How to make a discover card payment

How to make a discover card payment

Missing a credit card payment is a big no-no if you want to keep your credit history clean and your credit scores high. One of the best ways to protect yourself from missing payments is to set up autopay online. Discover cards offer this feature, along with several others that help you make sure you make timely payments and protect your credit.

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Pay by Phone

You can pay any amount on your Discover card by calling the Discover card payment phone number on the back of your card. When you call the number, listen for the "Make a payment" option and select that. You can make the payment using the tones on your phone, without having to speak with a human.

  • Provide the last four digits of your Social Security number.
  • Say, "Make a payment."
  • Say the amount you want to pay.
  • Confirm that you want to use the bank account on file (if you've set that up).
  • Choose to use another bank account. Provide the bank routing and account numbers if you use this step, and follow any other prompts.

If you want to make sure your payment went through and that you don't miss your payment deadline, ask to speak with an agent or associate. That person will take your information and process your payment.

Make a Payment Online

You can register for a Discover card online account tied to your card. You can log in 24/7 to check your balance, payment due, due date, interest rate, balance transfer offer, credit score or to make a Discover payment posting.

  • Visit www.Discover.com.
  • Click on "Register Account."
  • Follow the prompts to create an account.
  • Look for an email or text that confirms you have set up your account.

You will need to have several pieces of information available to do this. You will need your credit number, expiration date and CVV number on the back of your card. Have your street address, zip code, phone number, date of birth and Social Security number handy so you can create your account.

Once your account is set up, you can log in and click on the "Make a Payment" button under your payment due date, or click the "Payments" button on the top of the page and navigate to your desired page.

If you have set up your payment information (your bank account), follow the prompts to make your Discover payment posting. You can choose to pay your full balance, your minimum payment due or another amount.

Now that you're in your account, set up communications preferences, such as receiving notices by text or email and your statements electronically or by snail mail. Check your credit score while you're there, as well.

Use the Discover App

You can also use your smartphone to pay via the Discover app. Visit the mobile app page at Discover's website. Follow the directions to upload the app to your phone. Once the app is on your phone, follow the directions to register your card and account and set up bank payments.

Once that's done, follow the directions on the app to make a payment, which will be similar to your choices at your online account. Look toward the bottom of your screen for the "Services" and then select "Manage and Cards and Devices."

Pay by Mail

If you receive paper statements in the mail, you can use the tear-off payment stub portion of your statement and the return envelope to mail in your payment. You'll need a postage stamp. If you get your statements delivered electronically, navigate to your account and open your latest statement.

Look for the Discover card payment address on your statement. Whether you are using a paper or digital statement, you might see two addresses on it. One is the address from which statements are mailed and the other is the payment address. Make sure you use the payment address or your payment might go to the wrong location and your payment might arrive late.

Setting up Auto Pay

If you want to do more than just make a one-time payment from your online account or app, set up autopay. To set up autopay from your online account:

  • Find the "Payments" link at the top of the page and select "Automatic Payments."
  • Follow the prompts to set up automatic payments.
  • Look for an email that confirms you have set up automatic payments.

You will need your bank account information so Discover can draft payments from it. This will usually include your bank routing number and checking account number (you can find both at the bottom of one of your paper checks).

When you set up autopay, you can choose the date you want to make your payments each month. Select the due date, or a date that's one or two days before your due date if you want more of a cushion. You'll be asked to select how much you want to pay each month. You can choose to pay your entire balance each month (to avoid paying any interest), your minimum balance due or another number (for example, $100).

Follow the similar steps in your app if you want to use that method. You can also call the number on the back of your card and set up autopay with a live customer service rep. Your auto payments might not kick in for a few days, so Discover recommends paying your next statement payment due manually, then verifying that your auto payments will work from then on.

Don't Panic About Late Payments

Missed payments, which are those that don't arrive through your next payment cycle, can damage your credit score. In fact, payment history is the most important part of your credit score, making up 35 percent of your score, according to myFICO. Late payments (those that arrive late, but before your next billing cycle) are usually not reported to the credit reporting agencies by credit card companies.

You might have to pay a late fee if you make a late payment. If you haven't had more than one late payment during the past year, Discover will probably waive the fee. Call the number on the back of your card and ask to speak with a live agent. In addition to waiving your late fee, the rep can tell you if your late payment will be recorded and if it triggered an increased interest rate, as well as help you make a payment while on the phone.

All the methods you can use to pay your Discover Card.

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DISCOVER CREDIT CARDS

Discover ® has no annual fee on every single card

Cash Back Credit Cards: Discover it ® Cash Back, Gas & Restaurant Card, NHL ® Discover it ®

Travel Credit Card: Discover it ® Miles

Student Credit Cards: Discover it Student ® Cash Back, Student Chrome Card

Secured Credit Card: Discover it ® Secured

Business Credit Card: Discover it ® Business Card

Cash Back Credit Cards
Intro purchase APR is 0% for 14 months from date of account opening then the standard purchase APR applies. Intro Balance Transfer APR is 0% for 14 months from date of first transfer, for transfers under this offer that post to your account by then the standard purchase APR applies. Standard purchase APR: 11.99% variable to 22.99% variable, based on your creditworthiness. Cash APR: 24.99% variable. Variable APRs will vary with the market based on the Prime Rate. Minimum interest charge: If you are charged interest, the charge will be no less than $.50. Cash advance fee: Either $10 or 5% of the amount of each cash advance, whichever is greater. Balance transfer fee: 3% Intro fee on balances transferred by and up to 5% fee for future balance transfers will apply. Annual Fee: None. Rates as of . We will apply payments at our discretion, including in a manner most favorable or convenient for us. Each billing period, we will generally apply amounts you pay that exceed the Minimum Payment Due to balances with higher APRs before balances with lower APRs as of the date we credit your payment.

Travel Credit Card
Intro purchase APR is 0% for 14 months from date of account opening then the standard purchase APR applies. Intro Balance Transfer APR is 10.99% for 14 months from date of first transfer, for transfers under this offer that post to your account by then the standard purchase APR applies. Standard purchase APR: 11.99% variable to 22.99% variable, based on your creditworthiness. Cash APR: 24.99% variable. Variable APRs will vary with the market based on the Prime Rate. Minimum interest charge: If you are charged interest, the charge will be no less than $.50. Cash advance fee: Either $10 or 5% of the amount of each cash advance, whichever is greater. Balance transfer fee: 3% Intro fee on balances transferred by and up to 5% fee for future balance transfers will apply. Annual Fee: None. Rates as of . We will apply payments at our discretion, including in a manner most favorable or convenient for us. Each billing period, we will generally apply amounts you pay that exceed the Minimum Payment Due to balances with higher APRs before balances with lower APRs as of the date we credit your payment.

Student Credit Cards
Intro purchase APR is 0% for 6 months from date of account opening then the standard purchase APR applies. Intro Balance Transfer APR is 10.99% for 6 months from date of first transfer, for transfers under this offer that post to your account by then the standard purchase APR applies. Standard purchase APR: 12.99% – 21.99% variable, based on your creditworthiness. Cash APR: 24.99% variable. Variable APRs will vary with the market based on the Prime Rate. Minimum interest charge: If you are charged interest, the charge will be no less than $.50. Cash advance fee: Either $10 or 5% of the amount of each cash advance, whichever is greater. Balance transfer fee: 3% Intro fee on balances transferred by and up to 5% fee for future balance transfers will apply. Annual Fee: None. Rates as of . We will apply payments at our discretion, including in a manner most favorable or convenient for us. Each billing period, we will generally apply amounts you pay that exceed the Minimum Payment Due to balances with higher APRs before balances with lower APRs as of the date we credit your payment.

Secured Credit Card
22.99% standard variable purchase APR. Intro Balance Transfer APR is 10.99% for 6 months from date of first transfer, for transfers under this offer that post to your account by then the standard purchase APR applies. Cash APR: 24.99% variable. Variable APRs will vary with the market based on the Prime Rate. Minimum interest charge: If you are charged interest, the charge will be no less than $.50. Cash advance fee: Either $10 or 5% of the amount of each cash advance, whichever is greater. Balance transfer fee: 3% Intro fee on balances transferred by and up to 5% fee for future balance transfers will apply. Annual Fee: None. Rates as of . We will apply payments at our discretion, including in a manner most favorable or convenient for us. Each billing period, we will generally apply amounts you pay that exceed the Minimum Payment Due to balances with higher APRs before balances with lower APRs as of the date we credit your payment.

Business Credit Card
Intro purchase APR is 0% for 12 months from date of account opening then the standard purchase APR applies. Standard purchase APR: 12.99% variable to 20.99% variable, based on your creditworthiness. Cash APR: 24.99% variable. Variable APRs will vary with the market based on the Prime Rate. Minimum interest charge: If you are charged interest, the charge will be no less than $.50. Cash advance fee: Either $10 or 5% of the amount of each cash advance, whichever is greater. Balance transfer fee: 5% of the amount of each transfer. Annual Fee: None. Rates as of . We will apply payments at our discretion, including in a manner most favorable or convenient for us. Each billing period, we will generally apply amounts you pay that exceed the Minimum Payment Due to balances with higher APRs before balances with lower APRs as of the date we credit your payment.

Cash Back Credit Cards
Intro purchase APR is 0% for 14 months from date of account opening then the standard purchase APR applies. Intro Balance Transfer APR is 0% for 14 months from date of first transfer, for transfers under this offer that post to your account by then the standard purchase APR applies. Standard purchase APR: 11.99% variable to 22.99% variable, based on your creditworthiness. Cash APR: 24.99% variable. Variable APRs will vary with the market based on the Prime Rate. Minimum interest charge: If you are charged interest, the charge will be no less than $.50. Cash advance fee: Either $10 or 5% of the amount of each cash advance, whichever is greater. Balance transfer fee: 3% Intro fee on balances transferred by and up to 5% fee for future balance transfers will apply. Annual Fee: None. Rates as of . We will apply payments at our discretion, including in a manner most favorable or convenient for us. Each billing period, we will generally apply amounts you pay that exceed the Minimum Payment Due to balances with higher APRs before balances with lower APRs as of the date we credit your payment.

Travel Credit Card
Intro purchase APR is 0% for 14 months from date of account opening then the standard purchase APR applies. Intro Balance Transfer APR is 10.99% for 14 months from date of first transfer, for transfers under this offer that post to your account by then the standard purchase APR applies. Standard purchase APR: 11.99% variable to 22.99% variable, based on your creditworthiness. Cash APR: 24.99% variable. Variable APRs will vary with the market based on the Prime Rate. Minimum interest charge: If you are charged interest, the charge will be no less than $.50. Cash advance fee: Either $10 or 5% of the amount of each cash advance, whichever is greater. Balance transfer fee: 3% Intro fee on balances transferred by and up to 5% fee for future balance transfers will apply. Annual Fee: None. Rates as of . We will apply payments at our discretion, including in a manner most favorable or convenient for us. Each billing period, we will generally apply amounts you pay that exceed the Minimum Payment Due to balances with higher APRs before balances with lower APRs as of the date we credit your payment.

Student Credit Cards
Intro purchase APR is 0% for 6 months from date of account opening then the standard purchase APR applies. Intro Balance Transfer APR is 10.99% for 6 months from date of first transfer, for transfers under this offer that post to your account by then the standard purchase APR applies. Standard purchase APR: 12.99% – 21.99% variable, based on your creditworthiness. Cash APR: 24.99% variable. Variable APRs will vary with the market based on the Prime Rate. Minimum interest charge: If you are charged interest, the charge will be no less than $.50. Cash advance fee: Either $10 or 5% of the amount of each cash advance, whichever is greater. Balance transfer fee: 3% Intro fee on balances transferred by and up to 5% fee for future balance transfers will apply. Annual Fee: None. Rates as of . We will apply payments at our discretion, including in a manner most favorable or convenient for us. Each billing period, we will generally apply amounts you pay that exceed the Minimum Payment Due to balances with higher APRs before balances with lower APRs as of the date we credit your payment.

Secured Credit Card
22.99% standard variable purchase APR. Intro Balance Transfer APR is 10.99% for 6 months from date of first transfer, for transfers under this offer that post to your account by then the standard purchase APR applies. Cash APR: 24.99% variable. Variable APRs will vary with the market based on the Prime Rate. Minimum interest charge: If you are charged interest, the charge will be no less than $.50. Cash advance fee: Either $10 or 5% of the amount of each cash advance, whichever is greater. Balance transfer fee: 3% Intro fee on balances transferred by and up to 5% fee for future balance transfers will apply. Annual Fee: None. Rates as of . We will apply payments at our discretion, including in a manner most favorable or convenient for us. Each billing period, we will generally apply amounts you pay that exceed the Minimum Payment Due to balances with higher APRs before balances with lower APRs as of the date we credit your payment.

Business Credit Card
Intro purchase APR is 0% for 12 months from date of account opening then the standard purchase APR applies. Standard purchase APR: 12.99% variable to 20.99% variable, based on your creditworthiness. Cash APR: 24.99% variable. Variable APRs will vary with the market based on the Prime Rate. Minimum interest charge: If you are charged interest, the charge will be no less than $.50. Cash advance fee: Either $10 or 5% of the amount of each cash advance, whichever is greater. Balance transfer fee: 5% of the amount of each transfer. Annual Fee: None. Rates as of . We will apply payments at our discretion, including in a manner most favorable or convenient for us. Each billing period, we will generally apply amounts you pay that exceed the Minimum Payment Due to balances with higher APRs before balances with lower APRs as of the date we credit your payment.

This article was co-authored by Derick Vogel. Derick Vogel is a Credit Expert and CEO of Credit Absolute, a credit counseling and educational company based in Scottsdale, Arizona. Derick has over 10 years of financial experience and specializes in consulting mortgages, loans, specializes in business credit, debt collections, financial budgeting, and student loan debt relief. He is a member of the National Association of Credit Services Organizations (NASCO) and is an Arizona Association of Mortgage Professional. He holds credit certificates from Dispute Suite in credit repair best practices and in Credit Repair Organizations Act (CROA) competency.

There are 11 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

This article has been viewed 234,534 times.

Paying off your credit card on time each month is critical for maintaining a solid credit score and preventing late fees from piling up. [1] X Expert Source

Derick Vogel
Credit Advisor & Owner, Credit Absolute Expert Interview. 26 March 2020. For Discover card users, the simplest way to make a payment is to create a user account on the Discover website. If you prefer not to put your financial information online, you can also submit a payment through the mail in the form of a check or money order.

When you pay a credit card bill, there are different ways in which your payments could be applied. If your credit card has more than one APR (Annual Percentage Rate), your payments may go towards either a balance with highest APR or lowest APR, depending on the amount of payment made and other variants.

Understanding how your payment allocation works when you make payments to your credit card could help you learn how to make adjustments to your payments, if needed, in order to bring your overall balance down.

What are the types of APR?

There are five types of APR that you may be applied on your credit card:

Introductory APR: An introductory APR is a zero or low-interest rate in effect for a predetermined length of time, after you apply and are approved for a credit card. You can learn more about how long your introductory APR period is by reading your monthly statement.

Purchase APR: This type of APR will be applied when you make a purchase on your card and do not pay the full balance before your grace period (this is usually on or before your listed payment due date).

Cash Advance APR: When you make a cash withdrawal from your line of credit, a cash advance APR will be applied, usually immediately. This type of balance usually carries a higher APR than your purchase APR.

Balance Transfer APR: A balance transfer APR will be applied when you transfer a partial or full balance from another card.

Penalty APR: This type of APR is less common amongst credit card issuers, however, it is typically applied after consecutive late or missed payments or for payments made 60 days past their listed due date. In some cases, this higher APR may be applied to current and future balances. Because of the risk of damage to your credit score, in addition to a higher interest rate, it is strongly recommended that you make on-time payments to avoid this penalty.

How do payments work on a credit card?

Payments are applied to balances as they appear on your monthly statement before being applied to new transactions. When you make a transaction with your card, you may activate a purchase APR, but there are other types of APR, such as a penalty APR, balance transfer APR (when requesting a balance transfer) or a cash advance APR. Although you may see your overall balance on your monthly statement, you’ll also find information about the APRs you currently have on your monthly statement.

What is the minimum payment?

A minimum payment is an amount you are required to pay each month by your due date in order to keep your account current. Making the minimum payment by your due date also helps you avoid any added late fees. Your minimum payment is typically between 1-5% of your current outstanding balance, and usually includes any fees and interest you may have accumulated. The specific methods your credit issuer uses to calculate your minimum payment will be outlined in your credit card’s user agreement.

What if I pay more than my minimum balance?

The Credit CARD Act of 2009 stipulates that any excess payments you make (amounts higher than your minimum payment) should be credited towards the balance with the highest APR. If there is any amount leftover, this will be applied to the balance with the second highest rate of interest. You’ll usually make more progress in bringing down your balance faster if you pay more than the minimum balance by your due date, especially if you are being charged interest.

How to make a discover card payment

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The amount you owe on your credit card may appear on your statement as one number, but when it comes to how credit card payments work, it gets murkier. Depending how you've used the card, your total debt might be split into separate balances, such as:

A purchase balance, for things you bought with the card.

A balance transfer balance, for debts moved to the card from other accounts.

A cash advance balance, for money withdrawn from ATMs with the card.

These balances may each have different interest rates. When you make a payment on an account with multiple balances, your issuer isn't going to call you and ask how you want it handled. Instead, it will distribute your payment among your balances in a way that conforms to federal law.

CREDIT CARD DEBT TOOLS AND TIPS

How do credit card payments work?

Because of rules specified in the Credit Card Act , your issuer divides your credit card payment into two parts:

The minimum payment is the portion of your balance you’re contractually obligated to pay each month. The issuer can apply the minimum to whichever balance it wants. Often, this means the minimum goes toward the lowest-interest balance, rather than your most expensive one.

The excess payment is everything you pay above the minimum. The Card Act requires issuers to apply this part of your payment to the highest-interest balance first. After that, the remainder generally must be applied to the other balances in descending order, based on the applicable annual percentage rate, according to the law.

How does paying off a credit card work in practice?

You have a card with the following balances:

$640 of balance transfers at 0% APR.

$60 of cash advances at 25% APR.

$300 of purchases at 15% APR.

Your minimum payment is $25, but you opted to pay $100 instead. Here’s how your issuer might allocate your payment:

$25, the minimum payment, might go to balance transfers, since it has the lowest APR.

$60 might go to cash advances, which has the highest APR.

$15 might go to purchases, which has the second-highest APR.

Before interest charges were added, the remaining balances would be as follows:

$615 of balance transfers at 0% APR.

$0 of cash advances at 25% APR.

$285 of purchases at 15% APR.

The exception: deferred interest offers

Most of the time, having your issuer apply your excess payment to the highest-interest balance is the most cost-effective option. But the Card Act makes an exception for deferred-interest offers , often found on store cards and medical cards . That's because leaving those "no interest if paid in full" balances for last can have expensive consequences.

Deferred interest is different from the 0% APR offers you see on bank credit cards. Here's how:

With a 0% APR card, you are not charged any interest during the 0% period. That interest is waived entirely. Once that period is up, you can be charged interest only on outstanding balances going forward.

With a deferred-interest offer, by contrast, if you have not paid off the purchase in full at the end of the interest-free period, you will be charged retroactive interest going back to the original purchase date.

Suppose you buy a $1,000 washing machine on a store card that promises no interest on that purchase if you pay it off within 12 months, and 24% APR after that. After 12 months, you’ve only paid off $500. You’ll get charged 24% APR on $1,000 originally borrowed, not the $500 left unpaid.

Now say you have multiple balances on that card — because you continued to use it at the store, making purchases that did not have deferred interest — and have been making only partial payments. In that case, avoiding retroactive interest would be almost impossible. That's because the Card Act requires your issuer to apply most of that money to your highest-interest balances, not your deferred-interest balance.

Enter the Card Act's exception for deferred interest cards. This rule stipulates that in the two billing cycles before a deferred-interest offer expires, the issuer must apply any amount paid over the minimum payment to the deferred-interest balance first. This exception makes it slightly easier to avoid retroactive interest. But it doesn't make you immune from such charges, so stay vigilant. Read your statements and make sure you're on track to pay off your balance on time.

Avoid credit card payment allocation problems

There are a few ways you can exercise more control over your credit card balances:

Designate one “debt only” card. Move any credit card debt to a 0% balance transfer credit card , if you can qualify for one, and use it as a “just for debt” card. Then, use a separate card for purchases, and pay it off in full each month to avoid interest charges. If you don’t qualify for a balance transfer card, consolidating debt into one personal loan may also be an option.

Pay as much of your bill as you can afford. This ensures that a larger portion of your payment will go toward your most expensive balances. When you pay just the minimum, it allows your issuer to direct your payments to your least expensive debt, prolonging your repayment period.

Trust, but verify. Read your credit card statements closely and make sure your payments are being applied as they should be. If you think there’s a mistake, call your issuer and address the problem as soon as possible.

About the authors: Claire Tsosie is an assigning editor for NerdWallet. Her work has been featured by Forbes, USA Today and The Associated Press. Read more

Many or all of the products here are from our partners. We may earn a commission from offers on this page. It’s how we make money. But our editorial integrity ensures our experts’ opinions aren’t influenced by compensation. Terms may apply to offers listed on this page.

How to make a discover card payment

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Your credit card doesn't have to put you on the fast track to debt. Learn about one simple method that allows you to reap all the rewards and other credit card benefits without being at risk of overspending.Image source: Getty Images

As far as payment methods are concerned, credit cards are the closest thing out there to a double-edged sword.

Used correctly, the best credit cards can be worth thousands of dollars in perks and provide you with a secure form of payment. But they also present the potential for costly debt, which is why some consumers reject credit cards entirely.

It’d be a shame to leave valuable benefits on the table just because of how credit card use can go wrong. Fortunately, there’s a better, safer way to use your credit card.

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The risks and rewards of credit cards

The dangers of credit card debt are well-documented at this point. If you spend too much using your credit card, you could end up with a large balance that takes you months or years to pay off. During that time, you’ll pay steep interest charges every month, and if the balance results in high credit utilization, then your credit score will drop like a rock.

While the obvious solution is not spending too much, that’s easier said than done. Since you don’t need to pay credit card charges right away, it’s tempting to pay for today’s purchases with tomorrow’s money. Then you end up paying a small amount of interest one month and a bit more the next. It’s often these little steps that gradually bring you deeper into debt.

Despite the possibility of debt, credit cards also have significant advantages over other payment methods:

  • Security — Since your credit card isn’t directly connected to the money in your bank account, a thief couldn’t drain your cash with your credit card number.
  • Building credit — Paying your credit card bill on-time every month is the single-best way to build excellent credit.
  • Rewards — From travel rewards cards that get you free vacations to cash-back cards with impressive earning rates, there are plenty of credit cards that can generate value every time you use them.
  • 0% intro APRs — If you need free financing for a costly purchase, you could look at cards with lengthy 0% intro APRs.

How to use your credit card like a debit card

The smartest way to use your credit card is to treat it like it’s your debit card. You only use it for a purchase if you’d be able to pay the bill with the money currently in your checking account.

That’s a good philosophy to have, but how can you apply it in the real world? There are three options to consider, depending on how strict you want to be with yourself:

  • Monitor your credit card and checking account balances to ensure you don’t spend more than you can repay.
  • Pay your credit card bill more often — instead of once a month, you could switch to once a week or even more frequently than that.
  • Use an app, such as Debitize, that automatically deducts the money from your checking account whenever you charge something to your credit card.

As you can see, each option makes it a bit more challenging to overspend. The first will work fine if you’re confident you can stick to it and you won’t make exceptions whenever you want to buy something expensive. If overspending has been a problem for you, then the latter two options are worth looking at.

Regardless of which one you choose, if you use your credit card this way, you’ll get all the good features of your credit card without paying your card issuer a cent of interest.

Making credit work for you

The method described above is ideal when you have no credit card debt and you just want to earn rewards without getting stuck in debt. Other situations could call for different approaches, but this is undoubtedly the simplest and best way to approach credit cards for the typical consumer.

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Learn about the different ways you can pay your credit card bill

June 3, 2021 | 8 min read

If you use a credit card, that means you’ll likely have a payment to make every month. And staying on top of this bill is important because it can help keep your account in good standing. It’s also a big part of building healthy credit.

Knowing when and how to pay a credit card bill can help you turn this task into a habit. Most credit card issuers let you pay by phone, through an online account or mobile app, or by mail. You might even be able to pay in person. Here’s what to know about how you pay credit card bills and why it’s so important.

Ways to Pay Your Credit Card Bill

Depending on how your credit card issuer accepts payments, you may have several options to choose from. Here are some of the common ways issuers let you pay your credit card bill:

  1. ACH transfer: Automated Clearing House (ACH) payments let you transfer funds directly from one account to another. You can make this payment in person or by calling the phone number on the back of your credit card. You’ll likely need to provide your credit card account, bank account and routing numbers.
  2. Cash: If your credit card issuer has a location nearby, you may be able to pay in person with cash.
  3. Check: If your issuer accepts this form of payment, you can drop a check off in person. Or you can follow the instructions on your credit card statement to mail a check with your credit card bill. Just remember to allow plenty of time for your payment to reach the issuer before the due date.
  4. Mobile bill pay: Some credit card issuers offer a mobile app you can use to pay your bill. You’ll just need your payment account details.
  5. Online bill pay: Sign in to your credit card account, and provide your bank account or debit card details to make a payment online.

When to Pay Your Credit Card Bill

Every credit card has a billing cycle that typically lasts about a month. At the end of the billing cycle, your credit card issuer will send you a statement that lists your account activity, the minimum payment due and a due date. And that due date will be the same date every month.

Credit card issuers are also required to give you at least 21 days between the date your statement is mailed or delivered and the date your payment is due. You’ll want to make at least the minimum payment by the due date to keep your account in good standing and to avoid penalties.

Paying your bill on time can also have a positive impact on two areas that affect your credit scores:

  • Payment history: Making on-time payments shows responsible credit card use and may help you improve your credit.
  • Credit use: Another factor that impacts your credit scores is your credit utilization ratio, which measures how much credit you’re using. Paying down your balance may help you improve your credit score because it lowers your utilization ratio. Paying off your entire balance lowers that ratio even more and can help you avoid paying credit card interest.

Every card issuer has its own reporting schedule, so it’s best to ask your issuer about its practices. If you can find out when your card issuer reports your account activity, consider making at least a minimum payment before it’s reported as late.

Strategies for Making On-Time Credit Card Payments

It can be easy to miss a credit card payment, especially if you’re juggling multiple bills every month. But paying a credit card bill by the due date helps you maintain healthy credit and keep your credit card account in good standing.

Here are three ways to help you keep up with your credit card payment due date:

  • Set up autopay. With autopay, you’ll ask your credit card issuer to automatically take money from your bank account to pay your credit card. The issuer can withdraw the minimum payment, the entire balance or a prespecified amount on a prespecified date. This can ensure your bill is paid on time—just make sure you have enough money in your bank account before the autopay goes through.
  • Set up payment alerts. Sometimes it can be tricky to predict whether money will be available for autopay on the same day each month. In these cases, you can set up text or email alerts that notify you when a payment due date is coming up. When you see the reminder, make a payment using the method that works best for you.
  • Request a due date that works for you. Some card issuers like Capital One allow you to pick your due date. This can help you streamline your payments if you have multiple credit cards and other bills. You can usually do this either by calling your card issuer or making a request online.
  • Create a budget. Based on your take-home pay and ongoing bills, it may help to figure out how much you can afford to charge to a credit card each month. Try to stick to a budget so you can pay off the balance in full and avoid interest. When you plan ahead, you’re more likely to pay your credit card bills on time.

Try to Pay Your Credit Card Bill on Time, Every Time

The most important thing to remember is to make at least the minimum payment on your credit card by the due date every month. Consistently paying your bill on time can help you maintain good credit and keep your account in good standing.

You can find the payment amount and the due date by checking your most recent billing statement or calling your credit card issuer. And to help you meet this goal, you can set up autopay, set reminders or even ask your card issuer to adjust your due date.

Learn more about Capital One’s response to COVID-19 and resources available to customers. For information about COVID-19, head over to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Government and private relief efforts vary by location and may have changed since this article was published. Consult a financial adviser or the relevant government agencies and private lenders for the most current information.

We hope you found this helpful. Our content is not intended to provide legal, investment or financial advice or to indicate that a particular Capital One product or service is available or right for you. For specific advice about your unique circumstances, consider talking with a qualified professional.