How to support an employee with dyslexia

It has never been more important for companies to strengthen their commitment to inclusion.

While many companies are making an effort to hire employees from all races, backgrounds, and walks of life, it is equally as important to hire neurodiverse talent as well. For those who are unfamiliar, neurodiversity is a concept where disabilities such as dyslexia are viewed simply as any other human variation as opposed to a deficiency.

With that said, some individuals with a neurodiverse condition may require additional tools and support. It’s important that you’re equipped to overcome any barriers they may experience. This is why we have interviewed seven business leaders and asked them what is one way that employers can better support employees with dyslexia. Keep reading to learn easy ways you can help your company to be more inclusive and welcoming to those with neurodifferences!

How to support an employee with dyslexia

Adapt and Accommodate

Work with your neurodiverse or dyslexic employees on accommodations, if needed. Ask them what kinds of tasks they feel confident completing and which they may need extended deadlines for. Communication is important in the workplace no matter what and that includes creating accommodations and adaptations for employees who request them.

Offer Supportive Software

Supporting employees with dyslexia starts with understanding it yourself. As a manager, it is your responsibility to research and learn exactly what dyslexia entails so that you can make an educated plan with an employee. One specific example would be making sure that the employee has software or tools of some sort, like Read&Write, that can convert text to audible sound so that they can hear what others would read. It is a small way to ensure that an employee can still effectively and comfortably do their job.

Use Easy to Read Fonts

Choose easy to read fonts for all company correspondence. Some fonts are easier to read than others and, for employees with dyslexia, a poorly chosen font could add unnecessary difficulty to their work. Gather a list of fonts that are best for those employees to ensure their best work.

Adapt Your Team Communication Style

As the owner of the company, it is my responsibility to make sure that everyone is set up for success at Stomadent. To support individuals with dyslexia takes effort on the part of all team members, but can be done! The best way to support an employee with dyslexia would be to adapt your team communication style. In a presentation full of data and numbers on a slide, include visual elements that your employee will be able to easily understand and process. Not only does this show support for that team member, but adding graphics to any presentation will only make it more fun for everyone involved!

Demonstrate a Supportive Culture

First, understand that there may be employees you manage who are hesitant to disclose that they have dyslexia. This can be for many reasons, from worry for their career to embarrassment at what they may struggle with. The best way to support your employees who may deal with this is to be open-minded. If an employee does share with you these worries, make it clear to them that your office is a safe and supportive environment. A way to establish this kind of office culture can be achieved by asking your employees what they need. An employee with dyslexia may find they work better when documents are in a certain dyslexia-friendly font while others may benefit the most from innovative software such as Read&Write. In the end, discussing options with your employees is the best way to truly support them. After all, they understand their needs the best.

Partner with Expert Organizations

Engage in the interactive process with employees to better understand their disability and how it impacts them at work. Ask what they have found to be successful, and offer to research other methods, tools, and technologies that may be of assistance. Reaching out to professional contacts and organizations such as the Job Accommodation Network can yield great information and resources to help your employees.

– Colleen McManus, Senior HR Executive and Consultant –

Explore Digital Tools

When employing someone with dyslexia, you’ll want to pay attention to their preferred style of communication and learning to set them up for success. Digital tools can help. For example, instant spell checkers are helpful because the employee can focus on getting their thoughts down instead of worrying whether everything is spelled correctly. Screen readers can help with email and important documents, while speech to text tools can keep their notes and other documents clear. Finally, providing memos and other handouts on colored paper can improve contrast and help your employee discern them.

Provide Ample Review Time

One way employers can best support their employees with dyslexia is making sure that all meeting material is always distributed long before the meeting. Someone with dyslexia might become overwhelmed when receiving a document to review and discuss on the spot, so be prepared and deliver important documents in advance.

Individuals with neurodiverse conditions bring a wealth of skills and talent to any organization. As an employer, it’s important that you create an inclusive environment where they can thrive. To help, you, we’ve created a video series in partnership with neurodiversity specialists, Lexxic. Gain expert insights to help you support employees with dyslexia, adhd, autism and dyspraxia. You’ll also hear from Read&Write user, Taljinder, on the role of technology in supporting her dyslexia. Watch the series today.

It has never been more important for companies to strengthen their commitment to inclusion.

While many companies are making an effort to hire employees from all races, backgrounds, and walks of life, it is equally as important to hire neurodiverse talent as well. For those who are unfamiliar, neurodiversity is a concept where disabilities such as dyslexia are viewed simply as any other human variation as opposed to a deficiency.

With that said, some individuals with a neurodiverse condition may require additional tools and support. It’s important that you’re equipped to overcome any barriers they may experience. This is why we have interviewed seven business leaders and asked them what is one way that employers can better support employees with dyslexia. Keep reading to learn easy ways you can help your company to be more inclusive and welcoming to those with neurodifferences!

How to support an employee with dyslexia

Adapt and Accommodate

Work with your neurodiverse or dyslexic employees on accommodations, if needed. Ask them what kinds of tasks they feel confident completing and which they may need extended deadlines for. Communication is important in the workplace no matter what and that includes creating accommodations and adaptations for employees who request them.

Offer Supportive Software

Supporting employees with dyslexia starts with understanding it yourself. As a manager, it is your responsibility to research and learn exactly what dyslexia entails so that you can make an educated plan with an employee. One specific example would be making sure that the employee has software or tools of some sort, like Read&Write, that can convert text to audible sound so that they can hear what others would read. It is a small way to ensure that an employee can still effectively and comfortably do their job.

Use Easy to Read Fonts

Choose easy to read fonts for all company correspondence. Some fonts are easier to read than others and, for employees with dyslexia, a poorly chosen font could add unnecessary difficulty to their work. Gather a list of fonts that are best for those employees to ensure their best work.

Adapt Your Team Communication Style

As the owner of the company, it is my responsibility to make sure that everyone is set up for success at Stomadent. To support individuals with dyslexia takes effort on the part of all team members, but can be done! The best way to support an employee with dyslexia would be to adapt your team communication style. In a presentation full of data and numbers on a slide, include visual elements that your employee will be able to easily understand and process. Not only does this show support for that team member, but adding graphics to any presentation will only make it more fun for everyone involved!

Demonstrate a Supportive Culture

First, understand that there may be employees you manage who are hesitant to disclose that they have dyslexia. This can be for many reasons, from worry for their career to embarrassment at what they may struggle with. The best way to support your employees who may deal with this is to be open-minded. If an employee does share with you these worries, make it clear to them that your office is a safe and supportive environment. A way to establish this kind of office culture can be achieved by asking your employees what they need. An employee with dyslexia may find they work better when documents are in a certain dyslexia-friendly font while others may benefit the most from innovative software such as Read&Write. In the end, discussing options with your employees is the best way to truly support them. After all, they understand their needs the best.

Partner with Expert Organizations

Engage in the interactive process with employees to better understand their disability and how it impacts them at work. Ask what they have found to be successful, and offer to research other methods, tools, and technologies that may be of assistance. Reaching out to professional contacts and organizations such as the Job Accommodation Network can yield great information and resources to help your employees.

– Colleen McManus, Senior HR Executive and Consultant –

Explore Digital Tools

When employing someone with dyslexia, you’ll want to pay attention to their preferred style of communication and learning to set them up for success. Digital tools can help. For example, instant spell checkers are helpful because the employee can focus on getting their thoughts down instead of worrying whether everything is spelled correctly. Screen readers can help with email and important documents, while speech to text tools can keep their notes and other documents clear. Finally, providing memos and other handouts on colored paper can improve contrast and help your employee discern them.

Provide Ample Review Time

One way employers can best support their employees with dyslexia is making sure that all meeting material is always distributed long before the meeting. Someone with dyslexia might become overwhelmed when receiving a document to review and discuss on the spot, so be prepared and deliver important documents in advance.

Individuals with neurodiverse conditions bring a wealth of skills and talent to any organization. As an employer, it’s important that you create an inclusive environment where they can thrive. To help, you, we’ve created a video series in partnership with neurodiversity specialists, Lexxic. Gain expert insights to help you support employees with dyslexia, adhd, autism and dyspraxia. You’ll also hear from Read&Write user, Taljinder, on the role of technology in supporting her dyslexia. Watch the series today.

Getting the Best From People Who Struggle With Words

How to support an employee with dyslexia

Letters and words can confuse and frustrate a dyslexic person.

Have you ever wondered why a team member who is intelligent and full of good ideas seems to take forever to read documents, and writes reports and messages that are often riddled with errors. You may have assumed that he either rushes things or doesn’t check through his work enough. But had you thought that he may be dyslexic?

In this article, we explain what dyslexia is; we reveal some of the challenges faced by a dyslexic person; we look at some of the skills and strengths that she can bring to the workplace; and we explore how you can support her, so that she can thrive and succeed in your team.

What Is Dyslexia?

The word “dyslexia” is derived from Greek and means “difficulty with words.” People with the condition have difficulty processing and remembering information that they read and hear. But dyslexia has no bearing on intelligence. It’s a lifelong, generally genetic condition that affects between 10 and 15 percent of the population in the U.S. (about 10 percent in the U.K.).

No two dyslexics will have exactly the same set of symptoms but, according to the American Medical Association, they will experience some of the following:

  • Reading and writing skills below the level expected for their intelligence.
  • Problems with learning the meaning of words.
  • Impaired ability to recognize sounds and to link them with symbols.
  • Slow recognition of written words.
  • Trouble writing down ideas.
  • Poor spelling.
  • A tendency to transpose letters and numbers.
  • Confusion of left and right.
  • Trouble with coordination and poor spatial reasoning.
  • Family history of dyslexia or learning disorders.
  • Poor time management, planning and organizational skills.
  • Low self-esteem and high levels of stress.

If you recognize any of these characteristics in a team member, or even in yourself, there are many sources of help and information. Good places to start are the websites of The American Dyslexia Association (ADA) and the British Dyslexia Association (BDA). Both of these organizations offer work-based training and support in line with current legislation.

Note 1:

Some dyslexic people are reluctant to disclose their condition. They may worry about how it could impact their employment and career prospects, for example, or out of shame at their difficulty in reading and writing.

Note 2:

People with dyslexia in the U.S. are protected against discrimination by the Americans with Disabilities Act 1990, and those in the U.K. are covered by the Equality Act 2010. This means that employers need to make “reasonable adjustments” in the workplace so that dyslexic team member have the same opportunities as anyone else. We look at “reasonable adjustments” below.

Wherever you work in the world, talk to your HR department for more information about what legislation applies to your organization.

The Strengths and Advantages of a Dyslexic Team Member

It is worth reiterating that, just because someone has dyslexia, it does not mean that he is in any way less intelligent than his colleagues. In fact, chances are, he brings creativity, insight and powerful problem solving skills to your team.

According to Ronald Davis, author of the 2010 book, “The Gift of Dyslexia,” dyslexics think “outside the box” and often excel in entrepreneurship, science and inventions. Polar explorer Ann Bancroft, industrialist Henry Ford, and billionaire businessman Richard Branson all fit this pattern. Other famous and high-achieving dyslexics include physicist Albert Einstein, artist Pablo Picasso, movie director Steven Spielberg, and five-time Olympic gold medalist rower Sir Steven Redgrave.

With effective support, someone with dyslexia can be a valuable asset to your team. The way that she perceives the world is unique and can be a catalyst for innovation and success. But Davis also warns that, if not handled properly, the challenges faced by dyslexics can lead to low self-esteem , stress and even depression, which can exacerbate their condition.

Chances are, as the manager of a dyslexic person, you will have challenges to deal with. Changing his role or duties could cause him problems as he tries to adapt to new processes, for example, so you may need to provide additional training.

Similarly, introducing new technology can mean that you have to help her to adopt new ways of working. However, some new technology may really benefit her, and boost her engagement and productivity. We outline some of the assistive technology that’s available below.

Managing a Team Member With Dyslexia

Dyslexia can be very frustrating for your team member and for you as his manager. But there are many simple and inexpensive tips and strategies that you can use to support him, and to get the best from him.

If a team member asks for help managing her dyslexia, talk to her privately about her needs. Then talk to your HR department to make sure that your organization complies with legislation, and to find out what resources might already be available.

Here are some practical steps you can take to manage a dyslexic team member successfully:

1. Adapt Your Communication Style. Take your cue from your dyslexic team member and find out his preferred communication and learning styles . Because of his difficulty processing information, he may prefer you to demonstrate any tasks or activities that you want him to do. Or, he might respond better to information that is presented verbally and/or visually.

For example, if he is a visual learner, you can highlight the important points in documents, and use Mind Maps , Flow Charts and diagrams. He may also prefer to receive information by voicemail rather than email or instant messaging.

2. Make Workplace Adjustments. Reading is frustrating for many dyslexic people, because letters can appear to dance around the page. So, if you are handing out printed materials, using a colored background on them can be enormously helpful. Your dyslexic team member can tell you what background colors and contrast works best for her.

People with dyslexia need precise, clear instructions, and it’s better to give these in a quiet location and to follow them up with a written reminder.

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Are you an employer who doesn’t know how to support an employee with dyslexia? Listen

Around 10% of the population have dyslexia and it may affect their day-to-day work in ways that are not immediately obvious. Many dyslexic adults in the workplace have never been formally identified or assessed. Listen Sometimes, those who do have a diagnosis may choose to keep it to themselves. Not everyone understands how their dyslexic difficulties can impact on the many different circumstances which may present in the workplace. Listen

The following situations may cause problems for a dyslexic employee: Listen

  • A change of job description requiring a greater emphasis on written documentation or report writing. (Promotion may have this effect too.) Listen
  • An introduction of new methods of working or IT systems. Listen
  • A new line manager with a more rigid, bureaucratic and less sympathetic management style. Listen

Stress can cause dyslexia difficulties to become more obvious and further impact an employee’s work. Listen

How can you help as an employer? Listen

Ensure your workplace is sensitive to different working and learning styles. Allow employees to approach work tasks and procedures in a manner that is easiest for them. Listen If you’re aware an employee has dyslexia discuss how you can assist them, and implement necessary changes to your office environment. If you notice an employee struggling, it’s always worth investigating that there’s no underlying condition affecting their performance. Listen

The British Dyslexia Association has more information on screening and dyslexia tests for adults. Listen

For further information, employers can order the BDA Code of Practice for Employers. Note that failure to implement reasonable adjustments for a disability is a breach of the Equality Act. Listen

One in 10 people have dyslexia. For many, the digital workplace creates barriers to their success. Literacy software helps employees with dyslexia to overcome challenges. And empowers them to harness their unique strengths.

Dyslexic minds often process information visually and with originality. To their teams, people with dyslexia are often known as the problem-solvers. That’s because they’re able to recognize patterns. And discover connections that others have missed. They might also be known for their ability to look at tasks with a holistic and creative approach. And be renowned for being detailed verbal communicators. But for many, sharing their talents doesn’t come without its stresses and strains.

In the modern workspace, I’m sure you’ll agree that most of our communication is in the written format. And there’s an ever-increasing demand for accurate and speedy work. But if written communication doesn’t suit everyone, what then?

Literacy software helps to make the workplace more inclusive. It offers employees a choice in how they work. And helps to level the playing field. So every employee is empowered to succeed in their career.

Meet Colin, user of assistive technology

“Colin is intelligent, but doesn’t show it on paper.”

That’s the phrase that’s written on most of Colin’s reports from his school days. And unfortunately, it’s a phrase with which many people with dyslexia can relate.

As someone with dyslexia, Colin experiences difficulty processing information in his short-term memory. He also struggles with organization. And has challenges when it comes to writing and spelling.

Colin is also very well respected in his job, receiving many promotions before settling into his current role as Governance Manager in the UK Civil Service. But his succession didn’t come without its challenges.

It must be said that a world that’s not inclusive hinders the talents of people with neurodiversity. Colin experienced a time in his career where his job was on the line. Why? Because his role involved a lot of reading and writing, and the supports were simply not there.

Fortunately, Colin’s Line Manager stepped in. Through inclusive practice, he was provided with adjustments to support his way of working. And because of that, Colin began to thrive. One of his supports was Read&Write for Work.

“I have strategies to deal with my dyslexia. And one of the most important ones is Texthelp Read&Write. It helps me when I’m drafting any work-related papers, it picks up spelling mistakes, homophones, all the things that dyslexics have problems with. I’ve been using it for about 20 years.” – Colin Moloney

So, what is Read&Write?

Read&Write is a literacy software that supports users with neurodiverse conditions like dyslexia. Its features support employees to work in a way which suits their strengths. And, it’s also designed to empower efficiency and productivity in the fast-paced world of work.

Speedy processing

Many individuals with dyslexia process information best when it’s audible. Text-to-speech technology allows them to decode text in their preferred way. Helping them to take in information much quicker. And proofread their work much faster. Read&Write for Work offers text-to-speech across any platform or device. And supports easy listening on the go.

“Read&Write helps me to work at a faster rate. I can use text-to-speech instead of reading documents, which in turn allows me to work more quickly, as I am a slow reader.”

Improved focus

Individuals with dyslexia might find it difficult to focus. Read&Write provides a screen masking feature that helps to focus the users attention on content they want to read. It helps to reduce what many dyslexics describe as ‘distorted and moving text’. This makes it easier to interpret, and supports task completion.

Explaining the benefits of screen-tinting, Taljinder Duggal, Corporate Communications and Engagement Analyst with dyslexia and dyspraxia, explains;

“When reading an Excel document, the text and numbers used to dance all over my screen. The moment I added the screen masking feature, through color theory and by using the pink and blue tint overlays, the Excel sheet almost ironed itself out. I could read it seamlessly.”

Quick response

In the workplace, urgent matters creep up. Employees need to be able to react quickly, and with accuracy. Diction provides an alternative method of input. Employees simply speak their thoughts and watch as the words appear on screen. This helps those with dyslexia to get their thoughts down, without worry over the mechanics of spelling. Helping them to respond much faster, without feeling overwhelmed.

It offers a thoughtful adjustment. And supports an inclusive workplace

Employees with dyslexia may have their own coping mechanisms. But Read&Write provides an extra level of support. Providing the software helps you to demonstrate your commitment to diversity, equality and inclusion. And ensures your employees feel supported. Having the software readily available also means the support is there for those that may not have disclosed their disability. Or who may not know they have dyslexia.

A workplace culture that embraces diversity supports personal achievement and organizational success. Empowering employees to achieve and succeed. And helping organizations to make the workplace a place where great things happen – for everyone.

To find out more about Read&Write, visit our dedicated product page. Or, reach out to our team to discover how Read&Write can benefit your organization.

Dyslexia Support

Support for employees with dyslexia in the workplace is available through our work based support scheme. We offer vocational support in the workplace that aids specific traits of dyslexia. Our support service aims to act as a ‘middle ground’ between the employee and employer to enable the best working environment for both parties.

For more information on our experience of supporting employees in co-ordinance with the employer please see the following example.

Promoting dyslexia awareness in the workplace

We aim to promote positive attitudes towards working environments towards dyslexia. Our two-day training course is aimed at those who are working with adults who have dyslexia such as learning difficulty professionals, education policy advocates, college student support personnel and social support workers. The course aims to explain identification processes of dyslexia and provide guidance on the traits of dyslexia as well as advising on what facilities could be of benefit to someone with dyslexia.

The Dyslexia Foundation dyslexia training course is either 1 or 2 days and is accredited by BTEC at Level 3. The training is aimed to give the individual the skills to work and support dyslexic adults. This covers the history of dyslexia, identification, teaching practice and working practice. The training has been undertaken by many national and regional organisations working in the public, private and third sector. It can be delivered in a bespoke manner addressing all attendees’ needs and is a brilliant and accessible two day course introducing the different elements of dyslexia. It provides real experiences from our clients that act as a good method of the explanation of dyslexia.

The awareness course broaches subjects that encourage dyslexic friendly models of good practice such as:

  • Views and attitudes on dyslexia self-awareness and learning styles in dyslexia.
  • Identification of dyslexia and the ability to put in place support for someone with dyslexia in education and in employment.
  • Disability legislation.
  • Case studies and significant court cases involving dyslexics.
  • Highlights of what support is available.

Example of our experience of support

We were introduced to a prisoner on remand. Bernard was 37 and had self-diagnosed his dyslexia and had initiated contact with us to help him address his issues related to studying and his dyslexia characteristics. We tracked Bernard from Merseyside and visited Bernard periodically to identify his dyslexia and mentor him through his learning curve.

Bernard accomplished varying success in prison studying nutrition and sport. On release from prison after 2 years, we were instrumental in Bernard attending an access course to gain entrance to university. Bernard received a loan of a laptop from us and was offered mentoring session to enable him to complete his course of study. Bernard achieved his access qualification and after some considerable effort is now in his first year of a degree. Although he has chosen change his study path and has subsequently enrolled on an undergraduate law degree.

The mentoring and ICT intervention have enabled Bernard to undertake a course of study that was unattainable prior to his imprisonment. Bernard felt that school had let him down and he had underachieved considerably and feels that the degree will be a new start to his life. Bernard now understands that his learning disability has impacted on his life and is now very positive about the future.

What Is a Resume Label?

Dyslexia is a learning disability that interferes with visual, auditory or motor processes, making reading and comprehension difficult. Dyslexics don’t see the written word the same way others do. Letters or numbers may appear jumbled and meaningless. Because their reading ability is challenged, dyslexics take longer to perform certain tasks. The condition is most often recognized in children, but it is a life-long impairment that can greatly restrict you at work. If you are dyslexic, don’t be afraid to ask your boss or a prospective employer for assistance to help you succeed on the job.

Reasonable Accommodations

The Americans with Disabilities Act defines a disability as a physical or mental impairment that “substantially limits one or more major life activities.” Learning disabilities such as dyslexia are included. Under the ADA, employers with 15 or more employees must provide reasonable accommodations to people with disabilities, unless such accommodations would create a substantial hardship to the company. Such accommodations include changing the way a job is performed, acquiring equipment and making alterations in the workplace to accommodate the disability.

What You Can Do

Ask someone to read important documents to you. Ask your boss to give you verbal instructions rather than written notes and tape record important instructions or information. Break the job down into smaller tasks and allow enough time to finish any reading that is necessary to get the job done. Use your computer’s voice output, if you have one. Use your word processing program’s spell check and grammar check functions.

What Your Boss Can Do

You are entitled to accommodations, even if your workplace has fewer than 15 employees, but you must ask your employer to provide them. Many workplace accommodations don’t involve extra expense or undue hardship. Simply allowing you to take more time to complete tasks involving reading may be all that is necessary. Other accommodations include scanning documents into a computer and converting text to audio, or using voice-output software, also called screen-reading software, that highlights and reads text out loud from the computer screen. An on-screen ruler or copy highlighter can help you to focus on computer text. Use screen-reading software that reads text out loud, and try electronic and talking dictionaries. Other accommodations could include providing large-print documents or typewritten material in a large, clear font.

Get Help

Adults with dyslexia and other learning disabilities should seek assistance from testing and evaluation professionals. The Job Accommodation Network provides a searchable online resource for accommodation options for people with disabilities.

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As a long-time newspaper reporter and staff writer, Kay Bosworth covered real estate development and business for publications in northern New Jersey. Her extensive career included serving as editor of a business education magazine for the McGraw-Hill Book Company. The Kentucky native earned a BA from Transylvania University in Lexington.

Dyslexia is predicted to affect approximately 10% of the British population, according to the British Dyslexia Association (BDA). Subsequently, around 2.9 million workers are living with this learning difficulty, meaning it’s incredibly likely that a current or future employee will be dyslexic.

How to support an employee with dyslexiaUnderstandably, revealing a learning difficulty can be a daunting prospect in the workplace and this anxiety can prevent those with dyslexia asking for help. This means behaviours can occasionally be misunderstood as a lack of ability, dedication and inattention. But, those with dyslexia bring as many strengths and qualities to a business, as non-sufferers do, which means it’s incredibly important to encourage people to speak up about it.

Most commonly, symptoms of dyslexia include struggling to formulate thoughts quickly enough to participate in conversations, to confusing words within sentences and letters within words. Not only that, but struggling to schedule work, meeting deadlines and being able to recollect and record information are frequent signs of dyslexia.

Recognising these signs and encouraging an open conversation about dyslexia, will ensure that those living with it, can reach their full potential and enjoy work, whilst feeling fully supported by their employers. To facilitate this, the wellbeing experts at CABA offer 10 ways in which leaders can support employees with dyslexia:

  1. Set up a mentoring scheme

This ensures that the workforce feel more comfortable talking about learning difficulties in the workplace, with the hope being to subtly encourage those that are struggling to come forward and ask for help. A mentoring programme can offer a range of tailored advice and support for anyone who may be suffering with anxiety, mental health or any other form of learning difficulty in the workplace, not just dyslexia.

  1. Diagnostic Assessment

To be able to best support your team member, diagnostic assessments would be truly valuable in understanding their specific needs. These can be arranged via the BDA.

  1. Create dyslexia friendly content

If you recognise that an employee has dyslexia, small changes can be made to help employees navigate through work content. This may mean using an easily readable font such as Arial or Comic Sans, as it’s important that you don’t use small fonts or italic which can cause letters to appear more crowded. It may also be useful to use headings to create structure and to avoid background patterns or pictures that could easily be a distraction from the text.

  1. Adapt your communication style

It’s worthwhile asking your team member their preferred method of communication. This is because if the individual is a visual learner you could work using a mind map or flow chart, to best get across important points. Remember, everyone works differently, so ask the individual what works best, to ensure you get the most out of them.

  1. Training services

To help employers support staff members who may experience work based learning difficulties, The Dyslexia Association offers a range of services to ensure that both parties are mutually benefitting. So, ensure you set aside enough budget to invest in resources to help aid people with dyslexia.

  1. Assistive technology

There are a number of technological devices that can make work life easier for those with dyslexia. For example, speech recognition software allows speech to be converted into text, and vice versa – cutting out the task of reading and writing which can often take much longer for a dyslexic employee.

  1. Raise awareness

Symptoms associated with dyslexia can seem like a hindrance at work, however, if harnessed correctly they can be extremely beneficial to any business. Why not run a dyslexia awareness course for all staff, using a qualified and experienced dyslexia specialist who has experience training in the work environment? This will help to clarify any misconceptions about dyslexia and help to make all employees feel comfortable in dealing with it.

  1. Alternative workspace

Loud and busy environments can make it hard for dyslexic workers to concentrate, so to help them, it can be beneficial to offer alternative work environments. For example, allowing these employees to use a meeting room, to help them focus when they really need to. If this is not possible, then providing headphones or earplugs can be a useful alternative.