How to develop a plan to manage stress

“Experiencing stress is inevitable, but managed well, stress can promote emotional and intellectual growth and resilience as we age,” says Johns Hopkin stress management expert Frances Callahan, LCSW-C.

She has mapped an easy-to-follow plan for how to manage stress—at any age.

Identify your triggers.

Once you know where your stress is coming from—a relationship, kids, workload, a health problem—you can sometimes reduce or prevent the stress. After giving the matter some focused thought, you may identify practical steps to improve the situation. Even if changing the trigger isn’t possible, a shift in perspective may help mitigate stress. For example, if a friend is pushing your buttons, stepping back and adjusting your expectations may allow you to keep this close bond.

Stay connected.

Maintaining, improving, and increasing healthy relationships with supportive friends and family powerfully promotes resilience. Many find that connections with a faith family, neighbors, and even pets, help them feel positive and energetic, even if children and grandchildren aren’t close at hand.

Stay active.

Physical activity releases feel-good endorphins. Taking short walking breaks several times a day is a powerful tool for channeling stress. Exercising or joining yoga, dance, or tai chi classes with friends also helps achieve step 2—staying connected.

Find your “pause” button.

“After experiencing times of great change, high demand, or significant loss, it’s essential to press pause and rest. Often creating time and space for rest means saying “no” to invitations and requests for help, at least temporarily,” says Callahan. Consider spending quiet time daily: contemplation, reflection, and breathing fosters resilience and calm.

Plan your fun.

To prevent the daily rush from consuming your life, plan your fun for the day, week, month, or year. Callahan recommends, “instead of channel surfing, make a date to watch a special program, alone or with a loved one. Plan a monthly game night with friends and ask them to bring goodies to share. Identify fun activities that suit you, and schedule them.”

Reframe your thinking about stress itself.

Stress responses, including faster heart rate and breathing, evolved to improve our performance in stressful situations. Reminding yourself of stress’s evolutionary value may improve your performance and paradoxically reduce feelings of stress, in that you’re not adding “stress about stress” to the stress the original trigger aroused.

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7 Steps to Manage Stress and Build Resilience

How to develop a plan to manage stressAs recent months have demonstrated, stress is unavoidable. Now more than ever, it’s important to understand stress and how we can manage it. While stress can be beneficial, too much of it can be harmful.

When the body senses a threat (or stressor), it goes on high alert, and once the threat passes, the body quickly recovers. At least that’s the way it’s supposed to work. Stressors can include health matters, work, money, family issues, racism or gender inequality, and regular daily hassles. With unrelenting or too many stressors, your body might be on a constant state of high alert, leading to poor concentration, bad moods, professional burnout, and mental and physical health problems. When stress becomes chronic, the body cannot return to normal functioning. Chronic stress can be linked with health conditions such as heart disease, high blood pressure, diabetes, depression and anxiety.

Stress affects women and men differently. Many conditions associated with stress — such as post-traumatic stress disorder, depression and anxiety — are more common in women than men.

Beyond sex and gender differences, there are individual differences, too. Some people are more resilient than others. Stress affects them less or more temporarily, and they might even perform better under stress. “There’s a saying, ‘It’s not how far you fall; it’s how high you bounce.’ For those of us who don’t bounce back so easily, there’s good news. Resilience, to some extent, can be learned and there are some simple, practical things that people can do that may make a noticeable difference,” says Dr. Janine Austin Clayton, Director of the NIH Office of Research on Women’s Health. Clayton explains that some resilient people might also develop a greater appreciation for their lives, family, friends or other matters after stress.

Stress management and resilience building are particularly important to the health of women. Here are several tips to help women as well as men:

  1. Recognize and counter signs of stress. Your body sends signals that it’s stressed, including difficulty concentrating, headaches, cold hands, tight muscles, a nervous stomach, clenched teeth, feeling on edge, fidgety, irritable or withdrawn. Knowing how your body communicates can help you deal with stressful moments. Learn to not only recognize but also to name these feelings, either to oneself or to a friend. Then, take action to counter their effects. For example, deep breathing, stretching, going for a walk, writing down your thoughts and taking quiet time to focus can help induce relaxation and reduce tension.
  2. Take time for yourself. Make taking care of yourself a daily routine. It’s not selfish or self-indulgent — and it might require saying “no” to requests or prioritizing yourself along with your responsibilities. Start with small changes in your routine to help build resilience to stressful circumstances. Work in time to exercise, eat healthy foods, participate in relaxing activities and sleep. In fact, including a regimen of exercise, which for some may include yoga or meditation, can be very important when feeling stressed. Also, take time to notice the “good minutes” in each day or to do something that you enjoy, such as reading a book or listening to music, which can be a way to shift your attention and focus on the positive rather than the negative.
  3. Try new routines. From scheduling bath and bedtimes to blocking off time to plan and prioritize tasks, additional structure can provide a daily framework that allows you to attune to your body’s signals. Then, you can take steps to potentially manage stress earlier than you once did.
  4. Stay connected and make new friends. Stay in touch with family, friends and groups in your life — technology makes this easier than ever. Having or being a person to talk with can be reassuring and calming. Using video features can enhance the connection in telecommunication or online communications for some people.
  5. See problems through a different lens. Experts call changing the way we think about and respond to stress “reframing.” View sitting in traffic or around the house as an opportunity to enjoy music, podcasts or pleasant views. Reduce anger in response to rude or aggressive behavior by imagining what might be happening in that person’s life. Keeping situations in perspective is an important way to boost stress resilience. Other steps include positive thinking and creating plans before you begin to resolve problems. You can practice reframing and get better at it over time.
  6. Seek help with problems. Many people experience the same day-to-day strains related to caregiving, relationships, health, work and money. Look to friends and family, as appropriate, or other trusted individuals or resources for tips and information.
  7. Talk to a health professional if stress is affecting your well-being, you feel you cannot manage the stress you’re experiencing, or stress has caused you to engage in or increase substance use. Seek appropriate care if stress is harming your relationships or ability to work. If you have suicidal thoughts, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255). Lifeline chat is a service available to everyone 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. In addition, if you need help locating a mental health provider, the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) offers a site that can assist you at https://findtreatment.samhsa.gov. People who have experienced traumatic stress (directly or indirectly experiencing life-threatening and dangerous events) should find a treatment provider who practices trauma informed care — see https://go.usa.gov/xvydm for details. Additionally, in times of disasters and other sorts of emergencies, the National Disaster Distress Helpline (Call 1-800-985-5990 or text “TALKWITHUS” to 66746) can provide crisis counseling, emotional support and referrals to care related to disasters and public health emergencies.

Recognizing individual signals of a body’s stress responses and learning to respond to those signals in new ways can help build the emotional, intellectual and physical strength that comprise resilience, which can help you tackle future stressors.

How to develop a plan to manage stress

Well-Being – Stress Management

Description

This module will introduce you to ways to recognize and cope with stress. Throughout this self-guided module, you will work through action steps to create stress management goals, identify stressors and practice some stress coping skills.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this lesson:

  1. Create a stress management SMART goal.
  2. Recognize personal stressors and how they affect you.
  3. Practice stress coping skills related to mindfulness.

Resources and Materials Needed

  • Manage Stress Workbook

Instructions

This is a self-paced lesson. The outline below does not cover the entire Manage Stress Workbook, however you are encouraged to explore the workbook’s entire content. You will need to set aside 5-10 minutes for each activity. Activities do not need to be done in a linear order, but, instead, and can be completed separately and in any order that you determine.

This module was created and developed by the Purdue Recreation and Wellness team.

Module Outline

Find a quiet space where you will not be interrupted. Either open the Manage Stress Workbook on your computer or print off a copy and write in your answers.

How to develop a plan to manage stress

Stress is a normal and unavoidable part of our daily life. Reducing stress can be difficult, but it leads to a healthier and more enjoyable life. Mental health is incredibly important, especially as we continue to deal with a pandemic, so check in with yourself to make sure your stress levels are manageable.

If you feel like stress is getting out of control, here are a few tips to manage it better.

1. Identify What Causes Stress

Try to identify which situations trigger stress for you. Even if you cannot avoid these situations, being prepared for the stress can help you cope more efficiently and effectively. These situations can include any event or issue that comes up regularly in your life, like exams and deadlines. You can always try to avoid these stressful situations (if possible), but knowing what makes you anxious is the first step.

2. Plan Your Work Routine

Is work giving you a headache? Having a massive workload can trigger stress, especially if you are also short on time. Organizing your work into small chunks and pieces and managing your time can make the whole process much more doable and reduces the stress that comes with it. Organize your day based on your energy levels. If you have more energy in the morning, try to tackle challenging projects and save more manageable tasks for the afternoon.

3. Take Breaks

Taking little breaks during work is always a good idea, when possible. Try not to do all work at once. Get up and walk around, stretch, and take a deep breath. Reward yourself for your achievements with a treat, reflect on your progress and appreciate how far you have come.

4. Practice Saying How You Feel

If people are unreasonable and making unfair demands that stress you out, learn to push back and express how you feel. Understand that standing up for yourself and prioritizing yourself does not mean you are in the wrong. Communication can help calm a situation.

5. Develop Your Interests and Hobbies

Developing interests and hobbies can be a great way to let go of some stress. Shared hobbies like gaming or sports can be a great way to meet new people and be more social.

6. Look After Your Physical Health

Taking steps to look after your physical health can go a long way in improving your mental health. Try working out or meditating. Everyone feels much better physically and mentally after a good run in the park or a nice stretch.

7. Find Ways to Relax

If you know that something relaxes you, like listening to music, taking warm baths, or painting, try to set aside time to do that thing. These things can help you decompress and are a great way to forget about the worries and stresses in your life.

8. Socialize and Build Your Support Network

Make friends and socialize with people so that whatever you are going through, you do not have to go through it alone. Friends and family are always happy to help. Talk to someone in your family or have a virtual hang out.
If stress becomes chronic, it can take a heavy toll on your mental and physical wellbeing, which is why it is imperative to manage stress and anxiety. Following some of the tips mentioned above can help you cope with the stress.

Work-life balance

Work-life balance is adjusting your day-to-day activities to achieve a sense of balance between work life and personal life. Some benefits of a healthy work-life balance include:

  • reduced stress levels, at work and at home
  • greater focus and concentration
  • higher levels of job satisfaction
  • the opportunity to participate more fully in family and social life
  • more time to pursue personal goals and hobbies
  • improved health.

How to maintain good work-life balance?

Balancing the demands of a busy lifestyle is not an easy thing to do, but is best managed by regularly reviewing and assessing your priorities.

Here are a few ideas to help you strike a good work-life balance:

  • Set goals around what you value highly
  • Manage your time effectively—review job activities, priorities and success factors
  • Create a boundary between balancing work and personal time-leave work at work where possible
  • Build resilience and have a positive attitude
  • Avoid stress, mental exhaustion and burnout—fatigue affects your ability to work productively
  • Maintain a healthy lifestyle—look after yourself, eat well, sleep well and set aside a little time to exercise or pursue an activity that you enjoy
  • Enlist a good support system—learn to delegate, we all need a little help sometimes
  • Enjoy your work.

What is stress?

Everyone experiences stress at some stage in their life. It is a way for us to know that something in our life is causing us concern and is affecting how we are thinking and feeling.

Stress is not always bad. In small doses, it can help you perform under pressure and motivate you to do your best, but when you are constantly running in emergency mode, your mind and body pay the price.

Signs and symptoms of stress

  • Mental
    • Trouble thinking clearly
    • Memory problems
    • Can’t concentrate
    • Low attention span
    • Poor judgement
    • Anxious or racing thoughts
    • Constant worrying
  • Emotional
    • Moodiness
    • Easily upset or hurt
    • Irritability or short temper
    • Agitation, unable to relax or keep still
    • Feeling overwhelmed
    • Sense of loneliness and isolation
    • Depression or general unhappiness
  • Physical
    • Tightness in muscles
    • Aches and pains
    • Headaches, trembling, sweating
    • Nausea, dizziness
    • Chest pain, rapid heartbeat
    • Loss of appetite
    • Lack of sleep, dreams, nightmares
  • Behavioural
    • Eating more or less
    • Sleeping too much or too little
    • Isolating yourself from others
    • Procrastinating or neglecting responsibilities
    • Using alcohol, cigarettes, or drugs to relax
    • Nervous habits (e.g. nail biting, pacing).

These signs and symptoms of stress can also be caused by other psychological and medical problems. If you experience any of these, it is important to see your doctor—as they can help you determine whether or not your symptoms are stress-related.

Causes of stress

The situations and pressures that cause stress are known as stressors. There are 2 types of stressors:

  • external (where outside forces act on us)
  • internal (self-generated, we have some control over it).

External causes of stress

  • Major life changes
  • Work
  • Relationship difficulties
  • Financial problems
  • Being too busy
  • Children and family.

Internal causes of stress (self-generated)

  • Inability to accept uncertainty
  • Doubt
  • Negative self-talk
  • Unrealistic expectations
  • Perfectionism
  • Lack of assertiveness.

How to manage stress

Managing stress is about making a plan to be able to cope effectively with daily pressures. The ultimate goal is to strike a balance between life, work, relationships, relaxation and fun. By doing this you are more able to deal with daily stress triggers and meet these challenges head on.

Some strategies that can help you look after your mind and body, and in turn help you to better control behaviours that result from too much stress include:

Your body

  • Know your stress triggers
  • Recognise early warning signs and symptoms and act on them to reduce stress
  • Practise relaxation techniques or meditation
  • Eat a well-balanced, healthy diet
  • Exercise regularly—aim for at least 30 minutes every day
  • Get enough sleep—aim for around 8 hours every night.

Your thinking

  • Try to worry less about things you can’t control, and make plans for dealing with the things you can control
  • Set small, manageable and achievable goals
  • Apply problem-solving techniques—identifying the problem, clarifying its nature and map out options for dealing with it
  • Choose to have a positive attitude
  • Think positively about yourself and your achievements
  • Take time out to visualise a calm and peaceful place
  • Compete against yourself, not those around you and aim for your personal best
  • Develop, keep and use your sense of humour.

Your behaviours

  • Plan and organise ahead to allow enough time to get tasks done
  • Use ‘to do’ lists and set priorities to help you achieve your goals
  • Be open and honest with people, rather than hiding your thoughts and feelings
  • Seek guidance and support when you are feeling stressed
  • Create a balanced lifestyle for yourself and allow time for recreation and relaxation
  • Reward yourself when you reach your achievements and goals
  • Limit your intake of alcohol, caffeine and other drugs.

Support with mental illness and work

Resources are available for employees with mental illness and to assist employers and managers to support them.

Contact us

  • For general enquiries, feedback, complaints and compliments:

13 QGOV (13 74 68 13 74 68 )

For COVID-19 related enquiries:

134 COVID (13 42 68 13 42 68 )

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How to develop a plan to manage stress

Your business is a source of stress and worry. Whether it’s lack of sales, too much debt, or not enough money, your brain will be constantly going. And what about problems with employees or equipment? These items can cause stress too. Each part of your business has the potential to keep you up at night.

It’s no secret that the demands of running a business can be wearing. It can be frustrating to constantly increase your revenue, as you never know just how much is enough. Cutting your costs and reducing expenses can help, but the pressure is always there.

Stress is a well-known problem for small business owners. The sooner they can learn how to manage their stress by finding ways to relax, the better. Finding time to unwind, setting realistic goals, staying patient and being self-aware are all helpful ways to keep anxiety at bay when running a small business.

Below are my top five tips to manage stress for small business:

#1 The bright side

It can be tempting when getting a start-up to worry about the mistakes and problems. When you first set out, there may be things that need to be fixed, behind schedule, or not well funded.

You’re the boss. You deserve a pat on the back. Let’s break down all the things that have been going right. Start by listing everything that you accomplished and any milestones you reached while running your own show. Probably more than you think. Don’t forget about those little accomplishments, either.

When you’re feeling overwhelmed by everything that’s going wrong, look over your list of successes. Remembering all the good things will calm you down and make you feel more in control.

#2 Categorize your work

One of the fastest ways to feel overwhelmed in business is when you’re not able to accomplish anything at all. The more that you try to do, the fewer tasks you complete. Avoid this by focusing on one job or a small number of jobs at once. You can easily achieve so much more!

Your goals are what makes you standout therefore they should be at the forefront of your mind. What do you want to achieve? When you have a plan, you can prioritize your tasks better. Write down everything that you need to complete and rank them by greatest importance, not least importance. You should start with the most important tasks and work down the list. That way, you are setting an agenda for yourself to follow.

It’s easy to get stressed when you see how many things you need to do. Take your time and try not to get overwhelmed by the length of your list. Focus on what you need to work on next, and don’t forget to take care of yourself as well.

#3 Put your brain to rest

I’ll be lying if I said that as a business owner, you can find separation between work and home. You’ll always be thinking about your business, especially while you’re trying to sleep. Your brain can’t break away from it, even when you want it to.

When I can’t turn my brain off, I write down everything my mind is telling me. I’ll write about what my problem is, possible solutions, and any other notes. Sometimes writing it all out means it takes a while, but it’s worth it in the end. Once I finish writing everything down, I can relax and sleep.

I love how I can put my thoughts on a shelf. That way, my brain doesn’t have much to process. I know my business is safe for a time because there is nothing waiting for me to do. I also don’t have to worry about forgetting anything because it’s all on the shelf.

#4 Nothing is better than taking breaks

Here’s a scenario, you are a hunting giant, just established your online business 6 months ago and sales aren’t going well. What do you do next? Simple, start working even harder at your business day and night to grow, make sales and profit.

As a business owner, it’s important to create space and time for yourself. If you are constantly working, not getting anywhere, and worrying about your problem, taking a short break might just be what you need. Even 10 minutes of stepping away from your stressor can refresh and calm you. Taking a break can prevent burnout.

When you get away from your business for a little while, do something that calms you. Take a walk, have coffee, talk to a friend, or watch a funny video. This will give you a clear head and fresh energy to tackle the task. Plus, stepping away may even show you a new and better way to complete the task.

#5 Self caring is not selfish

Building a small business can be both challenging and exhausting. It’s hard enough to keep your brain going, but you also have to be careful to maintain your health. The long nights, early mornings, no weekends, and no sick days can really start to show on your body. To prevent this wear and tear from showing, make sure you take care of yourself and don’t add more stress to an already difficult time.

It’s time to take care of yourself. You know this. Sometimes the tedious actions can make all the difference. Drink water throughout the day, eat healthfully, and get enough sleep. You also need to pay more attention to your general health. Visit a health food store and buy some natural supplements. Reduce your caffeine consumption, too. When you’re healthy, it will be easier for your body to handle stress.

Wrapping up

As a small business owner, you are under a lot of stress. You need to be stress free in order to continue. Exercise is a positive step towards releasing your stress. It’s a proven method to reduce anxiety and frustrations. In addition, exercise can also clear your mind and relax you. All you need is a bit of courage, time and the gentle push to exercise.

Developing a stress management program is key to running an efficient home business. Stress affects your physical and mental health. Mismanaging your stress levels increases your risk of heart disease, panic disorder, obesity and depression. In addition, it reduces the effectiveness of your immune system. As a result, too much stress leads to susceptibility to illness and poor work performance.

Working from home does not have to be stressful. Learn how to manage stress, and create a routine that provides your body with a balance of work and relaxation.

Organize Your Office

Many cases of stress link directly to a lack of organization. You may have spent too much time searching for specific job instructions, and therefore lose precious time from your day. To make up the lost work, you will need to work longer into the day. This throws off the rest of your schedule and increases the stress on both you and your family.

Before ending a day, organize your desk so that everything is where you need it. Use file cabinets, calendars and in-boxes to ensure everything is where you need it. Always end work ten minutes early, and use that time to prepare for the next day’s work.

Exercise for Mental and Physical Health Benefits

Studies prove that stress levels drop when you exercise daily. Exercise before you shower in the morning and again at night. Ten minutes per session is all that is needed. The best stress-busting exercises are:

  • Dancing
  • Swimming
  • Tai Chi
  • Walking
  • Yoga

Walking is the best exercise of all because it is easy on the joints and takes you away from your home office and out into the fresh air. Don’t let inclement weather keep you from getting the exercise you need. An exercise or instructional DVD ensures you are exercising on rainy days too.

Change Your Eating Habits

Foods rich in serotonin actually reduce stress levels. Also, foods rich in B-12 will help with memory retention, thought processing and boost your overall energy. Foods to add to your stress management program include:

  • Almonds
  • Avocado
  • Cabbage
  • Grapefruit
  • Oatmeal or Cream of Wheat
  • Oranges
  • Seafood
  • Skim milk
  • Spinach
  • Tea
  • Whole grain bread

An important stress management training technique involves meditation. Go to a quiet room and sit or lie down. Close your eyes and focus on nothing but the sounds around you. If you find your mind wandering to your work duties, distract yourself with relaxation breathing.

The goal is to take 10 minutes away from your daily routine, where you are able to relax and unwind (and not let matters trouble you).

Learn Relaxation Breathing Techniques

Relaxation breathing involves taking a deep breath through your nose until your stomach expands. Hold the deep breath in for five seconds, and then slowly breathe it out through your mouth. Count to three before taking another deep breath. Keep track of your breathing and repeat the exercise for ten minutes. For best results, perform this stress management program technique while meditating.

Other Factors to Consider

Having an effective stress management program includes being able to identify triggers that cause you stress and finding opportunities for change. If stress is caused by projects piling up, consider creating a priority list, analyze your work flow, and work on small goals for each project until completion. If stress is caused by business and family conflict, learn scheduling and how to communicate boundaries.

If there is a particular activity you enjoy or you’ve found to help in relaxation, schedule that into your work day or week.

How to develop a plan to manage stress

Your business is a source of stress and worry. Whether it’s lack of sales, too much debt, or not enough money, your brain will be constantly going. And what about problems with employees or equipment? These items can cause stress too. Each part of your business has the potential to keep you up at night.

It’s no secret that the demands of running a business can be wearing. It can be frustrating to constantly increase your revenue, as you never know just how much is enough. Cutting your costs and reducing expenses can help, but the pressure is always there.

Stress is a well-known problem for small business owners. The sooner they can learn how to manage their stress by finding ways to relax, the better. Finding time to unwind, setting realistic goals, staying patient and being self-aware are all helpful ways to keep anxiety at bay when running a small business.

Below are my top five tips to manage stress for small business:

#1 The bright side

It can be tempting when getting a start-up to worry about the mistakes and problems. When you first set out, there may be things that need to be fixed, behind schedule, or not well funded.

You’re the boss. You deserve a pat on the back. Let’s break down all the things that have been going right. Start by listing everything that you accomplished and any milestones you reached while running your own show. Probably more than you think. Don’t forget about those little accomplishments, either.

When you’re feeling overwhelmed by everything that’s going wrong, look over your list of successes. Remembering all the good things will calm you down and make you feel more in control.

#2 Categorize your work

One of the fastest ways to feel overwhelmed in business is when you’re not able to accomplish anything at all. The more that you try to do, the fewer tasks you complete. Avoid this by focusing on one job or a small number of jobs at once. You can easily achieve so much more!

Your goals are what makes you standout therefore they should be at the forefront of your mind. What do you want to achieve? When you have a plan, you can prioritize your tasks better. Write down everything that you need to complete and rank them by greatest importance, not least importance. You should start with the most important tasks and work down the list. That way, you are setting an agenda for yourself to follow.

It’s easy to get stressed when you see how many things you need to do. Take your time and try not to get overwhelmed by the length of your list. Focus on what you need to work on next, and don’t forget to take care of yourself as well.

#3 Put your brain to rest

I’ll be lying if I said that as a business owner, you can find separation between work and home. You’ll always be thinking about your business, especially while you’re trying to sleep. Your brain can’t break away from it, even when you want it to.

When I can’t turn my brain off, I write down everything my mind is telling me. I’ll write about what my problem is, possible solutions, and any other notes. Sometimes writing it all out means it takes a while, but it’s worth it in the end. Once I finish writing everything down, I can relax and sleep.

I love how I can put my thoughts on a shelf. That way, my brain doesn’t have much to process. I know my business is safe for a time because there is nothing waiting for me to do. I also don’t have to worry about forgetting anything because it’s all on the shelf.

#4 Nothing is better than taking breaks

Here’s a scenario, you are a hunting giant, just established your online business 6 months ago and sales aren’t going well. What do you do next? Simple, start working even harder at your business day and night to grow, make sales and profit.

As a business owner, it’s important to create space and time for yourself. If you are constantly working, not getting anywhere, and worrying about your problem, taking a short break might just be what you need. Even 10 minutes of stepping away from your stressor can refresh and calm you. Taking a break can prevent burnout.

When you get away from your business for a little while, do something that calms you. Take a walk, have coffee, talk to a friend, or watch a funny video. This will give you a clear head and fresh energy to tackle the task. Plus, stepping away may even show you a new and better way to complete the task.

#5 Self caring is not selfish

Building a small business can be both challenging and exhausting. It’s hard enough to keep your brain going, but you also have to be careful to maintain your health. The long nights, early mornings, no weekends, and no sick days can really start to show on your body. To prevent this wear and tear from showing, make sure you take care of yourself and don’t add more stress to an already difficult time.

It’s time to take care of yourself. You know this. Sometimes the tedious actions can make all the difference. Drink water throughout the day, eat healthfully, and get enough sleep. You also need to pay more attention to your general health. Visit a health food store and buy some natural supplements. Reduce your caffeine consumption, too. When you’re healthy, it will be easier for your body to handle stress.

Wrapping up

As a small business owner, you are under a lot of stress. You need to be stress free in order to continue. Exercise is a positive step towards releasing your stress. It’s a proven method to reduce anxiety and frustrations. In addition, exercise can also clear your mind and relax you. All you need is a bit of courage, time and the gentle push to exercise.