How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

Our wall-mounted toilet keeps running. It is easy to “stop” by removing the plate with the push-buttons and pressing down the cylinder (valve?) inside, but I’d like to find an actual solution 🙂

It’s hard-ish to find out what the issue is for me as I know nothing about these things, and it’s inside the wall: hard to just take apart and look around.

The toilet is a ‘Duravit’, but I couldn’t find any specs on the flushing mechanism itself, so this can be ‘anything’ I suppose.

Any idea how to fix it, or what I can check? Or just call a professional?

Now for some visual clarification:

First the button. When pressing it halfway it doesn’t keep on running, but it’s not a good flush like that. Pressing it all the way makes it stuck in ‘open’ or so it seems. How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

Inside of the button-set (seems like air-pressure makes it work?) How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

So this blue-topped cylinder keeps stuck in the ‘up’ position

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

About to press it down to make it stop flushing. An easy fix, but annoying obviously

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

3 Answers 3

We had a similar problem with our Duravit toilet. We followed the instructions above, and after pulling out both the intake water controller portion, as well as the flush control, he didn’t find any calcium build-up: just some rust stains. How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing As a final check, my husband reached down into the toilet tank and felt something stuck in the bottom stopper valve. He felt what he thought was a broken piece of rubber, and after tugging on it with some force, he pulled the foreign object out in his hand from the access hole in the wall, and found a perfectly intact, but dead scorpionHow to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing]2 It must have died just that morning when the toilet started running. Luckily he wasn’t stung.

There were 2 (or maybe 3) things I needed to know:

(easy) the fact that these things can be disassembled easily

(harder) how the flushing actually works

and the third, the cause in this case:

calcium is evil

So after a friendly plumber who ‘refused’ to come by for such a trivial matter had proposed I’d take apart the thing, find something that was wrong, fix that, and assemble it first helped me get going, I removed a lot of parts:

  1. front plate (see above)
  2. Screws and the 2 platic rectangles keeping the front in place (see above)
  3. The water ‘hose’ (iron thing, again, see above)
  4. I removed the piece that starts/stops water flow with the floater (was on the left, no picuture) and gently set it down inside.
  5. The plastic base was the trickiest to remove: one side had a mechanism, the other side neede to slide up (but needed some force). See picture below.

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

Now that we finally have some picture, this is what happens: The blue part on the big cilinder (also featured above) is the one that stops the flow of water, but the smaller (white) one is the one that pushes it up when you press the button (airpressure). That one was the one that didn’t come down again, due to caclium buildup. Cleaning this fixed it! see picture of the problem before cleaning it.

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

Strange that a relalitvely new toilet (house is from 2008) will have this as a problem, so I suppose this will come back sometimes ;(

Posted on May 24 2022

This article focuses on sensor assembly maintenance for top mount flush valves. The sensor assembly is also called the ‘head’ of a sensor flushometer. Top mount sensor flushometers are flushometers in the following series: ECOS, MC (metal cover), G2, and SOLIS.

For top mounted sensor flushometers, the majority of the maintenance completed is within the sensor assembly. This is why it is critical for the maintenance personnel who service these units to understand what components are in the sensor assembly, and when and how to troubleshoot those components.

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

The 4 models of top mounted sensor flushometers: ECOS, MC (metal cover), G2, and SOLIS.

Top Mounted Sensor Flushometer Parts Breakdown

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

The image above shows all of the major components of a top mount sensor flushometer. Those components are the sensor assembly, valve body, outlet coupling, flush connection (vacuum breaker), spud coupling, spud flange, tailpiece, stop coupling, control stop, and supply flange.

Sensor Assembly Components

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

As you see in the image above, all of the following components are located within the Sensor Assembly:

  • Button Cover Assembly with Screws (Single and Dual)
  • Lens Window Cover
  • Locking Ring Sensor Module
  • Cover Rest Plate
  • Solenoid
  • Inside Cover

How Top Mount Sensor Flushometers Function

How does a Sloan automatic flush valve work? When the sensor is activated on a water closet (meaning the sensor has detected a valid target), it will send a signal to the solenoid telling it to open. The solenoid will then pull in a plunger, and open a relief path for water from the upper chamber to go down through the flex tube of the diaphragm and through the valve to the fixture. This depressurizes the upper chamber and pressurizes the lower chamber, which causes the diaphragm assembly to rise. That allows the flush to occur.

The sensor then sends another signal to close the solenoid. This seals off the relief path. The upper chamber then slowly refills through the diaphragm bypass, which forces the flex tube diaphragm assembly back down and into the seat, shutting off the flush.

Troubleshooting Sloan Top Mount Sensor Units

What causes a Sloan sensor flushometer to not flush? Why does a Sloan sensor flush valve keep running? How do you fix an automatic toilet flush? Learn the answer to all of these questions and more for top mounted sensor flushometers in the various scenarios listed below, along with other troubleshooting tips.

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

Always troubleshoot from the top of the unit, down. Start with the cover assembly (including buttons) then consider the sensor module, then the solenoid assembly, then the diaphragm.

Troubleshooting issues are listed from most common to least common. So if the first solution listed doesn’t work, then consider the next cause and try the solution for that item, and so on.

Run Ons

Continuous Flush With No Shut-off

  1. Debris is blocking the diaphragm bypass – Clean diaphragm to clear the bypass orifice
  2. Debris is stuck underneath the diaphragm – Remove debris
  3. Low pressure drop – Check facility or municipal line pressure
  4. Diaphragm assembly compromised O-ring, cracked plastic guide (old) – Replace diaphragm assembly with proper GPF kit
  5. Solenoid stuck open – Replace solenoid assembly EBV-136-A

No Flush

Unit Is Not Flushing At All

First situation: No activation when the sensor is activated or the override button is depressed.

  1. Override button damaged – Replace override button (3 different types)
  2. Batteries are depleted – replace batteries
  3. Sensor module is compromised – Replace sensor module
  4. Solenoid is stuck closed – Replace solenoid assembly EBV-136-A

Second situation: Sensor does not activate, override button does activate

  1. Sensor window is scratched – replace sensor window
  2. Sensing malfunction – replace sensor module

Sensor Activation Issues Due to Improper Installation

Sensor Does Not Activate, Override Button Activates

For sensor activation issues, consider whether this issue has always occurred or not (since installation). If yes, then we need to look at the installation.

  1. Rough-in too low, sensor is detecting front of toilet – Raise the supply or “elbow up” the stop, or reduce sensor range (older units that cannot self-adapt only)
  2. Sensor not centered properly – Re-orient sensor until pointed straight forward
  3. Reflection issue – Reduce sensor range (older units that cannot self-adapt only)
  4. Rubber strip (wiper) missing from inside the cover – Contact Sloan Technical Support

No Evacuation

No Evacuation When Flushed (either sensor or override button)

  1. Low pressure – Address plumbing system deficiencies
  2. Low consumption or urinal diaphragm installed in older closet – Install correct gpf diaphragm
  3. Short flushing (perforated diaphragm) – Replace diaphragm
  4. Locking ring not properly tightened (DFB – dual filter bypass diaphragm) – Tighten the locking ring

Leaking from Top-Mount Unit

Water or Mineral Deposits Showing Underneath the Head of the Unit

  1. Locking ring not tightened enough – Turn off water supply at stop, loosen and then re-tighten locking ring
  2. Diaphragm Assembly compromised – Replace diaphragm assembly

Water leaking from threads above or below the locking ring

  1. Solenoid leaking – Turn off water supply at stop, hand tighten solenoid or replace solenoid

Inconsistent Flush

Flush Duration is Randomly Normal, Long, or Short

  1. Pressure fluctuation within the facility – Check plumbing system pressure and flow capacity

Sloan Field & Tech Support Maintenance Recommendations

From Dominick, Sloan’s Senior Field & Technical Support Technician

  • Do not use pipe dope
  • Do not use Teflon tape
  • Tighten couplings and covers by hand, then “snug” with a wrench
  • Use a fixed smooth-jawed wrench
  • Avoid compression wrenches
  • Carry 100% silicone grease
  • Clean threads with a brass bristle brush
  • Wet the gaskets before installing
  • Clean with soap and water only

You will find the repair parts needed to service the units in this article on their repair parts pages listed below:

COMMON PROBLEMS

How to fix water hammer or resonance causing loud noise

Read below for information on how to fix:

1. WATER HAMMER: A loud bang in your pipes after a fill valve shuts off. Water hammer can be caused by worn or damaged faucet washers as well as heavy build up of minerals and rust inside shut off valves (located on the walls of your home).

2. RESONANCE: The rapid banging or “Jack Hammering” sound in a pipe during the fill process, during the flush.

1. WATER HAMMER:
Follow these steps to try and resolve water hammer:

  1. Shut off water supply to the house at the main.
  2. Open all the cold water faucets, start with the highest faucet (2nd or 3rd floor) and work to your lowest faucet (first or basement floor).
  3. Flush all the toilets in the home.
  4. Let water drain from open faucets. Wait approximately 20 to 30 minutes.
  5. Turn on water supply to the house at the main.
  6. Wait 5 to 10 minutes to let faucets regain a strong stream and flow water.
  7. Close all the cold-water faucets starting with the lowest faucet (first or basement floor) and to the highest faucet (2nd or 3rd floor).
  8. Toilets will automatically refill.
  9. Once all faucets are closed and toilets filled, flush toilets to check for water hammer.

If this does not resolve your issue, try these tips:

  1. Reduce flow from shut off valves (wall or floor valves).
  2. If you are not using a regulated fill valve (a toilet valve that regulates flow into the toilet tank), try replacing the toilet fill valve with a Fluidmaster PerforMAX® Fill Valve.
  3. If reduction of shut off valve does not resolve issue, Fluidmaster recommends calling a plumbing professional to help resolve the issue.

If you need to replace any of the toilet parts, why not get Fluidmaster’s Everything Kit includes everything you need to fix your toilet in one purchase?

If you are in the U.S. and have a 2″ flush valve toilet, we recommend the 2″ Everything Kit

If you are in the U.S. and have a 3″ flush valve toilet, we recommend the 3″ Everything Kit

If you are in Canada and have a 2″ flush valve toilet, we recommend the 2″ Everything Kit

If you are in Canada and have a 3″ flush valve toilet, we recommend both the 540AKR Flush Valve and the 400H Fill Valve

2. WATER RESONANCE:

Follow these steps to try and resolve resonant noise (resonance) or watch this video:

    1. Turn off water supply and flush the tank.
    2. Reach inside the tank with your right hand under the float cup and lift it up. With your right hand hold onto the gray shaft keeping the float cup all the way up. Do not allow the float cup to drop or valve shaft to turn.
    3. Place your left hand on the top of the valve cap and while placing your left hand thumb on the side of the arm coming out of the top. Turn the cap and lever counter clockwise 1/8th of a turn to unlock. You should be able to lift off the cap and lever from the valve body.
    4. Once the cap assembly has been removed inspect for debris on the seal (rubber disc with pin coming through) and also the valve portion still in the tank.
    5. Hold a cup upside down over the exposed opening of the valve and turn on the water supply full force for 10-15 seconds, allowing the pressure to free any debris inside the valve inlet.
    6. Reassemble the top of the valve by placing the cap arm next to the refill tube. To lock, press the cap down while turning it and the arm clockwise.

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushingFlushing Debris from Toilet Fill Valve to Fix Water Hamer

The bottom hand is lifting up on the float cup which raises the black arm under the top cap. The top hand is gripping the cap while the thumb is pressing on the raised lever arm.

If cleaning out the water system does not resolve issue Fluidmaster recommends calling a plumbing professional to help resolve the issue.

To download our free guide to fix common toilet problems please click here: Fluidmaster Toilet Repair Guide

Posted on November 08 2017

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

Troubleshooting a flushometer can be difficult. With different issues causing similar problems, it can be hard to identify the problem and best solution. Below are five videos covering the more common issues that occur with the Sloan G2 Flushometer. Each video quickly and thoroughly walks viewers through identifying a problem and the steps that need to be taken to solve it. We also cite specific tools that are needed to perform these repairs, different size options, and other useful tips relevant to the specific troubleshooting task shown within each video. If your problem is not listed below, check out our Sloan G2 Optima Plus Parts Breakdown and Troubleshooting Guide or the G2 Optima Plus Troubleshooting Flow Chart .

As always, you can give us a call (800-442-6622 M-F 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.) and we can assist you with any questions you may have.

Sloan G2 Flush Valve Volume Regulator Troubleshooting (2:02)

Does your Sloan G2 flushometer currently have too much or too little water running through it? If this is happening, you probably have the wrong volume regulator installed. In the video below, we show you the different types of volume regulators, and how to remove and install the correct one for your unit.

How to Clean Your G2 Diaphragm (2:03)
Does your Sloan G2 Flushometer run continuously? Does the water not shut off? The issue could be that your diaphragm assembly is clogged with dirt or debris. In the video below, we show you the proper way to clean the diaphragm assembly in order to correct this problem.

How to Replace a Sloan G2 Flushometer Solenoid (2:13)
Has your Sloan G2 Flushometer stopped flushing? You might need to replace your solenoid. If you don’t hear a click after the valve has been activated, then it means that your solenoid needs replaced. Watch the video below to see how this simple procedure is done.

How to Replace the Batteries in a Sloan G2 Flushometer (1:24)
In this short video we show you how to simply replace the dead batteries in your Sloan G2 Flushometer. The dead batteries in the Electronic Module, could be causing your unit not to flush. Watch the brief video below to learn how!

How to Adjust the Sensor Range on a Sloan G2 Flushometer (1:20)
Another possible reason your flushometer is not flushing could be that the sensor range is either too long or too short. The factory setting is sufficient in most situations, but if you think the sensor range is the problem, in the short video below we will show you how to adjust the range properly. Please Note: Not all G2 electronic modules have the range adjustment feature, watch the video to learn how to tell if your unit is adjustable or not.

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Suppose you are a tenant and live in a big building. You face clogged toilets many times. But you always maintain your bathroom. That puzzled you how you ended up with this disaster. So for your kind information, you are not the reason for this issue every time. If you know about this situation in detail and want a solution, I think this article will help you out.

Why does your upstairs toilet get clogged frequently?

I know you don’t want to see a clogged toilet in the morning. When you accidentally stop the drainage system of your bathroom, it is blocked, and after that, you can’t flush anything into it. When you live in an apartment in any building, you also face this type of issue there. And sometimes you have clogging problems with others’ faults. So if you don’t live on the ground floor but face a clogged toilet, sometimes you are not the reason for this clogging issue. If your upstairs toilet keeps clogging frequently, there are many reasons behind this like:

Fault in S-blocked:

An S-shaped pipe is usually attached to the toilet’s bottom. It is mainly used to prevent a bad smell in the restroom. You can face the clogged toilet when somehow this pipe got stuck and didn’t empty appropriately after using it. You make it worse if you throw hair, pad, etc., in the bathroom. But you can unclog the toilet by using a plunger or other tools. If you fail, then call the plumber to fix the issue.

Poor flushing issue:

This time, low flush systems are top-rated to save some water from waste and extra utility charges. And that’s why it is famous as a saving type of bathroom in their washroom. But in the meantime, this toilet creates a problem because of low water pressure. The old version low flush toilet needs little power to push the human waste into the drains. But the bathroom doesn’t meet that much pressure in flush, and then it can’t clean the bowl, and the trash gets stuck there. And you end up with a blocked toilet that is not usable.

Water issue:

In many places, water is not pure at all. And I think everyone faces this widespread problem. But it’s a matter of assurance that This water is not dangerous for humans to drink or use but is a bother for daily purposes. The impurities create a calcified or white hard mark in the restroom after you use it daily. It’s not easy to clean the toilet, and it also narrows the gap between water and waste pipes daily. So after some years, you face this clogged toilet.

Water level issue:

For a successful flush, there’s a need for a quantity of water that creates enough water force to clean the toilet bowl immediately. If the water level of your tank is low, then the flush system didn’t meet the strength, and waste is stacked at the drainage pipe, and it didn’t make it to the sewer system. In the end, you got a clogged toilet.

Blockage in daring line:

Sometimes, the old drain is behind the clogged toilet. Because of the age of the drain line used opposite it, it may continuously block when you try to flush regular waste with toilet tissue. So when you throw any hair, paper, or litter into it, you make it worse.

Throwing hard objects in the toilet:

Flushing other objects into the bathroom are the most common reason behind clogging toilets. Many times kids love to experiment and throw many hard things into it. And sometimes adults also did that, throwing food, sanitary napkins, cats or dog litter, and any make-up wastage into the toilet. But the drainage system only flushes the human waste into others. And it clogs the toilet very quickly.

This reason is the basic villain behind any clogged toilet. There are also many other reasons you may find for this issue. And as the solution, you must know how to maintain a bathroom and also, if there is a kid over there, educate them on how to use this properly. It also reduces the rate of clogging the toilet.

How to fix a clogged upstairs toilet?

Up there, you know why the toilet keeps clogging. But sometimes, you end up with a clogged toilet without doing anything. It may take you like a mystery if you live upstairs in the building. But this is not a difficult thing, and yes, you are not the culprit behind this occurrence. First, check if the toilet vent is opening on the roof or not. Most of the time, the duct becomes blocked because it’s open at the top of the roof, and sometimes it is also connected with your sewer system inside the home. So when you suspect the vent system is blocked for any reason, check it from the roof and talk to a plumber to fix this. For a DIY fix, you can follow some easy steps to keep your upstairs toilet clog-free.

  • You can use a plunger or toilet snake to unclog the toilet
  • Adjust the water level correctly
  • Never flush any unusual thing like hair, food, metal, etc
  • Keep your drainage pipe clear
  • Replace the flush valve and flapper to get a powerful flush

Another reason for this problem is if the toilet is an older low flush model. Sometimes all drainage systems are interconnected in the building in a row on every floor. If one toilet clogs by accident, you also face the issue of that by any chance. That’s why try to maintain your toilet and ask everybody to do it properly.

Final Thought

Clogging is a very bothersome stage for everyone. So if you and another family who live in the building take care of this and maintain it properly, I think you may not face any issue with that. And if you face any clogging problem, you can solve it on your own with the help of a plunger or baking soda, vinegar solution, etc. Otherwise, you may contact the landlord and call the plumber to help you out of this trouble.

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

The Spruce / Michelle Becker

Your home toilet consists of two major parts: the bowl unit that rests on the floor, and the upper tank that holds the water that is released each time you flush the toilet. The bowl is little more than a solid piece of porcelain drain fixture with no moving parts at all. With only a few exceptions, there aren’t many repairs that involve the bowl. The tank, on the other hand, is where two important valves are located, as well as the handle that initiates the flush action. Here is where most of the toilet repairs occur. You might be surprised to learn that most toilet problems are fairly easy to fix yourself.

Newer style toilets can differ greatly in terms of the flushing design and parts. It’s always a good idea to know the make and model of your toilet before you start to work on it. The manufacturer’s name is usually stamped into the porcelain, and the model appears on the underside of the tank cover.

Before you can begin repairs, it’s important to have a basic understanding of how your toilet tank works.

How the Toilet Tank Works

The toilet tank’s function is to hold a quantity of water until you flush the toilet, at which time the water in the tank rushes down through an opening in the bottom of the tank and into the bowl, forcing waste out of the bowl and into the home’s drain and sewer lines. There are two major toilet parts in the tank that make this possible: the flush valve and the fill valve.

The toilet fill valve is the mechanism that fills the tank with water. It is also known as a “ballcock” or a “refill valve.” The fill valve is usually located to the left side of the tank as you look down from above with the tank lid removed. Fill valves comes in four basic variations:

  • Plunger-type ballcock: the oldest type, usually made of brass
  • Diaphragm-type ballcock: older styles may be brass, newer types are plastic
  • Float cup fill valve: a newer design, usually made of plastic
  • Floatless fill valve: another newer design; not allowed by some codes

Whatever the design, the fill valve works to automatically open the water supply valve when the water level falls in the tank during a flush, then shuts off automatically when the water level rises to a specific level in the tank. Depending type of design, the valve is operated either by a floating ball or a float cup that moves up and down with the water level in the tank. Floatless fill valves operate by sensing water pressure at the bottom of the tank.

If you remove the tank lid and watch what happens inside the tank during the flush cycle, you will quickly understand the mechanics of how a toilet flushes.

ATTENTION INSTALLERS: With the exception of the control stop inlet, DO NOT USE pipe sealant or plumbing grease on any valve component or coupling! To protect the chrome or special finish of Sloan flushometers, DO NOT USE toothed tools to install or service these valves. Use the Sloan A-50 Super-Wrench™ or other smooth-jawed wrench to secure couplings. Regulations for low consumption fixtures (1.6 gpf/6.0 Lpf closets and 1.0 gpf/3.8 Lpf urinals) prohibit use of higher flush volumes.

Urinals (EL-1500 Sensor)

When the sensor detects a user, a slow flashing red light appears in the sensor window. After eight (8) to ten (10) seconds, the light flashes rapidly to indicate that the sensor is armed. When the sensor no longer detects a user, the sensor immediately activates the solenoid valve after a 0.5 second delay.

Water Closets (EL-1500-L Sensor)

Detection and activation are the same as for the urinal EL-1500 sensor (ABOVE) except when the sensor no longer detects an user, the sensor activates the solenoid valve after a three (3) second delay.

The EL-1500 urinal and EL-1500-L closet self-adaptive sensors are equipped with a “Sentinel Flush” feature. These units automatically activate the solenoid every twenty-four (24) hours after the last user.

  1. Valve does not function (red light does not flash when user steps in front of sensor).
    • A. No power is being supplied to sensor. Ensure that the main power is turned “ON”. Check transformer, leads and connections. Repair or replace as necessary.
    • B. EL-1500/EL-1500-L sensor is not operating. Replace sensor.

  2. Valve does not function (red light flashes when user steps in front of sensor).
    INDICATOR: The red light stops flashing when user steps away and the valve makes a “clicking” sound but does not flush.
    • A. No water is being supplied to the valve. Make certain that water supply is turned “ON” and the control stop is open.
    • B. EL-128-A cartridge is fouled or jammed. Turn electronic power to valve “OFF” (failure to do so could result in damage to the solenoid coil). Remove the solenoid operator from the valve and remove the EL-128-A cartridge. Clean and/or repair as necessary.

INDICATOR: The red light stops flashing when user steps away but the valve does NOT make a “clicking” sound and does NOT flush.

  • A. EL-163-A solenoid shaft assembly is fouled or jammed. Turn electronic power to valve “OFF” (failure to do so could result in damage to the solenoid coil). Remove EL-101 or EL-166 nut from the solenoid operator. Remove the coil from the solenoid operator. Use a spanner wrench or pliers to remove the EL-163-A solenoid shaft assembly from valve. Clean and/or replace as necessary. Be sure to replace plunger spring when reassembling solenoid shaft assembly.

INDICATOR: The red light flashes three (3) fast flashes, three (3) slow flashes then three (3) fast flashes (“S-O-S”) and continues to repeat this cycle even when user steps out of the sensor’s detection range.

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Folks, I am posting here in the hope that someone can help me. I am completely unfamiliar with plumbing, and am groping in the dark here.

My problem is as follows:

I have a flushometer toilet. A little while ago, our building shut off the water to do some repairs. When I got back home after the water was turned back on and went to flush the toilet, the water would not stop running. I jiggled the flush lever thinking that it was stuck, but it wasn’t, and the water continued to run. I called in the super, who shut off the water using the control valve, and then replaced a valve that is located in the pipe below the flushing mechanism. This did not do the trick. The super than said that the whole mechanism (basically all the piping from the toilet bowl to the wall) would need to be replaced. I am hoping to avoid that if possible.

My flushometer is probably an old one. It does not have a very wide top, which makes me think it may be a piston type (although I may be wrong). If I remove the cover at the top, there is a vertical screw, which seems to control the power of the flush. When I fiddle with it, and release the control valve, I can get the toilet to flush, but the water will not stop flowing – it will just flush, re-fill with water, flush again, etc. The vertical screw is mounted in a top piece made of yellow metal (copper?) I tried to remove it to see if the piston or diaphragm is below it, but it will not turn or move in any way.

Thank you in advance for your replies, hoping I can get this fixed.

There are basically two brands of “old” flushometers, so we would need a picture of yours. Piston style are notorious for “sticking”, and usually the only good repair is to change the piston, rather than repair it.

This is a photo from some other website, but the unit looks like mine (the shut off valve is different, but everything else looks identical).

I managed to get the top (copper colored) cover off. Inside, there was a unit which had SLOAN G-77 written on it. I think that this might be a Sloan Gem or Gem 2 unit per what I saw online.

see: 4D on last page

Retired U.A. Local 1 & 638
“Measure Twice & Cut Once”

The piston assembly has a white gasket on the bottom, called a Piston Seat. The old one should be removed from the inside body of the valve and the new one must snap in flatly. Using the wrong piston will present other issues. Ge9m 2 uses a G-1007A for the 3.5 gpf or G-1016A for the 1.6 gpf.

for additional info you can call Sloan Customer Service at 800-982-5839

Thanks for the info! Is there any way to find out if my toilet is a 1.6 or 3.5 Gpf? Or is it more of a choice – I can pick whichever one I want depending on how much water I want each flush to contain?

You could use either pistons, but if you have a 3.5 gpf piston and replace it with a 1.6 gpf piston assembly you will be less than 1/2 the full water your toilet requires. This could cause other issues and CLOGS.

Thank you to everyone for your help! I removed the piston and fiddled around with it, and it looks like it was just stuck. It started working properly, and now the toilet works again. I might still need to buy a new one since if it got stuck once it might again, but at least now I know what to do.

I have just spent 2 (nearly) full days trying to salvage an old (1950’s) 3.5g Flushometer. Started with a full rebuild kit, no help.Bought and installed a new spud, and reset the damned toilet, bought another ‘cover’ for the diaphragm (plastic, goes inside the bell housing). No help.
Just got off the phone with Sloan tech support, and with all the q&a that went with it, I decided to order a Complete valve assembly (part #3910107).Seems my problem was a gift of a plumber who reset the toilet to clean out the drain. His reinstall was shabby, cross-threaded fittings, patch with teflon tape, and overstressed install.
Sloan says the new cover was not adequate to the old diaphragm/bell housing assembly.

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Last Updated on January 18, 2022 by toilethaven

How do you tell your toilet flush valve is bad?

A toilet flush valve is the opening at the bottom of the toilet tank where water leaves the tank and enters the bowl during flushing. A toilet flapper sits on top of the flush valve to prevent the water from continuously running into the bowl when the toilet is not being flushed.

To replace a toilet flush valve, turn off water to the toilet, drain the tank, disconnect the water supply line then remove the tank. Remove the old flush valve and install the new one then put the tank back on the bowl. Connect the water supply and flush the toilet. Check for leaks between the tank and the bowl.

To remove a toilet flush valve, remove the toilet tank and place it on its side. Slide out the tank to bowl gasket then loosen the flush valve mounting nut using slip-joint pliers. Disconnect the flapper from the flush valve and lift it out of the tank.

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

Toilet flush valves are not universal. They vary in size between 2 and 4 inches. Apart from that, there are different types of flush valves like the standard flush valve, canister-style flush valves, dual flush valves and flushometers.

However, for toilets with the same size and type of flush valve, their flush valves are universal.

When you have a running toilet, most of the time the flapper or the fill valve are the problem but sometimes the flush valve is the culprit.

Replacing a toilet flush valve is not hard but it is definitely time consuming. You will first need to remove the toilet tank and then install it back after replacing the flush valve.

If your toilet is continuously running even after replacing the flapper and fill valve, it is a sign that you have bad/crack flush valve. Water will slowly trickle inside the bowl and after sometime followed by ghost flushing.

A toilet tank to bowl gasket is installed on the outside of the flush valve where the toilet tank sits on the bowl. This prevents water from leaking between the tank and the bowl.

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

Most people prefer to change this gasket also as they replace the flush valve. It is inexpensive and also comes with new toilet tank bolts which you should also replace.

Alternatively, you could buy a complete toilet tank repair kit that contains a flush valve, toilet tank to bowl gasket, toilet tank bolts, flapper, fill valve and toilet float. This should serve you for 5 years or more.

Toilet Flush Valve Types

There are 4 main types of flush valves. These are:

  1. Standard flush valves
  2. Canister flush valves
  3. Flushometers
  4. Dual-flush valves

In these post we will focus on the standard flush valves. If you have a Kohler toilet you most likely have a canister type flush valve. Check out how to fix it in this post

On the other hand if you have a dual flush toilet, your toilet tank looks different from a single flush toilet tank. See how to fix it in this post.

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

Most flush valves are universal but they have to be of the same size. Flush valves vary in size from 2 to 4 inches. Most toilets have a 2-inch flush valve but modern low flow toilets have larger flush valves and an even larger trapway to give the toilet a powerful flush while using less water.

An example of this is the American Standard Champion 4. It has a 4-inch flush with a consumption of 1.6 gallons per flush. It is among the best flushing toilet.

How do you know the size of your flush valve? Some people use a tennis ball to compare it with a 2-inch flush valve and a soft ball to a 3-inch flush valve.

The best way to tell your toilet’s flush valve size is to search its name and model number on the manufacturer’s website. You will find a specification sheet with all of your toilet dimensions. The toilet model number is usually stamped on the inside of the toilet tank.

Once you have purchased the correct size of the flush valve you are ready to replace it. Gather together all the materials needed.

Materials Needed

  • New Flush valve
  • Long screwdriver
  • Adjustable wrench
  • Channel lock pliers
  • Sponge
  • Rag or towel
  • Hacksaw blade (optional)
  • WD-40 (optional)

How to Replace a Toilet Flush Valve

Replacing a toilet flush valve involves the following steps:

  • Empty the toilet tank
  • Remove the toilet tank
  • Remove the old flush valve
  • Install the new flush valve
  • Install the toilet tank
  • Test the new flush valve

Step 1: Drain the Toilet Tank

Step 2: Remove the Toilet tank

Step 2: Remove the Old Flush Valve

Step 3: Install the New Flush Valve

Step 4: Install the Toilet Tank

  • Lift off the toilet tank and guide the bolts through the toilet bowl mounting holes.
  • The toilet tank bolts will protrude from underneath the toilet tank. Put in a rubber washer, a steel washer and a nut on each bolt.
  • To keep the toilet level, tighten the bolts alternatingly initially with your hands before using a wrench.
  • Again, care must be taken not to tighten the bolts too much that the tank is cracked.
  • Put the toilet flapper on top of the flash valve opening and hook its ears on the overflow tube’s pegs.
  • Connect the refill tube back to the overflow tube.
  • The top of the overflow tube should be about ½-1 inch below the flush lever. If it’s longer than that cut it off with a hacksaw. This will prevent your toilet tank from overflowing.
  • Reconnect the toilet water supply line back to the tank. Again, this should only be hand tight.

Step 5: Test the New Flush Valve

  • Open the shut off valve and let the toilet tank fill with water.
  • Check for any leaks between the tank and the bowl. This will tell you if the toilet tank to bowl gasket is sealing properly.
  • Flush the toilet a couple of times. If you had a running toilet, it should now stop. To be sure the toilet is not dripping even the least amount of water, wait a few minutes and hold a toilet paper below the rim of the toilet. The toilet paper should stay dry.
  • If you are pleased with everything, put your toilet tank lid back on and enjoy your throne moving forward.

And that is how to replace a toilet flush valve. If you would like to replace the toilet flapper and/or the fill valve, check out this very informative posts

COMMON PROBLEMS

Determining your toilet’s noise and how to fix it

This article on toilet making noise defines simple solutions for:

1. GHOST FLUSHING: This can happen intermittently, cycling every few minutes or every few hours

2. FILL VALVE HISS: A noise that is constant and sounds like forced air moving through the toilet.

3. WATER RESONANCE: (constant thumping) A noise you hear when the toilet is flushed and the toilet is running water during its flush cycle

1. GHOST FLUSHING:
This refill sound is alerting you that your toilet is losing water, either internally (if there’s no water on the floor or exterior of toilet) or externally leaking if you see water outside the toilet.

Internal Water Loss:

  1. Check refill tube first: If refill tube is inserted or shoved into the overflow pipe, remove it and reattach clipping the tube to the overflow pipe. This will keep the tube from entering the overflow pipe and stop the leak.
  2. Clean bottom of the tank and flapper area and replace flapper. To determine which size flapper you need, please click here: Determine size of toilet flapper.
    If you need a 2″ flapper, we recommend the 502 flapper; if you need a 3 ” flapper, we recommend either the 513A flapper or the 5403 flapper
  3. Replace flush valve drain (last resort if 1 and 2 do not resolve the issue).

External Water Loss:

  1. Water draining from bottom of tank around fill valve and water supply connection: Leaks coming from the bottom of the fill valve that have been in use for a long period of time (not new installations) should be removed along with the supply line and replaced.
  2. Water draining from the bottom of the tank from the fill valve and water supply connection: Remove fill valve and clean bottom of tank both inside and outside. Make sure the shank washer is placed on fill valve first (it is designed to seal tank from the inside of tank) and install valve. Hand tighten the fill valve lock nut. If using water supply line older than 5 years replace supply line.
  3. Leaks coming from under the tank onto the toilet bowl: These leaks indicate failed bolt seals. The tank to bowl gasket and toilet bolts with washers should be replaced.

Watch this video to fix ghost flushing of your toilet:

2. FILL VALVE HISS:
This noise is alerting you that water is constantly passing through the fill valve and going into the tank.
Read more below or or watch this video:

Here are some steps for removing the top cap and flushing out debris from the fill valve:

  1. Turn off water supply and flush the tank.
  2. Reach inside the tank with your right hand under the float cup and lift it up. With your right hand hold onto the gray shaft keeping the float cup all the way up. Do not allow the float cup to drop or valve shaft to turn.
  3. Place your left hand on the top of the valve cap and while placing your left hand thumb on the side of the arm coming out of the top. Turn the cap and arm counter clockwise 1/8th of a turn to unlock. You should be able to lift off the cap and lever from the valve body.
  4. Once the cap assembly has been removed inspect for debris on the seal (rubber disc with pin coming through) and also the valve portion still in the tank.
  5. Hold a cup upside down over the exposed opening of the valve and turn on the water supply full force for 10-15 seconds, allowing the pressure to free any debris inside the valve inlet.
  6. Reassemble the top of the valve by placing the cap arm next to the refill tube. To lock, press the cap down while turning it and the arm clockwise.
    How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing
  7. The bottom hand is lifting up on the float cup which raises the black arm under the top cap. The top hand is gripping the cap while the thumb is pressing on the raised lever arm.

Watch this video on how to remove and replace cap assembly of the fill valve:

3. WATER RESONANCE:
This noise is alerting you that your shut off valve at the wall has an obstruction in the flow path of the water. Here are some solutions:

a). If you are based in the U.S., we recommend using a regulated fill valve to stop noise like our 400AH PerforMAX® Fill Valve or the 400H PerforMAX® Toilet Fill Valve

If you are based in Canada, we recommend using the 400H PerforMAX Toilet Fill Valve

PerforMAX® fill valves come with a regulator built into the valve to slow down the incoming water. By reducing the speed by the incoming water we can stop the resonance noise that is occurring.

b). If a PerforMAX® Fill Valve does not stop the problem then the buildup of debris in your shut off valve is so severe we recommend replacing the shut off valve at the wall.

c). If you need to replace any of the toilet parts, why not get Fluidmaster’s Everything Kit includes everything you need to fix your toilet in one purchase?

If you are in the U.S. and have a 2″ flush valve toilet, we recommend the 2″ Everything Kit

If you are in the U.S. and have a 3″ flush valve toilet, we recommend the 3″ Everything Kit

If you are in Canada and have a 2″ flush valve toilet, we recommend the 2″ Everything Kit

If you are in Canada and have a 3″ flush valve toilet, we recommend both the 540AKR Flush Valve and the 400H Fill Valve

To download our free guide to fix common toilet problems please click here: Fluidmaster Toilet Repair Guide

Running Toilet?

Do you have a constant or intermittently running toilet? Let’s troubleshoot this and get it fixed. If your toilet keeps running, there are a couple of potential issues your toilet may have. The first, and most common, is a leaky flapper. Different parts of the country deal with different types of water. From harsh municipality chemicals to well water, all wreak havoc on the life of a toilet flapper. The most common, and quickest fix is to replace your leaking toilet flapper. The second common cause is due to a malfunctioning fill valve. If your fill valve has an external float, build-up can cause the float to stick and prevent your fill valve from turning off or turning on.

Choose from the following options:

  1. Learn how to identify your toilet symptoms – Video and step-by-step instructions below.
  2. Click find part to find the correct replacement flapper and fill valve for your toilet.
  3. If this doesn’t quite describe your toilet issue, choose from the other common troubleshooting topics.

Does this describe your toilet issue?

Step 1

Check out the video to learn how to fix your running toilet.

Step 2

Video didn’t help? Check out the step-by-step instructions below.

Step 3

You can always give our Technical Support team a call too. We are here and happy to help! U.S.A: (262) 763-2434 & outside U.S.A.: (800) 528-3553. Available: Monday through Friday, 7:30 AM to 5:00 PM CST.



How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

STEP 1: More times than not, your flapper is the cause to your running toilet. As the flapper slowly leaks, it causes the fill valve to do it’s job and that’s why you hear your fill valve running. Test if your flapper is leaking by marking the water level of your tank with a pencil.

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

STEP 2: Turn your water supply off. Wait for a minimum of 25 minutes. If your water level drops below the pencil mark, you have a leak in your tank.

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

STEP 3: Leave the water off for a couple hours and see where the water level drops to. If the water level drops to the flapper, your flapper is leaking and needs to be replaced. If it drops to a point on your overflow tube or your tank drained completely, your flush valve needs to be replaced.

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

STEP 4: If your tank is not leaking, but your toilet is constantly running or water is rising into flush valve overflow tube, your fill valve is malfunctioning and needs to be replaced or serviced. Did you know Korky replace old technology too?

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

STEP 5: If this didn’t solve your running toilet issue, maybe it’s time to service your fill valve. This is a quick disassemble of the fill valve, without removing it from your toilet and cleaning it out to ensure it works properly. Check out how: here.

Beside this, why does my toilet splash when I flush?

If the water in the bowl is very low, it will glug and splash, looking like bubbles. Low water in the bowl can be caused by the fill valve hose not correctly positioned into the overflow tube. The flush time may be too short or you may have siphoning occurring, which causes low water in the bowl.

Beside above, how far does toilet water spray when flushed? While there may be some academic discussion about how far water droplets from your toilet spray when you flush, two feet to twenty feet, there is an average consensus that the outer reaches of your fecal shower are six feet or less.

Also to know, how do I stop my toilet from splashing?

The key is laying a piece of toilet paper over the surface of the water. It’ll slow down the falling poop and cause it to pierce the water’s surface at more of an angle — and in doing so, eliminate the problem of poop splash forever.

Is it bad if toilet water splashes on you?

This can happen when germs enter the urethra during sex, unwashed hands touching genitals, or even when toilet water back splashes.” Yeah, you can get a UTI from the bacteria in toilet water back splash. Shudders. If you think you have a UTI, but you‘re not sure how you got it, don’t worry.

One of the most perplexing plumbing issues has to do with the toilet when it’s flushing by itself. If you’re a homeowner or simply someone with a toilet that is flushing by itself, it could be the indication of a much more serious issue. Because of that, it’s very critical that you keep the following information in mind when trying to assess whether or not a toilet is actually properly flushing or not. Too many people assume that the reason a toilet flushes is due to the complications in the plumbing construction. This is actually not true.

When it comes to automatic flushing there are several possibilities, but without a doubt, it’s something that can easily be addressed without much issue at all. Should you doubt that this is true, you’ll also have to consult some others because overall, there should be no reason that this happens. There are plenty of complications in the code that might prevent people from assuming whatever happens due to the reasons outlined in most plumbing manuals, but it’s usually a simple diagnosis, and similarly speaking, it’s usually a simple fix as well.

Faulty Flush Switch

When you press the switch on the toilet to make it flush, this is called the flush switch. This switch is there to engage the toilet into flushing whatever water is in the bowl. When this happens, the septic tanks flushes itself and the water pressure causes massive suction. However, sometimes, this switch can get too sensitive and begin flushing on its own. If your toilet is just blindly flushing without any reason at all, this usually means that the flush switch is faulty and needs to be engaged properly. It’s not uncommon that this happens for a lot of people, so if it’s something that you can think of, then you’re definitely at risk for this getting more serious. However, if you have a plumber or toilet tech take a look at the unit, they can most likely repair it and get it working again.

Imbalance in Water Pressure

Water pressure is something that you have to be very aware of when constructing a toilet or flush mechanic. This is something that plenty of people have trouble with, but rather than being at fault or uncomfortable, you can rest assured that this is a simple fix if you decide to make the effort necessary to repair everything that is broken.

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

Find all of the Sloan tools needed to service your flushometers, perform ongoing maintenance, and replace broken parts quickly and easily with help from this flushometer tool diagram. This diagram shows you which tools are used in various areas of flush valves and the descriptions below describe how to the tools are used, and on which parts they are needed, and what models they can be used on.

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

This tool is simple – it removes spuds. This heavy-duty spud wrench is rugged and adjustable, and works for most any spud with a capacity of 1”-4”. View the Spud Wrench in our online store.
How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

This tool is designed to remove top mount Sensor Activated Flushometer Head Assemblies. Using this tool to remove the head assembly instead of using another wrench will prevent marking or damaging the unit. View the Heavy Duty Strap Wrench in our online store.

At Sloan Repair, we carry all of the tools needed to service flush valves, faucets, and other fixtures. View our plumbing tools page to see which tools are listed online and place your order, or give us a call to inquire about any tools that you need but do not see listed on our site by calling our toll-free phone number at 800-442-6622 Mon-Fri 7:30am-5pm EST

Are you excited to read the topic Does Roto-Rooter Fix Toilets?

Tired of having a clogged toilet? Does your toilet keep lacking the flushing power, or does it leak way too much that your water bill is digging a hole in your wallet? With broken toilets inviting unhealthy lifestyles and health hazards, not to mention, the inevitable rise in the water supply bills and the underlying result of such wastage results in the depletion of a natural resource that we need to save. Or are you just looking for some new styles of toilets to fit your personal space in the bathroom?

You don’t have to worry about that anymore! Yes, Roto-Rooter can fix toilets and have the perfect solution for every one of your toilet and plumbing problems, available 24/7 at your service just at the click of a button or a call.

History of Roto-Rooter

  • Roto-Rooter Plumbing & Water Cleanup (formerly known as Roto-Rooter Plumbing &Drain Service) is a plumbing business based in Cincinnati.
  • They provide numerous services including toilet repair, sewer & drain service, water cleanup to their customers residentially or commercially.
  • They are based in the United States, founded in 1935 by Samuel Blanc after getting inspired by a clogged sewer at his son’s apartment.
  • He made a sewer the cleaning machine out of a washing machine motor, wheels from a little wagon, and a cable, and the invention was hence named, “Roto-Rooter”.
  • And as they say, the rest is history, and now Roto-Rooter is one of the biggest providers of plumbing services in both the United States as well as Canada.

Roto-Rooters Services & Charges:

Well-known for their plumbing services, what exactly does Roto-Rooter have to offer? The cost of Roto-Rooter services is determined by the amount of work that has to be done. Where you reside may also have an influence on pricing. Here is the complete list to help you out :

Toilet Clog Repair, Leaking Toilet Repair, Running Toilet Repair

How annoying is it to wake up to a clogged toilet when you’re in dire need of using it? Not to mention, it’s one of the most, if not the most common problems. A running toilet is also a lot more annoying than a leaking toilet daily. It does not just make your bathroom tiles slippery and gross, but also potentially waste gallons of water every passing day. Roto-Rooter costs between $160 and 450 for basic plumbing issues including leaky faucets, line repairs, and clogged drains.

Toilet Repair, Flushing System Repair

If you have a problem with your toilet or any of the flushing system elements, Roto-Rooter plumbers will normally charge between $50 and $300, depending on how long it takes to fix it.

However, identical services can set you back a bit more than $170.

Toilet Installation and Replacement, Commercial Toilet Installation Service

This is one of the most bothersome things, just as renovating a home is, installing a whole new toilet isn’t the easiest home improvement task out there. Roto-Rooter consists of professional plumbers who recommend you the best commercial toilet, urinal, or bidet that goes well together with your bathroom setting, helping you achieve long-term, durable, dependable, and valuable goals.

Commercial Toilet Repair and Plumbing Services

  • In today’s world, commercial toilets and urinals are one the most important features of a business or a workplace. Immediate repairing is important also for the safety of your patrons and employees as wastewater is associated with potential health risks and unsanitary conditions.
  • Roto-Rooter plumbers can solve any type of commercial toilet problems, including leaking toilets, clogged toilets, running toilets, cracked tanks and bowls, toilets with non-functional flushes, or water pressure issues.
  • They also go as far as repairing, replacing, and relocating pipes that are associated with commercial toilets.
  • The ultimate price can range from $500 to $20,000, if not more, depending on the complexity of the project, the length and depth of the pipes, and the cost of replacement pipe parts.
  • Roto-Rooter will charge you a lot more if you require help replacing broken pipes. The exact cost will be determined by the job’s intricacy, the length and depth of the pipes, and the cost of replacement pipe components, but it is likely to be in the thousands of dollars.

Conclusion

Although the cost may appear to be greater than what a typical plumber would charge, it will be well worth the investment since you will receive expert services that will last a long time. Roto-Rooter has licensed professionals who provide 24-hour emergency toilet repairing services to get your toilets running as soon as possible. There may be many problems that cause a running toilet issue in your home, and it’s important to address them as fast as possible to avoid unwanted trouble. Roto-Rooters don’t charge you any extra fee for nights, weekends, or holidays, so you can rest assured that your toilets are in the right hands!

Last updated: Feb 24th, 2022 by Tyler White

A clogged toilet is among the most frustrating things in any household. However, a weak flushing toilet can lead to a slow, stinky disaster that is a lot worse.

Sometimes low water in the tank can cause a weak flushing toilet. Other times clogged holes around the rim can lead to a weak flush performance. Either way, here are some quick tips to help get rid of the problem and boost the flushing power of your toilet.

Table of Contents

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

Why is a Powerful Flush Important?

Since a powerful flush forces waste down the drain in one go and stop it from coming back up, it is essential to keep your toilet clean and hygienic. A strong flush also saves you from having to flush the toilet multiple times. Toilets that require multiple flushes are considered a weak and less desirable choice.

Tips to Make a Toilet Flush Stronger

Here are 5 ideas to make a toilet flush stronger.

1. Test for Clogs

Testing for toilet clogs is the first step toward making your toilet flush stronger. Even if your toilet is not completely clogged, waste build-up over the years can cause the toilet to clog partially, which can affect the flushing performance.

Pour a gallon of water inside the bowl, and if the water struggles to flush, it means that the toilet is partially clogged. Use a plunger or snake to clear the pipes.

2. Vinegar

You can also use vinegar to improve the flushing efficiency of a toilet. A vinegar soak is a lot more proactive and effective than simply checking for clogs. First, open the tank lid and remove the fill hose that varies by toilet model. Now, put a funnel inside the overflow tube carefully, and fill it with vinegar.

Leave it for a couple of hours then, put everything back the way it was. Flush the toilet and you should notice a significant difference in flushing power. The vinegar should quickly and gently remove the build-up in your toilet and pipes.

3. Reset Your Water Level

Toilets flush by releasing water from their tanks into the toilet bowls, then refilling the tank for the next flush. The tank knows that as soon as the floating rubber device drops below a fill line, it is going to need a refill so, it keeps filling the tank until the floating rubber reaches the fill line again.

Open the tank and locate the float and the fill line. Activate the flush while keeping the lid open and watch the water release into the toilet bowl and then fill back up. Check to see if the tube stops refilling before the float reaches the fill line. If it does, the toilet won’t perform a fully efficient flush. Adjusting the float is pretty easy—you have to position it to connect it to the refill tube. Now, flush again and see if it is working correctly.

4. Clean the Rim

Water enters the toilet bowl through several jet holes that are located around the upper rim. These jets control the pressure and the flow of water as it flows into the bowl. The flow of the water creates the centrifugal force required to boost the efficiency of the flush.

Over time, these jets tend to accumulate dirt and waste build-up, which leads to a partial clogging of these jets and making it harder for water to flow effectively. The water struggles to clear up the blockage inside the jets, which is why you get a weaker flush.

Locate the jets under the rim. You will quickly notice build-up and clogging around the nozzles. To clear this up, use a heavily watered-down bleach or a vinegar solution and an old toothbrush or wire brush to scrub away the blockage and obstruction on the nozzles. When you are finished, clean the toilet thoroughly with bleach or a standard toilet bowl cleaner.

5. Switch Toilet Models

If nothing seems to increase the flushing power of the toilet, you can also consider buying a new toilet that is designed in a modern way. Pressure assist toilets consist of bladders that hold water under pressure. These toilets are more expensive than most traditional toilets but have a strong flushing performance.

Vacuum-assisted toilets contain plastic tanks that generate suction action in the tank as the water releases while sucking the waste out of the bowl, generating a lot more flushing power than conventional toilets.

You can also replace the pipes that connect to the toilet. When pipes get old and you haven’t replaced them in a long time, it can lead to a slower flushing performance. Changing the pipes is a small change that can make a huge difference.

Summary

In conclusion, these few tips and tricks can help you increase your toilet’s flushing power and you won’t need a professional! A few adjustments here will prolong the life of your toilet and help maintain its top-notch performance.

General Tips, How-To and DIY Guides

Below is the parts breakdown for the Sloan G2 Flushometer. Scroll down and click on the part number(s) you need to repair your G2 Flushometer. Note that the Sloan G2 flushometer is the exact same item as the Sloan G2 Optima Plus flushometer, the naming convention has simply been shortened in recent years to just ‘G2’ instead of ‘G2 Optima Plus’. (If an item below does not have a link, we still carry it, but the item is not currently on our website. If you would like to order this item, give us a call.) View our G2 Troubleshooting Flow Charts for additional help troubleshooting your G2 flushometers.

Quick Links

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

Troubleshooting Q&A

PROBLEM:
Sensor flashes continuously only when user steps within range

CAUSE:
A) Unit in start-up mode

SOLUTION:
A) No problem. This feature is active for the first ten minutes of operation.

PROBLEM:
Valve doesn’t flush; sensor not picking up user

CAUSE:
A) Range too short.

SOLUTION:
A) Increase the range.

Learn how to complete sensor range adjustments on your G2 flushometer by watching our YouTube video: Sloan G2 Flushometer Sensor Range Adjustment.

PROBLEM:
Valve doesn’t flush; sensor picking up opposite wall or surface, or only flushes when someone walks by. Red light flashes continuously for first ten minutes even with no one in front of the sensor.

CAUSE:
A) Range too long.

SOLUTION:
A) Shorten range.

Learn how to complete sensor range adjustments on your G2 flushometer by watching our YouTube video: Sloan G2 Flushometer Sensor Range Adjustment.

PROBLEM:
Valve DOES NOT flush even after adjustment

CAUSE:
A) Range adjustment potentiometer set at full “max” or full “min” setting.

B) Batteries completely used up.

C) Problem with electronic sensor module.

SOLUTION:
A) Readjust potentiometer away from full “max” or “min” setting.

C) Call Equiparts at 800-442-6622 to replace Electronic Sensor Module or Click here for #08697 (G2 Closet Module) or #08698 (G2 Urinal Module).

PROBLEM:
Unit flashes four quick times when user steps within range

CAUSE:
A) Batteries low.

SOLUTION:
A) Replace batteries.

PROBLEM:
Valve DOES NOT shut off

CAUSE:
A) By-pass orifice in diaphragm is clogged with dirt or debris, or by-pass is clogged by an invisible gelatinous film due to “overtreated” water.

B) Dirt or debris fouling stem or flex tube diaphragm.

C) O-ring on stem or flex tube diaphragm is damaged or worn.

D) Problem with electronic sensor module.

SOLUTION:
A) Remove flex tube diaphragm and wash under running water. NOTE: Size of orifice in by-pass is of utmost importance for the proper metering of water by the valve. Equiparts recommends that you do not enlarge or damage this orifice. Replace inside parts assembly if cleaning does not correct the problem.

B) Remove inside parts assembly and wash under running water.

C) Replace quad seal if necessary.

D) Turn solenoid counter-clockwise very slightly.

PROBLEM:
Not enough water to fixture

CAUSE:
A) Wrong flush volume regulator installed in flex tube diaphragm kit.

B) Wrong Optima Plus model installed; i.e. 1.0 GPF urinal installed on 3.5 gallon closet fixture.

C) Enlarged bypass in diaphragm.

D) Control stop not adjusted properly.

E) Inadequate volume or pressure at supply.

B) Replace with proper Optima Plus model.

D) Readjust control stop.

E) Increase water pressure or supply (flow) to valve.

View our Sloan G2 Flush Valve Volume Regulator Troubleshooting Video for more volume troubleshooting information.

PROBLEM:
Too much water to fixture

CAUSE:
A) Wrong flush volume regulator installed in flex tube diaphragm kit.

B) Control stop not adjusted properly.

C) Wrong Optima Plus model installed; i.e. 3.0 GPF model installed on 1.0 or 1.5 gallon urinal fixture.

D) Dirt in diaphragm bypass.

B) Readjust control stop.

C) Replace with proper Optima Plus model.

D) Clean under running water or replace flex tube diaphragm.

View our Sloan G2 Diaphragm Cleaning Video to see how to clean the diaphragm with step by step instructions.

PROBLEM:
Unit works with Cover Off, but not On.

CAUSE:
A) Broken override button or missing rubber divider.

SOLUTION:
A) Replace override button or cover.

BATTERY REPLACEMENT
When required, replace batteries with four (4) alkaline type AA batteries. Note: water does not have to be turned off to replace batteries. Loosen the two (2) screws on top of unit. Remove the complete cover assembly. Lift the sensor module from its plate. Unplug the electrical connector from the battery compartment cover. Loosen the retaining screw on the battery compartment cover. Install four (4) alkaline type AA batteries.

Install the battery compartment cover and secure with retaining screw. Make certain that the battery compartment cover is fully compressed against the gasket to provide a seal. Do not overtighten. Plug the electrical connector into the battery compartment cover. Reinstall the sensor module onto the plate. Reinstall the complete cover assembly onto the plate. Tighten the two (2) screws on top of the unit.

CARE AND CLEANING INSTRUCTIONS
DO NOT use abrasive or chemical cleaners to clean flushometers, they may dull the luster and attack the chrome or special decorative finishes. Use ONLY soap and water, then wipe dry with clean cloth or towel. While cleaning the bathroom tile, the flushometer should be protected from any splattering of cleaner. Acids and cleaning fluids can discolor or remove chrome plating.

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

What’s that noise from the toilet? Does it mean you have a problem with phantom flushing? We’re not talking about the latest “Ghostbusters” film, but the uncanny experience of hearing your toilet flushing on its own.

There’s no shame in admitting that you may be a little spooked. Phantom flushing (also known as “ghost flushing”) is indeed worrisome. It’s a sign of water leaks somewhere in the toilet – bad news because leakage wastes water (which costs you money on your Ottawa-area water bill and is environmentally-unfriendly as well).

Not sure whether your toilet is leaking? Try this easy test. Add several drops of food colouring to the toilet tank and wait half an hour. If you end up with coloured water in the toilet bowl, you’re definitely looking at a leak. (Friendly plumber tip: Be sure to flush after finishing this test so the colouring won’t leave a stain.)

Now let’s plunge deep into this plumbing problem to explore 4 possible causes.

1. Flapper

The most likely culprit is your toilet flapper, that circular rubber thingamajig at the bottom of the tank that acts as a cover for the flush valve drain hole. This component normally opens when you flush the toilet and closes when the toilet tank refill is complete.

However, toilet flappers tend to last only about 5 years. A flapper which has warped or otherwise deteriorated over time will not close properly, leading to the eerie sound of the toilet flushing on its own. Fortunately, there is a fix: remove the old flapper and install a new one.

Another flapper-related issue occurs when the chain that holds the flapper in place is too long. As a result, the flapper may not be correctly seating atop the drain. When this happens, it could help to cut out a section of chain and then replace the flapper.

2. Flush Valve Gasket

Next on the list of toilet troubleshoots is your flush valve gasket. This is a simple circular piece, which serves as a mechanical seal for the flush valve. When the gasket stops working as it should, it will allow water to leak down the drain… and once again, you’ll be faced with phantom flushing phenomenon. Sometimes both the flush valve gasket and the tank-to-bowl gasket both fail, resulting in a water leak from the tank onto your floor.

3. Float

The float has the important function of controlling the water level in your toilet tank. If the water supply is too low, you won’t get a powerful enough flush. But if the level is too high – guess what? Your toilet will keep up that irritating flushing on its own. If this is the case, adjusting the float is key to a successful resolution.

4. Refill Tube

A fourth toilet part that may need attention is the refill tube. This narrow flexible tube, usually white or black, sits at the top of your toilet tank, connected to the fill valve. The refill tube may become detached or conversely, extend too deep into the overflow tube. Either situation could cause your toilet to flush on its own until the refill tube is repositioned.

End Phantom Flushing Fast

Count on the skilled, experienced OOTW team to solve your most perplexing plumbing problems. We know emergencies happen any time, so we make it easy for you to reach us, by phone or book online for toilet repair .

Whether your problem occurs when Flushing, Refilling or Not in Use, choose a tab below to help find the solution:

  • FLUSHING
  • REFILLING
  • NOT IN USE

Hearing hissing, rumbling or thumping when flushing? Need more than one flush to clear the bowl? Your fill valve , flapper or flush valve could be the source. Take a look below for some common FLUSHING problems or view all problems:

COMMON PROBLEMS

  • Toilet Tank Won’t Fill Up Or Is Slow To Fill
  • Toilet is making abnormal noise
  • Toilet running constantly

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

  • Fill Valve
  • Flapper
  • Flush Valve

After you flush, if the tank takes too long to fill or gets close to overflow, check for fill valve or flapper issues. Banging noises from the pipes could also mean water supply trouble.

Take a look below for some common REFILLING problems or view all problems:

COMMON PROBLEMS

  • Toilet Tank Won’t Fill Up Or Is Slow To Fill
  • Toilet running constantly
  • Toilet flushes on its own (Ghost Flushing)

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

  • Fill Valve
  • Flapper
  • Connector

When it’s not flushing or refilling, flush/refill sounds or short bursts of air every so often may come from the fill valve . Constant leaks could need a new toilet seal or other repair parts .

Take a look below for some common NOT IN USE problems or view all problems.

COMMON PROBLEMS

  • Toilet flushes on its own (Ghost Flushing)
  • Toilet running constantly
  • How to check if the bowl is overfilling

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

  • Fill Valve
  • Toilet Seals
  • Repair Parts

Fluidmaster Products

Easy to install and built to last, both consumers and plumbers trust our products the most to fix all toilet problems.

Fill Valves

The fill valve controls the refill of your tank after your flush.

Flappers

The flapper is the main seal that holds water in your tank.

Flush Valves

Flush valves ensure a steady exit of water from your toilet tank.

Repair Kits

Need to replace more than one part? Choose from a variety of all-in-one repair kits.

Tank Levers

Our toilet tank levers have a universal fit and come in many styles.

Water Supply Connectors

Get higher flow capacity from your water supply line to a variety of household appliances.

Wax & Wax-free Toilet Seals

Our 3” and 4” floor outlet toilet bowl seals are easy to install.

Repair Parts

From supply nuts to toilet bowl caps, we’ve got you covered.

Automatic Toilet Cleaners

Choose from environmentally friendly cleaners that won’t harm your toilet’s parts.

Access Panels

ClickFit® Access Panels provide easy access to in-wall plumbing and electrical.

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

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Also, how does a toilet flush valve work?

Once you push the handle, the chain that is connected to the flapper and flush valve is pulled up by the handle arm. By lifting the flapper up, the water inside the tank is allowed to flow down into the toilet bowl. The overflow tube empties directly into the toilet bowl below, refilling the bowl after a flush.

Likewise, how do you adjust a commercial toilet flush valve? How to Increase the Flushing Pressure on a Commercial Toilet

  1. Unscrew the access cap located at the elbow where the water supply line enters the flush valve.
  2. Rotate the control stop screw counter-clockwise with a screwdriver until it is fully open.
  3. Rotate the control stop screw counter-clockwise, one-quarter turn at a time.

Also, how does a commercial toilet work?

Commercial toilets work starting with the handle. Once the handle has been pressed down, a chain attached to the handle is pulled up. This activates a powerful release of water by the flush valve.

What does a vacuum breaker do on a toilet?

A vacuum breaker is an attachment commonly placed on a bibcock valve or toilet or urinal flush valve, that prevents water from being siphoned backward into the public drinking water system. This prevents contamination should the public drinking water system’s pressure drop.

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

We’ve all been here before, haven’t we? You flush the toilet expecting the bowl to empty as it has countless times before. This time, the water doesn’t empty all of the way. It keeps rising and rising. Suddenly, your toilet is overflowing and now you have a catastrophe all over your bathroom floor.

Plumbing issues can be a real inconvenience for any homeowner. But when you’re having to deal with a toilet overflowing, it can be a nightmare. Our toilets are the most commonly used appliances we have in our homes. They don’t tend to act up often, but when they do, it’s important to act quickly to prevent serious water damage to your home and drain pipe damage.

What Causes a Toilet to Overflow?

If your toilet is overflowing, odds are pretty high that you have a drain clog. A blockage typically will cause a sudden overflow when the toilet is flushed. You can sometimes identify a blockage before flowing by paying attention to have fast the water reenters your toilet bowl after flushing. If your toilet is prone to clogging, it is best to keep an eye on it after each flush and listen for any gurgling sounds.

Typical causes for a toilet clog include:

Flushing too much waste and/or toilet paper at one time.

Using the toilet to dispose of non-flushable bathroom trash, such as pads, tampons, cotton balls, paper, dental floss, or diapers.

Flushing kitchen waste, including cooking grease, fruit and vegetable peels, meat trimmings, etc.

Disposing of pet waste, including clumps of kitty litter and dog waste bags. Even products advertised as flushable may cause problems under the right conditions.

Weak or partial flushing that, over time, allows a clog to form and grow. Older low-flow toilets and toilets with tank float or flapper problems may be the culprit in this case.

Leaving small children unattended in the bathroom. There’s no telling what they’ll find fun to flush!

Keep in mind that the clog may not be in just your toilet’s line; it could be in the main sewer line for your home or apartment building. Check the other toilets on the line to see if that’s a possibility.

How Do I Quickly Stop an Overflowing Toilet?

No matter what led to this situation, there are some fast-acting steps you should take in order to take control of the situation.

Toilet Shutoff Valve

First, shut off the water supply to the toilet. Look for a silver football-shaped knob coming out of the wall at the back of the toilet and turn it counterclockwise. This will stop any additional water from flowing into the toilet and making the situation any worse. Homeowners tend to freeze up when they see water running out of their toilet and onto their floor. All you need to remember is by shutting off the water supply, water will stop flowing into the toilet and all over your bathroom rug.

Toilet Tank Flapper

Sometimes, the shutoff valves get stuck since they are left open for years and infrequently touched. If your valve is stuck, or for whatever you cannot reach it, the next solution lies within the tank of the toilet. Lift the lid off the top of your toilet and look for your flapper. It’s a rubber disc that covers the hole at the bottom of the tank. If the flapper is open, even just a little bit, this can cause water to keep running into the bowl. Simply push the flapper down with your fingers until the water stops running. It’s likely you’ll need to replace the flapper, but more importantly, this isn’t a permanent fix. You will still need to unclog the toilet.

Toilet Tank Float Ball

If you still have water overflowing at this point, you’ll need to find the float ball inside the take. The float ball looks like a big balloon attached to a rod inside the toilet tank. This ball, when raised by the water level in the take, tells the toilet to stop filling with water after you flush. To trick your toilet into thinking the tank has filled with water, simply lift the float ball as high as it will go. Find something to prop the rod and float ball up with while you clean up your bathroom floor and work on unclogging your drain.

Do I Need to Call a Plumber When My Toilet Overflows?

If you can self-diagnose an issue with your tank flapper or float ball, these typically can be fixed yourself by going to your local hardware store and buying replacement parts. If you believe there is a blockage in your drain pipe, try using a plunger or drain snake to clear the drain yourself.

There may be other reasons causing your toilet to overflow that can be much more serious. These are situations better trusted to a professional plumber that can remove the worst clogs and also check for less common clog causes, like tree roots growing into your sewer line, or a broken or collapsed pipe. If clogging is a frequent problem in your home, we may be able to recommend a solution—from new toilet installation to video sewer inspection and pipe repair.

If you believe your toilet or drains needs immediate repair, find your nearest ARS/Rescue Rooter location to book your appointment online right away!

Do you hear water leaking noisew at night? Are you worried that a constant sound of running water (the same sound you hear after flushing) means high water bill? What about when your Champion 4 Toilet flushes all by itself in the middle of the night?

At this point, you are mind is probably going crazy with the thoughts of:

  • Toilet water is somehow leaking below the bathroom, possibly causing thousands of dollars in damage
  • All those ghost flushes will jack up your water bill
  • You will have to replace the innards of a toilet or replace the entire toilet which will cost time and money

Well, all those could be true but I think a simple fix with a $5-10 dollar replacement part may solve your problems related to:

  • Intermittently / randomly running toilet
  • Ghost flushing
  • Failed flush valve seal
  • Long tank refill time

In this article, I will show you exactly what you need to buy and perform simple steps to make this flushing problem go away.

REQUIRED MATERIALS

  • Purchase either American Standard Toilet Flush Valve Seal Kit ($10) or Fluidmaster Toilet Flush Valve Seal for American Standard Champion 4 toilet ($5).
  • $10 part comes with extra parts (O-ring for the shaft which will be handy to have in the future); $5 part just comes with a valve seal
  • OPTIONAL but recommended: American Standard Champion Toilet Chain Assembly
  • OPTIONAL but recommended: American Standard Champion Toilet Clevis Pin Assembly (note: It is NOT called a “Levis Pin Assembly”!)
  • Rubber gloves
  • Rag / hand soap

STEP-BY-STEP INSTRUCTIONS

  • STEP #1 – Turn off the water supply (shutoff valve from wall is usually located on the lower left side of the toilet)
  • STEP #2– How down the flush lever to drain as much as possible from the tank
  • STEP #3 – Remove the tank lid (brown stain indicates mineral build up from water)
  • STEP #4 – un-clip the cotter pin (in my case a wire tie) then remove the chain “bucket” holder and clevis pin from the flush lever; store these tiny parts in a zip lock bag or small tray away from the work area;
  • How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing
  • How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing
  • STEP #5 – Gently lift up the chain so that you can place your hand below the piston assembly
  • STEP #6– Remove the thumbscrew cap by turning it counter-clockwise
  • STEP #7 – Remove the thumbscrew cap and piston top cover
  • STEP #8 – Gently lower the bottom piston cover by removing your hand
  • How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing
  • How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing
  • How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing
  • STEP #9 – Because my water contains lots of minerals (a.k.a. “hard” water), submerged rubber components tend to degrade fast. The OEM gasket seems like it is made from open cell foam core whereas the one from Fluidmaster is more “rubberized”. Note the original color of the gasket from underside where it was not submerged in water
  • STEP #10 – Fluidmaster part had grooves on the inner ring side so you can install it without worrying about the correct side being up. Grab some paper towel and wipe the inside of the piston seat to remove any build up
  • How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing
  • How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing
  • How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing
  • STEP #11– Once you install the new replacement gasket, you can reinstall the piston top cover. You will need to align four “tabs” to ensure that both top and bottom piston covers are mated properly.
  • STEP #12 – Reinstall the thumbscrew cap by turning the cap clockwise. Turn until you hear a click noise, then turn again until you hear the second click noise. TIP: If you stop at the first click, the seal will NOT BE TIGHT and will cause your toilet to ghost flush again!

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

  • STEP #13 – Reinstall the chain and clevis pin assembly. TIP: in order to maintain tension in the chain, you need to ensure that the open slit on the chain bucket faces to the right side of the tank. If the opening slit face the left side of tank, the chain will frequently pop off
  • STEP #14 – turn the water back on and observe; you should not hear any slow dripping sounds

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

CONCLUSION

This work only took about 30 minutes to complete. I am happy to report to you that ghost flushing is no more!

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Reader Interactions

Comments

Paul Kozoro says

Thank you very much for the concise and detailed step instructions and Visuals. .

Water Splashes When Toilet is Flushed

How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

  • How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing
  • How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing
  • How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing
  • How to fix a toilet on a flushometer that keeps flushing

LESLIE: Now we’ve got Matt in Wisconsin who’s dealing with a splashy toilet. That is the worst: constantly cleaning a toilet seat. Tell us what’s going on.

MATT: Well, when we flush the toilet, a good portion of air comes up through the trap, forcefully enough to cause the water to splash up onto the seat or the inside of the lid if it’s closed.

TOM: Well, what really causes that, Matt, is a venting problem. Is this a new problem or has it always been this way?

MATT: No, it’s just within the last couple of months.

TOM: OK. So then what I suspect is that you’ve got a blockage somewhere. If your vent for that toilet is partially blocked, then the drain line is being starved with air. And if it’s starved with air, it’s going to try to gulp that air from somewhere else and that’s what’s causing the bubbles.

TOM: So, what you need to do is try to figure out where that obstruction is. And it’s going to be somewhere in the vent that is connected to the waste line under the toilet, if that helps you narrow it down a bit.

MATT: Yes, it does. Thanks.

TOM: You’re very welcome. Thanks so much for calling us at 888-MONEY-PIT.

It’s more likely than not that you’ve experienced a slow flushing toilet either once or multiple times. This is an abnormal situation that needs to be investigated and fixed especially when running an independent system like a septic tank.

The ‘why’ and how to solve the problem is what we seek to discuss here.

You’re likely reading this article because you’re faced with the same problem. If you are, you only need to be patient and read through this short article to find answers. The good news is; a slow flushing toilet situation can be resolved.

Without an iota of doubt, toilets play a crucial role in homes.

As a matter of fact, your toilet is one of the most important parts of your home’s plumbing system. Quite a lot of homeowners may be oblivious to this fact until such toilets malfunction.

Two Possible Causes For A Slow Draining Toilet

Whenever you notice your toilet flushing slowly, there could be two possible causes. A malfunctioning fixture may be the first possible cause. The other may be due to issues with your septic tank.

The smooth functioning of your toilet is closely tied to your septic tank condition. This is why we’re considering the relationship between the two. Slow draining toilets due to faulty fixtures are quite minor and can be fixed easily.

However, septic tank-related problems are quite significant and will have to be urgently investigated. Your slow flushing toilet serves as a symptom that points to a developing problem.

Among the many possible causes for this problem is the likelihood of a filled septic tank.

There’s only one major action to take when dealing with a filled septic tank. It involves pumping the tank. This should resolve the problem of slow flushing.

Pumping Your Septic Tank

When a septic tank reaches capacity, one of the first signs it shows is a slow flushing toilet. When this is noticed, the first thing you need to find out is when last you pumped your septic tank.

Septic tanks must be pumped once every three to 5 years depending on size and number of users.

Sometimes, there’s no way of knowing whether the tank is full unless you investigate. We recommend that you leave such a task to the experts. Opening a septic tank is a high-risk situation due to the release of dangerous gases.

Apart from the foul odor, excessive exposure could knock you out. In severe cases of exposure, death may result.

So, it’s best to call a licensed septic technician or service to take a look. Their findings provide answers on whether to pump your tank or look elsewhere for your slow draining toilet problem.

Experiencing Slow Toilet Flushing Even When Septic Tank Was Pumped Recently?

As stated earlier, a recently pumped septic tank is no guarantee that you won’t experience a slow flushing toilet.

In this situation, you’ll need to look elsewhere. You’ll need all the help you can get in spotting the issue and finding a lasting solution to it.

A licensed plumber will be of great help to your quest of solving the problem. There are several possible reasons why you’re having a slow flushing toilet.

These include mild clogs, water tank settings, improper ventilation, sediment in the waterline, issues with the flapper valve, and hard water.

Mild Clogs

One of the possible reasons why you’re experiencing a slow-flushing toilet could be due to mild clogs.

Mild clogs allow for the partial or sluggish passage of water. Objects may be accidentally dropped down the toilet, thus preventing the free flow of water.

A plumber will need to be called immediately to get rid of such clogs. Possible tools to be used include plumbing snakes as well as plungers among others.

Water Tank Settings

The water tank position is always above the toilet seat.

This water reservoir setting could be tampered with. When this happens, less water gets supplied to the bowl when flushed. You’ll have to make the right adjustments to allow for increased water flow and flushing efficiency.

Consider raising the float arm as an intervention to increase water volume in the tank. More water volume is likely to increase toilet flushing efficiency.

Improper Ventilation

Poor ventilation is a possibility why you’re experiencing a slow flushing toilet. It has to do with inadequate pressure. Gurgling sounds are among the primary symptoms you’re likely to notice.

When this is noticed, it’s simply a pointer to the possible absence of air in your plumbing waste line.

This can be resolved with the help of an expert. When an expert arrives, he proves for all sorts of issues. Improper ventilation is determined after conducting several assessments all showing clear symptoms.

Sediment in the Water Line

When it comes to sedimentation in the waterline, it goes beyond the toilet.

This is also noticed in other water outlets. The main cause for this is a buildup of sediments which eventually gets in the way of free water movement. Less water is allowed into your plumbing fixtures which contribute to slow flushing.

You’ll need to call a licensed plumber to check what the exact problem is. Sediment accumulation in the water line isn’t a complex issue at all and can be resolved within a short period of time.

Issues with Flapper Valve

Your toilet’s flapper valve can also cause slow flushing. You may be wondering which part of the toilet your flapper valve is located. This component is the rubber stopper you find at the bottom of the toilet bowl.

As time goes on, the optimal performance of the flapper valve decreases. It is only a matter of time before this reduction in flapper valve performance affects flow.

When determined that the flapper valve is failing, a replacement will be necessary.

Hard Water

Hard water issues extend to toilets too.

Hard water is known to contain quite a lot of minerals including calcium and magnesium carbonates. As you continually use such water, there’s a steady and slow deposit of hard water minerals in pipes as well as the toilet.

Removal of these minerals is necessary for optimal functionality.

The relationship between slow toilet flushing and septic tanks has been highlighted. We’ve also seen that sometimes, septic tanks might not be filled, yet slow flushing may be observed.

For such development, we’ve provided possible reasons why this could be so.

In most commercial restrooms, urinals are the chief plumbing fixtures than toilets because they are easier to maintain and they help maximize space in small men’s rooms. Urinals, however, aren’t immune to common plumbing problems.

If your urinal keeps on running, you may need to replace some parts, and having Delany plumbing repair kits will help a lot.

If you have repair kits handy, you can deal with the problem immediately. Delay usually results in higher repair expenses when the problem gets out of hand. The good news is that repairing a running urinal is relatively simple.

What Causes Urinals to Keep Running?
What causes this to happen? Toilets are normally reliable, but every now and again, they malfunction. It’s not uncommon to find a toilet that is either broken or always running in public restrooms and commercial buildings.

When this happens, the diaphragm is usually the source of the problem. The diaphragm in the flushometer flushes by moving up and down. A little quantity of dirt can get lodged behind the diaphragm, causing it to stay open after a flush or causing it to wear out.

Given how frequently commercial and public restrooms are used, it’s reasonable for urinal components to sometimes require repair and replacement.

Types of Urinal Flushometers
All types of urinal flushometers use the same basic design components and mechanical concepts to function. However, there are various varieties that are distinguished by their characteristics. The repair you’ll need to do depends on the types of urinal flushometers you have. Following are the three types of flush valves and flushometers.

Manual flushometers are flushometers with a classic design that includes a lever to activate a flush.

Push-button flushometers replace the typical lever with a push button that can be mounted on the instrument or connected to it through tubes and placed nearby. They work the same way as manual flushometers.

Touchless or automatic flushometers employ an infrared sensor or another device to electronically activate a flush without forcing the user to touch any component of the machine.

How to Fix a Urinal That Keeps Flushing?
Check the kind of flushometers you have and follow the repair guide below.

Manual Flushometer
1. First, you’ll need to turn the water supply off. There is a slot for the screwdriver on either side of the flushometer, whether it’s pointing left or right. Turn the screwdriver slot with a flat screwdriver to turn the water off.

2. Remove the top lid of a flushometer with a wrench. You can remove the lid immediately after loosening the top with the wrench.
3. Remove the flange cover from the flange.

4. Look for a sediment-covered gasket. The weep hole in it is what causes a flushometer to keep on flushing.

5. Remove and clean the gasket, paying special attention to the weep hole and making sure not to widen it.

6. After cleaning the gasket, put it back and carefully replace the flange cover.

7. Put the flushometer’s top lid back and turn the screwdriver slot to turn the water back on.

Automatic Flushometer
Consult your manual for the exact steps for repairing the model you have. The steps below, however, should still guide you through repairing automatic flushometers regardless of the exact model.

1. You should be able to see a screwdriver slot whether your flushometer is on the right or left. Use a flat screwdriver to turn it.

2. Hold the chrome button down for a few seconds. Listen for two clicks separated by two seconds. If you hear this, the diaphragm has to be cleaned or replaced. By removing the flushometer’s cover, you may further examine it.

3. Finish by tightening the solenoid. On the solenoid, look for any double stacked or rings. If you’ve already serviced it, you should have a professional take a look at it.

4. Remove the flush head’s screw. Turn it slightly to loosen it and remove the flush head cap.

5. Locate the diaphragm and replace it with a new one. Having Delany plumbing repair kits at hand will be helpful in this case.

6. Put the flush head back and tighten the flushometer in place. This will restore the urinal’s water supply.

After the water has been turned back on, flush the toilet to check if the issue has been resolved. Wipe down the joints with a cloth before flushing, and check for leaks during and after the flush. If you see a leak, tighten the joints and flush the system again.

Your urinal flushometers should be working smoothly again.

Where to Find Delany Plumbing Repair Kits
Get your Delany flushometers and repair parts here at Quality Plumbing Supply. We are an official distributor of Delany flushometer products and we stock a huge inventory of urinal parts that you can order with convenience and ease at our online store.

We accept bulk orders and we ship for orders $99 and above. Talk to us if you need assistance choosing the right parts or if you need more information about Delany flushometers.