How to use the dewey decimal system

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How to use the dewey decimal system

The Dewey Decimal System organizes information into 10 broad areas, which are broken into smaller and smaller topics. Different topics are assigned numbers, known as “call numbers.” For example, “Tigers” are given the number 599.756. To see what books we currently have available about tigers, go to the nonfiction shelves and find the books that have that number on their spine label.

A list of some of the information you can find in the different Dewey Decimal areas appears below. You can use our catalog to search for specific subjects. If you click on the links with each section, you will be redirected to a sampling of the catalog offerings on that call number’s topics.

Dewey Decimal System

000 General Knowledge

Find out what’s cataloged in the 000s

  • Computers and the Internet
  • UFOs and Unexplained Mysteries
  • Almanacs, Encyclopedias
  • Libraries, Museums, Newspapers, World Records.
100 Psychology and Philosophy

Find out what’s cataloged in the 100s

  • Death and Dying
  • Ethics
  • Emotions and Feelings
  • Logic
  • Making Friends
  • Optical Illusions
  • Superstitions .
200 Religions and Mythology

Find out what’s cataloged in the 200s

  • Amish
  • Bible Stories
  • Buddhism
  • Christianity
  • Judaism
  • Islam
  • Quakers, and other world religions
  • Greek, Roman and other myths.
300 Social Sciences and Folklore

Find out what’s cataloged in the 300s

  • Careers
  • Customs
  • Environment
  • Families
  • Folktales
  • Government
  • Manners
  • Money
  • Recycling
  • Transportation.
400 Languages and Grammar

Find out what’s cataloged in the 400s

  • Dictionaries
  • English grammar
  • Sign Language
  • Arabic
  • Spanish and other languages from around the world.
500 Math and Science

Find out what’s cataloged in the 500s

  • Animals
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Dinosaurs
  • Fish
  • Fossils
  • Geology
  • Insects
  • Physics
  • Planets
  • Plants
  • Stars
  • Weather .
600 Medicine and Technology

Find out what’s cataloged in the 600s

  • Cookbooks
  • Engineering
  • Farming
  • Health
  • Human Body
  • Inventions
  • Manufacturing
  • Pets
  • Nutrition
  • Robots
  • Space Science .
700 Arts and Recreation

Find out what’s cataloged in the 700s

  • Architecture
  • Crafts
  • Drawing
  • Games
  • Jokes
  • Movies
  • Music
  • Puppets
  • Songbooks
  • Sports .
800 Literature

Find out what’s cataloged in the 800s

  • Children’s Literature Anthologies
  • Plays
  • Poetry
  • Shakespeare
  • Writing Process .
900 Geography and History

Find out what’s cataloged in the 900s

  • Ancient World
  • Biographies
  • Countries
  • Native Americans
  • States
  • Travel
  • Wars .

Nonfiction vs Fiction

Fiction is fabricated and based on the author’s imagination. Short stories, novels, myths, legends, and fairy tales are all considered fiction. While settings, plot points, and characters in fiction are sometimes based on real-life events or people, writers use such things as jumping off points for their stories.

Nonfiction, by contrast, is factual and reports on true events. Histories, biographies, journalism, and essays are all considered nonfiction. Usually, nonfiction has a higher standard to uphold than fiction. A few smatterings of fact in a work of fiction does not make it true, while a few fabrications in a nonfiction work can force that story to lose all credibility.

Historical Fiction vs Creative Nonfiction

In a work of historical fiction, the story takes place in the past, but characters, actions, and other details are fictionalized. Creative nonfiction, on the other hand, is a broad term that encompasses many different types of writing (and, it seems worth noting, not all of it is historical). Creative nonfiction that covers the past uses the tools of dramatization but does not fictionalize.

Creative nonfiction that includes historical eras or events does not fictionalize. While it might read like a novel, its task is to remain factually accurate. In A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier, Ishmael Beah tells of his experience as a child during wartime in Sierra Leone. It unfolds with the kind of detail and tension you would expect in a novel. When rebels attack Beah’s home, he is in another town:

For more than three hours, we stayed at the wharf, anxiously waiting and expecting either to see our families or to talk to someone who had seen them. But there was no news of them, and after a while we didn’t know any of the people who came across the river. The day seemed oddly normal. The sun peacefully sailed through the white clouds, birds sang from treetops, the trees danced to the quiet wind…

“What are you going to do?” Gibrilla asked us. We were all quiet for a while, and then Talloi broke the silence. “We must go back and see if we can find our families before it is too late.”

Here, Beah recounts his own experience. Authors writing about events or eras they didn’t experience can also dramatize.

Both historical fiction and creative nonfiction that covers historical events or eras serve to illuminate real events from the past in a compelling and dramatic way. But each has a different relationship with factual accuracy.

Accessing eLibrary Resources:


  • «
  • »

Starting from a blank page? Need ideas on formatting? Can’t find right word? Whatever your stage of resume writing, we’ve got you covered.

How to use the dewey decimal system

The Dewey Decimal System organizes information into 10 broad areas, which are broken into smaller and smaller topics. Different topics are assigned numbers, known as “call numbers.” For example, “Tigers” are given the number 599.756. To see what books we currently have available about tigers, go to the nonfiction shelves and find the books that have that number on their spine label.

A list of some of the information you can find in the different Dewey Decimal areas appears below. You can use our catalog to search for specific subjects. If you click on the links with each section, you will be redirected to a sampling of the catalog offerings on that call number’s topics.

Dewey Decimal System

000 General Knowledge

Find out what’s cataloged in the 000s

  • Computers and the Internet
  • UFOs and Unexplained Mysteries
  • Almanacs, Encyclopedias
  • Libraries, Museums, Newspapers, World Records.
100 Psychology and Philosophy

Find out what’s cataloged in the 100s

  • Death and Dying
  • Ethics
  • Emotions and Feelings
  • Logic
  • Making Friends
  • Optical Illusions
  • Superstitions .
200 Religions and Mythology

Find out what’s cataloged in the 200s

  • Amish
  • Bible Stories
  • Buddhism
  • Christianity
  • Judaism
  • Islam
  • Quakers, and other world religions
  • Greek, Roman and other myths.
300 Social Sciences and Folklore

Find out what’s cataloged in the 300s

  • Careers
  • Customs
  • Environment
  • Families
  • Folktales
  • Government
  • Manners
  • Money
  • Recycling
  • Transportation.
400 Languages and Grammar

Find out what’s cataloged in the 400s

  • Dictionaries
  • English grammar
  • Sign Language
  • Arabic
  • Spanish and other languages from around the world.
500 Math and Science

Find out what’s cataloged in the 500s

  • Animals
  • Biology
  • Chemistry
  • Dinosaurs
  • Fish
  • Fossils
  • Geology
  • Insects
  • Physics
  • Planets
  • Plants
  • Stars
  • Weather .
600 Medicine and Technology

Find out what’s cataloged in the 600s

  • Cookbooks
  • Engineering
  • Farming
  • Health
  • Human Body
  • Inventions
  • Manufacturing
  • Pets
  • Nutrition
  • Robots
  • Space Science .
700 Arts and Recreation

Find out what’s cataloged in the 700s

  • Architecture
  • Crafts
  • Drawing
  • Games
  • Jokes
  • Movies
  • Music
  • Puppets
  • Songbooks
  • Sports .
800 Literature

Find out what’s cataloged in the 800s

  • Children’s Literature Anthologies
  • Plays
  • Poetry
  • Shakespeare
  • Writing Process .
900 Geography and History

Find out what’s cataloged in the 900s

  • Ancient World
  • Biographies
  • Countries
  • Native Americans
  • States
  • Travel
  • Wars .

Nonfiction vs Fiction

Fiction is fabricated and based on the author’s imagination. Short stories, novels, myths, legends, and fairy tales are all considered fiction. While settings, plot points, and characters in fiction are sometimes based on real-life events or people, writers use such things as jumping off points for their stories.

Nonfiction, by contrast, is factual and reports on true events. Histories, biographies, journalism, and essays are all considered nonfiction. Usually, nonfiction has a higher standard to uphold than fiction. A few smatterings of fact in a work of fiction does not make it true, while a few fabrications in a nonfiction work can force that story to lose all credibility.

Historical Fiction vs Creative Nonfiction

In a work of historical fiction, the story takes place in the past, but characters, actions, and other details are fictionalized. Creative nonfiction, on the other hand, is a broad term that encompasses many different types of writing (and, it seems worth noting, not all of it is historical). Creative nonfiction that covers the past uses the tools of dramatization but does not fictionalize.

Creative nonfiction that includes historical eras or events does not fictionalize. While it might read like a novel, its task is to remain factually accurate. In A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier, Ishmael Beah tells of his experience as a child during wartime in Sierra Leone. It unfolds with the kind of detail and tension you would expect in a novel. When rebels attack Beah’s home, he is in another town:

For more than three hours, we stayed at the wharf, anxiously waiting and expecting either to see our families or to talk to someone who had seen them. But there was no news of them, and after a while we didn’t know any of the people who came across the river. The day seemed oddly normal. The sun peacefully sailed through the white clouds, birds sang from treetops, the trees danced to the quiet wind…

“What are you going to do?” Gibrilla asked us. We were all quiet for a while, and then Talloi broke the silence. “We must go back and see if we can find our families before it is too late.”

Here, Beah recounts his own experience. Authors writing about events or eras they didn’t experience can also dramatize.

Both historical fiction and creative nonfiction that covers historical events or eras serve to illuminate real events from the past in a compelling and dramatic way. But each has a different relationship with factual accuracy.

To learn more about what the parts of a book’s call number mean, take a look at Finding Books with Library of Congress and Dewey Call Numbers

Overview

For Works by or about an individual author, the citation order is to first class together all the works by or about an author, then secondly to subdivide by the Book Number Scheme. The first component of the call number is accomplished using an abbreviated or modified Dewey class number and an author cutter number. This is followed by the locally devised UIUC book number:
830 Literatures of Germanic languages
831 Early to 1517
832 Reformation, etc. 1517-1750
833 Classic period, 1750-1830
834 Post classic & modern, 1830-1940/50
835 Contemporary authors not already established in the UIUC catalog, 1940/50-
836 German dialect literature
837 German-American
838 German miscellaneous writings
839 Other Germanic literatures
840-849 – for UIUC Practices see this link

For Works by or about an individual author, the citation order is to first class together all the works by or about an author, then secondly to subdivide by the Book Number Scheme. The first component of the call number is accomplished using an abbreviated or modified Dewey class number and an author cutter number. This is followed by the locally devised UIUC book number:
840 Literatures of Romance languages
841 Old and early French to 1400
842 Transition & renaissance periods, 1400-1600
843 Classical period, 1600-1715
844 18 th Century, 1715-1789
845 Revolution to present, 1789-1940/50
846 Contemporary authors not already established in the UIUC Catalog, 1940/50-
847 French Canadian
848 Provencal
849 French dialect literature
850-859 – for UIUC Practices see this link

For Works by or about an individual author, the citation order is to first class together all the works by or about an author, then secondly to subdivide by the Book Number Scheme. The first component of the call number is accomplished using an abbreviated or modified Dewey class number and an author cutter number. This is followed by the locally devised UIUC book number:
850 Italian, Romanian, Rhaeto-Romanic
851 Early period to 1375
852 Classical learning, 1375-1492
853 1492-1585
854 1585-1814
855 1814-1940/50
856 Works in and/or about Italian dialects
857 Sardinian
858 Romanian (including Wallachian)
859 Rumansh, Rhastian, Rhaeto-Romanic, Moldavian
860-868 – for UIUC Practices see this link

Description:

The purpose of this lesson is to teach students about the fundamentals of the Dewey Decimal System to enable them to locate books in the library. Many students are overwhelmed when entering the library because of the vast amounts of books on the shelves. Learning the Dewey Decimal Classification System will guide the students to the books of their choice!

How to use the dewey decimal system

How to use the dewey decimal system

The Dewey Decimal Classification System is the most widely used method for classifying books in the library. This system is a general knowledge organization tool that is continuously revised to keep pace with knowledge. It is named after Melvil Dewey, an American Librarian who developed it in 1876. This system is a numerical scheme for the arrangement of subjects of nonfiction books, and it classifies books by dividing them into 10 main subject groups that are called categories. Each category is represented by figures beginning with 000 and going on to 999. In other words, it is a system of numbers used to mark and arrange mostly non-fiction books.

How to use the dewey decimal system

Each number stands for a special topic. Every book is given a number and is put on the shelf in number order. Books with the same number are put in alphabetical order by the author’s last name. There are three summaries of the DDC. The first summary contains the ten main classes. The first digit in each three-digit number represents the main class. For example, 500 represents natural sciences and mathematics. The second summary contains the hundred divisions. The second digit in each three-digit number indicates the division. For example, 500 is used for general works on the sciences, 510 for mathematics, 520 for astronomy, 530 for physics. The third summary contains the thousand sections. The third digit in each three-digit number indicates the section. Thus, 530 is used for general works on physics, 531 for classical mechanics, 532 for fluid mechanics, 533 for gas mechanic. A decimal point follows the third digit in a class number, after which division by ten continues to the specific degree of classification needed. A subject may appear in more than one discipline. For example, “clothing” has aspects that fall under several disciplines. The psychological influence of clothing belongs in 155.95 as part of the discipline of psychology; customs associated with clothing belong in 391 as part of the discipline of customs; and clothing in the sense of fashion design belongs in 746.92 as part of the discipline of the arts.

The Dewey Decimal Classification System is used in most Public School libraries. It is essential for students to understand why books are numbered and how to find the numbers on the shelves, so they can use the library effectively and in a friendly manner. Dewey is also used for other purposes, e.g., as a browsing mechanism for resources on the Web. One of Dewey’s great strengths is that the system is developed and maintained in a national bibliographic agency, the Library of Congress.

How to use the dewey decimal system

The students will be able to:

  • Identify each of the 10 major classes of the Dewey Decimal System
  • Identify the difference between fiction and non-fiction
  • Identify the numbers in the 2 nd and 3 rd places
  • Locate non-fiction books and explain the call number by using the Dewey Decimal System.

Computer, pen, pencil, paper and handouts identifying the categories of the Dewey Decimal System.

Are You Ready To “Dew” It?

How to use the dewey decimal system

  • Activity 1:
    1. The students will be placed in groups of 5 – 6 persons.
    2. A student will identify a category and the other students will name a title of a book that will fall under the category.

Make up a game using decimal jeopardy (for example: given the book title, “The Biography of Michael Jordan” the student will have to identify the category and number of the book.)

Students will make up a Dewey Decimal System rap song using all the numbers and categories.

Students will write a biography about Melvin Dewey.

How to use the dewey decimal system

  • Identify non-fiction books according to classification and add correct call numbers to each.
  • Locate books on the shelf according to the Dewey Decimal System.
  • Matching quiz using numbers and categories.

Dewey Decimal Quiz

The book “Fishing with Dad” has the Dewey number 799. What does each number represent?

Using the Dewey numbers, arrange the following numbers in order: 796.1, 796.9, 796.4, 796.01, and 796.12.

Name the continent represented by the call number 916.

Books about trees have this call number ___________.

What class division would you check to locate a book on occupations?

Answers to Quiz:

7 represents “Fine Arts”
the second 9 represents “recreation”
the third 9 represents “hunting fishing and shooting”

My favorite dorky librarian joke is that I was absent the day they taught the Dewey Decimal System in library school. This is 100% true. As part of my Masters in Library and Information Science, I had to take a class in cataloging. It covered all the different systems used in academic and public libraries, plus all the methodologies behind cataloging. Exactly one class period was dedicated to learning the Dewey Decimal System, and I had the flu that week.

So it’s not an impossible system to learn. Pretty much everything I know about Dewey was learned on the job and through osmosis as a lifelong library user and second generation librarian.

And now I live the Dewey Decimal system; naming the number for random subjects is my best party trick. I think it’s beautiful and idiosyncratic and a soothing constant of the universe. I love that animals are in the 500s (Natural Sciences), but farm animals and pets are in the 600s (Technology). I love that everyone thinks Dewey is just for nonfiction, but it’s actually for all books, period. There are just so many fiction books that it makes no sense to squeeze them into their rightful place in the 800s (I also love blowing a second- or third-graders mind with this fact). I should have a “WWDD?” sticker on my car.

Photo by Jackie Reeve.

I don’t expect kids in the 21st century to memorize the 10 main categories like we all had to do growing up. But I do hope they learn their favorite sections. It tells me more when a child can show a classmate that the dog books are 636.7 than if they can recite that the 000s are “General Information.”

And I can tell you, there is a shortlist of subjects (out of thousands of possibilities) that kids ask me for Every. Single. Day. Most of them are in the 500s, 600s, and 700s. They occasionally stray from the list, but it’s a pretty universal truth of childhood nonfiction reading that they will ask for something on this shortlist. If your child has a favorite, or if you ever need to make a library trip as quick and painless as possible, this is the list to save. Here’s a PDF version, too.

ooos (General Information) to 200s (Religion)

  • 031: World record books
  • 292: Greek and Roman mythology

300s (Social Sciences) to 400s (Language)

  • 350s: Military (not including war or history, those are down in the 900s)
  • 398.2: Fairy Tales (398 is folklore in general, including nursery rhymes). Fun fact: fairy tales are fictional, but they are kept in the 300s basically because they represent, and teach us about, the cultures they come from. You probably won’t find the Disneyfied versions here.
  • 419: Sign Language

500s (Natural Sciences, far and away the most circulated nonfiction section)

  • 500s: Science experiments
  • 520s: Space (Astronomy, not space exploration–that’s the 600s)
  • 550s: Volcanoes, hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes, and weather
  • 567: “Fossil cold-blooded vertebrates,” otherwise known as dinosaurs
  • 595: Insects, spiders, and worms. Such a great section.
  • 597: Reptiles and amphibians
  • 598: Birds
  • 599: Mammals (each mammal has its own special number after the decimal, there are just too many to list)

600s (Technology)

  • 600-609: Inventions
  • 610s: Medicine and health
  • 620s: Engineering (including rockets)
    • 629: “Other engineering” is a big one; it includes cars, trucks, planes, space exploration, AND robots.
  • 636: Pets and farm animals
    • 636.1: Horses
    • 636.7: Dogs
    • 636.8: Cats
  • 641: Cooking
  • 646: Sewing, clothing, costume design, hair, and makeup. A cosplayer’s best bet.

700s (The Arts)

  • 709: Art history
  • 720s: Architecture. But actual construction is back in the 600s with technology. See how the system makes order of the universe? I *big glittery heart* Dewey.
  • 741.5: Graphic novels and cartoons. Oh, this is a wondrous number. Chant it in times of stress.
  • 743: How to draw
  • 745 and 746: Crafts
  • 780s: Music
  • 790-792: Theatre and dance
  • 793-795: Games
  • 796: Sports
    • 796.3 includes football, baseball, and basketball, each with their own number in the hundredths column.

800s (Literature, the magic number for fiction that we only use for some fiction)

  • 811: North American poetry
  • 818: Jokes and riddles. This one is tricky because officially jokes could also be under 793.27 or 808.8, but I’ve personally never seen them anywhere but 818.
  • 820s: British literature

900s (History and Geography)

  • 910s: Explorers and atlases
  • 920: Group biographies (like the Wright brothers)
  • 921: Biographies and autobiographies
  • 930s: Ancient history
  • 940s: European history (including the World Wars)
  • 970s: American history (including Native Americans, the states, and the Revolutionary and Civil Wars)

How to use the dewey decimal system

Geography Worldwide Explorer Continent Country Concept

The Dewey Decimal System is the most widely used classification system in the world. Over 135 countries around the globe use the Dewey Decimal, and it has been translated into 30 different languages. But, before the Dewey Decimal System, each library had its own way of organizing items. It was often difficult for people to find specific books in libraries. Library visitors would have to rely on the librarian to know where each item was shelved. And this was the same story when visitors would visit a new library; they would have to find out how to use a different system for each library they visited.

How to use the dewey decimal system

History Behind the Dewey

Table of Contents

Do librarians still use the Dewey Decimal System?

The English version was published as the Universal Decimal Classification and is still in use today. According to a study done in 1927, the Dewey system was used in the US in approximately 96% of responding public libraries and 89% of the college libraries.

Is there an alternative to the Dewey Decimal System?

It was developed as an alternative to the Dewey decimal system, which is currently the most commonly used system in school and children’s sections of public libraries. Metis is named for the Titan Metis, who was the mother of Athena. The Metis main categories are based on studies of the practices of young children.

How were libraries organized before Dewey?

Before Dewey, the Columbia College Library was shelved by “fixed location”, a finding system in which books are assigned to specific shelves or bookcases, in contrast to the relative order of modern classifications. In the library room used up to 1883, there were ten alcoves that were designated for broad subjects.

How library books are organized?

Libraries in the United States generally use either the Library of Congress Classification System (LC) or the Dewey Decimal Classification System to organize their books. Most academic libraries use LC, and most public libraries and K-12 school libraries use Dewey.

How can I raise my IQ to 200?

Here are some activities you can do to improve various areas of your intelligence, from reasoning and planning to problem-solving and more.

  1. Memory activities.
  2. Executive control activities.
  3. Visuospatial reasoning activities.
  4. Relational skills.
  5. Musical instruments.
  6. New languages.
  7. Frequent reading.
  8. Continued education.

What is the IQ rating scale?

IQ tests are made to have an average score of 100. Most people (about 68 percent) have an IQ between 85 and 115. Only a small fraction of people have a very low IQ (below 70) or a very high IQ (above 130). The average IQ in the United States is 98.

Does IQ increase with age?

Age. IQ can change to some degree over the course of childhood. In one longitudinal study, the mean IQ scores of tests at ages 17 and 18 were correlated at r=0.86 with the mean scores of tests at ages five, six, and seven and at r=0.96 with the mean scores of tests at ages 11, 12, and 13.

At what age is your brain the sharpest?

Scientists have long known that our ability to think quickly and recall information, also known as fluid intelligence, peaks around age 20 and then begins a slow decline.

At what age does IQ peak?

Smaller improvements are still noticeable from age 20 until what the researchers described as a “peak” begins at age 35. The peak lasts until roughly age 45, at which point chess skill – and, the study theorizes, overall mental performance – begins a marked decline.

What was the highest IQ ever recorded?

Marilyn vos Savant (/ˌvɒs səˈvɑːnt/; born Marilyn Mach; 1946) is an American magazine columnist, author, lecturer, and playwright. She was listed as having the highest recorded intelligence quotient (IQ) in the Guinness Book of Records, a competitive category the publication has since retired.

Who has an IQ of 300?

His score was the highest that had ever been obtained. In terms of IQ, the psychologist related that the figure would be between 250 and 300. Late in life William Sidis took general intelligence tests for Civil Service positions in New York and Boston.

CGCC Library a great place to study

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We have all learned in Elementary school but the real question is, do we all still remember?

knowing how to use the Dewey Decimal system is an essential part in navigating a library. Have you ever found yourself searching the library for a book, and spending more time looking than you have too? I have and it can be extremely frustrating. knowing the basics of the Dewey Decimal can fix that problem.

First off

  • You will need to understand that the Dewey Decimal System is divided in to 10 classes, and each class is a specific category.
  • The categories are arranged from 000 to 900
  • The categories include subjects such as, General work, Philosophy and Psychology, Religion, Social Sciences, Language, Science, Technology, Arts, Literature, and History, geography & biography.

Second

The notations in the system are used to represent each specific breakdown in classification. For example, 533 represents the topic gas mechanics. The first number, 5, represents the main class, science. The next number, 3, indicates the division, physics. The last number, 3, the section in physics, gas mechanics.

Now you see all those numbers do make sense!

The Dewey Decimal System Rap

Above is an entertaining video on the Dewey Decimal System… Enjoy!