts. Unlike Addition and Subtraction of Fractions, representing these equations may not be the simplest and the fastest, but sometimes, doing so gives you a better understanding of what actually happens to fractions when they are multiplied or divided.

Multiplying and dividing fractions is not complicated.

Knowing how to multiply and divide fractions will help you succeed when other, more complex mathematical concepts, such as simplifying algebraic expressions, solving equations and so on.

In order to multiply and divide fractions it is not required to find the GCF, unlike when adding and subtracting them.

Most students find the process of multiplying fractions the easiest of all operations with fractions. All you have to do is multiply numerators and denominators respectively (the product of the numerators over the product of the denominators), recording the final answer as a reduced simplest fraction. In order to reduce a fraction, divide both the numerator and the denominator by their GCF (greatest common factor).

The process of dividing the two fractions is a bit more complex. But as long as you understand why things are done a certain way everything is really simple.

​In order to divide one fraction by another fraction, find the reciprocal of the second fraction and then change the operation to multiplication. To get the reciprocal of a fraction, just turn it upside down. Switch the numerator and denominator.

How to divide and multiply fractions

When you are required to multiply or divide mixed numbers, convert them into improper fractions first, then apply the rules discussed above. In order to convert a mixed number into an improper fraction, multiply the number of wholes by the denominator of the fractional part and add the numerator to the product. The result goes into the numerator. The denominator stays unchanged.

Turn the second fraction upside down, then multiply.

There are 3 Simple Steps to Divide Fractions:

Step 1. Turn the second fraction (the one you want to divide by) upside down
(this is now a reciprocal).

Step 2. Multiply the first fraction by that reciprocal

Step 3. Simplify the fraction (if needed)

Example:

Example:

1 2 ÷ 1 6

Step 1. Turn the second fraction upside down (it becomes a reciprocal):

1 6 becomes 6 1

Step 2. Multiply the first fraction by that reciprocal:

(multiply tops . )

1 2 × 6 1 = 1 × 6 2 × 1 = 6 2

(. multiply bottoms)

Step 3. Simplify the fraction:

6 2 = 3

With Pen and Paper

And here is how to do it with a pen and paper (press the play button):

To help you remember:

♫ “Dividing fractions, as easy as pie,
Flip the second fraction, then multiply.
And don’t forget to simplify,
Before it’s time to say goodbye”

Another way to remember is:

“leave me, change me, turn me over”

How Many?

20 divided by 5 is asking “how many 5s in 20?” (=4) and so:

1 2 ÷ 1 6 is really asking:

how many 1 6 s in 1 2 ?

Now look at the pizzas below . how many “1/6th slices” fit into a “1/2 slice”?

How many in ? Answer: 3

So now you can see why 1 2 ÷ 1 6 = 3

In other words “I have half a pizza, if I divide it into one-sixth slices, how many slices is that?”

Another Example:

1 8 ÷ 1 4

Step 1. Turn the second fraction upside down (the reciprocal):

1 4 becomes 4 1

Step 2. Multiply the first fraction by that reciprocal:

1 8 × 4 1 = 1 × 4 8 × 1 = 4 8

Step 3. Simplify the fraction:

4 8 = 1 2

Fractions and Whole Numbers

What about division with fractions and whole numbers?

Make the whole number a fraction, by putting it over 1.

Example: 5 is also 5 1

Then continue as before.

Example:

2 3 ÷ 5

Make 5 into 5 1 :

2 3 ÷ 5 1

Then continue as before.

Step 1. Turn the second fraction upside down (the reciprocal):

5 1 becomes 1 5

Step 2. Multiply the first fraction by that reciprocal:

2 3 × 1 5 = 2 × 1 3 × 5 = 2 15

Step 3. Simplify the fraction:

The fraction is already as simple as it can be.

Answer = 2 15

Example:

3 ÷ 1 4

Make 3 into 3 1 :

3 1 ÷ 1 4

Then continue as before.

Step 1. Turn the second fraction upside down (the reciprocal):

1 4 becomes 4 1

Step 2. Multiply the first fraction by that reciprocal:

3 1 × 4 1 = 3 × 4 1 × 1 = 12 1

Step 3. Simplify the fraction:

12 1 = 12

And Remember .

You can rewrite a question like “20 divided by 5” into “how many 5s in 20”

So you can also rewrite “3 divided by ¼” into “how many ¼s in 3” (=12)

Why Turn the Fraction Upside Down?

Because dividing is the opposite of multiplying!

But for DIVISION we:

  • divide by the top number
  • multiply by the bottom number

Example: dividing by 5 /2 is the same as multiplying by 2 /5

So instead of dividing by a fraction, it is easier to turn that fraction upside down, then do a multiply.

We learn fractions from an early age, and the reason for that is simple: we use fractions in our daily lives, especially when we grow older. It has applications in cooking, shopping, and other daily functions.

Adding fractions or subtracting is still pretty simple, but fractions can be pretty confusing when you get to the multiplying and dividing.

Do you find it difficult? We’re here to help. Review the steps below to learn multiplying and dividing fractions easily.

Different Types of Fractions

Let’s refresh our memory, first. There are 3 kinds of fractions:

  • proper
  • improper
  • mixed

The process on how to multiply and divide fractions is basically the same no matter what fraction you have, but there will be an extra step based on the type.

A proper fraction has a numerator (the number on top) that’s smaller than the denominator (the number on the bottom). A few examples would be 1/2, 3/11 and 9/10.

In an improper fraction, it’s the opposite. The numerator is larger than the denominator. Some examples: 5/4, 7/3 and 24/11.

Lastly, keep in mind that mixed fractions contain a whole number and a proper fraction, which we can get from an improper fraction since there’s always a whole number in an improper fraction.

In the examples above, we can convert all improper fractions into the mixed fractions 11/4, 21/3 and 22/11.

Multiplying Fractions

The process in multiplying fractions is pretty straightforward: you multiply the top numbers then you multiply the bottom numbers. Let’s see a few examples on how it would work on the different types of fractions.

How to Multiply Proper Fractions

There are 3 simple steps to multiplying proper fractions.

  • Step 1: Multiply the numerators with each other
  • Step 2: Multiply the denominators with each other
  • Step 3: Simplify (if applicable)

For example, we have 1/2 and 4/9. If we multiply these numbers, we’ll have (1 * 4)/(2 * 9).

If we multiply the numerators, we get 4, then if we multiply the denominators, we get 18. Put them together and you have 4/18.

We can further simplify this number, so we’ll end up with 2/9. This is the correct answer.

How to Multiply Improper Fractions

The process with improper fractions is the same as the above. The only difference is that your teacher might require you to simplify the answer further to a mixed number. The steps then become:

  • Step 1: Multiply the numerators with each other
  • Step 2: Multiply the denominators with each other
  • Step 3: Simplify (if applicable)
  • Step 4: Turn into a mixed fraction

For example, 3/2 * 6/5 will become (3 * 6)?(2 * 5). Multiplying the top numbers, we get 18; and then multiplying the bottom numbers, we get 10.

Now we have 18/10, which we can simplify to 9/5. We can leave it at that, but if your teacher requires you to convert improper fractions into a series of mixed fractions, we’ll simplify it further to 1 and 4/5.

How to Multiply Mixed Fractions

In case you have mixed fractions, turn them into improper fractions first. Afterward, the process of multiplying mixed numbers is still the same as the above.

  • Step 1: Convert mixed fractions into improper fractions
  • Step 2: Multiply the numerators with each other
  • Step 3: Multiply the denominators with each other
  • Step 4: Simplify (if applicable)
  • Step 5: Turn into a mixed fraction

Suppose we have 1 and 3/4 * 2 and 1/2. We turn each one into improper fractions first, so now we’ll have 7/4 and 5/2, which we can now multiply using the process above.

(7 * 5)/(4 * 2) becomes 35/8. We can’t simplify this to a smaller number, so we’ll proceed with simplifying it back to a mixed fraction. We’ll get 4 and 3/8.

Dividing Fractions

Dividing has a similar process to multiplying fractions, but we’ll have to do one thing beforehand. This early step helps combat the confusing process of diving fractions.

First, you get the reciprocal of the divisor and then proceed with the problem using the multiplication process.

  • Step 1: Get the reciprocal of the denominator
  • Step 2: Multiply the numerators with each other
  • Step 3: Multiply the denominators with each other
  • Step 4: Simplify (if applicable)

Let’s take a look at examples.

How to Divide Proper Fractions

Dividing proper fractions is one of the simplest procedures compared to the other methods on this list. That said, many young students still get confused because it requires multiplication instead of straight up division.

Let’s divide 3/5 by 2/3. In this example, 2/3 is the divisor, the number or fraction that’s on the right side of the equation. Let’s get the reciprocal by inverting the numbers, so now we have 3/2.

Now, let’s multiply it. Note that it ends up as an improper fraction, but it doesn’t matter as the process is still the same.

The equation becomes (3 * 3)/(5 * 2), which then equals to 9/10. You can’t simplify or reduce this number further, so this is the final answer.

How to Divide Improper Fractions

The process doesn’t change when compared to dividing proper fractions. But, let’s give you an example to properly see how it works. Here’s one with both improper fractions.

4/3 / 5/2. What’s the divisor? That’s right – it’s 5/2, so now we’ll get its reciprocal, which is 2/5. Now, we’ll proceed with multiplying these numbers.

(4 * 2)/(3 * 5) is 8/15. Since this is a proper fraction that you can’t simplify further, you don’t have to turn it into a mixed fraction.

How to Divide Mixed Fractions

Like in multiplying mixed numbers, there’s an extra step before you proceed with the process.

  • Step 1: Turn mixed fractions into improper fractions
  • Step 2: Get the reciprocal of the denominator
  • Step 3: Multiply the numerators with each other
  • Step 4: Multiply the denominators with each other
  • Step 5: Simplify (if applicable)
  • Step 6: Turn improper fractions into mixed fractions

Let’s take 6 and 1/2 and 1 and 5/4. Following step 1, this gives us 13/2 and 9/4. Following step 2, 13/2 / 9/4 becomes (13 * 4)/(2 * 9).

Multiply those numbers to get 52/18. We can simplify this to 26/9. As it’s an improper fraction, you’ll have to turn it into a whole number.

The final answer becomes 2 and 8/9.

Multiplying and Dividing Fractions Still Confusing?

Don’t worry! You’ll get it by practicing continuously until multiplying and dividing fractions, no matter the type, becomes second nature to you.

Find online resources that can give you challenges to answer. You can also challenge yourself or ask other people to give you fractions that you can multiply or divide. Then, check if your answer is correct using our online fraction calculator.

While some people might be breathing deeply into a paper bag at the thought of calculating with fractions, if you understand each step and why it’s necessary, it can become a piece of cake. Or 1/6 of a cake, if you like.

A rule to remember:

Whether you’re adding, subtracting, multiplying or dividing fractions, you should always aim for the “tidiest” answer possible. Tell your fraction if “its bum looks big in this” and simplify it down to the smallest option (e.g. 3/6 becomes 1/2, which retains the same proportions but is less clumsy).

How to divide and multiply fractions

How to add and subtract fractions

  1. Check: do your denominators match?
  2. If not, multiply them together (and balance the numerators accordingly)
  3. Add or subtract using the numerators, keeping the denominator the same.

For an adding or subtracting task, you need to make “common denominators“. The hardest thing about common denominators is trying to say it. Go on, recite it quickly ten times and come back to read the rest of the article when you’ve finished crying.

What are denominators and numerators?

A denominator is the number hanging out below the fraction line, so “common denominator” just means that you need all those numbers in the sum to be the same as each other. The number sitting on top of the fraction line is called the numerator.

When it comes to adding and subtracting fractions, it’s very simple once you’ve checked for (or created, if necessary) a common denominator.

Step 1) Check: do your denominators match?

If you’re very lucky, your denominators will already be the same, so you just add together the numerators from the top halves and keep your existing denominator under the line.

Example: 1/4 + 1/4 = 2/4

. And it’s the same deal for a subtraction sum, except you subtract the numerators instead:

Example: 2/3 – 1/3 = 1/3

Step 2) If denominators do not match

If the denominators are not already the same number (like if you want to add 1/4 + 2/3), you’ll need to multiply them together. The figure you get from the multiplication becomes the common denominator, and therefore forms the bottom part of each fraction in the sum.

Example: If you need to do 1/4 + 2/3, make a common denominator:

4 x 3 = 12. Now 12 goes on the bottom of each fraction.

Now you’re working with the same number under each fraction. And of course, you need to adjust the numerators accordingly, or your fractions won’t be equivalent. Think about it. If you paid for 1/4 of a cheesecake, you would be furious – and hungry – if you were just handed 1/12 of the cheesecake. Those aren’t equivalent, so you need to adjust the numerator so it’s proportionately the same size.

You do this by multiplying the numerator by the same figure you used to multiply the denominator. Look:

1/4 becomes 3/12 (both parts, top and bottom, have been multiplied by 3)

And 2/3 becomes 8/12 (both parts, top and bottom, have been multiplied by 4)

Step 3) Add or subtract your numerators

So, you’ve made sure that there’s a common denominator, and that nobody’s ripped you off with a smaller piece of cake (i.e. you adjusted your numerator accordingly). Now you’re now free to do your simple sum, adding or subtracting, using the numerators. Leave your common denominator as it is; that doesn’t change now. That’s it!

Example: SUM: 1/4 + 2/3

Multiply your denominators together (4 x 3 = 12), and adjust the numerators proportionately: 3/12 + 8/12

Do the sum on top of the fraction = 11/12

Does my bum look big in this? Nope. This is the smallest this fraction can be.

Let’s try another example.

Example: SUM: 3/4 – 1/8

Multiply your denominators together (4 x 8 = 32), and adjust the numerators proportionately: 24/32 – 4/32

Do the sum on top of the fraction = 20/32

Does my bum look big in this? Sorry, yeah it does a bit. 20/32 can be simplified down to 5/8. Much better!

Education link: Check out the fantastic math worksheets for adding fractions and subtracting fractions at DadsWorksheets.com.

How to multiply fractions

When you want to multiply fractions together, it’s beautifully simple.

  1. Multiply the numerators together: anything sitting on top of the fraction gets multiplied together. This becomes the numerator of your answer.
  2. Multiply the denominators together: anything lurking below the line in the fraction gets multiplied together. This becomes the denominator in your answer.
  3. Does my bum look big in this? Shrink the fraction to the smallest denominator possible.

Example: 4/5 x 1/4 = 4/20 = simplified is 1/5

Education link: Check out the worksheets for multiplying fractions at DadsWorksheets.com.

How to divide fractions

[TIP] When dividing fractions, you don’t ever have to do any division. Weird, right? Instead, we are going to multiply. It makes more sense if you consider that division is the opposite of multiplication, so we flip one of the fractions upside down to compensate for this.

Step 1

The first thing you want to do is make it a multiplication sum. Get rid of that divide symbol and replace with an X.

But now it’s a totally different sum, right? It’s going to make a bigger number instead of a smaller one? Aha! Well.

Step 2

Flip the second fraction upside down, putting the old denominator on TOP of the line and the numerator underneath.

Example:

Let’s say you have the following fraction sum:

Keep the first fraction the same:

Change the ÷ to x:
1/2 x 3/4

And flip the second fraction upside down.

So your calculation (and you know how to multiply from the previous section) is:

1/2 ÷ 3/4
which becomes
1/2 x 4/3
= 2/3

Does my bum look big in this? No, you look wonderful, 2/3! You’re perfectly simple as you are.

Education link: Check out the worksheets for dividing fractions at DadsWorksheets.com.

Calculations complete. Should you wish to check your answers, we have a handy fractions calculator that you can use.

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Common Questions

How do I multiply fractions with different denominators?

How do I multiply fractions with whole numbers?

How do I divide fractions with whole numbers?

How do I divide fractions by whole numbers?

How do I multiply fractions with different denominators?

The same way you multiply them if they had the same denominator! Check out our guide below for more details.

Common Questions

How to divide and multiply fractions

How to divide and multiply fractions

First, convert any fractions with whole numbers into an improper fraction. You can do so using our guide here.

Then, you can multiply your improper fractions and fractions normally using our guide below!

How to divide and multiply fractions

First, convert any fractions with whole numbers into an improper fraction. You can do so using our guide here.

Then, you can divide your improper fractions and fractions normally using our guide below!

How to divide and multiply fractions

Multiplying and dividing fractions might seem confusing, but they’re actually much easier than adding and subtracting fractions.

The key thing to remember is that if we have the same number in the numerator and denominator, they cancel out:

5 × 3 5 × 2 ​ = 5 ​ × 3 5 ​ × 2 ​ = 3 2 ​ How to divide and multiply fractions

Check out our example below or try out our calculator.

3 5 2 ​ ÷ 6 2 0 ​

  1. Flip the second fraction (if dividing): The funny thing about division is that it’s actually just multiplying. We just need to first flip the second fraction: 3 5 2 ​ Г· 6 2 0 ​ = 3 5 2 ​ Г— 2 0 6 ​
  2. Simplify the fractions: Now, we’ll simplify our fractions to make multiplying easier.

Simplify Fraction 1: Our first fraction is a mixed number, so we’ll convert it to an improper fraction. If you’re not sure how, check out this guide. 3 5 2 ​ ​ = ( 3 + 5 2 ​ ) = 5 1 5 ​ + 5 2 ​ = 5 1 7 ​ ​
Simplify Fraction 2: Our second fraction doesn’t have whole numbers, but we can reduce it a little by dividing the top and bottom by the same number. 6 2 0 ​ = 6 Г· 2 2 0 Г· 2 ​ = 3 1 0 ​

  • Merge the fractions: Now, using our two simplified fractions, we multiply by merging our two fractions: 5 1 7 ​ Г— 3 1 0 ​ = 5 Г— 3 1 7 Г— 1 0 ​
  • Cancelling: Now, our favorite part – cancelling numbers. Basically, we’re going to see if there is anything we can divide both a number in the top and a number in the bottom by. In this case, we can divide both 10 and 5 by 5: 5 Г— 3 1 7 Г— 1 0 ​ ​ = 1 5 ​ Г— 3 1 7 Г— 1 0 2 ​ = 1 Г— 3 1 7 Г— 2 ​ ​
  • Multiply / Simplify: Now, we just multiply the tops and the bottoms, and we’re done! 1 Г— 3 1 7 Г— 2 ​ = 3 3 4 ​
  • Multiplying and Dividing Fractions Calculator

    Try it out – enter in two fractions to multiply or divide.

    Multiply the tops, multiply the bottoms.

    There are 3 simple steps to multiply fractions

    1. Multiply the top numbers (the numerators).

    2. Multiply the bottom numbers (the denominators).

    3. Simplify the fraction if needed.

    Example:

    Step 1. Multiply the top numbers:

    1 2 Г— 2 5 = 1 Г— 2 = 2

    Step 2. Multiply the bottom numbers:

    1 2 Г— 2 5 = 1 Г— 2 2 Г— 5 = 2 10

    2 10 = 1 5

    With Pizza

    Here you can see it with pizza .

    How to divide and multiply fractions

    Do you see that half of two-fifths is two-tenths?
    Do you also see that two-tenths is simpler as one-fifth?

    With Pen and Paper

    And here is how to do it with a pen and paper (press the play button):

    Another Example:

    Step 1. Multiply the top numbers:

    1 3 Г— 9 16 = 1 Г— 9 = 9

    Step 2. Multiply the bottom numbers:

    1 3 Г— 9 16 = 1 Г— 9 3 Г— 16 = 9 48

    Step 3. Simplify the fraction:

    9 48 = 3 16

    (This time we simplified by dividing both top and bottom by 3)

    The Rhyme

    в™« “Multiplying fractions: no big problem,
    Top times top over bottom times bottom.

    “And don’t forget to simplify,
    Before it’s time to say goodbye” в™«

    Fractions and Whole Numbers

    What about multiplying fractions and whole numbers?

    Make the whole number a fraction, by putting it over 1.

    Example: 5 is also 5 1

    Then continue as before.

    Example:

    Make 5 into 5 1 :

    2 3 Г— 5 1

    Now just go ahead as normal.

    Multiply tops and bottoms:

    2 3 Г— 5 1 = 2 Г— 5 3 Г— 1 = 10 3

    The fraction is already as simple as it can be.

    Answer = 10 3

    Or you can just think of the whole number as being a “top” number:

    Example:

    Multiply tops and bottoms:

    3 Г— 2 9 = 3 Г— 2 9 = 6 9

    6 9 = 2 3

    Mixed Fractions

    You can also read how to multiply mixed fractions

    Fraction Word Problems With Interactive Exercises

    Example 1: If it takes 5/6 yards of fabric to make a dress, then how many yards will it take to make 8 dresses?

    Analysis: To solve this problem, we will convert the whole number to an improper fraction. Then we will multiply the two fractions.

    Answer: It will take 6 and 2/3 yards of fabric to make 8 dresses.

    Example 2: Renee had a box of cupcakes, of which she gave 1/2 to her friend Juan. Juan gave 3/4 of his share to his friend Elena. What fractional part of the original box of cupcakes did Elena get?

    Analysis: To solve this problem, we will multiply these two fractions.

    Answer: Elena got 3/8 of the original box of cupcakes.

    Example 3: Nina’s math classroom is 6 and 4/5 meters long and 1 and 3/8 meters wide. What is the area of the classroom?

    Analysis: To solve this problem, we will multiply these mixed numbers. But first we must convert each mixed number to an improper fraction.

    Answer: The area of the classroom is 9 and 7/20 square meters.

    Example 4: A chocolate bar is 3/4 of an inch long. If it is divided into pieces that are 3/8 of an inch long, then how many pieces is that?

    Analysis: To solve this problem, we will divide the first fraction by the second.

    Answer: 2 pieces

    Example 5: An electrician has a piece of wire that is 4 and 3/8 centimeters long. She divides the wire into pieces that are 1 and 2/3 centimeters long. How many pieces does she have?

    Analysis: To solve this problem, we will divide the first mixed number by the second.

    Answer: The electrician has 2 and 5/8 pieces of wire.

    Example 6: A warehouse has 1 and 3/10 meters of tape. If they divide the tape onto pieces that are 5/8 meters long, then how many pieces will they have?

    Analysis: To solve this problem, we will divide the first mixed number by the second. First, we will convert each mixed number into an improper fraction.

    Answer: The warehouse will have 2 and 2/25 pieces of tape.

    Summary: In this lesson we learned how to solve word problems involving multiplication and division of fractions and mixed numbers.

    Exercises

    Directions: Subtract the mixed numbers in each exercise below. Be sure to simplify your result, if necessary. Click once in an ANSWER BOX and type in your answer; then click ENTER. After you click ENTER, a message will appear in the RESULTS BOX to indicate whether your answer is correct or incorrect. To start over, click CLEAR.

    Note: To write the mixed number four and two-thirds, enter 4, a space, and then 2/3 into the form.