How to keep honey from crystallizing

How to keep honey from crystallizing

Did your jar of honey crystallize? This is totally normal, and natural. Crystallized honey is just as edible and delicious as liquid honey, but if you don’t like the texture of crystallized honey, it is quite simple to soften honey by adding heat.

Heating honey will liquefy crystallized honey. But bee careful. If you overheat the honey during the decrystallization process you risk changing the quality and losing raw honey nutrients and benefits.

To preserve the best qualities of that raw honey, you must melt it slowly in a glass jar using low, indirect, and constant heat for as long as the honey takes to decrystallize.

Decrystallize Honey in 4 Steps

Step One: Place glass jar of honey into a larger glass or ceramic bowl (if your honey comes in a plastic bottle spoon out crystallized honey into a sealable glass jar).

How to keep honey from crystallizingHow to keep honey from crystallizing

Step Two: Heat a pot of water up to a temperature between 95°F and 110°F. You can create this warm water bath using a kettle, instant pot, or, if you want precision, a sous vide cooker.

Step Three: Pour the warm water bath into the bowl and jar of honey is sitting in. Make sure the water line is above the level of the honey but below the lid. You do NOT want water to accidentally get into your honey jar or container.

How to keep honey from crystallizing

Step Four: Leave the jar of honey sitting in the bath, stirring occasionally, until the honey reliquifies. Monitor the water temperature with a thermometer and adjust by adding hot or cool water to keep it at or below 110°F.

How to keep honey from crystallizingHow to keep honey from crystallizing

The length of time that your honey will take to decrystallize depends upon the amount you are liquefying, but a typical honey jar takes a little over an hour to decrystallize.

Why Does Honey Crystallize?

Pure, raw honey crystallizes naturally over time as the sugar “precipitates out” of the solution into crystal form. Honey is made up of glucose and fructose. Different honey varietals have different ratios of these sugars, which means different honeys crystallize at different rates.

The higher the glucose, the faster a honey will crystallize. These include:

Honeys that are higher in fructose than glucose crystallize more slowly. These include:

Remember, crystallized honey has not spoiled! Honey does not go bad, and crystallized honey still has the same quality and flavor, just maybe a different color and texture. Learn more about the science of honey crystallization.

Decrystallization: A “HONEY-DON’T” LIST

Don’t microwave raw honey to decrystallize it. Microwave ovens cook food unevenly (that is why you have to turn your microwave dinner halfway through the cycle). You can’t control the temperature at all and are likely to scorch or boil at least some of your raw honey in a microwave.

Don’t boil raw honey. You may be tempted to immerse your entire honey jar in boiling water, but that will destroy beneficial enzymes and other properties found only in raw honey.

Don’t heat honey in a plastic bottle. Don’t take the risk that you’ll melt plastic into your honey.

Don’t liquefy honey over and over again. Decrystallize only what you need at one time. The flavor and aroma of the honey will fade with repeated cycles of heating and cooling (and liquefying and crystallizing).

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What Happens When You Overheat Raw Honey

Whether you buy raw local honey for the benefits of the pollen or if you are a gourmand with a taste for the world’s most delicious raw honey, you have excellent reasons to take extra care when decrystallizing your honey.

Pollen, propolis, antioxidants, and enzymes found in raw honey are destroyed at temperatures above 110°F. Heating honey higher than 140°F degrades the quality of the honey and temperatures above 160°F caramelize the sugars. Once caramelized, what you have in your honey jar may be sweet, but it isn’t really honey anymore.

The boiling point of water is 212°F. If you really want to preserve your raw honey while decrystallizing it, you can’t just drop the jar in boiling water. Most residential hot water heaters are set to 140°F, so even tap water will need to be monitored closely with a thermometer if you are using it to decrystallize honey.

It hasn’t gone bad at all, thanks to the antibacterial properties of honey it can actually last for several years.

How to keep honey from crystallizing

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We use a ton of honey in our house.

Once I discovered that Logan was willing to try just about anything if it was dipped in honey, I made sure to always have a nice, large bottle on hand.

The problem, though, with buying the larger bottles of honey is that they tend to crystallize over time.

We aren’t going through them as fast as the smaller containers.

Why Does Honey Crystalize?

Crystallization of honey is a natural process and, though not convenient, is nothing to worry about.

Simply put, the glucose in the honey is precipitating out of the liquid honey.

There are a few factors that can affect how quickly your honey crystallizes.

That will depend on factors like the conditions under which your honey has been stored and the variety of honey that you have.

Higher fructose honeys will last longer without crystallizing.

Honey stored at colder temperatures will crystallize faster than honey stored above 70 degrees F.

Which explains why we have more of a problem with this during the fall and winter months than we do in the summertime.

You can actually still use honey it crystallized form, so long as you can get it out of the container.

It will soften and dissolve when added to a cup of hot tea just fine.

How to Decrystalize Honey

There are a couple of ways to fix your crystalized honey, all of which are really pretty easy.

How to keep honey from crystallizing

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Decrystalize Honey By Soaking in Water

My favorite way to decrystallize honey is to boil water in my tea kettle, then place the jar or container of honey in a large bowl or pot and pour the hot water around it.

Let it soak for several minutes until the honey has softened and liquified itself again.

How long it needs to soak will depend on how crystallized it is, how cold it has been stored at, and the quantity of honey.

Naturally, a larger container will take longer than a small amount.

If needed, replenish with additional hot water if it is taking a long time.

2. Decrystalize Honey in the Microwave

Another way to decrystallize honey is to place the honey in a microwave-safe container, with the lid removed.

Then, microwave the honey over medium power for 30 seconds at a time, stirring in between microwaving sessions.

Continue until it has been decrystallized.

Be careful not to scorch or boil the honey.

What I don’t prefer about this method, is that you can’t really do this with crystalized honey that comes in a plastic bottle.

The microwave can warp the plastic.

I tried this before and my bottle definitely came out shrunken and misshapen, so you really need to remove the honey and put it in a glass or ceramic container.

But, that can be kind of difficult when the honey is stuck in its solid state.

Unless the container has a wide enough mouth to scoop the honey out and transfer it to another bowl or jar that is microwave safe!

5 Favorite Uses for Honey

Honey isn’t just for adding to a cup of hot tea. Here are a few of our favorite uses for this delicious, sweet liquid gold.

How to keep honey from crystallizing

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Natural Cough and Sore Throat Remedy:

Honey is the perfect addition to Homemade Cough Syrup.

It helps coat the throat and will draw pus from wounds and has antibacterial and antimicrobial properties.

Plus, it makes the whole concoction taste a lot better.

Easy Chicken Dinner Recipes:

One of our absolute favorite easy chicken dinner recipes – in terms of taste and the fact that it takes literally 10 minutes max to whip up – is this Honey Mustard Baked Chicken.

Chicken is baked up to sweet, tender perfection in a sauce of honey, fresh rosemary, and dijion mustard.

Baking:

Honey is a great sugar substitute in baking, especially in recipes like this Honey Corn Bread Muffin.

When substituting in recipes that originally call for sugar, you won’t need to use as much honey as sugar to achieve your desired sweetness.

This is due to honey’s high fructose content.

These recipe for Baked Almond Joy Donuts is another baking recipe that calls for honey.

Drink Sweeteners:

Honey is great for sweetening drinks because it dissolves a lot easier than granulated sugar does.

That means you can eliminate making a simple syrup.

Condiment:

Honey is great drizzled or used as a dip for many things.

Kids can dip homemade chicken tenders in honey.

Drizzle it on top of pancakes or waffles in place of syrup.

I also love it glazed on top of this Honey Marmalade Mustard Glazed Corned Beef (perfect for St. Patrick’s Day!).

What are some of your favorite uses for honey?

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Learning how to decrystallize honey will save you money and extra trips to the store. Honey can last for years if you know how to save it!

Have you every opened your pantry to find your delicious, liquid gold honey suddenly completely crystallized? Its a bummer, but the good news is there is no need to toss it out.

It hasn’t gone bad at all, thanks to the antibacterial properties of honey it can actually last for several years.

How to keep honey from crystallizing

Why Does Honey Crystalize?

Crystallization of honey is a natural process and, though not convenient, is nothing to worry about. Simply put, the glucose in the honey is precipitating out of the liquid honey.

There are a few factors that can affect how quickly your honey crystallizes. That will depend on factors like the conditions under which your honey has been stored and the variety of honey that you have.

Higher fructose honeys will last longer without crystallizing. Honey stored at colder temperatures will crystallize faster than honey stored above 70 degrees F.

Which explains why we have more of a problem with this during the fall and winter months than we do in the summertime.

You can actually still use honey it crystallized form, so long as you can get it out of the container. It will soften and dissolve when added to a cup of hot tea just fine.

How to keep honey from crystallizing

How to Decrystallize Honey

There are a couple of ways to rid your honey of its crystallization, all of which are really pretty easy.

1. Soak in Hot Water

My favorite way is to boil water in my tea kettle, then place the jar or container of honey in a large mixing bowl or pot and pour the hot water around it. Let it soak for several minutes until the honey has softened and liquefied itself again.

How long it needs to soak will depend on how crystallized it is, how cold it has been stored at, and the quantity of honey. Naturally, a larger container will take longer than a small amount.

If needed, replenish with additional hot water if it is taking a long time.

2. Microwave

Another way to decrystallize honey is to place the honey in a microwave-safe container, with the lid removed, and microwave the honey over medium power for 30 seconds at a time, stirring in between microwaving sessions. Continue until it has been decrystallized, careful not to scorch or boil the honey.

What I don’t prefer about this method, is that you can’t really do this with honey that comes in a plastic bottle. The microwave can warp the plastic (I tried this before and my bottle definitely came out shrunken and misshapen), so you really need to remove the honey and put it in a glass or ceramic container.

But, that can be kind of difficult when the honey is stuck in its solid state!

How to keep honey from crystallizing

5 Favorite Uses for Honey

Honey isn’t just for adding to a cup of hot tea. Here are a few of our favorite uses for this delicious, sweet liquid gold.

Natural Cough and Sore Throat Remedy: Honey is the perfect addition to Homemade Cough Syrup. It helps coat the throat and will draw pus from wounds and has antibacterial and antimicrobial properties. Plus, it makes the whole concoction taste a lot better.

Easy Chicken Dinner Recipes: One of our absolute favorite easy chicken dinner recipes – in terms of taste and the fact that it takes literally 10 minutes max to whip up – is this Honey Mustard Baked Chicken. Chicken is baked up to sweet, tender perfection in a sauce of honey, fresh rosemary, and dijion mustard. This One Pan Honey Roasted Turkey and Vegetables also looks amazing!

How to keep honey from crystallizing

Baking: Honey is a great sugar substitute in baking, especially in recipes like this Gluten Free Cornbread. When substituting in recipes that originally call for sugar, you won’t need to use as much honey as sugar to achieve your desired sweetness due to honey’s high fructose content

Drink Sweeteners: Honey is great for sweetening drinks because it dissolves a lot easier than granulated sugar does, which means you can eliminate making a simple syrup. Try: Boozy Pumpkin Chai Latte and Fig Bees Knees.

Condiment: Honey is great drizzled or used as a dip for many things. Kids can dip homemade chicken tenders in honey. Drizzle it on top of pancakes or waffles in place of syrup. Personally, I can’t wait to try these Paleo Baked Pears.

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How to keep honey from crystallizing

We’re chatting cooking techniques, dessert ideas, and everything in between. If you’re already a member, invite your friends to join us too!

If you’re wondering about honey crystallization then start here. Honey is a supersaturated sugar solution made up of water and a mix of sugars—mostly glucose and fructose. Over time, the sugar begins to “precipitate out” of the solution, which means the water separates from the glucose, causing the sugar to take crystal form. When honey crystallizes, new crystals will continue to build upon older crystals until all of the glucose in the honey has crystallized.

You can’t fully prevent raw honey from crystallizing, but you can take steps to slow down the process. And if you really don’t like the texture of crystallized honey, you can choose honey varietals that take a lot longer to crystallize.

How to keep honey from crystallizing

How You Store Your Honey Affects Crystallization

All raw honey will crystallize over time, though the type of honey, method of storing, and temperature all affect how quickly it will crystallize.

Crystallization happens much faster at lower temperatures. Even in a beehive, honey can begin to crystallize if the temperature drops too low. When the temperature of the honey dips below 50°F, the crystallization process will accelerate.

Don’t store honey in a chilly basement or unheated mudroom. To slow crystallization naturally, store your honey at room temperature or warmer (the warmer the better).

Store honey in glass jars instead of plastic. Plastic is more porous than glass. Moisture encourages crystallization and glass will do a better job of keeping moisture out of your honey (as long as the lid is on tight).

Why Does Some Honey Crystallize and Other Honey Doesn’t?

Unfiltered honey may crystallize faster than filtered honey because crystals will begin to form on pollen or beeswax or any other small particles within the unfiltered honey solution, which will encourage other crystals to form.

How to keep honey from crystallizing

Some types of honey crystallize much slower than others.

The type of nectar the bees used to make the honey influences how fast the honey will crystallize. Honey with a higher level of glucose than fructose will crystallize much faster. The flower nectar used to make the honey will influence the balance of glucose to fructose in the honey that the bees produce.

Clover honey, lavender honey, and dandelion honey are all much higher in glucose, so they will crystallize faster than other varietals.

Acacia, sage, and tupelo honey are all higher in fructose than glucose so they will crystallize much more slowly than others. If you really don’t like crystallized honey, you should consider buying one of those varieties. But over time, even tupelo honey, which is revered for how long it takes to crystallize, will eventually turn to crystals (particularly if you store it in an unheated location).

Can You Eat Crystallized Honey?

Yes! Some people prefer their honey crystallized. It is much easier to spread on toast. In fact, creamed honey does not contain cream and it is not whipped like butter. It is crystallized. Creamed honey (also called spun honey) is made by controlling the crystallization process so that the crystals that form are of a much smaller size. The small crystals give creamed honey a smooth, velvety texture.

Honey boasts a ton of natural health benefits and is often seen as a healthier alternative to sugar. This yummy, glazy treat made from the world’s busiest manufacturers (bees) can help sweeten your days in a variety of ways. Perhaps you’ve gotten into the honey making business yourself; doing so saves a lot of cash and ensures that you know exactly where your honey is coming from. Or maybe you’ve started buying raw honey for all the beneficial enzymes, vitamins, and minerals found in it. Either way, you might have noticed a problem with your raw product and are wondering how to keep honey from crystallizing.

How to Keep Honey From Crystallizing

How to keep honey from crystallizing

Sadly, there is a very simple answer to this question: you can’t. If crystallization is going to happen, there’s not really anything you can do to stop it other than pasteurizing the honey, which supposedly gets rid of all beneficial enzymes and severely decreases the vitamins and minerals found in it (which is probably why you went for the raw product anyway).

While this may seem like a bummer, you should know that your honey isn’t ruined by crystallization; in fact, some people may like those little crunchy bits on their toast or bagels. However, just because you can’t stop it doesn’t mean you can’t slow or reverse the process.

Why Does Honey Crystalize?

How to keep honey from crystallizing

Two of the primary ingredients in the nectar your bees harvest are fructose and glucose. Some nectar has more of one or the other; and is the glucose that crystallizes.

Some honey, such as tupelo, can stay liquid for years because of the amount of fructose in it. Others go solid far more quickly. The process usually starts at the bottom of your jar and works its way up. Solid matter like beeswax, pollen and the like in your raw honey allow the crystallization process to start. Pasteurizing the product gets rid of these solid particles, which is why the glucose in such products doesn’t crystalize.

What to Do About Crystalized Honey

How to keep honey from crystallizing

Though you can’t stop it from happening without pasteurizing it, there are some things you can do to help slow down or reverse the crystallization process. For instance, keeping your honey in a warmer area (above 70 degrees) helps slow it down; however, you definitely don’t want it anywhere near 57 degrees, as that happens to be the ideal temperature for crystallization. Make sure to keep the lid tight at all times as well.

If you’re not so concerned with the fact that it’s crystallized but are more so about the texture, consider mixing it with seed honey. That way, any crystals that form will follow the lead of the smaller ones in the seed honey, making for a smoother product. Furthermore, you can always re-liquify your honey by heating up some water in a skillet and then setting your jar in it. After a moment, shake it up a bit and the crystals should dissolve. If you happen to have a plastic container, though, wait until the water cools a bit so you don’t warp the container.

Conclusion

You may not be able to stop honey from crystalizing, but there are some things you can do to either slow down the process or dissolve the crystals back into liquid form. Honey has a myriad of health benefits, and raw honey carries beneficial enzymes, vitamins, and minerals. That, and it also gives you a more intriguing taste than your common pasteurized product does. By following these steps, you can slow down the process of crystallization or even reverse it if you wish. Happy honey heating!

A reader asks how to prevent her raw honey from crystallizing.

I can not remember how my mother, who was born in 1922, kept raw honey from sugaring (crystallizing). Can someone help?

Although there are external factors such as storage conditions, temperature, relative humidity and the type of container that may influence the tendency of honey to crystallize; sometimes the crystallization process is out of our control.

The tendency of honey to crystallize depends primarily on its glucose content and
moisture level. The overall composition of honey, which includes sugars other
than glucose and more than 180 identified substances such as minerals, acids and
proteins, also influences crystallization.

How to Avoid Honey Crystallization

1. Steady heat during bottling – Holding honey at temperatures in the range of 104-140°F (40-71°C) during bottling also slows the rate of crystallization. Mild heat treatment delays crystallization by dissolving crystals and flash heating to 140-160°F (60-
71°C) dissolves crystals and expels incorporated air (which can also stimulate
crystallization).
2. Filtering honey – Proper filtering removes particles that might initiate crystallization. Honey with a low glucose-to-water ratio is likely to remain liquid, avoiding crystallization.
3. Low glucose levels in honey – Although most varieties of honey crystallize after
extracting, those that contain less than 30% glucose, such as tupelo and sage honeys,
resist granulation.
4. Proper storage environment – Honey can be stored indefinitely but it retains its form better if stored in a cool dry area avoiding sunlight. Honey is sensitive to moisture in the surrounding atmosphere, therefore, it should be kept in a tightly lidded container. For long-term storage, the use of air-tight, moisture-resistant stainless steel drums is recommended. For optimal temperatures to store honey, see below:

  • Cool temperatures [below 50°F (10°C)] are ideal for preventing crystallization.
  • Moderate temperatures [50-70°F (10-21°C)] generally encourage crystallization.
  • Warm temperatures [70-81°F (21-27°C)] discourage crystallization but degrade the honey.
  • Very warm temperatures [over 81°F (27°C)] prevent crystallization but encourage spoilage by fermentation as well as degrading the honey.

Here is a great article for more information on honey and long term storage.

If you find that your honey has crystallized, don’t throw it out. It can easily turn back to liquid form by slowly warming the container in a pan of warm water. Others say to set it in a warm window to slowly warm.

This article was originally published at Ready Nutrition™ on January 28th, 2014

How to keep honey from crystallizing

Honey is one of the finest natural products, having the ability to cure and prevent countless diseases. The process in which honey becomes solid is called crystallization. When separated from water, honey’s glucose crystallize. Keep in mind that glucose of honey is less soluble as compared to fructose. If the honey has crystallized, you can put it in the microwave oven to dissolve it; however, in order to make full use of the honey, it is highly recommended that you prevent it from crystallizing in the first place.

One of the simplest ways of preventing crystallization is to place the honey in a freezer, although you would have to thaw before it can be poured easily.

Things Required:

– Honey
– Ice cube tray
– Plastic wrap

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Instructions

Pour honey into ice cubes

In order to prevent honey from crystallizing, the first step is to arrange ice cubes according to the quantity of honey you have. For individual servings, pour honey into the ice cube trays. However, if you desire to store a large quantity of honey, it is recommended that you use a larger container.

Wrap the ice cubes with plastic bags

Plastic bags are easily available in grocery stores. Once you have put the honey into the ice cubes or a container, you need to wrap them with plastic bags. You can now put the ice cubes or the container, wrapped with plastic bags, into the freezer. The honey however, will not freeze but it will become thicker. The plastic bags do not allow any freezer odours to seep through, which means that your freezer will remain clean even if the trays tip.

Usage of the cubes

Whenever you feel like using honey in any recipe, you can take the required number of cubes out and put them in the recipe. However, it is highly recommended that you place the cubes on a counter for a few minutes before using them because this would make it easy for you to stir the honey in any mixture. Keep in mind that one cube of honey contains about one tablespoon, so use the cubes in recipes accordingly.

Defrosting honey in a container

If you have stored honey in a larger container instead of ice cubes, you also freeze that. However, it needs to be remembered that you would have to defrost the container for approximately half an hour before using it.

The development of sugar crystals in honey is a natural development called crystallization.

Honey is a sweet liquid with a high sugar-to-water content ratio. In order to handle this disproportionate ratio, sugar condenses or “precipitates” out of the solution into its solid form. The solid form of sugar is granulated and coarse. This precipitate creates chunky, uneven honey.

Honey crystallizes at all stages, from the hive to processing, packaging and storing. Beekeeping tricks can stop honey crystallizing inside the colony and affecting the batch of honey produced in your apiary.

Why Does Honey Crystallize?

  • The origin of the nectar
  • Moisture content and humidity
  • Temperature

The Origin of the Nectar

The type of flowering plant that provides the nectar affects the likelihood of crystallization. The more glucose in the nectar, the faster the honey gets coarse.

Honey that has a higher ratio of glucose to fructose generally crystallizes faster than those with a lower ratio.

Moisture Content and Humidity

If glucose is dissolved in a smaller amount of water, the honey will crystallize faster. If the same amount of glucose is in a solution with a more substantial amount of water, it’s less saturated and will precipitate slower.

Temperature

Glucose is more easily dissolved in warmer water. So, the ambient temperature affects the solubility of sugar.

This means that just below room temperature, crystallization occurs. When the temperature is around 50–59 degrees Fahrenheit, this is the optimum range for honey crystals to form. Below this range, the precipitation rate decreases until freezing, where the sugar does not crystallize. Conversely, above 86 degrees Fahrenheit, crystallization doesn’t happen.

How to Stop Honey Crystallizing in Your Beehive

Different scenarios may occur for you to want to stop crystallization from occurring:

  • Scenario 1: You put your hive in a foraging range with a high concentration of one plant species. It turns out your bees mostly collected nectar that had a high glucose-fructose ratio.
  • Scenario 2: Before the end of the honey flow, you notice white granules in some of your comb. The season for this was really low humidity, and some of the uncapped honey had lost too much moisture, causing the glucose to precipitate.
  • Scenario 3: The temperatures of your winter season were brutally low. Despite your best precautions, one of your colonies did not survive the winter. When you check the frames, the drawn comb is filled with uneaten and crystallized combs of solid sugar.

Scenario 1

Over the winter, your bees ration their supply of honey and water. If the nectar that ripened into honey was of a high glucose to fructose ratio, it might crystallize in the comb over the winter months. Your bees cannot digest solid sugar granules, but they can dissolve the crystal back into a solution using water.

Moisture condenses from respiration and accumulates on the cold areas of the hive. They can use this water to rehydrate the crystallized sugar. But, with the weakening effects of the winter season and a limited water supply, this may be too taxing for the members of the colony.

So, even with enough honey to last the winter season, if the honey crystallized in the hive over the cold months, the colony may perish from starvation.

Method

To deal with this, some beekeepers feed their bees with a sugar syrup that has more fructose than glucose. They do this in preparation for winter so that there’s a better balance in the hive of sugar syrup that’s unlikely to crystallize.

Scenario 2

When you go about checking your hives like a diligent beekeeper, you may notice that some of the uncapped combs look like they have a white pest or infestation. This is usually precipitated sugar.

Method

If you notice that some of your frames have crystalline combs after the harvest flow is complete, you can encourage your hive to clean them before the wintering.

Lightly spray uncapped crystal combs with warm water to help the granules dissolve.

Hopefully, if there’s no more nectar or sugar source nearby, your bees will redeposit this honey in their drawn frame.

Scenario 3

When the hive dies off, you will want to use that drawn comb in a new or existing hive for the nectar flow. It would be a waste if you weren’t able to use the already drawn comb.

If there’s crystalline honey in the comb, this will cause any newly deposit honey to crystallize faster once you harvest. So, it’s crucial for your next season that you get all of the granules out of your combs. By removing them, you’re stopping your next season of honey from crystallizing rapidly.

Method

There’s only one way to make sure that the comb remains structurally intact and the crystals are gone. Your bees have to eat it.

Timing is important here. Introduce the frame to a hive of healthy bees, but make sure to exclude the queen from the comb that has crystallized sugar in it. Exclude her so that she cannot lay her brood in the comb that you want the bees to feed on. If you do that, your bees can happily dissolve and feed on the granulated sugar.

Is Honey Crystallization Bad?

Having granules of sugar in your honey is definitely not a bad or unhealthy thing. In fact, if you’ve ever heard of creamed honey, that is honey processed to blend crystallized and liquid honey together.

Interestingly, most honey produced is granulated, but we’re conditioned to purchase liquid honey. Therefore, it’s most often processed to dissolve the crystallized sugar. Decrystallization can also be done in the home.

For the beekeeper, crystallization can be detrimental because it can affect the health of the hive over the winter months. For harvesting, remnants of crystallized sugar can taint the new batch of honey. It can also be a surprise boon to your colony, providing healthy food to strengthen your thriving colonies.