How to get your employment history

How to get your employment history

Some of us have had long and varied employment histories. It is rare these days to meet a person who has worked for a single company for more than 10 years. When you apply for a new job, you are often required to give a detailed account of your employment history. What happens if you can’t recall all of the details in terms of where you worked and when? It’s not a good idea to guess dates or names when it comes to a job application. If the potential employer decides to make a few fact-checking calls, and it looks as if you’ve lied on your application, you’re in a bad position.

Look Up Records at the Social Security Administration

If you’ve gone blank on the details of some of your jobs, the Social Security Administration can help. Simply fill out a Request for Social Security Earnings Information form and submit it. In return, you will receive detailed information about your work history including employment dates, employer names and addresses, and earnings. There is a fee of $115 to receive this detailed list of employers.

Your State Unemployment Office

A free option may be to get records from your state’s unemployment office. If you’ve moved around a lot, this could prove difficult, but if most of your employment was in one or two states, you can request these records and reconstruct your job history. Check with your state to find out what is available.

Use Your Tax Forms

If you’ve been good about saving tax records, you should have your W2 forms, which contain information about previous employers. But if you still can’t find the dates of your previous employment, try calling the human resources office at each company you worked for and asking for specific months and years.

Beware of Abuse

Whenever you’re sending a request using your Social Security number, you are vulnerable to identity theft. Be certain to provide the correct address where you want to receive your employment records. In addition, keep the information in a safe and secure place once you have it. It’s important to keep your Social Security number private. Once you have obtained your employment history, consider putting all of the information on a LinkedIn account or on a resume that you keep on your personal computer and update each time you change jobs. That way, the next time you’re asked for an employment history, you won’t need to seek help and pay fees to the Social Security Administration.

When applying for new positions, most applications will require you to list your work history. If you’ve been in the professional world for a while, you may not remember every job you’ve worked in the past. This article explains what employment history is and the best ways to keep track of your own employment history.

What is employment history?

Employment history is a record of a person’s previous employment. Your work history typically includes information on employer names, job titles, positions held, duties, responsibilities and dates of employment.

Employment history helps employers understand and verify your employment background. Your entire work history is also useful when writing a resume because it helps you easily identify the most relevant experience for a given job application.

Can employers verify your work history?

Yes, employers can verify your work history by contacting the previous employers you list on your resume. Employers normally verify the dates of your previous employment, your job titles and your duties. Knowing your work history can ensure the information you provided on your resume is accurate and honest.

How to find your work history

Here are some steps you can follow if you want to find your own work history and make your resume more accurate:

1. Firstly, search old documents

Sifting through your previous tax records can help you find previous jobs. When you file tax returns, you also file a W2 form that shows dates of employment and company names. If you have a copy of these records, you can easily get important work history details.

If you used an online service to prepare some of your tax returns, log in to that service and get the information you need from your saved documents. Note, however, that any online service will only have tax documents from the year(s) that you filed your returns using that service.

Your tax returns aren’t the only documented source of your employment history. Consider also searching through old resumes because they might list jobs that you’ve forgotten about.

2. Next, contact the Social Security Administration

You can get your work history from the Social Security Administration by filling in a Request for Social Security Earnings Information form. You can either get a certified or a non-certified statement of your earnings, which will also show details of your work history, including employment dates and employer names.

3. Thirdly, contact former employers

You can also contact your previous employers (assuming you remember the names of the companies you used to work for). It’s very likely your former employers will have some of the most essential details about your time with them on record, such as your job title, dates of employment and main duties.

The quickest route to getting details of work history from former employers is to directly contact their human resources department. In some cases, you might find that a company you used to work for has gone out of business—if that is the case, you can still try the other options on this list.

4. Finally, use your computer

You can perform a local search on your hard drive for old resumes you saved, and they will often show the details about your past employment that you’re looking for.

If you can’t find any resume documents on your hard drive, the internet is a good alternative to check out. You can log in to various professional networking or social media platforms and look around for details of your former employment. When initially setting up a profile on many of these platforms, they ask you to fill in information about your work and there is a good chance you completed these sections using the information you are looking for.

If you go through all of these steps, you should be able to completely trace out your entire employment history, no matter how long your career has been. The next important thing to do is to understand how to keep track of the work history you’ve compiled for future reference.

Tips to keep track of your employment history

After going through all the steps to find out your full work history, here are some actionable tips to keep track of things for the future:

Update your online profiles

All professional networking websites give you the chance to fill in extensive information about your employment history. Take the opportunity to update your profiles when you have the time so that you can easily get your work history in the future. Consider updating your social media profiles with your work history—most platforms let you keep this information private so that only you can see it.

Create a resume master copy

If you have worked in several jobs over many years, you’ll probably know that adding every one of them to your resume is not practical. Employers really just want to see your relevant work experience and you don’t need to fit your entire career into the work history section of your resume. However, creating a master copy of your resume is a good way to keep a record of your entire employment history in one document. You can refer to the master copy when tailoring your resume to suit particular job applications.

Save important work history information to the cloud

To ensure you don’t lose important electronic documents containing information about your work history, it is advisable to back them up to the cloud. There are many free file storage services available where you can upload your master resume and other relevant files. Cloud services let you access your files anytime, anywhere.

How to get your employment history

When filling out a job application or applying for unemployment benefits, you may be asked for your employment history. This is a list of all the jobs you have held, including the companies you have worked for, job titles, and dates of employment.

In some cases, the hiring manager may only be interested in where you worked for the past few years. In others, the company may want an extensive employment history going back many years.

If you've been working for a long time, this may sound like a daunting task, but it is something you can recreate yourself even if you don't remember exactly when you worked at each job. Once you've confirmed the details, you can keep track of subsequent positions moving forward, so it will be easier to provide the information to prospective employers.

When You Need to Know Your Employment History

It can be hard, especially if you’ve had a lot of jobs, to keep track of your personal employment history. However, when you’re applying for new positions, many companies want an accurate record of where and when you worked, especially when they’re conducting employment background checks. When you’re applying for unemployment benefits, you’ll need to provide your most recent work history as part of the application process.

If you don’t remember the details, and many people don’t, you can recreate them with information from the Social Security Administration, Internal Revenue Service, your state tax or unemployment department, and prior employers. It’s important to provide prospective employers with accurate information. Don’t guess where you worked and when, because, if you’re wrong, employers will want to know why.

If the dates don’t match what the employer discovers about you when they verify your employment history, it will be a red flag and could jeopardize your chances of getting hired.

Do keep in mind that you can include the months/years you worked at a company rather than specific dates of employment on your resume. Keep in mind, however, that some job applications may require more specific details.

How to Find Your Employment History

How to get your employment history

What can you do when you don't remember your exact dates of employment? It will take some time, but you can recreate your employment history yourself for no cost. Even though you may be tempted by ads for companies saying they will do it for a fee, you don't need to pay a company to get the information for you.

Check With Your State Tax Department or Unemployment Office

State tax departments and unemployment agencies can often release employment histories for individuals, as long as they worked for in-state employers. In Washington State, for example, it's called a "Self-Request for Records," and you can request as far back as10 years.   In New York, you can request a transcript of your New York State wages and tax withholding. Most states have similar resources available.  

Request Employment History from Social Security

You can receive a statement of your employment history from the Social Security Administration (SSA) by completing a “Request for Social Security Earnings Information” form. You’ll receive detailed information about your work history, including employment dates, employer names and addresses, and earnings.  

The SSA charges a fee for detailed information based on the length of time for which you would like to receive records.

Use Your Tax Returns

If you have saved copies of your tax returns, you should have your copies of your W2 forms, as well. That will give you company information, and you should be able to estimate your dates of employment.

Request Transcripts of Your Tax Returns

You can request transcripts of previous years’ tax returns if you don’t have your copies. Learn how to get transcripts of your tax returns online or by mail.

Check With Prior Employers

You can also reconstruct your employment history by contacting the human resources department of any of your former employers, if you're not certain about your start and end dates of employment. Let them know that you would like to confirm the exact dates of employment that they have on record.

What Your Employment History Should Look Like on a Resume

Job seekers typically include work history in the “Experience” or “Related Employment” section of a resume:

  • In this section, list the companies you worked for, your job titles, and the dates of employment.
  • One additional element to your resume work history is a list (often a bulleted list) of your achievements and responsibilities at each job.
  • You do not need to (and should not) include every work experience in your “Experience” section. Focus on jobs, internships, and even volunteer work that is related to the job at hand.

One useful tip is to make sure that whatever work history you include on your job applications matches what is on your resume and LinkedIn profile. Make sure there are no inconsistencies that could raise a red flag for employers.

How to Keep Track of Your Employment History

For future reference, an easy way to keep track of your personal employment history is to keep your resume and LinkedIn profile up-to-date.

How to get your employment history

Why do you need your Employment History from SSS Website? Your SSS Employment History may be required by your employers especially when you are applying for a new job. If you also want to know when your Employers reported you as their Employee and started contributing your SSS Premium then the Employment History from SSS Website will also be helpful. Some embassy also require a copy of your SSS Employment History and Actual Premiums as proof of your Employment in the Philippines.

The Employment History displayed on the SSS Website does not provide your exact hire date in the company, but the month and year of your reporting date on a certain Employer.

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HOW TO CHECK YOUR EMPLOYMENT HISTORY FROM SSS WEBSITE

The SSS Website works best in Internet Explorer 11, but this post will help you in navigating the website using Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox.

1. Login your Member Account in www.sss.gov.ph
2. After successful login, click Inquiry menu and you will be redirected to the “Employee Static Information” page. Click on Member info on the third layer navigation then select Employment History.

How to get your employment history

3. Your Employment History will be displayed on the page. Your Employer ID, Name, Reporting date and Employment Date will appear on the screen.

How to get your employment history

If you were Employed in a certain company and it did not appear in your Employment History, chances are they did not report you and have not remitted your SSS Contributions. You may report it to your nearest SSS Branch and submit proof of your employment and payslip.

How do you know your job applicant is truthful regarding their workforce experience? Without verifying employment, you could waste money on a time-consuming, expensive onboarding process—only to find that your new employee has no proficiency at all in your respective industry.

Fortunately, verifying employment history of your candidate is easy to do. Verifying candidates’ work records won’t take much time, or cost much money—if any at all—and it’s a necessary step you should take to reduce the risk of a wrong hire.

What Does Employment Verification Show?

To verify the past employment history of your job applicants, make a detailed list of the items you expect to uncover. In some cases—especially if you’re verifying a candidate’s former employment at a job held many years ago—you might not be able to receive much information; regardless, you should always try to get as many relevant specifics as possible. A comprehensive employment verification process should:

    Verify title: Title indicates the role or position the employee held. Common designations include manager, shift lead, associate, and so on. If a resume lists past leadership experience, make sure those statements are accurate.

Why Verify Employment History?

As noted, verifying employment history allows employers to double-check that the information reported on a candidate’s resume is correct—and resume inaccuracies are more common than you might expect. According to a CareerBuilder survey, 58% of hiring managers say they have caught incorrect information on applicant’s resumes.

How to get your employment history

Their report states that common resume inconsistencies include:

  • Dates of employment
  • Job title
  • Job duties

Identifying these patterns can help protect your business from making the wrong hire, as your next job offer should go to a candidate with long-term prospects for success at your company—and who’s vested in its future success. Considering that nearly 1 in 3 new hires look for new employment within their first six months on the job, it’s important to find candidates that are in it for the long haul.

How to get your employment history

Taking the time away from your daily duties to train a new employee, only for them to quit merely weeks or months later, can be expensive and detract from your bottom line.

How Do I Verify Employment and Work History for a Potential Job Candidate?

When you’re ready to verify past employment for your job candidate, there are at least two routes to choose from:

  1. Hire a Third Party Employment Verification Service

Outsourcing employment verification is appealing because it takes the responsibility off your hands. You can free up your time and energy to focus on your company while waiting for the results of the search.

The drawback, however, is how much hiring a third party company could cost—and how long it can take. By the time you find a company whose services suit your needs, you then need to wait for them to gather verifiable proof of employment using candidate-provided information; if your candidate has not yet provided the information that they need, you’ll have to wait for that too. You’ll also need to assure compliance with federal regulations; before using a third-party verification service, make sure their methods are compliant with all applicable laws.

  1. D-I-Y Employment Verification

You can also perform a do-it-yourself employment verification. It may take a bit of time out of your day, but it’s relatively simple to do, and well worth the effort. If you decided to verify past employment yourself, be sure to:

  • Call references: Too many employers don’t ask for or contact the references provided on a candidate’s resume. These references can help you confirm important information and get a better idea of the candidate’s aptitude for an open position.

How to get your employment history

  • Use independently-found contact information: To ensure objective information, reach out to past employers using contact information you found independently—not only what’s listed on the resume. If they say their direct report was “John Smith” at “Company X”, run a simple internet search including the company name to check that the contact information online is consistent with what’s included on the resume. If it’s not, don’t panic immediately; you might have been provided their cell phone number versus their public listing, for example.

However, if you should run into such a discrepancy, make sure to contact both emails and phone numbers to double-check the information is accurate.

How to get your employment history

ShareAble for Hires is not an employment verification service. But to improve their chances of making a great hire, employers turn to ShareAble for Hires for employment screening. We provide FCRA-approved pre employment background checks, which gives you access to:

  • National Sex Offender Registry check
  • National Most Wanted database check
  • Federal Watch Lists check
  • Instant State and County Check
  • SSN and Name Match Report
  • Deceased Persons SSN Check
  • Current & Previous Addresses
  • Full Credit Report
  • Employment records where available

While ShareAble for Hires doesn’t verify past employment, we complement your own verification with thorough screening services. ShareAble for Hires offers criminal background checks and employment credit checks delivered within minutes to help you confirm your hiring decision and have peace of mind.

How to get your employment history

Some of us have had long and varied employment histories. It is rare these days to meet a person who has worked for a single company for more than 10 years. When you apply for a new job, you are often required to give a detailed account of your employment history. What happens if you can’t recall all of the details in terms of where you worked and when? It’s not a good idea to guess dates or names when it comes to a job application. If the potential employer decides to make a few fact-checking calls, and it looks as if you’ve lied on your application, you’re in a bad position.

Look Up Records at the Social Security Administration

If you’ve gone blank on the details of some of your jobs, the Social Security Administration can help. Simply fill out a Request for Social Security Earnings Information form and submit it. In return, you will receive detailed information about your work history including employment dates, employer names and addresses, and earnings. There is a fee of $115 to receive this detailed list of employers.

Your State Unemployment Office

A free option may be to get records from your state’s unemployment office. If you’ve moved around a lot, this could prove difficult, but if most of your employment was in one or two states, you can request these records and reconstruct your job history. Check with your state to find out what is available.

Use Your Tax Forms

If you’ve been good about saving tax records, you should have your W2 forms, which contain information about previous employers. But if you still can’t find the dates of your previous employment, try calling the human resources office at each company you worked for and asking for specific months and years.

Beware of Abuse

Whenever you’re sending a request using your Social Security number, you are vulnerable to identity theft. Be certain to provide the correct address where you want to receive your employment records. In addition, keep the information in a safe and secure place once you have it. It’s important to keep your Social Security number private. Once you have obtained your employment history, consider putting all of the information on a LinkedIn account or on a resume that you keep on your personal computer and update each time you change jobs. That way, the next time you’re asked for an employment history, you won’t need to seek help and pay fees to the Social Security Administration.

How to get your employment history

When applying to educational institutions, or seeking professional accreditation, it is sometimes necessary to obtain an official record of past employment. Most employers withhold a portion of your paycheck to prepay Federal taxes and Social Security benefits. The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) and Social Security Administration (SSA) keep detailed records for each individual, and should be able to provide a detailed employment history.

Obtaining Employment History from the Internal Revenue Service

Visit the Internal Revenue Service’s website at www.IRS.gov. Click “Forms and Publications” on the left hand navigation sidebar.

Search for IRS Form 4506. The 4506 series is used to request a transcript or copy of past income tax returns. These transcripts will detail any taxable income you may have received from past employers.

Fill out Form 4506, 4506-T, or 4506-EZ in their entirety. Return these forms to the IRS, and include a check or money order for the processing fee.

Obtaining Employment History from the Social Security Administration

Visit the Social Security Administration’s website (see Resources). Like the IRS, the SSA keeps records of past employment and wages.

Click “Forms and Publications,” and search for SSA Form 7050. This form can be used to request a transcript of past employment.

Learn how you can check your SSS employment history using the SSS website

How to get your employment history

There are several reasons why you might want to check your Social Security System or SSS employment history online. For example, you might want to know if your employer has registered you under their account or has remitted your SSS contributions. You might also be worried about the money withheld by your company from your salary through payroll deductions.

You might ask, “How do I check my SSS employment history?” The best way to check SSS records online is through the SSS website. If you have an SSS online account, you can easily check your SSS employment history report and see if your employer or company has faithfully remitted your contributions. Under the law, Philippine employers have up to 30 days to report their new employees to SSS and to remit the monthly contributions of their employees.

Since not everyone is tech-savvy or knows how to browse the web effectively, I have put up a short tutorial on how to get your SSS employment history online using the SSS website.

Please take note that you should be an SSS member and have an account with the SSS website. If you don’t have an SSS online account, you can register for a free account at the SSS website.

Important: The SSS website recommends that you use the Internet Explorer browser to log in to the SSS website. However, Microsoft has decided to retire Internet Explorer in favor of Microsoft Edge. But don’t worry because Google Chrome fully supports the SSS website. You can log in to your SSS website on your Chrome browser and everything should work as expected.

Step 1: Visit the SSS website at https://www.sss.gov.ph and enter your User ID and password. If you forgot your User ID or password, you can request to have it sent to your email address on file.

How to get your employment history

Step 2: Hover over E-SERVICES, then click Inquiry. You will be redirected to the Employee Static Information page.

How to get your employment history

Step 3: Under the Member Info link, click Employment History. This will open your Employment History page.

How to get your employment history

Step 4: You can now view your Employment History page. Here you will have access to your SSS employment history report with information such as the name of your employers, their employer ID, reporting date, and employment date.

How to get your employment history

There you have it; those are the steps you can take to check your SSS records online. If you notice any discrepancies, don’t hesitate to contact your SSS liaison officer at your nearest SSS branch. Employees can file complaints against delinquent employers if necessary.

If you have any questions or clarifications, please post a comment below. Don’t forget to like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter.