How to cane a chair

While we absolutely love cane chairs as a decor choice, the downside is that they tend to break pretty easily. Whether you’ve found a great second-hand chair at a flea market, or you’ve got an old one that needs a little TLC, learning how to fix a cane chair seat or back is easier than you’d think!

Of course, the easiest thing to do would be to rip out the cane and just replace it with a sturdier fabric. But then you’d lose the whole charm of having a cane chair in the first place! As long as you can source some pre-woven cane, you’ll be able to restore your piece to its former glory in no time.

First off, know what kind of cane you’re looking for. Pre-woven cane comes in three styles:

Conventional weave which is the classic look you’re probably used to,

closed modern weave which is a little sturdier,

and open modern weave with a more blocky style.

Cane chair repair: how to fix a seat or back

Pre-woven cane material comes in various widths and is sold by the inch. Here’s what you need to gather, and how you proceed.

Materials you’ll need

  • Before you get started, you’ll need to gather the following materials:
  • pre-woven cane (available in sheets by the inch)
  • cane spline
  • water
  • white vinegar
  • wood glue
  • wood stain or paint (optional)

Tools you’ll need

  • wedge or blunt edge chisel ( a flat head screwdriver would also work)
  • razor utility knife
  • hammer
  • clean rag

Repairing your cane chair

Step 1 : Fully remove the old cane and the reed that holds it in place (the spline), using your knife and chisel. Be extra careful near the wood and be sure not to accidentally chip it.

If you have issues removing the spline, it may have been set with hide glue. In this case, a solution of equal parts warm water and distilled white vinegar, applied and left to soak, will help loosen it.

In some cases, you may be able to keep the spline intact and just lever it out of the groove, which means you won’t have to buy new spline.

Step 2: Once the old cane is all gone, clean out the grooves with a damp rag and make sure there’s no cane, dirt, or adhesive left behind. If necessary, you can sand any rough edges.

Step 3: Soak your new cane sheets for 30-60 minutes in warm water — the bathtub might be the best place to do this. Let drip dry for 5 minutes.

Step 4: Lay your cane sheet squarely over your chair and trim to fit. You want it to cover the groove in the chair back by at least a half-inch. Gently push the edges into the chair’s groove using your wedge or even a kitchen spatula. To keep it straight, push a small section on one edge, then do the same to the opposite side. Work your way around the perimeter, making sure it’s securely in the groove.

Step 5: Trim any excess cane sticking out of the groove, using a sharp knife. While you do this, soak your spline in warm water for 10 minutes.

Step 6: Add wood glue into the cane-filled groove, then dry off your spline and push into the groove. Start at the top center of the chair and work your way around. You can use a hammer and wood block to tap it into place if needed. Use clamps around the edge of the chair to hold the spline in place for at last 24 hours until it dries.

Step 7: If your cane chair needs a little more sprucing up, you can add wood stain or a fresh coat of paint!

I used cane to create DIY rattan dining chairs out of a standard solid oak wood set. The results are stunning.

How to cane a chair

We were given this dining table set when we first bought our own home, and believe me, it was a great help to us back in the beginning – before we had any furniture. I also loved how the table top and the actual seats were made of solid oak wood.

Although this set was really useful, it didn’t excite me or look interesting enough, so I wanted to make a few changes. It made for an easy DIY project, here’s how I upcycled my basic dining set with matt furniture paint and rattan.

Before:

  • Learnhow to reupholster a dining chairtoo.

Supplies

  • Set of chairs
  • Cane webbing rattan fabric – you can find some on Amazon
  • Cordless screwdriver
  • Paint – I used Hessian Matt Furniture Paint by Rustoleum
  • Oval paint brush
  • Staple gun
  • Mitre saw
  • 1cm x 4.5cm piece of timber
  • Half dowel trim
  • Wood glue
  • Clamps
  • Wood filler

How to DIY cane dining chairs: step-by-step

Cane dining chairs make a great addition to modern dining room setups as we all know rattan is still trending hard! Plus, you can use this technique to upcycle other pieces of furniture too such as kitchen cabinets, dressers and the like.

1. Strip and sand

The first thing I needed to do was remove the spindles in the back of the chair, as that was where the cane would be. I took the chair apart with my cordless screwdriver and kept the screws in a safe place for later on.

The chair seats were previously painted, and the rest of the chair had a sheen to it, so they all needed to be sanded down. I used my mouse sander for the majority of the project, however, for the more intricate parts I used a rotary tool.

Once it was all sanded, I cleaned it down with a sugar soap solution to rid the surface of all the sawdust.

2. Paint it

The colour I used has to be my favourite colour so far. It is Hessian Matt Furniture Paint by Rustoleum, and it’s a beautiful warm neutral.

In total, the chairs needed around two coats, three in some places.

I have found that using an oval paint brush is the best type of brush when upcycling. It distributes the paint really well on the surface of my projects, and also fits well around contoured surfaces. It’s a way better feel than a normal flat paint brush.

3. Prepare the rattan

I’ve heard that rattan material should be soaked for around 30 minutes in warm water before fitting, as this makes it easier to handle and much more flexible. The thing is, I heard this after I completed these chairs. I didn’t find it difficult to apply the cane to the chair, but I can’t help but think it could have been even easier if I did.

The only preparation I did was cut the cane to size and made sure I cut the pieces bigger than I needed to, to allow for movement when fitting. My first piece was way too small, so I learnt from that mistake!

4. Add the cane and the timber

This part of the project took a little bit of trial and error.

I used a staple gun to fix the rattan to the wooden frame of the chair. I started with the top and then worked my way down towards the sides, making sure I stretched the rattan so that it wouldn’t sag.

Once it was all in place, I cut pieces of timber with a mitre saw to fit around, and cover the edge of the rattan. I used a 1cm x 4.5cm piece of timber to cover the top and back, and a half dowel trim for the sides.

I secured all the timber to the frame with wood glue and a load of clamps. Corner clamps, spring clamps and quick release trigger clamps.

I filled all the gaps and holes with wood filler, and once dry sanded it all down for a smooth finish.

5. A final lick of paint

The last thing was to do a couple coats of paint on the bare timber, and then I was all done. Apart from having to repeat this for the remaining three chairs of course!

It took a while, but it was totally worth it.

  • Learnhow to paint furniturethe right way.

The results:

And, there we have it, my DIY cane dining chair.

Jess Grizzle is a multi-award winning content creator and home interiors influencer. Her social media platforms include her Instagram @grizzle_abode which she started in May 2019. Here she shares the joys and trials of living in a home during a renovation and her many DIY projects.

Although she has always been creative, she really found her love for DIY once she and her husband became homeowners. She realised quite quickly out of the two of them, she was the one with the desire to buy power tools and learn new DIY skills.

She found her passion of championing women to do DIY and take on their own challenges. This led her to become a co-founder of the @femalediycollective, a growing female DIY community celebrating projects from women all around the world.

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How to cane a chair

Would you do this project? According to our survey, 52% of respondents preferred DIY compared to hiring a pro.

How to cane a chair

The average price to Cane a Chair Seat noted above is cost data to compare a contractor’s estimate with doing it yourself.

How much does it cost to cane a chair? Transform an old chair with a new cane seat and give it a new lease on life, It will cost $350 to have it done vs. doing it yourself for $70.

Looking for a chair with a cane seat as an accent piece in your home? Antique hunters are always on the lookout for a chair with an original cane seat because it’s a prized possession. If you’re looking for such a treasure and find one with damaged or missing caning, you can have the chair recaned or do it yourself, assuming you’re patient and persistent – and adept at working with your hands.

There are two kinds of caning for a chair, one is a sheet of machine-woven cane that you install with glue and pegs in a chair with a narrow groove around its edge. The sheet and materials will run about $50.

If your chair has holes around its perimeter, it’s an older piece and can be recaned with narrow strands of thin cane. A professional will charge about $2 a hole, so a typical chair will cost about $350. You can buy the materials for $70 and do it yourself and pocket a nice savings. But that saving is well earned because it’s a tedious, time-consuming job, and well worth mastering if you have more than one chair. It will cost more if the chair requires repair work or refinishing to restore it.

Read these directions to do it yourself from the Wicker Woman Chair Caning Instructions.

The average price to cane a chair seat noted above is cost data to compare a contractor’s estimate with doing it yourself.

Want to tackle some other DIY projects? Here are some related guides:

How to cane a chair

Gene and Katie Hamilton

Welcome! We hope you’ll find the job costs of home improvement projects useful when you’re deciding whether to do a job yourself vs. hire a contractor. We’re the authors of 20 home improvement books, most notably Home Improvement for Dummies©, Bathroom Remodeling for Dummies©, Carpentry for Dummies©, Plumbing for Dummies©, and Painting and Wallpapering for Dummies©. Our most recent book Fix It and Flip It is in its second edition. We’ve appeared as home improvement experts on television programs such as CNN, Dateline, the Today Show, HGTV and many others.

When a caned seat is punctured, there’s no need to kick it to the curb or pay the high cost to have it professionally recaned. This simple repair option will conceal the damage while making the chair functional again.

How to cane a chair

Cane Seat Repair

When a caned seat is punctured, there is no need to kick it to the curb or pay to have it re-caned by hand. This simple repair option will make the chair functional again.

Photo by: Marian Parsons

Related To:

Materials Needed

  • 1/2″ plywood or MDF (piece large enough to cover seat of chair)
  • serrated knife or electric carver
  • quilt or upholstery batting in desired thickness
  • cardboard upholstery stripping
  • cardboard
  • staple gun (electric, manual or pneumatic) and staples
  • scissors
  • spray adhesive
  • permanent marker
  • jigsaw
  • eye protection
  • 2″ foam cushion

Create a New Padded Seat

Use a jigsaw to cut 1/2" plywood or MDF into shape of chair seat. Then cut coordinating piece of upholstery foam using a serrated knife or electric carving knife. Use a pair of scissors to cut upholstery or quilt batting to same shape as well. Using spray adhesive, glue batting to foam, then foam to plywood cutout. Tip: Because of the back, it might be difficult to trace seat shape directly onto plywood, so make a paper template and trace that to ensure a good fit.

How to cane a chair

Cut a New Seat

Use a jigsaw to cut ½” plywood or MDF to shape of chair seat. Use serrated knife or electric carving knife to cut cushion foam to same shape. Use a pair of scissors to cut upholstery or quilt batting to same shape as well. Stick batting to foam and then foam to plywood cutout using spray adhesive. Tip: Because of the back, it might be difficult to trace seat shape directly onto plywood, so make a paper template and trace that to ensure a good fit.

While we absolutely love cane chairs as a decor choice, the downside is that they tend to break pretty easily. Whether you’ve found a great second-hand chair at a flea market, or you’ve got an old one that needs a little TLC, learning how to fix a cane chair seat or back is easier than you’d think!

Of course, the easiest thing to do would be to rip out the cane and just replace it with a sturdier fabric. But then you’d lose the whole charm of having a cane chair in the first place! As long as you can source some pre-woven cane, you’ll be able to restore your piece to its former glory in no time.

First off, know what kind of cane you’re looking for. Pre-woven cane comes in three styles:

Conventional weave which is the classic look you’re probably used to,

closed modern weave which is a little sturdier,

and open modern weave with a more blocky style.

Cane chair repair: how to fix a seat or back

Pre-woven cane material comes in various widths and is sold by the inch. Here’s what you need to gather, and how you proceed.

Materials you’ll need

  • Before you get started, you’ll need to gather the following materials:
  • pre-woven cane (available in sheets by the inch)
  • cane spline
  • water
  • white vinegar
  • wood glue
  • wood stain or paint (optional)

Tools you’ll need

  • wedge or blunt edge chisel ( a flat head screwdriver would also work)
  • razor utility knife
  • hammer
  • clean rag

Repairing your cane chair

Step 1 : Fully remove the old cane and the reed that holds it in place (the spline), using your knife and chisel. Be extra careful near the wood and be sure not to accidentally chip it.

If you have issues removing the spline, it may have been set with hide glue. In this case, a solution of equal parts warm water and distilled white vinegar, applied and left to soak, will help loosen it.

In some cases, you may be able to keep the spline intact and just lever it out of the groove, which means you won’t have to buy new spline.

Step 2: Once the old cane is all gone, clean out the grooves with a damp rag and make sure there’s no cane, dirt, or adhesive left behind. If necessary, you can sand any rough edges.

Step 3: Soak your new cane sheets for 30-60 minutes in warm water — the bathtub might be the best place to do this. Let drip dry for 5 minutes.

Step 4: Lay your cane sheet squarely over your chair and trim to fit. You want it to cover the groove in the chair back by at least a half-inch. Gently push the edges into the chair’s groove using your wedge or even a kitchen spatula. To keep it straight, push a small section on one edge, then do the same to the opposite side. Work your way around the perimeter, making sure it’s securely in the groove.

Step 5: Trim any excess cane sticking out of the groove, using a sharp knife. While you do this, soak your spline in warm water for 10 minutes.

Step 6: Add wood glue into the cane-filled groove, then dry off your spline and push into the groove. Start at the top center of the chair and work your way around. You can use a hammer and wood block to tap it into place if needed. Use clamps around the edge of the chair to hold the spline in place for at last 24 hours until it dries.

Step 7: If your cane chair needs a little more sprucing up, you can add wood stain or a fresh coat of paint!

Some things that do not sit right with you are easy to ignore. But it is just about impossible to ignore the discomfort of sitting on a chair that has broken or worn out canes. When your seat canes are damaged, the pillow will start to push through the seat frame and the chair can start to pinch quite a lot. But don’t throw out your beautiful chair just yet. We are going to teach you how to recane a chair seat yourself using simple tools you probably already have at home.

Table of Contents

What Is Chair Caning?

Chair caning is a very specific task that involves applying a rattan cane to the base or back of a chair. There are different types of cane furniture. A lot of different patterns or weaving techniques can be used to cane a chair.
You can still find cane chairs available to buy. These materials are popular for making zero gravity chair for tall man. The materials are tough enough to handle outdoor temperatures and natural elements.

What is cane?

Cane is a part of the rattan plant. This material is made by peeling the skin from rattan vines. These strips are then wrapped around a frame to create a beautiful piece of furniture or it is weaved through furniture to create a base to sit on.
Cane is a popular weaving material because it is less porous and doesn’t absorb liquids or spills. The strips are also very strong and it is a 100% environmentally friendly product.

What are the types of chair caning?

Cane can be woven in all sorts of patterns to create a beautiful chair seat or back. The three most popular cane patterns are the following;

Hole-to-hole cane, hand caning, or lace caning

With this type of cane, individual strands are hand-woven through drilled holes around the chair seat or back frame. This is now considered the old way of making cane furniture because weaving takes a lot longer than webbing does.

Pressed cane, spline cane, or cane webbing

With this type of caning, a machine woven cane sheet is softly hammered into a groove of the chair seat or back. The sheet is then held in place with a reed spline. This method is much faster than weaving cane materials over or through the chair holes or sides.

Porch cane, wide binding cane, or binder cane

With porch caning, the strands are woven around the seat top and bottom or sides instead of through holes in the frame. Diamond patterns are usually used with this type of pattern. It is called porch cane because a lot of porch chairs are made using this technique. This weaving pattern and the material were also popular for making rocking chairs. Rocking chairs also used to be very popular for porch seating.

Let’s Learn How to Recane A Chair Seat

Don’t just sit here… let’s get started. It is easier to recane a chair that has grooves in the frame than those with holes in the frame. The ones with holes in the frame need to be carefully woven to create a beautiful pattern and to be strong enough. This weaving pattern is complex and takes a long time. Here is a quick look at a good tutorial video to help you recane a weaved seat.

To recane a chair with grooves, you will need the following items:

  • Cane sheets (12 – 24 inches wide)
  • Caning spline (Get the exact width and length for your project)
  • Caning wedges
  • Screwdriver
  • Hammer
  • Utility knife
  • Carpenters glue
  • Fine sandpaper
  • Spray lacquer

Here is a quick look at the best steps for recaning a chair with a groove.

Step 1

First, you need to cut the cane sheet. It should extend the size of your chair seat grooves by 1 inch on all sides. Be careful not to cut your fingers. Cane materials might need quite a bit of effort to cut.

Step 2

Soak the cut sheets in hot water for an hour. This makes the caning material softer and easier to work with, especially since the edges need to be bent over to fit inside the groove.

Step 3

Grab your chair and cut around the edges of the old spline on the chair. Break the bond of old glue and lift the old cane from the groove.

Step 4

Use your screwdriver to raise the edges of the old spline. Be careful not to cause damage to your chair’s groove lines. If the grooves are damaged, your new cane won’t fit properly.

Step 5

You can now pull out the old spline and cane sheet. Set these aside or throw them away if you are not planning on repurposing these materials.

Step 6

Place the softened cane on your chair. Be careful to put it straight so there will be a 1-inch overlap on all sides.

Step 7

Hammer a caning wedge through the groove on each side of the chair. This will keep the cane from moving around as you work. Your woven pattern should run across and up the seat and not diagonal.

Step 8

Add more wedges on the sides of the cane. Now start to push the cane into the groove. Take care to keep the pattern straight and to maintain the same stretch across your surface.

Step 9

Soak your caning spline in hot water for 15 minutes so it will soften. This will make the spline much easier to work with.

Step 10

Put carpenters glue into the chair grooves. Now press the soft spine in the grooves so the cane pushes into the groove with it. Remove the wedges as you work your way around the chair.

You should push it down hard and use your hammer to tap the spline into the groove.

Step 11

Grab your utility knife and trim the excess cane off the sides of the splice. Be careful not to cut your fingers when you are cutting off the cane materials. If you don’t cut off the excess materials, the weary edges will be visible through the chair surface.

Step 12

Take your sandpaper and sand down the edges of the cane so there will be no sharp points to harm you.

Step 13

You can now take your lacquer and spray the entire cane. Be careful to add an even layer across your cane surface.

It is important to let your cane sit for a few days before you use it or before you add any weight to it. In this time, the glue and lacquer will fully dry and the cane sheet will conform to your chair’s design.

You can now give yourself a pat on the shoulder. You just recanted your very first chair. For a bigger challenge, you should learn how to weave a cane seat so you can repair all of those old chairs that have holes drilled along their frames.

Final Thoughts

It might be challenging to learn how to recane a chair seat, but it is worth your efforts if it means you can restore an antique chair to its former glory. If you do decide to replace your old broken chairs with new chairs then you should have a look at some of our other guides. We compare a wide range of chair types in our other buying guides. You can find the best recliner for sleeping after surgery, the best living room chair for neck pain, the best ergonomic chair for watching tv, and many others.

Thank you for reading our guide. We would love it if you could reach out and give us a shout if this guide helped you fix your old chair.

7252 Heil Avenue
Huntington Beach, Ca. 92647
Phone: (714) 847-0707
Fax: (714) 843-5645
Email:
[email protected]

Chair Caning & Seat Weaving Supplies

Description: This kit is great if you need to re-do a pressed cane seat, but are unsure of the exact size needs.

Also, if you want to send material to a friend or family member who has a chair that needs re-doing but are unsure what sizes are required.

This is great for re-sellers and do-it-yourselfers alike.

Reed Spline
Reed Spline is the wedge-shaped reed that is used to hold the cane webbing into the groove around the seat frame. Spline is flexible and is bent into coils for easy shipping. When in doubt about size, send a sample of the Spline from the chair. If you are routing a new groove, make the groove 1/16" deeper than the Spline to be used.

W632
4′ x 8′ sheets – $205.50 each – 5 sheet bales $175.00 each
4′ x 4′ sheets – $105.00 each – 5 sheet bales $85.50 each
2′ x 8′ sheets – $105.00 each – 5 sheet bales $85.50 each

Screen Weave
White on White
Order Number: PW-590-W
21" width

Screen Weave
Brown on Brown
Order Number: PW-590-NN
21" width

Ask for current price on 50 foot rolls.

Sample cards available for $0.50 each.

These are made from a high quality paper.They come in 7 different patterns. Samples available upon request for .50 each..

PWLM10-47
Black Spokes, Cream Weavers
Widths Available: 47"

PWLM13-47
Black Spokes, Light Brown Weavers
Widths Available: 47"

Made of steel, with a handle that will not split with hard usage. Used for removing old spline in chairs. Available in two sizes: Number 1 is 1/8" wide at the tip and Number 3 is 3/16" wide at the tip.

These are used for pressing cane webbing into the groove. put up in sets of 5 hardwood wedges, shaped for easy usage on round, as well as square seats.

Price:$2.10/ per set of 5

Original Glue
This glue is ready to use and requires no further preparation. Its uniformity and high quality contribute to its superior performance because it sets slowly, allowing plenty of time for the cane to dry. It is water soluble and can be removed from unfinished wood with soaking.
Order Number Description Price
LG-BOT 4oz bottle $2.49 ea
LG-QT 1 quart bottle $18.95 ea
LG-GAL Gallon $62.50 ea
Pocket Calipers
Offers you easy reading, gearless English and Metric measurements without the need for reading a vernier (or a bar ad dial) How to cane a chair
Order Number: Price Provides the smoothness and “feel” to make accurate measurements to .001″. with depth bar, thumb roller and scale on bar.
PC-E $42.50

Restauracion de Sillas Enjuncadas Con Cana Presionada, por Mike Frank
Order Number: B0110-S Price: $2.95
Describes how to restore seat bottoms made with pre-woven press cane. Includes tools and material requirements and illustrated step-by-step instructions, en Espanol.

Re-caning a chair might seem difficult, but once you get into it, it is really easy and you will feel more comfortable, proud and confident that you did you own cane job. Just by getting the correct size cane and spline for your chair, you will have fun and enjoy this project.

Cain Tools, Spline and Supplies You Will Need for your Chair :

  1. A spline chisel and mallet for removing the old cane and spline.
  2. Safety glasses are a must have.
  3. Caning wedges for holding the cane in place and for driving it into the groove.
  4. A sharp utility knife and scissors. for cutting the spline and cane material.
  5. A flat thin bladed chisel for trimming the excess cane after it is pushed into the groove.
  6. A bottle of white, yellow, or hide glue.
  7. The pre-woven cane and spline.
  8. A wet rag.
Step 1 – Removing the Old Stuff (The hardest part)

Prop the chair seat up on a work bench or other table so you can chisel without having to bend over. If the spline that holds the cane in place appears to be in tight, you might want to use the utility knife or a thin bladed chisel to separate both sides of the spline where it butts up against the wooden seat frame. This will make it easier to remove with the chisel. You can also drill small holes into the spline and inject it with white vinegar to pre-soften the glue. Starting at the front of the seat, drive your spline chisel into the spline pry up some spline. If it doesn’t want to come out as one piece, you will have to take it out in layers until you get to the bottom. Always keep the chisel pointed away from body parts. Once you get the bulk of the spline removed, you can tilt up the spline chisel on it’s end and use it like a scraper to clean the groove out better. I like to take 80 grit sand paper folded up to do the final cleaning. You don’t have to remove every bit of glue on the bottom of the groove as long as the sides are clean.

Step 2 – Prepping the Cane and Spline

You will need measure the groove length if the cane has rounded corners. Cut your spline about two inches longer than the groove. If the corners have a tighter radius than a small can of soup, you will need to soak the spline in a tub of warm water to make it limber. If the groove has square corners, you will need to pre-cut them to size with 45 degree miters. The utility knife works good for this. Cut each side and label it where it goes. I usually install them temporarily in the groove to make sure the miters line up. Once you have all four pieces cut to fit, set them aside. Make sure that the width of your spline is the same width as your groove for proper fit.

Grab your scissors and cane material. You want to cut it so that it extends an inch past the groove in all directions. Make sure you have the shiny side up. After it is cut, you need to thoroughly wet it. Soaking it isn’t necessary. This will make the cane expand.

Step 3 -Installing the Cane

Holding the cane in position, sight through it at the front or rear board of the chair seat to make sure it is aligned. On all four sides, hammer a wedge into the groove in the middle of each section. This will hold the cane in place while you push it into the groove. I like to use a thinner wedge that has rounded edges to push the cane in. Start at one side and work your way around removing the holding wedges as you go. On curved corners, a thinner wedge will get into the curves better. It is crucial that you finish the project at this point since you don’t want the cane to dry up and shrink without being held in with the spline. Once you have the cane pushed to the bottom of the groove, you need to trim the excess material away. To do this, you can either use a utility knife or a flat chisel. You need to cut it half way up the outer side of the groove. I have found the chisel works the best and is the safest.

Step 4 – Installing the Spline

Once you have the cane trimmed, and all loose pieces out of the groove, it is ready for the glue. Any type of water based glue will work. Just tip the bottle up side down and run a bead into the groove all the way around. If your spline is in pieces, just hammer them in with the mallet. If you only have a hammer, you can use a wood block to hammer on so you don’t dent the spline.

If you have your spline still soaking, take it out and dry it off with a towel. On one end, make a 45 degree cut. when you angle it, it makes it harder to notice the seam. Put the seam at the back of the chair and hammer one end in. Work your way around until you get to the other end. Since you cut it long, it is overlapping. Line it up over the first angle cut on the other end and using the utility knife, make the cut and hammer the remainder in. Once the spline is in, all you need to do is wipe off any glue that may have oozed out.

Once the seat dries, it will tighten up. It is best not to finish cane since it needs to breathe. If you have to color it, you will need to us e a colored lacquer since it barely will take any stain.