How to use pearl ex pigments

Our most versatile product yet, Pearl Ex Powdered Pigments may be used any time a metallic or pearlescent effect is desired: mix them into acrylics, oils, printing inks, encaustics, alcohol inks, epoxy, glues, casting resins, clay, varnishes…the list goes on!

Try it mixed with Gum Arabic for a DIY metallic calligraphy ink or watercolor, in the Pearl Ex Varnish for working on non-porous surfaces, or mixed into one of Jacquard’s colorless extenders for use on fabric.

Pearl Ex is a safe, inert pigment that exhibits extreme colorfastness and stability. The different particle sizes produce different effects, from a smooth pearly luster, to a highly metallic sheen. Pearl Ex creates a metallic effect without being a real metal—it will never tarnish or fade!

Note: Pearl Ex Powdered Pigments were specifically developed as an art material. They are NOT for cosmetic use.

FABRIC/FIBER/SURFACES
polymer clay, encaustics, paper, shrink plastic, leather, glass, canvas, wood, and more! Mix with a binder to use on natural and synthetic fibers.

How to use pearl ex pigments

ABOVE: 5 NEW Pearl Ex Colors

690 Knox Gold, 697 Hot Copper
682 Duo Green-Yellow, 695 Duo Aqua-Blue,
& 696 Duo Blue-Purple

Because Pearl Ex is a dry pigment, you can add it to the resin to color it. Add more to supersaturate it or less to give it a marbled effect.

How do you mix powdered pigment into resin?

Sprinkle a little powder pigment on top of your mixed cup of resin and stir. Go with less than what you think you need as you can always add more. Use a kitchen measuring spoon if necessary (or lay off the coffee that morning LOL). This mixing cup contains 1/2 ounce of resin.

How do you mix Pearl Ex powdered pigments?

Mix 4 parts Pearl Ex to 1 part Gum Arabic and add water to desired consistency for a watercolor paint. If mixing in a plastic well palette, this mixture can dry out and become reconstituted with water. Dust Pearl Ex Powders onto shrink plastic before shrinking.

How much pigment do you put in epoxy?

How Much Coloring Pigment Do I Add to Epoxy? Epoxy – Add 3 to 4.5 ounces of pigment per gallon of epoxy. Paint – Add 25-50 grams of pigment per gallon of paint.

Can I use Pearl Ex powdered pigments in soap?

Mix Pearl Ex with any clear medium to use over any surface. Knead dry Pearl Ex powder into polymer clay to color it. Pearl Ex can be mixed into glycerin soaps in soapmaking and wax for candlemaking.

What do you mix pigment powder with?

Mix It With Distilled Water Start with a small amount of water and gradually add more to work into a paste. If it becomes too watery, you can always add more paint pigment powder to thicken it back up. Along with tempera, this is one of the easiest and most eco-friendly ways to make paint.

Can you use pigment powder in resin?

Jacquard’s Pigment powder can be used for artwork involving epoxy resin.

How much pigment do you add to resin?

Mixing Ratio: Use one teaspoon of colored pigment per 4 ounces of resin /hardener mixture. Add pigment to resin and mix well before adding hardener. Note: Only a small amount of pigment is needed to color a fairly large amount of resin.

Are Pearl Ex pigments safe to use on skin?

Pearl Ex is a safe, inert pigment that exhibits extreme colorfastness and stability. The different particle sizes produce different effects, from a smooth pearly luster, to a highly metallic sheen. Note: Pearl Ex Powdered Pigments were specifically developed as an art material. They are NOT for cosmetic use.

What is powdered pigment used for?

Both mica powders and pigment powders are used in the cosmetics industry. In fact, a combination of pigments and mica powder is used to create eye shadow, blush, and powdered foundation makeup. These can be used with polymer clay. You can read about Using Eye Shadow with Polymer Clay here.

Is mica powder and pigment powder the same?

The main difference between Pigment Powder and Mica Powder is their shine. Pigment Powders are matte while Mica Powders are shimmery. You are left with a beautiful glow when you use Mica Powder. Mica Powders are also very versatile and can be used for an assortment of different projects.

How do you add pigment to epoxy?

First mix resin and hardener thoroughly in the mixing ratio recommended by the manufacturer. Once you have mixed the two components carefully, it is time to add the paint. Add a small amount of paint concentrate or pigments to the mixture and mix well. Repeat this process until you have achieved the desired shade.

Can you mix oil paint with epoxy resin?

Yes, you can use ArtResin epoxy resin over oil paint once it has dried thoroughly. It will fully bond to and seal in any dry oil painting.

Can I use mica powder in epoxy?

Start with a small portion of mica powder first to mix with the resin. Depending on how opaque you want it to be, add a few more. Once you’re done mixing, the colored resin can now be used. A surface coated with mica – resin has a shimmery, metallic look.

How to use pearl ex pigments

Video #720: These beautiful powders will take on different looks depending on the background color they are brushed onto.

In this video I am going to talk about how Jacquard Pearl Ex Powdered Pigments can be used as a surface treatment for Polymer Clay.

In a previous video I had showcased an acrylic organizer by Melody Susie, where the middle drawer was filled with Pearl Ex Powders. So I figured that now would be a good time to talk more bout those beautiful powders… specifically about how the different colors look on samples of both white and black polymer clay.

A viewer who saw how I stored the Pearl Ex containers in the previous video, had a great tip I’d like to pass along. She said to turn your Pearl Ex containers upside down so that the colors are more visible at a glance. Seeing all of my 24 jars of sparkly colored powders in the clear acrylic drawer looks very pretty and makes me happy.

I have only two of the sets of Pearl Ex Powdered Pigments made by Jacquard – Series 2 and Series 3. I’ve listed all of the colors from all of the Pearl Ex series, with links to where you can find them on Amazon, just below the video lower down on this page.

The square cutout clay samples that you’ll see in the video, were made by butting two sheets of polymer clay up next to each other, one white one black. Then, right where the two sheets met each other, I used a square cutter on the diagonal, to create the black and and white clay chips.

Each black and white polymer square was rubbed with one color of the Pearl Ex powder and baked… to show you how the same powder will look different on a light vs a dark surface.

Pearl Ex powders will bond very well to raw polymer clay and will be permanent when baked.

Although the baked on powders are quite durable and tough to scratch off, they should be protected if your piece is going to be used in a high abrasion situation (like beads on a bracelet). You can use finishes like PYMII, Renaissance Wax, Golden Varnish or any other polymer clay safe finish you may have on hand. Perhaps the Pearl Ex Vanish will be good too, but I haven’t tested it yet.

If the piece is not going to be exposed to high wear (like a sculpture) than the Pearl Ex powder doesn’t need to be sealed or protected at all.

Pearl Ex can be mixed into liquid polymer clays, solid polymer clay, varnishes, gel mediums, paints and more. I’ll show you more about that in future videos.

  • Related Video: Storing Craft Supplies in an Acrylic Cosmetic Organizer
  • Related Article: Pearl Ex Powders And Polymer Clay Beads
  • Related Article: Stenciling On Polymer Clay Using Pearl Ex Powder
  • Related Video: Sealing Polymer Clay Best Practices
  • Related Resource: Pearl Ex Series 2 On Amazon

658 Aztec Gold
661 Antique Copper
662 Antique Silver
682 Duo Green-Yellow
683 Bright Yellow
684 Flamingo Pink
685 Spring Green
686 Turquoise
687 True Blue
688 Misty Lavender
689 Blue Russet
690 Sparkling Copper

  • Related Resource: Pearl Ex Series 3 On Amazon

640 Carbon Black
641 Pumpkin Orange
642 Salmon Pink
643 Pink Gold
644 Reflex Violet
645 Grey Lavender
646 Mink
665 Sunset Gold (also in Series 1)
692 Duo Green-Purple

  • Related Resource: Pearl Ex Ser 1 On Amazon… I Don’t Have This Set Yet

650 Micropearl
652 Macropearl
654 Supper Russet
655 Super Copper
656 Brilliant Gold
657 Sparkle Gold
663 Silver
664 Super Bronze
665 Sunset Gold (also in Series 3)
673 Inference Violet
674 Inference Gold
680 Duo Red-Blue

  • Related Resource: Pearl Ex 8 Set On Amazon… I Don’t Have This Set Yet

630 Citrine
631 Scarlet
632 Magenta
633 Shimmer Violet
634 Sapphire Blue
635 Apple Green
636 Emerald
637 Dark Brown

  • Related Resource: Pearl Ex 32 Set On Amazon… I Don’t Have This Set Yet

658 Aztec Gold
670 Interference Red
683 Bright Yellow
651 Pearl White
659 Antique Gold
671 Interference Blue
684 Flamingo Pink
652 Macropearl
660 Antique Bronze
672 Interference Green
685 Spring Green
653 Red Russet
661 Antique Copper
673 Interference Violet
686 Turquoise
654 Super Russet
662 Antique Silver
674 Interference Gold
687 True Blue
655 Super Copper
663 Silver
680 Duo Red-Blue
688 Misty Lavender
656 Brilliant Gold
664 Super Bronze
692 Duo Green-Purple
689 Blue Russet
657 Sparkle Gold
665 Sunset Gold
693 Duo Violet-Brass
691 Solar Gold

Do you have any suggestions for videos on tips, techniques or products you would like to learn more about? Let me know in the comments section below!

My goal is to help you to learn quicker and easier ways to bring up the professionalism in your polymer clay art.

Oh and don’t forget to give these videos a Thumbs Up click at YouTube if you are enjoying them. The more Likes a video gets, the higher it rises in the searches. And that means even more people will be able to join in on this polymer clay journey of a lifetime.

Also, by subscribing to our YouTube Channel directly, you will receive notifications as soon as new videos are uploaded. To subscribe, click here… Pearl Ex Powdered Pigments On Polymer Clay … the Subscribe Button is right near the top of that YouTube page.

How to use pearl ex pigments

Using Pearl Ex powder is an easy way to add sparkle and color to your resin projects. Here are seven easy tricks to color resin with Pearl Ex powder.

How to use pearl ex pigments

Tip 1

If you brush the powder on very thinly, the end product will be just a hint of colour on the resin. These blue disks were made with the same blue colour of Pearl Ex. The one on the left was lightly brushed. The one on the right had Pearl Ex mixed in.

How to use pearl ex pigmentsTip 2

You can apply Pearl Ex to just one part of the mold or use different colours in different areas of the mold. For example, use yellow or gold Pearl Ex in the centre of a flower with the petals a different colour.

How to use pearl ex pigments

Tip 3

Use coloured resin with the painted Pearl Ex technique in tip two for a different effect. I cast these leaves with Pearl Ex painted in the mold, blue on the left and gold on the right. The resin was tinted with Resin Obsession Bright Red Translucent pigment.

How to use pearl ex pigmentsTip 4

Paint on Pearl Ex, then pour in a resin mixed with a different colour of Pearl Ex to add dimensions.

How to use pearl ex pigments

Tip 5

If you have a mold with a deeply etched pattern and only want the Pearl Ex to be in the high areas of the completed piece, carefully use a wet wipe to clean off the high points of the interior of the mold. You can even paint in a second colour of Pearl Ex.

How to use pearl ex pigmentsTip 6

Because Pearl Ex is a dry pigment, you can add it to the resin to color it. Add more to supersaturate it or less to give it a marbled effect. The blue charm on the left has more powder than the red-blue charm on the right. The small ovals have even less Pearl Ex powder. The same colour Pearl Ex colored each sample.

Tip 7

After painting the Pearl Ex on, if you have too much loose powder in the mold you can hold it over your trash can and tap the mold to have the loose powder fall off. If you want to save the powder, tap the loose powder off over a clean coffee filter. Then, pour it back into the Pearl Ex bottle.

What other easy tricks to color resin with powder do you use?

Ready to create with resin but hesitant to get started because you’re afraid of making mistakes? I get it. I made so many mistakes in the beginning, I was convinced resin didn’t work. What I know now is there are a few key details that you need to know to make something amazing with resin. I share them in my PDF ebook, Resin Fundamentals. Stop making mistakes with resin and instead make something that has people saying, “I can’t believe you made that!”. Buy the book now and a download link arrives in your email inbox in minutes!

Unpublished Blog Posts of Resin Obsession, LLC © 2021 Resin Obsession, LLC

Mix Pearl Ex with any clear medium to use over any surface. Knead dry Pearl Ex powder into polymer clay to color it. Pearl Ex can be mixed into glycerin soaps in soapmaking and wax for candlemaking. Pearl Ex can be mixed into a medium and airbrushed.

What is Pearl Ex used for?

Pearl Ex pigments are highly versatile and can be used to add color to a variety of different crafting mediums. Among other projects, Pearl Ex can be used to create colored embossing powder, colored polymer clay, watercolor paints, and tinted adhesive.

Can you add pigment to acrylic paint?

Adding pigment to wet acrylic medium is the first thing that comes to mind. I have even added dry powdered pigment to wet acrylic (clear) medium on the canvas. A broadcast approach. It is kind of unconventional, but it resembles pastel when you are done.

Can you mix mica powder in acrylic paint?

You can mix mica powder right into oil paint, acrylic paint, or mediums to give the painting depth. There are two ways you can use mica powder with clay. You can either mix it in with the raw clay to add color or you can brush the pigment on, sealing it with a finish.

Can you mix mica powder with water?

Here is a tip: mix mica powder in water and spray it on your paper. This will make the pages of your journal or scrapbook shiny and shimmery. Have fun!

Is Pearl Ex safe?

Pearl Ex is a safe, inert pigment that exhibits extreme colorfastness and stability. The different particle sizes produce different effects, from a smooth pearly luster, to a highly metallic sheen. Pearl Ex creates a metallic effect without being a real metal—it will never tarnish or fade!

Is Mica safe in lip gloss?

Yes this is cosmetic grade Mica. It is safe to apply to your skin. I put it in homemade lip balms. When you receive your Mica double check the jar to make sure it is labeled for cosmetic use.

What is the difference between Mica and pigment?

Pigments are flat and non-shimmery. They tend to be opaque. Mica is a mineral which has a glassy shine. It doesn't dissolve into anything.

Is Mica powder toxic?

Mica powder has pearlescent effect. Smear a little mica flour, the object would become colorful and shining. Non-toxic. It is definitely safe to use this mica powder as a kind of pigment.

Can I use mica powder in lip balm?

I added 6 scoops of Mica to 1 ounce of lip balm base – this is about 1/8 tsp. You can use up to 1/4 tsp to one ounce of lip balm. Step 6: Stir the base very well, making sure all Mica is incorporated into the mixture.

Can you mix eyeshadow with acrylic powder?

First, you will need a container, a clear powder (Acrylic) and an eyeshadow color that you will like for your nails. Pour in the acrylic clear powder in the container and pour the same amount of your simmer or eyeshadow color into the container. Close this container and shake the ingredients to mix them up.

What are pigment powders used for?

Pigment powder. Pigment is the part that actually gives the paint color, usually offered in powder form. You can mix pigment powder with a binder such as oil or acrylic. Pigment powder is not only used for painting or stamping, but also for example for coloring gypsum or some types of clay.

What kind of glitter do you put in lip gloss?

The simplest and easiest lip gloss uses just coconut oil and cake decorating pearl dust. If you want to make a more professional lip gloss, then you will need to add some beeswax and shea butter to it as well.

What is mica powder made of?

So what are they made from? Mica powders are made from a couple of ingredients, the main one being mica (unsurprisingly!) Mica is a naturally occurring mineral found all over the world, which is then coated with other naturally minerals such as iron oxide and tin oxide to name just a few.

How is pigment made?

Synthetic organic pigments are derived from coal tars and other petrochemicals. Inorganic pigments are made by relatively simple chemical reactions—notably oxidation—or are found naturally as earths. Pigments are insoluble particulate materials that provide colour, opacity, gloss control,…

$3.69. Pearl Ex Powdered Pigments are very fine powdered mica pigments that are non-toxic, inert, and can be mixed into virtually any viscous, transparent medium and applied to any surface! Since they are not metals, they will never rust or tarnish.

What is Pearl Ex used for?

Pearl Ex pigments are highly versatile and can be used to add color to a variety of different crafting mediums. Among other projects, Pearl Ex can be used to create colored embossing powder, colored polymer clay, watercolor paints, and tinted adhesive.

What are effect pigments?

Effect pigments allow automobile manufacturers to develop their own distinctive color effects. They have excellent characteristics including the ability to withstand the ravages of weather and UV rays.

What are powdered pigments?

Pigment Powder. Pigment powders are ground-up colors, sort of like powdered colored chalk. Pigments are the actual colors themselves and have names such as ultramarine blue, cadmium red, yellow ochre, and titanium white. Pigments are what manufacturers use to give paint its color.

What is Pearl in paint?

Pearl paints add depth to the base color, and bend the light to throw off a soft glow or even shift colors under certain angles. Aftermarket paint shops and OEMs both use pearl paints for added luster to auto finishes. “Ghost” pearls have little or no actual pigment in them and intensify the color they're used with.

How do you make mica pigment?

Determine what color mica powder you want to create. Select and measure the iron oxides pigments that mix to make that color. Blend the sericite mica and half of the iron oxide pigments with the base powder. Add more pigment until the mixture is the desired shade.

How to use pearl ex pigments

Pearl Ex by Jacquard are safe, inert powdered pigments that can be used for a multitude of arts and crafts projects. Pearl Ex can be mixed into any viscous medium for a metallic/pearlescent effect, including oils, acrylics, gouache, wax, polymer clay, watercolors, and so much more. These pigments are colorfast, temperature resistant, weather resistant and non-tarnishing, and can be applied glass, metal, wood, fabric, paper, any other surfaces for archival applications. Different particle sizes produce different effects, from a smooth pearly luster to a highly metallic sheen.

It’s surprisingly easy to make Pearl Ex pigments into a beautiful calligraphy ink, ready for use with pointed and broad-edge nibs. This article will help walk you through the process. Here’s a list of tools and ingredients you’ll need:

    , color of your choice
  • Jacquard’s powdered gum arabic
  • Empty jar
  • Pipette or eyedropper
  • Distilled water
  • Stirring stick or brush
  • Measuring spoon
  • Dip pen, holder, and paper of your choice

How to use pearl ex pigments

The first step is to mix Pearl Ex with gum arabic. Gum arabic is used as a binder in a variety of artistic techniques; this means it helps hold particles together, increases luminosity, and prevents cracking and bleeding once your ink is dry. Mixing this medium with Pearl Ex pigments will improve your calligraphy and make your solution have a longer shelf life. The proper ratio is 1 part gum arabic to 4 parts Pearl Ex. If you need more or less ink, you can always adjust the size of your measuring spoon.

Next, add distilled water to your gum arabic/Pearl Ex mixture. It’s very important to add water slowly, especially if you’re mixing a small batch of ink. We recommend using an eye dropper or pipette. Keep a mixing brush or stick close by and stir often, making sure you get any clumps off the bottom of the jar. Once your Pearl Ex has achieved the consistency of an acrylic ink (such as Dr. Ph. Martin’s or Ziller) it’s ready to use.

Use a brush to paint your Pearl Ex calligraphy ink onto the back of your nib. If the mixture seems a little too thick for your preference, add more water. On the other hand, if the mixture seems to runny, add more gum arabic. Once you’ve achieved an ideal viscosity, your custom-mixed calligraphy ink is ready to use! Pearl Ex‘s metallic sheen shows up great on both dark and light papers, and gives a raised appearance to your letters once dry. If you don’t use the entire mixture in one sitting, store your Pearl Ex in an airtight jar to use for future projects.

Pearl Ex powdered pigments are available in 48 shimmering colors. You can find them all here.

How to use pearl ex pigments

Recently I’ve noticed much confusion about the difference between mica powder and pigment powder. Both can be mixed into and used to add color to resin, soap, candles, and translucent polymer clay. They are both colorants and can be used to color the surface of polymer clay. But they are not the same thing. Here’s the difference.

Mica is sparkly. Pigment powder is matte. They behave differently. But online listings are often confusing and they’re sometimes sold mixed together in the same packet. And that can mean the powder you bought won’t work as you expect.

Mica Powder

How to use pearl ex pigments

Mica is a natural stone mineral with shiny flakes. When mica is ground into a powder, you get mica powder. Mica powders are therefore sparkly, sort of like very fine glitter. They’re used to give a metallic or shimmery pearl-like effect. They come in many colors. Pearl Ex is a popular brand of pure mica powder. (See a color chart of all Pearl Ex colors here.) While mica powders do often have color, they’re not optimal for coloring things because their main purpose is to create sparkle or shine. They won’t create a solid wash of bright color.

Pigment Powder

How to use pearl ex pigments

Pigment powders are ground-up colors, sort of like powdered colored chalk. Pigments are the actual colors themselves and have names such as ultramarine blue, cadmium red, yellow ochre, and titanium white. There are also artificial pigments with names like Pigment Blue 15. Pigments are what manufacturers use to give paint its color. They are not sparkly. Pigment powders are excellent at coloring things (this is their job, after all). Pure artist’s pigments (pure color) are fairly expensive, so pigments you buy from cheap sellers online are usually mixed with fillers (such as chalk) that make the color go farther. (For the nitpickers among us… in recent years the word pigment occasionally refers to mica and synthetic mica particles. Therefore it can be said that mica is a type of pigment, but pigments are not mica. But in reality, these materials are two different things and are very dissimilar materials.)

Confusion

Confusion happens when sellers of craft materials try to gain buyers by using confusing keywords. You often see listings in online marketplaces (like this one on Amazon) where the terms are used rather loosely. In this case, I’m not exactly sure what you’d get. You might get pigments, you might get mica powder, or you might get a mixture. And while we’re at it, these colorants are not a dye, contrary to what the listing says. Pigments and dyes are completely different things, as explained in this article.

Used in Cosmetics

Both mica powders and pigment powders are used in the cosmetics industry. In fact, a combination of pigments and mica powder is used to create eye shadow, blush, and powdered foundation makeup. These can be used with polymer clay. You can read about Using Eye Shadow with Polymer Clay here. Cosmetic supply companies are excellent sources of both pigments and mica powder. But choose a reputable company to be sure of exactly what you’re getting.

They Behave Differently

How to use pearl ex pigments

While both mica powders and pigments can be used to color the surface of polymer clay, they do behave quite differently. Knowing which material you have will help you know how to use it in your clay project. These are both incredibly versatile materials that can be used in so many ways beyond adding rosy cheeks to a cherub. For example, about a third of the veneers in my 100 Days Project are done using mica powders and pigment powders. Here’s an example of a veneer using only pigment powders, mica powders, and a stencil.

Learn to Use Them – Get the Powders Guide

Do you want to know more about using mica powders and pigment powders on polymer clay? You’re in luck. I wrote a huge 90-page guide called “Powders – using mica, pigments, metal powder, and dyes with polymer clay.” It explains all about these beautiful powdered colorants and how to use them in and on polymer clay and explains how to use them on both raw and baked polymer clay. This information will also be invaluable if you use these powders with other media. Check it out, I know you’ll love it!

Many people have asked for tips and/or techniques relating to Pearl Ex. Apparently it’s one of those must have products that nobody is quite sure what to do with once they get it home. Been there done that 😉

Pearl Ex Basics.
What is Pearl Ex?

Pearl Ex is a powdered pigment pure and simple. It has no binders, or other mediums mixed in making it a highly versatile way to add color and shimmer to virtually any project at hand.

Pearl Ex can be mixed with virtually any media or any surface. Since it has no binders or fixatives it will need to be added to a medium with permanent qualities or sprayed with a clear varnish, acrylic sealer or lacquer. It can be added to paints, clear embossing powders, inks (like a re-inker), clays, wood, painted onto plastics, glass, metal, etc. It really is an excellent way to add a beautiful metallic shimmer to your projects.

A few basic techniques include:

*Mixing Pearl Ex with clear embossing powder to create beautiful shimmery embossed images.

*Mixing 1 part Gum Arabic with 4 parts Pearl Ex and a dab of water to create a smooth creamy watercolor type paint. You can add more or less water depending on the consistency you are looking for.

*Apply Pearl Ex to polymer clay either by mixing the pigment into the clay before shaping or dusting it on prior to molding and/or baking.

*You can also apply a coat of Pearl Ex to shrink plastic before it has been shrunk.

*Use it dry by dusting onto any surface then “Fix it” by spraying with a sealer of some sort (Spray Varnish, Lacquer, Acrylic Sealer, etc).

So today I wanted to start off with something easy.

We’ll be using Pearl Ex and Gum Arabic to create a nice creamy watercolor paint that we will apply directly to the stamp.

**Gum Arabic is a binder. By mixing the gum arabic, Pearl Ex and water – the pigment is suspended in the gum arabic, when this mixture dries on your project the gum arabic permanently binds the PE to the paper. Therefore no additional sealing (lacquer, varnish, spray sealer) is necessary.

Begin by mixing 1 part Gum Arabic with 4 parts Pearl Ex. This doesn’t have to be precise measurements. I just use one of my tiny spoons and eyeball it. Add water. again, this isn’t exact measuring, I usually start off with one or two squirts of water mix and decide at that time if I need to add more.

If you have stamped the image a few times and the paint begins to dry, give it a light mist of water and it will be good for another couple “watercolor” images as shown below.

First stamped image is on the far right (don’t ask) then it was good for 3 additional stampings plus two more after misting with water.

For a twist you could first color your stamp using watercolor crayons; apply the Pearl Ex paint as highlights or where desired, mist with water and stamp.

I like to speed drying when using this technique to keep the water/Pearl Ex in place.

And here is the watercolor crayon & Pearl Ex Paint combo. You can somewhat see from the photo where the Pearl Ex has transferred to the stamped image (darker areas) while the watercolor crayons appear lighter in color.