How to raise a mynah bird

How to raise a mynah bird

The Mynah birds are an omnivorous, softbill bird that loves to eat fruit as well as dine on reptiles, insects, baby birds, small rodents and discarded waste from human habitation. They have a short digestive tract; therefore, these birds eat a lot and likely have frequent and often loose droppings. These birds need a proper balance of proteins, fat, carbohydrates, vitamins, minerals and water in their diet.

Ideal nutrient percent for Mynah Birds

The ideal nutrient percentage for the Mynah bird is a mix such as 18 percent protein and 8 percent fat and very small percentage of iron. These birds can easily develop iron storage disease; therefore, low iron foods are the best.

Good fruits for Mynah Birds

Fresh fruits are a large part of the Mynah’s diet. You can give your bird bananas, diced apple, dates, oranges, pineapple, pears, plums and watermelon.

Good vegetables for Mynah Birds

Diced vegetables are good for Mynah’s, and these can be added to their diet. You should add these vegetable in small amounts, as these are not as important as fruits.

Pelleted Diets for Mynah Birds

Pellets are the ideal diet, which is nutritious as well as easy to feed. Since pellets are dry, the dropping of bird tends to be less messy. But, keep in mind that pellets should not be the only diet for a mynah bird. Some pellets have excessively high values of iron that may contribute to iron storage disease or hemochromatosis in the mynah birds. You can check with your vet for the newest iron content recommendations.

Protein required for Mynah Birds

The Mynah birds can eat insects such as mealworms, crickets, and wax-worms. Occasionally, they can also be given day old-mice.

Vitamin supplements for Mynah Birds

A Mynah bird eating 75 – 80% of its diet in the form of pelleted food may not need vitamin, minerals or amino acids supplements. If your bird is tested for the vitamin deficiencies, ask your veterinarian to suggest the best supplement for your bird.

How to raise a mynah bird

Water

You should give fresh and clean water to your bird. If the quality of your tap water is not good, you may consider the use of bottled water. Furthermore, all the dishes must be cleaned thoroughly on daily basis with soap and water.

Some other points to remember:

You should keep in mind the following points:

  • You should always monitor the amount of food eaten by bird
  • Mynah birds do not chew/bite their food; therefore, try to give food in small easy to swallow, bite size pieces
  • You should offer fresh water every day
  • Try to offer a variety of fresh foods every day
  • You should offer fresh fruits and vegetables to the birds
  • Due to short digestive tract, these birds have a very quick transit time
  • Try to give food in small amount
  • You should clean all the dishes of food and water daily

How to raise a mynah bird

About Swati

Swati takes pride of being a dog lover. Her current passions include blogging, writing and collecting dog pictures of various breeds. She is an active member of stray dog care society.

by Carol Sarao / in Family

Mynah birds, relatives of the European starling, are native to Southeast Asia; some varieties, such as the crested mynah and the hill mynah, inhabit parts of the United States year-round. Baby mynah birds, like countless other types of birds, often are found fluttering on the ground. Fledglings, or young, feathered baby birds, often leave the nest as they are learning to fly; usually, both parents are watching nearby and are perfectly capable of feeding and caring for the baby on the ground. A featherless baby bird, sometimes called a “fallen pinky,” must be returned to the nest or placed in a basket tied to a branch if the nest can’t be located; it is not true that parents will reject a baby because a human touched it. However, if a pinky or fledging is obviously orphaned–for example, you’ve seen its parents meet their demise–you can save its life by taking it to a licensed wildlife rehabilitation centre for expert care. If that’s not possible, there are techniques you can use to keep it alive.

  • Mynah birds, relatives of the European starling, are native to Southeast Asia; some varieties, such as the crested mynah and the hill mynah, inhabit parts of the United States year-round.
  • A featherless baby bird, sometimes called a “fallen pinky,” must be returned to the nest or placed in a basket tied to a branch if the nest can’t be located; it is not true that parents will reject a baby because a human touched it.

Place a shoebox with airholes in it on top of a heating pad. Put a piece of soft cloth in the container, layer several paper towels on top of that, and place the baby on top. Use a thermometer set in the corner of the box to make sure the temperature does not get too hot. Baby mynahs 2 weeks of age or less need to be kept at a temperature of 33.3 to 34.4 degrees Celsius; if over 2 weeks old, or a fledgling, maintain the temperature at 86 to 88 degrees.

Place the box and heating pad in a dark, quiet room. Continue to monitor the temperature in the box, moving slowly and calmly.

Soak mynah/softbill pellets until they are thoroughly soft and moistened, and use one end of a Popsicle stick to dab bits of food into the baby’s mouth. If you feel the bird is in danger of imminent starvation or dehydration, use canned dog food, canned cat food or baby food until you can get to the pet store. You can also make an alternative nutritious recipe by mashing up equal amounts of cooked brown rice, oatmeal formulated for babies, applesauce and boiled egg.

  • Place the box and heating pad in a dark, quiet room.
  • Soak mynah/softbill pellets until they are thoroughly soft and moistened, and use one end of a Popsicle stick to dab bits of food into the baby’s mouth.

Make sure the bird has swallowed each bit before you attempt more. Do not give liquids–the bird can aspirate them–and there is enough liquid in the moistened food anyway. Don’t force food, but don’t stop until the baby indicates he’s had enough; he will refuse to open his mouth, close his eyes and doze off.

Feed a pinky every 30 minutes from sunrise until about 10 p.m. The bird does not need to be fed during the night but should be fed promptly at dawn. If your baby bird has begun to fledge, he needs to be fed roughly every two hours.

Reduce hand feedings to every three hours when the bird reaches 3 weeks of age, and start offering bits of fruit. When feathers begin to appear, transfer the bird to a birdcage with perches appropriately sized for his feet.

Begin offering water in a bowl to your baby mynah when he reaches 6 weeks, as well as a bowl of moistened pellets for him to pick on.

  • Feed a pinky every 30 minutes from sunrise until about 10 p.m.
  • The bird does not need to be fed during the night but should be fed promptly at dawn.
  • Begin offering water in a bowl to your baby mynah when he reaches 6 weeks, as well as a bowl of moistened pellets for him to pick on.

Put a bowl of ordinary dry pellets in your mynah’s cage by the time he is 8 weeks old. You should continue to hand-feed him as necessary, but he will begin to pick at the pellets out of curiosity and learn to eat by himself.

Place your mynah in a cage that is large enough to let him fly once he is eating on his own. The cage should be set outside in a location that is sheltered from predators. For information on how to release your mynah back into the wild, visit the Raising Orphaned Baby Wild Birds website listed in the Resources section.

To find a licensed wildlife rehabilitation centre in your area, visit the Wildlife International link in the Resources section. To stimulate a baby mynah to eat, tap gently on its beak.

WARNING

Always wash your hands thoroughly after handling or feeding your baby mynah; like all birds, they can carry salmonella germs.

Sunday, 29 March 2020

How to Get Rid of Mynah Birds

Mynah Bird

The mynah bird is a member of the starling family. A native of Southeast Asia, the mynah has migrated and can now be found all over the world. The species is commonly thought of as invasive as it fights aggressively with native wildlife. It destroys the eggs and fledglings of other birds, reducing the overall biodiversity of any given area. It is hostile not just to other birds but to small mammals such as squirrels and possums. It also inflicts damage to crops, generates huge amounts of noise and has been known to spread diseases among other animals and even to people. If you have mynah birds and you’d like to get rid of them, follow the steps in the guide below.

Limit the available sources of food. If you see mynah birds in your yard, immediately remove any bird feeders and stop leaving birdseed out. Additionally, you should begin feeding your pets inside as mynahs are opportunistic and will make use of almost any available source of nutrition. If you keep chickens or other domestic birds, ensure they are fed in an enclosed area that is inaccessible to mynahs. When feeding any other livestock, be sure to sweep up any grain spills immediately and remove any uneaten food.

Reduce the available nesting sites. Mynahs like to build their nests inside tree hollows, gaps in roofing, cavities in eaves, and depressions found in overgrown shrubbery. You can decrease the attractive nesting sites in your yard by keeping your trees and shrubs well-trimmed and by filling in any holes in your woodwork. Also, you can line the edges of your roof and your windowsills with spikes so the birds are unable to roost there.

Remove any existing bird nests. Be sure to wear a long-sleeved shirt, hat, face mask and protective gloves. Mynah birds often carry mites that can cause relentless itching and red, irritated rashes if you come into contact with them. Once the nest has been removed, place it into a plastic garbage bag, tie the bag shut and immediately remove the nest from your property.

Make your home and yard as uninviting as possible. Use a combination of anti-bird-friendly techniques such as hanging pie tins from trees, spraying shrubs and foliage with pepper-spray, or booby-trapping areas the birds like to gather with a substance called Hot Foot, which functions in a manner similar to a glue board but which allows the bird to escape.

Encourage natural predators. Adopt several large cats, if you can. They will help keep the birds away, though they may bring you any they are able to catch as a token of affection. If you cannot adopt live animals, then purchase a few pretenders — plastic owls, rubber snakes, synthetic hawks — and place them around your property, particularly in areas that might seem like good nesting sites. Artificial predators that are motion-activated tend to have the greatest effect.

Set up a mynah trap. Contact your local extension office and ask them to bring a mynah trap to your property. Be sure they instruct you as to the proper use of the trap and the appropriate baits to use. Traps should be situated as far away from possible disturbances as possible and the bait should be the only available food source in the immediate area. Once the birds have been trapped, they can be collected and humanely disposed of by a qualified professional.

Mynah Bird

Baby Common Mynah Talking Bird .

Very good talkers and the is the best time to teach them to talk, healthy neat and clean bird,

Around 4 month old young babies,

very friendly, take food from my hand and love to stay out of cage

Whistling / singing and making some sounds,

Price : £195 Each,

Brand new Good size Top open cage available for Extra.

Viewing most welcome and we recommend that you visit and see all of the parrots available to make a selection of your choice or delivery can be arranged anywhere in the UK, Wales and Scotland.

Product Description

30Mynah Bird

A confident and a little aggressive Mynah bird, the common Mynah has adapted well to the urban environment, making it one of the most abundant and familiar Mynah birds in Asia.

Common Mynah Bird

The Common Mynah is brown with a black head. It has a yellow bill, legs and bare eye skin. In flight it shows large white wing patches. The Common Mynah is a member of the starling family and is also known as the Indian Mynah.

Similar species to Mynah Birds

The Common Mynah Bird is sometimes confused with the slightly larger (24 cm – 29 cm), although both species have similar common names, the Noisy Miner is actually a native honeyeater. Both have yellow bills, legs and bare eye skin, but the Common Mynah Bird is brown with a black head and in flight it shows large white wing patches. The Noisy Miner is mostly grey. The Common Mynah Bird is closely associated with human habitation. In the evening, large groups of Common Mynah Birds gather in communal roosts, mainly in the non-breeding season, in roof voids, bridges, and large trees, and numbers can reach up to several thousands.

Mynah Bird feed

Common Mynah Birds, feed on insects, meal worms, fruits such as apples and grapes and some vegetables. Common Mynah birds, particularly enjoy feeding on insects and meal worms. If you would like to teach Mynah Birds some tricks or you would like to train them, then you are able to easily with meal worms.

Common Mynah Bird Life Span

Mynah Birds usually live up to 20 years, they are very active and a little aggressive Mynah birds throughout their life.

Common Mynah Bird Talking

Mynah Birds are very talkative birds and you can teach them many words and the Mynah Birds have a human like voice.

Mynah Birds are also very good whistlers and singers, the best age to teach the Mynah Birds to talk is when the Mynah Bird is about 1 year old.

If you find a baby bird on the ground, your first instinct might be to pick it up and rush it to safety. But this isn’t necessarily the best option, and it may even be illegal.

“It is not a good idea to raise a baby bird, or any type of wildlife, yourself; in fact, it is illegal in many states,” says Isabel Luevano, center manager and former lead rehabilitation technician for the San Francisco Bay location of the International Bird Rescue organization. “Ideally, you wouldn’t want to have the bird in your possession for more than 24 hours, and getting it to a licensed wildlife rehabilitation center, veterinary office or humane society as soon as possible will give the bird the best chance of survival.”

In addition, each species of bird requires specific types of nutrients, supplements, diet, bird cages, handling and substrates, Luevano points out. “If given incorrect care, birds can suffer defects in behavior, habituation, growth abnormalities, feather contamination and even death,” says Luevano. “Many wild birds also carry zoonotic diseases, which can be dangerous to humans, especially to children and the elderly.”

Nestling vs. Fledgling: Why the Difference Matters

When it comes to rescuing birds, one of the first things you have to understand is the difference between a nestling and a fledgling.

“In songbirds, a nestling is a young bird that is mostly naked with little to no feathering, may have closed eyes, and may not be able to move well,” says Luevano. “A fledgling songbird is a young bird that has some to mostly feather growth, has opened eyes, can move, and is quite active and able to hop and flap.”

This is an important distinction, because many bird species jump from their nests even when they are not completed flighted. “These species are meant to be on the ground, hopping and learning to forage, with mom or dad keeping guard a few feet away,” Luevano says. And while it’s true that young birds are very vulnerable to predators and injury during this time, this is a natural stage that all birds must go through.

Ensure Safety for the Baby Bird While Waiting

If you are unsure if the baby bird you see is a nestling or a fledgling, wait for a while at a safe distance, says Luevano. “If you see an adult bird coming, then the bird is not orphaned—if it’s been longer than an hour with no adult bird in sight, then it would be appropriate to intervene and contact a wildlife center, vet, or humane society.”

While waiting, secure any free-roaming dogs or cats that might pose a threat to the bird, and then watch closely.

“It is important to not look away, even for a few minutes,” says Brittney Chrans, a wildlife rehabilitation technician at the California Wildlife Center. “Oftentimes, the parent swoops in very quickly, feeds the baby, and then flies away for more food; you might miss it in the blink-of-an-eye.”

If the bird is a fledgling baby bird and is in the open, Chrans says you can gently nudge it toward a nearby area with hiding places, like bushes or shrubs, but no farther than an 8-foot radius from where it starts. For a nestling, Chrans suggests looking very hard for its nest. “If you find the nest, gently place the bird back into it,” Chrans says. “It doesn’t matter if you touch the bird; the mother won’t reject it.”

Taking the Lost Bird Home

If the parents don’t return after an hour, or it’s clear that the bird is injured and needs help, it might be time to intervene.

According to Laura Vincelette, LVT, with Pet Care Veterinary Hospital, clear instances of this include when the baby bird has no feathers (nestling), if there is noticeable bleeding or injury, or if the baby bird is in immediate danger from predators—like crows, cats, or dogs. In those cases, you can use a small washcloth to pick the bird up and gently place it in a closed box or container. “If the bird is placed in a box, small holes should be made for ventilation and the top taped shut or securely closed,” says Vincelette.

Home Care and Feeding for Baby Birds

Once you get the bird home, the basic rule is always to keep the bird in an environment that’s warm, dark, and quiet, says Luevano. “Keeping the bird in a warm place ensures the bird will not get cold or hypothermic, being in a dark place will calm the bird, and having it in a quiet space will keep the bird’s stress levels down,” she says, adding, “as hard as it is, please avoid peeking in on the bird, as each time you do, the bird’s stress levels increase.”

If you’re using a clear container to house the bird, Vincelette recommends placing a towel over the container to make it dark.

Luevano suggests trying to create a nest inside the box using any small deep dish that’s about two inches in diameter (such as a clean soup bowl) and draping a hand towel over it to create a sort of lip and a nice area for the bird to tuck into. “But not all species are used to nests,” Luevano cautions. “Some—especially if they have fledged from their nest—will not want a nest and will jump out of it,” she says.

While it might be tempting to try to feed the bird, experts caution that this is almost always a bad idea.

“I do not recommend any person feed a baby bird, as it is incredibly dangerous for the bird,” says Luevano. “If fed improperly, a baby bird can aspirate (choke) on any food or fluids given, which can cause respiratory infections and often death.” In addition, it’s very difficult to determine what type of food the bird needs—some species eat insects, while others eat grains, seeds or fruits, explains Luevano.

Luevano recommends speaking with a professional before trying to give any kind of food or fluid to a found bird. “If you have to keep the bird for 24 hours, the best option is warmth and a safe place to ‘hide’ until a professional can help,” says Luevano. “Many times, the bird is so stressed out that food given too soon can cause problems.”

The one exception to the rule is hummingbirds, as they need to receive food very often to survive. “For hummingbirds, mix 1 part sugar to 4 parts water, dip a straw or a Q-tip into the mixture, and let the bird drink from the droplet,” says Chrans. “Allow the hummingbird to drink as much as it wants, and then repeat this every 30 minutes for babies and every hour for adults until help is reached.”

Although sugar is not enough nutritionally for a hummingbird to thrive, it will keep it alive for a short period of time, until you can get it to a licensed rehabber to provide it with proper nutrition, sa Chrans.

This article was verified and edited for accuracy by Dr. Laurie Hess, DVM

Mynah’s make fascinating pets and are the best mimics in the world of birds. Categorized amonst the softbills, these playful birds require special care, especially when it comes to diet.

Mynah’s make fascinating pets and are the best mimics in the world of birds. Categorized amongst the softbills, these playful birds require special care, especially when it comes to diet. It is also important to note that they are very active birds and require a lot of space. If you think a mynah is the bird for you, then read on.

It is important that you obtain your mynah bird from a reputable domestic mynah breeder, so as to avoid supporting wildlife smugglers, who are responsible for the deaths of vast numbers of birds captured in the wild. Because mynahs can, and should, only be obtained through domestic breeders, it may be a challenge to obtain one; however, there are a number of online resources that will assist you in locating a good breeder.

The most popular pet mynah species are the Greater Indian Hill mynah and the Java Hill mynah. Java Hill mynah’s are the larger of the two and are notable for having a clearer, more human-like voice. On the other-hand Greater Indian Hill mynahs are known to be easier to handle. Mynah’s do well on their own, but a pair is also acceptable. They tend to make more noise when there are two, and do better in an outdoor aviary.

It is advisable to house your mynah in a large cage with a few perches made of natural branches, as they do not climb but only fly and hop. A cage with a grated floor is best as it allows for easy cleaning of the newspaper lined catch tray. A shelf and a nest box will make your mynah feel right at home. The mynah’s cage should be put in a busy part of the home as they are gregarious and enjoy company. Avoid drafty spots and direct sunlight. Include a bathing dish in the cage, along with a water bottle or dish. Be sure to keep both sources of water clean. Supply your very active bird with toys such as mirrors, bells, swings, bottle caps, paper and so forth. Be careful of rope toys as these may catch the tongue of your mynah.

Mynah’s require a specialized diet as hemochromatosis is common. This is a disease that causes too much iron to collect in the bird’s liver, resulting in the bird being poisoned. As such, the mynah must be fed a low iron diet, preferably softbill food that has been formulated to meet their needs. Avoid things such as parrot food, red meat, acidic fruits, seeds and live foods. Recommended fruits to accompany the pelleted diet include apple, banana, melon and grapes, with the seeds removed. Keep the food dishes clean and the cage free of uneaten food items that may spoil. You may wish to give your mynah distilled water if you are concerned about the iron content in your water.

While there are number of considerations to take into account before bringing a pet mynah into your home, if you do decide to do so you will find it a truly rewarding experience.

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W.K. Kellogg Bird Sanctuary

Cared for by the Michigan State University, the W.K. Kellogg Bird Sanctuary was established by, and named after, a man who is more likely to be associated with breakfast by millions of people in .

The Tale of Winston Perchhill – Part One

My name is Winston. Winston Perchhill. I am a happy member of a flock of three cockatiels, but it hasn’t always been like this. I would like to take you back to my earliest memories.

I taught the little bird how to talk Singhala, but I did not teach the little bird how to talk Tamil.

My myna bird grew up to be big and strong. We kept the bird in the house, but every morning at 10:00 AM the bird went out to take a bath in the birdbath.

My Mynah Bird

One morning at 10:00 AM, a man from a bank in Kandy came by my house and saw my myna bird taking a bath. The man said to my mother, “That is a nice bird. I would like to buy that bird. I will pay you 500 rupees for the bird.”

My mother told the man from the bank to ask me, because it was my bird. I told the man that I would never sell the bird, because I had raised up the bird from the time that it was a baby.

So, the man asked my mother where did I get the bird from. My mother told him that I got it from my brother.

Then, the man asked my brother to sell him the bird for 500 rupees. My brother told the man that he could not sell it, because it was my bird.

Sometimes, in my village, the Tiger come in the night. The Tiger kill a lot of people in my village of Bowalawatta.

That night at about midnight, there was a knock on the door. Nobody answered. Nobody said anything. We knew that it might be the Tiger.

Every night we put the Myna bird in a cage. We covered the cage with a black cloth, so that the myna bird could not see. But, the myna bird could talk. He did not know any better.

So, when there came a knock on the door, my myna bird said: “Open the door. Open the door.”

The man kept knocking and my myna bird kept saying real loud, “Open the door. Open the door.”

So, what could my mother do? Finally, she opened the door.

There was a man at the door wearing a mask. He had a gun. We all put our hands up. He came in the house. He looked around. Finally, he said, “Where’s the bird.”

As soon as he spoke, my mother recognized his voice. He was the man from the bank. He was not any kind of Tiger. When the Tigers come, they come at least 4 or 5. This man, we suddenly realized, was all alone. Nobody else was there.

My mother said, “I know who you are, and you can not have the bird.”

The man did not say anything. He just ran out the door and disappeared into the night.

The next day, my mother went to that bank. The man was not there. We never saw that man again.

My myna bird is still alive today and living in my mother’s house in Bowalawatta. He is 14 years old now. I spoke to my bird the other day on the telephone.

This is a true story.

Rankoth Pedigedera Dayawathie

UPDATE: Nowadays, with Dayawathie in America, her mother Ukkuamma Rankoth, is taking care of the Mynah Bird. However, Ukkuamma says that the bird is old now. He rarely talks except when spoken to. His feathers are turning white too. He is still alive but will probably not live much longer. He is about 15 years old now.

UPDATE: Sad News: The Myna Bird died in March, 2004, after living for 18 years. Here is a Mynah Bird story:

At 02:47 PM 10/28/99 -0400, [email protected] (WILLIAM GEIGER) wrote:

About 20 years ago, my father and I took our dog to the veterinarian for medical help. In the waiting room were other pets and their owners. Also, attached to a coffee table, was a cage containing the vet’s myna bird.

The myna bird meowed like a cat. The cats seemed uninterested. However, the dogs found this disturbing. Some of them barked at the bird.

The bird barked back, which really distressed the dogs, making them bark ever louder. The bird responded, “SHUT UP!” The poor dogs did not know what to make of this.

You already know that the bird learned these sounds from the cats, dogs and owners that came in nearly every day.

Hi everyone, I’m pretty sure some of you heard the name of this bird before, common myna or Indian myna… So they’ve actually migrated to my country and now are posing a major threat to the local wildlife. I’ve witnessed them with my own eyes destroying a speckled bulbul birds nests and destroying their eggs. That being said they’re a massive pest here and the government has allowed the use of low powered airguns to shoot them in urban areas. I already plan on taking them down really soon since I’m also not fond of their annoying voice every morning. Has anyone have experience with them? I think they’re related to starlings!

Hi everyone, I’m pretty sure some of you heard the name of this bird before, common myna or Indian myna. So they’ve actually migrated to my country and now are posing a major threat to the local wildlife. I’ve witnessed them with my own eyes destroying a speckled bulbul birds nests and destroying their eggs. That being said they’re a massive pest here and the government has allowed the use of low powered airguns to shoot them in urban areas. I already plan on taking them down really soon since I’m also not fond of their annoying voice every morning. Has anyone have experience with them? I think they’re related to starlings!

Hello Never heard of them till your post, so I looked them up, looks like they have a great yellow aiming point right behind the eye. Set your self up with a good backstop, bait station and have fun Eric

Hello Never heard of them till your post, so I looked them up, looks like they have a great yellow aiming point right behind the eye. Set your self up with a good backstop, bait station and have fun Eric

People have those as pets because they will imitate sounds and things that they hear. I know they used to cost quite a bit of money to buy one in a pet store.

People have those as pets because they will imitate sounds and things that they hear. I know they used to cost quite a bit of money to buy one in a pet store.

Member of the crow family, highly intelligent as far as birds go, tend to pair with a mate, so be on the lookout for the follow-up…

They are challenging targets, worthy of respect, anything past 75 meters is a good shot in my books! They get a bad reputation wherever they seem to go…

I envy your position!

Member of the crow family, highly intelligent as far as birds go, tend to pair with a mate, so be on the lookout for the follow-up.

They are challenging targets, worthy of respect, anything past 75 meters is a good shot in my books! They get a bad reputation wherever they seem to go.

I envy your position!

They’re a huge pest in here in South Africa as well as places like Australia. They’re really horrible birds and similar but worse than European starlings in my opinion.

I and most people I know shoot them every chance we get. They are very smart though and catch on quickly, avoiding areas that their pals get shot. They also tend to spend a lot of time on sidewalks etc in heavily urbanized areas where it is difficult to shoot them safely due to lots of people and cars being around.

Bottom line is they can be challenging to hunt and are almost impossible to eliminate. Nothing quite as satisfying to smack with an airgun though. Also, they are always in pairs and you can generally get the mate as well if you are patient, as they will come investgate what happened.

@riazp I think you mean starling/sturnidae family 👍🏻😄

  • This reply was modified 4 months ago by Macros.

They’re a huge pest in here in South Africa as well as places like Australia. They’re really horrible birds and similar but worse than European starlings in my opinion.

I and most people I know shoot them every chance we get. They are very smart though and catch on quickly, avoiding areas that their pals get shot. They also tend to spend a lot of time on sidewalks etc in heavily urbanized areas where it is difficult to shoot them safely due to lots of people and cars being around.

Bottom line is they can be challenging to hunt and are almost impossible to eliminate. Nothing quite as satisfying to smack with an airgun though. Also, they are always in pairs and you can generally get the mate as well if you are patient, as they will come investgate what happened.

@riazp I think you mean starling/sturnidae family 👍🏻😄