How to fix fudge

How to fix fudge

Desserts are course meals that we all enjoy. It’s very hard to say no to desserts. No one can turn down chocolate or a fruity dessert mixed with other ingredients which resulted in the perfect mouthwatering meal.

Fudge is one of those desserts that has a very creamy, smooth texture. This old-fashioned recipe needs to be cooked at a specific temperature.

Also, the ingredients have to be properly mixed. It’s a very tasty dessert. However, it may be a challenge to make it.

There are many things to consider before making a fudge. Otherwise, the fudge may turn grainy, crumbly or it may not set properly.

Actually one of the most common issues that can occur when making fudge is that it may not set well. So, is there a way to fix it?

How can I fix fudge if it doesn’t set? There are ways that can help you save your recipe without you having to start over.

If the fudge does not set we have provided tips that are very useful and can help you save the recipe without having to start over.

How to Fix Fudge That Didn’t Set?

How to fix fudge

One of the common problems that may occur when you are making fudge is that it may not set properly. Moreover, the fudge may turn sticky, messy, hard which won’t meet your expectations. And won’t provide the results that you are expecting.

This may occur due to many reasons. You have probably made some mistakes during the process of cooking the fudge. This can happen to everyone, so don’t worry about it.

You should also know the fudge which is overcooked or not left at the proper temperature can cause the fudge not to set as it is supposed to.

For those reasons and problems, we have found the solutions in the kitchen. There is a way to fix the fudge without throwing it away. Just follow the next 5 steps.

Step 1:

Firstly, you should put the already made fudge back into the large pan that you made in the first place. Then, add 1 and a half cups of water.

Step 2:

Your next step is to stir the fudge over low heat until the texture dissolves. And be super careful because the water might have diluted the flavor. Also, this is the time to add more ingredients if you think that it’s necessary.

Step 3:

Afterward, you need to increase the heat over to medium and bring the mixture to boil. It is very important to follow the instructions in the recipe that you are initially making.

Note that you should check the temperature at which the fudge needs to be cooked. This is very important. And the temperature is an important part of the process of making.

Step 4:

Furthermore, you should remove the pan from the heat and follow the next instructions from the recipe. It is crucial to let it cool down before beating it.

After you have decided that is cooled enough, beat it, and also keep in mind that the mixture may loosen up and then thicken before you add it into the pan.

Step 5:

Repeat all of the steps from cooling to stirring. Extra tip: Add more seasoning if you think that it is necessary in order to provide more aroma and taste.

Extra Tips

How to fix fudge

Actually, if you plan on making fudge, we have made a list of things that need to be taken into consideration. These are some additional tips that you need to know in order to avoid some of the problems that occur as well as the fudge not setting properly.

Buy a candy thermometer

An important instrument that you have to have is a candy thermometer. This is important since the fudge needs to be cooked at a particular temperature. One of the reasons why it may not set is because it was probably overcooked.

Know when to stop stirring

You should know that once the sugar dissolves and the mixture comes to a boil, that means that you have to stop stirring. The sugar may crystalize, meaning it may cause an effect on the fudge and the texture will become gritty. Once the texture gets its proper thickness, stop stirring.

Let it cool off

The cooling-off part also matters. It will make the fudge come down to its creamy texture. Also, never force the cooling part. Do not place it in a freezer because you won’t have any effect and you’ll just make it worse.

Related Questions

How long does fudge take to set?

For the fudge to set it takes approximately 3 hours. Another good option is to leave it overnight. This way you’ll leave it enough time to set properly.

Why is my fudge too soft?

If the cooking time is too brief and there’s not enough evaporation, too much water will remain and your fudge will be very soft.

Can I freeze fudge to make it set?

You shouldn’t leave the fudge in the freezer. It’s best to leave it for a couple of hours to set in the fridge and to avoid putting it in the freezer so it can set faster. If the fudge does not set, that means that you have done something wrong in the recipe.

How do you fix separated fudge?

You can fix the separated fudge by adding oily, hard fudge and get it back in a pot with a cup of water. Cook the mixture on low heat until you notice that the fudge dissolves.

Saurabh

I am a foodie and I also love cooking. This is my food blog, here you will find some really useful tips and recipes!

by Vicki
(Bristol Tn)

I have a really good fudge recipe but sometimes the fudge comes out grainy.

What am I doing wrong? Does it have something to do with how fast or how long I boil it?

Here’s the fudge recipe that I am using.

  • 2 sticks butter
  • 3 cups sugar
  • 5 oz evaporated milk

  1. I bring milk and butter to a small boil and add sugar gradually.

    I bring to the boil again and reduce heat, cooking and stirring constantly for 7 min.

  2. I then pour it over 1 bag choc chips, add a small jar marshmallow cream and mix.

I think I am messing up with the boiling. Maybe I bring it to a boil too fast or too hard or cook it too long or not long enough.

The first two batches I did turned out perfectly. The next was grainy. I want to prevent future occurrences of the fudge comes out grainy result.

I think you are right about the cause of your grainy fudge. It sounds like the temperature may have gotten too high when you were boiling your fudge.

You do want to bring the sugar mixture to the boil slowly and don’t let it get too hot. Generally speaking, you don’t want it to be more than about 235°F. If you have a candy thermometer, that will help you monitor the temperature.

If you don’t have a thermometer, look at the candy syrup stages and follow the instructions for soft ball stage using the cold water method.

I make a fudge very similar to the one you are making, except I use the microwave. It’s so quick and easy. Check out this Fantasy Fudge Recipe and see if you might want to give it a try.

By the way, when your fudge comes out grainy, you can fix it by putting it back in the pot and adding a little evaporated milk to it and bringing it slowly back to the soft ball stage.

Once you reach that point, remove from heat and set the pot over a bowl of cold water to reduce the heat while you are stirring until the desired consistency.

Hope that helps! Fudge is just too good to waste!

Comments for Fudge Comes Out Grainy

I did mine yesterday and need to recook it. How much evaporated milk do you add? I may try a bouble boiler of sorts (pot in pot) so it does not burn.

Who can help me make a small batch of grainy (YES!) fudge for my beloved brother’s birthday gift? He LIKES grainy fudge. I’ve never made fudge but think it cannot be too difficult with a good recipe.

I’ve always had trouble with that Fantasy Fudge recipe when I tried doubling it. I’ve given up and only do one batch at a time! 🙂

You can try salvaging the fudge by slowly reheating it and adding some evaporated milk as described above, but some people have reported that when you try that method with fudge recipes that have marshmallow already added, you tend to end up with the mixture burning on the bottom of the pan.

I guess it’s up to you whether or not you want to try to salvage this mixture as fudge or use it for something else.

Generally speaking, the “grainy” effect is because the sugar crystals re-formed and once that happens, it’s a chain reaction throughout the fudge. Ugh! One way to try to prevent crystallization is to use a pastry brush dipped in hot water and brush down the sides of the pan from time to time while boiling.

Also, when you are stirring, try to NOT scrape the sides of the pan because that’s where the sugar crystals tend to form.

Finally, when you pour it out into your tray, don’t scrape the sides of the pan then either. I know, I know, you hate to waste that fudge. I’m the same way. I simply scrape that excess bit stuck to the pan into a separate little bowl for me to “sample” right then and not mix it with the rest.

If you want to make it sweeter, you could try stirring in some milk chocolate chips after you’ve removed the reheated mixture from the stove.

I made fudge last night for the first time. It has already set but is very grainy and taste like a dark chocolate (not sweet enough). i used the recipe on back of Kraft Jet-Puffed Marshmallow creme (Fantasy Fudge). I doubled the recipe (now i realize not a good thing to do).
Here is the recipe:

3 cups sugar
3/4 cup (1-12 sticks) butter
1 can (5 oz) evaporated milk
1-12 pkg (12 square Baker’s Semi-Sweet Chocolate, chopped (oops, used unsweetened)
1 jar (7oz) Jet Puffed Marshmallow Creme
1 cup chopped walnuts
1 tsp vanilla
Line 9-inch square pan with foil. Bring sugar, butter and milk to full rolling boil in large saucepan on medium heat, stirring constantly. Boil 4 min. or until 234 degrees on candy thermometer, stirring constantly. Remove from heat. Add chocolate and marshmallow creme; stir until melted. Stir in nuts and vanilla. Pour into pan. Cool.

Well, i didn’t stir as much as i should have and when i took off heat i stirred too much. Also didn’t have a candy thermometer and just realized i used unsweetened chocolate.
Fudge is already set. Is there anything I can do now to fix it besides throwing it out? 🙁

How to fix fudge

Fudge sets based on the ratio of components and the temperature — if anything is wrong you could end up with a goopy mess.

What do you do if your fudge doesn’t set? It depends on why it didn’t set. Sometimes you can salvage the fudge by changing the ingredients or by changing the temperature. Otherwise, you may need to use your fudge in a different recipe altogether.

Regardless, don’t throw it away! There’s still a lot that you can do with fudge, even if it isn’t setting up properly.

Why Doesn’t Fudge Set?

Most fudge is cooked by heating it to a specific temperature, mixing all the ingredients just right, and then allowing it to cool. Once it cools, it is beaten so that it will harden — this is an essential step for old-fashioned fudge that isn’t there in modern fudge. There are modern fudge recipes that take a lot of guesswork out (some even use the microwave). But most old-fashioned fudge recipes are going to require that you get everything correct for it to set.

The most common issue with fudge setting is not bringing it to the right temperature. Getting it to the right temperature prepares it for setting correctly; otherwise, it’ll just become a gooey chocolate mess.

Of course, there are other alternatives; you might have added too much milk, for instance, which will end up with either a softer or runnier product. This is a common mistake if you’re trying to convert a recipe or use different units of measurement.

What Should You Do If Your Fudge Didn’t Set?

First, scrape all the fudge back into your pot. Add water until the mixture is runny again, usually about a cup and a half, but it depends on the recipe that you’re using. Let the fudge completely dissolve within the water on medium heat before bringing it up to a boil.

Bring the fudge back to boiling temperature (212 F). Cook at the temperature specified at the recipe again and then take it off the heat. Repeat the steps of cooling the fudge and then beating it until it has lost its sheen.

Once the material is no longer shiny, you can pour it into a pan and see if it sets up. Let it cool completely to room temperature before placing it in a refrigerator.

If it still doesn’t set, then there may be another issue, and you might need to reuse it instead. You can reuse fudge for many things: chocolate sauce for ice cream, icing for cakes and cupcakes, or a drizzle for cookies and other pastry desserts. Fudge that doesn’t set is essentially a chocolate sauce or a thick pudding.

What Are Some Recipes You Can Use Your Fudge For?

How to fix fudge

If your fudge failed to set, there are a few other uses for it. Your fudge is useful in recipes that call for melted chocolate.

First, you could make brownies with your failed fudge; the fact that it didn’t set properly shouldn’t interfere. Instead, you’ll get rich, thick chocolate brownies.

You can also make molten lava cake with fudge that didn’t set properly because the fudge should still melt inside of the cake; of course, if it’s very runny that could be a challenge.

Fudge can be used in pudding cakes, regular cakes, and cupcakes, replacing melted chocolate directly. Keep in mind that unless your fudge is very dark, the recipes will come out sweeter, especially if they request semi-sweet or dark chocolate or baking chocolate.

Other things you can use fudge for include truffles (the interior filling, though you may need to freeze it first) or chocolate fruits (you can use it for fondue and dip fruit into it).

How Can You Avoid Fudge Not Setting?

How to fix fudge

Recipes that include marshmallows or condensed milk will almost always set up; it’s very hard to botch these recipes. Marshmallows provide a natural thickening agent, as does the condensed milk; if you put it in the refrigerator, it will thicken up regardless.

So, if you’re having a hard time trying to get your old-fashioned fudge to set, you might just want to try a different recipe.

You can use these “modern” fudge recipes like any other fudge recipe, including mix-ins, flavoring, and other flourishes — they just have a different base. They’re also slightly less challenging, which means you’re less likely to experience grainy textures or other mishaps.

How to fix fudge

Fudge sets based on the ratio of components and the temperature — if anything is wrong you could end up with a goopy mess.

What do you do if your fudge doesn’t set? It depends on why it didn’t set. Sometimes you can salvage the fudge by changing the ingredients or by changing the temperature. Otherwise, you may need to use your fudge in a different recipe altogether.

Regardless, don’t throw it away! There’s still a lot that you can do with fudge, even if it isn’t setting up properly.

Why Doesn’t Fudge Set?

Most fudge is cooked by heating it to a specific temperature, mixing all the ingredients just right, and then allowing it to cool. Once it cools, it is beaten so that it will harden — this is an essential step for old-fashioned fudge that isn’t there in modern fudge. There are modern fudge recipes that take a lot of guesswork out (some even use the microwave). But most old-fashioned fudge recipes are going to require that you get everything correct for it to set.

The most common issue with fudge setting is not bringing it to the right temperature. Getting it to the right temperature prepares it for setting correctly; otherwise, it’ll just become a gooey chocolate mess.

Of course, there are other alternatives; you might have added too much milk, for instance, which will end up with either a softer or runnier product. This is a common mistake if you’re trying to convert a recipe or use different units of measurement.

What Should You Do If Your Fudge Didn’t Set?

First, scrape all the fudge back into your pot. Add water until the mixture is runny again, usually about a cup and a half, but it depends on the recipe that you’re using. Let the fudge completely dissolve within the water on medium heat before bringing it up to a boil.

Bring the fudge back to boiling temperature (212 F). Cook at the temperature specified at the recipe again and then take it off the heat. Repeat the steps of cooling the fudge and then beating it until it has lost its sheen.

Once the material is no longer shiny, you can pour it into a pan and see if it sets up. Let it cool completely to room temperature before placing it in a refrigerator.

If it still doesn’t set, then there may be another issue, and you might need to reuse it instead. You can reuse fudge for many things: chocolate sauce for ice cream, icing for cakes and cupcakes, or a drizzle for cookies and other pastry desserts. Fudge that doesn’t set is essentially a chocolate sauce or a thick pudding.

What Are Some Recipes You Can Use Your Fudge For?

How to fix fudge

If your fudge failed to set, there are a few other uses for it. Your fudge is useful in recipes that call for melted chocolate.

First, you could make brownies with your failed fudge; the fact that it didn’t set properly shouldn’t interfere. Instead, you’ll get rich, thick chocolate brownies.

You can also make molten lava cake with fudge that didn’t set properly because the fudge should still melt inside of the cake; of course, if it’s very runny that could be a challenge.

Fudge can be used in pudding cakes, regular cakes, and cupcakes, replacing melted chocolate directly. Keep in mind that unless your fudge is very dark, the recipes will come out sweeter, especially if they request semi-sweet or dark chocolate or baking chocolate.

Other things you can use fudge for include truffles (the interior filling, though you may need to freeze it first) or chocolate fruits (you can use it for fondue and dip fruit into it).

How Can You Avoid Fudge Not Setting?

How to fix fudge

Recipes that include marshmallows or condensed milk will almost always set up; it’s very hard to botch these recipes. Marshmallows provide a natural thickening agent, as does the condensed milk; if you put it in the refrigerator, it will thicken up regardless.

So, if you’re having a hard time trying to get your old-fashioned fudge to set, you might just want to try a different recipe.

You can use these “modern” fudge recipes like any other fudge recipe, including mix-ins, flavoring, and other flourishes — they just have a different base. They’re also slightly less challenging, which means you’re less likely to experience grainy textures or other mishaps.

I made fudge with evaporated milk I made myself. Added this to butter and sugar and heated. Added this to chocolate and stirred enough to mix. Poured into 8×8 dished and left to set up. No such luck. What I have is silky thick hot fudge sauce-like chocolate. Kind of like soft caramel. What can I use this for now or do y’all have suggestions as to how to fix it?

4 Answers 4

It sounds like your fudge simply wasn’t heated enough. Fudge is basically a superconcentrated syrup, and it sets when sugar dissolved in the water (from the butter and milk) comes out of solution as the mixture cools and forms crystals. Temperature is your proxy measurement for the concentration of sugar – if you don’t hit the right temperature, the concentration will be off and your fudge won’t set properly.

Here’s a useful little article with some tips for fixing your fudge. Essentially, you want to cook the syrup right up to 237° to 239° F (that’s 114° to 115° C) in order to get the proper concentration. I generally heat my syrup up to 235° F and let carry-over do the rest of the work. If it’s overcooked (resulting in grainy fudge) or undercooked (resulting in poor setting) all you really need to do is add a bit of cream, reheat the fudge to the target temperature, and let it set again.

How to fix fudge

logophobe’s answer is correct on how to fix this.

As for what you can do with it if you don’t want to start over:

My favorite uses are as hot fudge topping or dissolve it in water or milk for luxurious hot chocolate.

How to fix fudge

I had an issue with my fudge coming out (after setting overnight) the same consistency as what you put over an ice cream sundae. Here’s how I fixed it:

I added more sweetened condensed milk (that’s all, nothing else)and microwaved it with the “syrup” I made that was supposed to be fudge. After the first 2 minutes I stirred it really well and stuck it back in for 2 more minutes. Stirred it again and stuck it in for 3 minutes. All on high.

After removing it that third time, I let it sit on the counter (not stirred) for 10 minutes to cool and settle. Then I started stirring. And stirring and stirring. And then I stirred some more.

I started out with liquid and the consistency from there went to that of frosting, then to cake batter. As I picked up the bowl it was in to get a better stir, I noticed the bottom of the bowl was still quite hot. I then had this brainstorm: I was using my middle sized mixing bowl so I thought, What if I put this middle sized bowl inside the larger bowl with some refrigerated water in it? Well. that was the ticket!

You can only put about 1 inch of water in the larger bowl or it will come up over the top of your bowl of fudge and mess that all up so do not put more than one inch of very cold water in that larger bowl. It made the consistency thicken much faster but beware it is kind of messy trying to hold the fudge bowl still when it wants to spin in the water. I had to refresh the water 5 times, about every 3-5 minutes. The key seems to be in cooling the fudge enough for it the thicken and it went much faster with this technique.

Please note that when I put the fudge bowl inside the larger bowl with the fresh cold water, I let it sit about a minute before I started stirring. The pyrex bowl I was using had retained a lot of heat and that’s what was causing the fudge to not thicken so I was actually cooling the bowl off, not so much the fudge.

My cake batter consistency fudge quickly went to that of taffy and continued to thicken from there. It never got to cookie dough consistency but I really couldn’t stir it much anymore at all so I poured it into a pan and it’s now in the fridge.

by Brenna
(Coarsegold, CA)

How to fix fudge

What can you do when your fudge won’t get thick?

HELP I can’t get my fudge to thicken.

I followed a recipe to the T, but it never thickened for set up. I used a lot of ingredients, and I just want to know if I can salvage what I’ve made somehow.

Here’s the recipe and instructions. Please, tell me how I can thicken it and not destroy the flavor!

Can I just add corn starch??

Ingredients:
4 cups white sugar
1 cup light brown sugar
1/2 cup butter
1 (12 fluid ounce) can evaporated milk
1 (7 ounce) jar marshmallow creme
1 (16 ounce) jar peanut butter
1 teaspoon vanilla extract

Grease a 9×13 inch baking dish.

In a medium saucepan over medium heat, combine sugar, brown sugar, butter and evaporated milk.

Bring to a boil, stirring constantly, and boil for 7 minutes. Remove from heat; stir in marshmallow creme until well incorporated and melted.

Stir in peanut butter and vanilla until smooth; spread in prepared pan. Let cool before cutting into squares.

Prep Time: 10 Min
Cook Time: 10 Min
Ready In: 50 Min

Any help or advice you can offer is much appreciated so that I can try to salvage this mess.

Comments for I Can’t Get My Fudge To Thicken

Well, I used evaporated milk instead of condensed. The recipe called for 14 oz condensed. I used 14 oz evaporated.

A friend recommended marshmallow to thicken, but I see powdered sugar recommendations.

Anyone know which is best and if so how much for my recipe Which contains 14 oz evaporated milk and 2 cups of semisweet chocolate chips and 1 tsp vanilla.

Okay, I’ve tried to reheat and re-set my fudge twice, using the soft ball method and everything. It’s still a runny liquid.

All the advice online seems to contradict itself. Do I stir vigorously over the heat, or will that make it gritty? Do I let it boil over medium without touching it, or will it get scorched? Do I add cream and/or water to the mix, or do I add powdered sugar? Do I stir after cooling, or put it right into the fridge? This is all to fix a recipe that was supposed to be the ‘easy way’ (just condensed milk and melted chocolate) and wouldn’t set at all.

I may try oreo crumbs, since I am an oreo addict, lol and I am afraid the ones you mentioned are a bit too adventurous for me and thanks for the replies.

Actually it firmed up fairly well, and is soft but fudge like. After refrigerating all night I will see if I can cut into squares, if not perhaps I can try balls of fudge. do you think rolling in powdered sugar will work? it has enough chocolate taste from all the bits, lol

My family seems to enjoy hard fudge instead of creamy fudge, here’s my version.

3 cups white sugar
3 tablespoons corn starch
2 tablespoons Hersey Cocoa
1/2 cup whole milk
1 pinch of salt
4 tablespoons margarine or butter
1 teaspoon vanilla

mix dry ingredients to a powder so there is no lumps later. then mix the rest.

Bring to a hard boil for 3.5 minute to 4.5 minutes stirring the whole time. under cooking will make syrup, over cooking will make chocolate sugar cubes.

remove from heat and keep stirring just to the point of the mixture hardening. pour into buttered pan

if you don’t keep stirring as it cools it might not harden.

I have never used a Thermometer before and I might try it some time to make a more consistent batch. If it doesn’t harden I’ve found reheating doesn’t work so well. Boiling closer to 4.5 minutes seems to work best. Oh NEVER make fudge on a rainy day.

Do let us know how your “fix” works out for you, but I just wanted to let you know that it would be best not to give the fudge to your dog if it fails. Chocolate is not good for dogs (even though they will scarf it down) and in many cases can kill them. Just wanted to tell you in case you end up thinking you’re giving your dog a treat and poison it by mistake. 😉

After reading all the comments, and especially liking the one with THE recipe for failed fudge brownies, I made mine into cookies:
2c. Failed fudge
1 egg
1tsp baking soda
2 3/4 c flour

I’m glad I found your Web site, as I have been keeping some failed peanut butter fudge (semi-firm, not runny) in my freezer for a month hoping to find a suitable use for it.

I had hoped to make the fudge for my two grand daughters but had misplaced my recipe (using marsh mellow cream). I followed some peanut butter fudge recipe (which, at first glance seemed similar to mine) while searching the internet. That was a mistake!

I didn’t recognize the “red flag” until it was too late.

The instructions said to add the marsh mellow cream to the sugar mixture at the beginning of the cook cycle rather than at the end of it.

I did so thoughtlessly and straight away realized the error. The mixture began to swell and overflow the sauce pan. I actually had to transfer the mixture into a bigger pan while it still cooked!

I guess this is NOT a chocolate fudge recipe, since you don’t mention any cocoa or chocolate at all.

That’s okay! We’re not fudge biased. 🙂

If your thermometer is accurate and you got the mixture hot enough, you should still be able to get your fudge to thicken by continually stirring it (till it feels like your arm will fall off!).

If that just doesn’t work, you can fix it by adding some powdered sugar into it to help it thicken. Start with a smaller amount 1/2 cup or so and add more as needed.

Question: How to Harden Chocolate Fudge?

I had made fudge using chocolate and condensed milk and refrigerated it overnight but the next day, after keeping it out for more than three hours when I was cutting it, it was gooey and was not hard at all. How to harden fudge? And if I have to melt it again, how do I check the temperature without a candy thermometer?

Answers

You can reheat it on a very, very low flame until it gets softer (do not let it sieze) and mix in nuts, cereal (like Chex or shredded wheat), M&Ms, and pretzels. Coat everything, spoon out blops on to wax paper and refrigerate.

Or use it for milkshakes or dipping. I tell the story of a fudge recipe that was an epic fail as fudge but I loved it so much as an ice cream/cake topping that I now–when I get a hankering–make it wrong on purpose to use for milkshakes and dipping!!

Blessings and happy new year!

6 More Questions

Ask a Question Here are the questions asked by community members. Read on to see the answers provided by the ThriftyFun community or ask a new question.

Question: Semi Hard Cooked Fudge?

I used 1 stick salted butter, 2 tablespoons cocoa, 2 cups sugar and a can of evaporated milk. I accidentally poured 12 oz evaporated milk in instead of 5 oz as called for.

Answers

Try adding more of the other ingredients proportionally to the extra milk you used and re-cook the whole batch. That should thicken it all to the right consistency.

Usually adding more ingredients does not work very well when you have this much added liquid.
I would say to use what you have in drinks like milk or coffee or try just adding more milk to the fixture and chill or heat and enjoy!
Make a new successful batch by starting from scratch.

Question: Fudge Too Soft?

Can I use the reheat method if I used the condensed milk and marshmallow cream to fix my fudge that is not setting firm enough. It isn’t holding shape. I made two trays and hate to throw away.

By Tammy from Republic, WA

Answers

You can melt it and then stir in some powdered sugar.
Or, you can melt it and stir in some additional hard chocolate.
Or, call it “spoon fudge” and serve it by the spoonful instead of cutting it in squares.

Question: Baked Fudge Too Runny?

I made baked fudge with cocoa, flour, sugar, eggs, and a little vanilla. I doubled the recipe and all ingredients. I then baked it in the oven sitting in a pan of hot water at 325 for 45 mins. It was super runny like still moving in the pan when I took it out of the oven.

Answers

I have never had luck fixing fudge. I find it best to use it’s is as a spread or syrup (heat it and let it get runny). You risk totally ruining it if you try. At least this way you get a yummy dip/treat!

Question: Fixing Fudge With Too Much Evaporated Milk?

I accidentally added 12 oz of evaporated milk to my fudge recipe calling for 5 oz. evaporated milk. I believe I cooked it long enough with 2 cups sugar, a stick of salted butter and two tablespoons of cocoa.

Answers

You will have to add the other ingredients in proportion to the extra milk you added to fix this.

Sorry to hear you are still having issues. I had commented on your other post that most of the time fudge is not fixable after it is made, but it can be a lovely dip or spread. Definitely DOES NOT have to go to waste.

Maybe it is time to find different recipe!

These two both use the whole 12 ounce cans of milk:

Hope you find one you like!

Question: Making Ice Cream Topping from Too Soft Fudge?

My fudge is too soft. How can I make ice cream topping?

Answers

Put it in a sauce pan on a very low heat with a little cream or milk stirred in. Or if you have a double boiler, that works too. Just add small amounts and stir until you get it the consistency you like.

Thin it out with a little milk or cream.

The best way I have found out is cooking it on the stove. You can add your ingredients to a pan and cook it on a very low heat on your stove. This should work for you.

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Archive: Fudge Too Soft

My fudge is too soft when I take it out of the refrigerator. Is it that I have used condensed milk instead of evaporated?

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How to Make Old-fashioned Fudge and Fix Mistakes

December 20, 2012 by Linda

Old-fashioned fudge (without marshmallows!) has a reputation for being finicky and tough. It will quickly tire arms out—my mom even has stories of sharing the efforts of fudge making with her siblings. Making fudge has been a bane in my baking existence for several years. I couldn’t get it to set no matter how cautious I was with measurements and temperature. Through my search for a good recipe, I have found one that has yet to fail me with resolutions to prevent and fix common mistakes.

I have had no problems with the following recipe. The fudge has always turned out completely smooth. I use a hand mixer with no ill effects and it does not get grainy if I overbeat. I was even able to fix it when I didn’t cook it enough due to a candy thermometer that wasn’t calibrated correctly (Correct calibration is essential). Testing for soft ball* stage does work as I have successfully made it this way as well. The most important thing is making sure to watch the fudge and the temperatures throughout the entire cooking process.

Ingredients (Recipe from – Better Homes & Garden: The New Cook Book yr.1965):

  • 2 c. sugar
  • ¾ c. milk
  • 2 1-ounce squares of unsweetened chocolate
  • Dash of salt
  • 1 tsp. corn syrup**
  • 2 Tbps. butter
  • 1 tsp. vanilla
  • ½ c. chopped nuts (optional)***

Getting Started

Butter the sides of a heavy saucepan—this will prevent the sugar from sticking and crystalizing.

Combine sugar, milk, unsweetened chocolate, salt and corn syrup.

Cook over a medium heat, stirring constantly until sugar dissolves and mixture is boiling.

Lower temperature to a simmer and do not stir unless necessary. Cook until it reaches 234F or soft ball stage***.

Immediately remove from heat and cool in cold water (no ice) until it reaches 110F. While cooling, add butter on top of mixture—do not stir.

Once cool, add vanilla.

Beat fudge—this will get tiring, so either find a few extra, willing arms; however, I always cheat and use a hand mixer. Once the fudge thickens and loses its gloss, pour into a buttered pan.

***Optionally, stir in nuts at the end of the beating time.

Fixing Mistakes

  • Too thick: If fudge became too thick during beating (Oops! The hand mixer can be overzealous), knead with hands until it softens then press into buttered pan or roll and slice. Optionally, cut cute shapes with cookie cutters!
  • Too soft: If it doesn’t set, it was either poured too soon (Tired arms! Give me a break!) or wasn’t cooked enough. Fix by mixing in ¼ c. milk and recooking to 234F or soft ball stage. Cool to 110F. Beat until it loses gloss.

*Testing for Soft Ball Stage

Test for soft ball stage (234F-238F) by dropping mixture into a bowl of cold water (no ice). If ready, mixture will hold shape and can be formed into a soft ball between your fingers.

**Substitute Corn Syrup

If you do not have corn syrup, you may make a substitute sugar syrup by combining:

  • 2 c. sugar
  • 3/4 c. water
  • 1/4 tsp. cream of tartar
  • 1 pinch salt

Heat until boiling. Lower heat to a simmer and put lid on for 3 minutes to soften any sugar crystals. Cook until it arrives at 234F, or soft ball stage. Syrup will keep for approximately two months. I have tried this and it does work—I never have corn syrup around.