How to make a flagpole

Introduction: Build Your Own Flagpole

Show support for your country and troops by building this easy flagpole.

Step 1: Buy Hardware

All items can be bought at a major Home Improvement Store.

You will need the following items:

2 – 3/8″x10’6″ 18 Guage Top Rails for Chain Link Fencing.
(You can find these in the garden center)
1 – 1/4″ Braided Nylon Rope. (50ft)
2 – #16 Pipe Clamps
2 – 5/8″ Fast Eye Snaps
1 – 41/2″ Rope Cleat
1 – 1/2 ” Swivel Pulley
1 – Mini Solar Crackle Sphere

Step 2: Attach Hardware

Attach Swivel Pulley to top Galvanized Pole using a pipe clamp. –
Thread rope through pulley. –
Tie Eye Snap to rope using easy knot. –
Take other end of rope and attach eye snap. –
Tie the rope ends together between the Eye Snaps making one continuous circle with the rope. –

Attach Rope Cleat to bottom Galvanized Pole using pipe clamp.

Step 3: Mount Light to Top

Simply drop the Mini Solar Crackle Sphere stake into the top end of the pipe. This light is solar, turns on at night and changes colors. The best part about it is that it only costs $4.00.

Step 4: Raise Old Glory

Slide bottom pole into top pole.
Using post hole diggers, bury flag pole about 3 feet in the ground.
Raise your Flag. Tie rope off on rope cleat.
Pray for wind. Enjoy.

Build Cost – $40.00

Proudly Made In America.

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How to make a flagpole

How to make a flagpole

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17 Comments

How to make a flagpole

Question 2 years ago on Step 4

How can you add a yardarm to this?

How to make a flagpole

Question 3 years ago on Step 2

What size pole and how high

How to make a flagpole

I built the flagpole with a few very minor mods for convenience and to accommodate local soil conditions. My flag has been flying proudly on it for about six months. I’d like to add a POW/MIA flag under the American flag. Do you think the pole could handle that?

How to make a flagpole

Can you raise and lower the flag?

How to make a flagpole

How to make a flagpole

How to make a flagpole

How to make a flagpole

How to make a flagpole

This was a great lead. I modified it to fit my situation.

I have an aluminum pole mast that hung at an angle. It was always getting tangled by the prevailing winds at our house. So the answer was a vertical flagpole. I have long wanted one.

I had a 5′ piece of 1 1/2″ PVC pipe (white), and it had an angle cut on one end. In my front yard there are brick planters. In a corner area I drove the PVC pipe down until it hit something hard. (Rock, bedrock, or . )

I only used one 10′ 6″ pipe, and my aluminum mast (about 5′) fit the swedged end of the rail pipe. (LUCKY ME!)

The solar light I chose fit fine, but I added a short piece of 3/4″ Sch 20 sprinkler PVC to the upright. And I used some Locktite brand Gel super glue to make sure the fixture head stayed on and was glued to the PVC as well. The solar light is a fantastic idea, and I can’t wait for dark to bring it on.

I followed the rope instructions, but hung my pulley from a closed up “S” hook at the top of the pole

Then the flag pole was set into the 1 1/2″ PVC driven into the ground.

Worked good, and no more tangled flag!

OH, and I used bronze harness snaps like this:

I got all my needs at my local Lowe’s, but harness snaps are available at feed stores as well. I just like these type of snaps and have one on my dogs leash, too.

My 4′ X 6′ sown American Made Flag flies beautifully now in the afternoon breeze.

Thanks for this DIY home grown flag pole. And Happy Memorial Day!

I fly my American flag 24/7 because our troops are out there 24/7.

Flagpoles are the standard for displaying our nation’s flag. You can buy a flagpole from a number of different manufacturers or you can build your own. Building a flagpole is easier than you might think. This method requires very little specialized labor.

Build the flagpole

  1. Buy one 5 foot length each of 1”, 1 ¼”, and 1 ½” diameter galvanized pipe. You will also need one 1 ¼” x 1” galvanized reducing coupling, one 1 ½” x 1 ¼” reducing coupling, and one 1 ½” ips threaded flange. You can buy these materials at your local hardware store or plumbing company. As an alternative, you can purchase one 21’ length of 2” galvanized pipe but you will need to make the base proportionately larger.
  2. Screw the couplings and lengths of pipe together and screw the threaded flange on the 1 ½” pipe end.
  3. Obtain a square of ½” or ¾” mild steel plate and have it welded on the flange. Make certain the pole is centered on the steel plate.
  4. Burn or drill a ½” hole in each corner of the steel plate.
  5. Paint the steel plate with a good primer and at least one coat of galvanizing.
  6. Buy the pulley and rope assembly, known as a single pulley truck and halyard, for the top of the flagpole and have it welded in place or buy the type that is bolted in place.
  7. At this point, you can also install an ornament like an eagle on the top of the pulley truck.
  8. You can also paint the flagpole with multiple coats of exterior paint at this point, if you wish. An oil based paint will serve you best.

Building your own flagpole is fun and easy

  1. While you are waiting for the paint on the flagpole to dry, you can start on the base. Choose a location for your flagpole that is suitable and visible.
  2. Dig a square hole at least 12“ deep and several inches larger all around than your steel base.
  3. Build a square frame that projects above the ground at least 3 ½”.
  4. Buy enough cement mix to fill the hole and add water to make a concrete base.
  5. Pour the cement into the square form and trowel it off.
  6. Cut a square of ¾” plywood that is larger than the steel base.
  7. Clamp the plywood to the steel base and drill out the four corner holes.
  8. Install 4 – 3/8” x 4” or ½” x 4” quick bolts or concrete anchors in the holes in the plywood, locking them in place with nuts and washers on each side of the plywood.
  9. Press the bolts and plywood into the wet cement and level the plywood with a torpedo level.

Show your patriotism; fly our nation’s flag

  1. After the cement hardens and cures, remove the plywood.
  2. Leave the bottom nuts on each bolt the same distance from the surface of the cement.
  3. Raise the flagpole and install it over the bolts.
  4. Install washers and nuts.
  5. Plumb the flagpole in all four directions.
  6. Attach the flag.
  7. Play reveille or our national anthem while you raise your new flag.

Tips

Check with your local community building and codes division for flagpole ordinances. You can plumb your new flagpole by adjusting the top and bottom nuts on all four bolts at the base.
Learn the rules for properly displaying our nation’s flag.

Making a flag pole might seem easy to accomplish but it actually requires some hard work and dedication. In this article, we have put together 10 DIY flag pole projects that you can make for outdoor use.

After going through this article, you will have learned how to professionally build and install a flagpole using different methods.

How to make a flagpole

Table of Contents

1. DIY Flag Pole

How to make a flagpole

Buying a new and stylish flag pole might cost you more than $500 and might not be as strong as the one that you could make with your own hands and choose the right, durable materials. This flag pole cost about $130 to make, which is quite inexpensive, isn’t it?

To build this, you need galvanized pipe, PVC pipes, and pipe caps, concrete, rope, pulley, and a few other supplies. The creator started by cutting the PVC pipe first, to the required length. You need a splitter or a driving knife to make some of those cuts. The. The next step is to dig and level the ground for the pole, then mix your concrete and fill the hole where the pipe will be inserted into. The remaining work is quite technical and needs a close watch to get the right measurement for the pulley, bolts, and other items that will be introduced for the flag to be hung

2. DIY Fast Flag Pole

You can build this flag pole In 30 minutes or less. The making process is easy and quick to build. Here are a few supplies you need to begin with, you need one rope cleat, two small ratchet straps, one screw eyelet, and a nice location to hang your pole when it’s done. This project is easy and the galvanized pipe used can last a long period.

3. How To Build A Flag Pole

The creator has an old pulley from his shop, and he decided to use it, but he cut out the top to weld the other pulley system to the pole. If you have an old pulley like that you can as well use it and attach it to your pole. All the materials that were used in this guide were old unwanted pipes that were cleaned up and sprayed to look new and improved. Then, the next thing is to dig and prepare the ground for pouring concrete and mounting the pole.

4. How To Make A Flag Pole

How to make a flagpole

Here’s a quick guide that will teach you how to build this with ease. This flag pole is not the regular tall flag pole that you might be thinking of, this is a small flag pole that might just be a few meters above your head. It is also movable and portable. You’ll be using a PVC pipe for the pole, Mark a halfway point in the PVC pipe and attach your cleat. You need a good cleat kit for this process. Then, drill holes on the body and attach the cleat, continue using the kit to complete the process.

5. DIY Flag Pole PVC

How to make a flagpole

This is a super cheap flag pole that was made for just $40, it’s easy to build and durable. The $40 covers the materials excluding the flag. To make this flag pole you’ll need PVC pipe, PVC primer, nylon rope, level, step ladder, Quikrete fast-setting concrete, and much more. No serious digging is required.

6. How To Make A Garden Flag Pole

How to make a flagpole

There are several ready-to-use solutions when you want to make a garden flag pole, you can decide to buy and install or build from scratch, but whichever method you want to adopt, will cost you some money. With this guide, you will learn how to build from scratch and install at the same time. You’ll need a steel or wooden pole, 2 pipe clamps, 1 swivel pulley, 1 rope cleat, a braided nylon rope, and a few others. With just 8 simple steps your garden flag will be ready for mounting.

7. DIY Flag Pole Installation

This time-lapse video tutorial is meant to show you how to install a flag pole although, the creator gave a detailed guide on how to build it from scratch, if it already has a flag pole at home and you have attached all the necessary pulley and rope, then you need this video tutorial to show you how it’s done.

8. How To Make A Collapsible Flag Pole

Here’s a step-by-step guide on how to build a collapsible flag pole. You need a PVC pole, PVC couplings, PVC cap slips, rotating flag mounting rings, and an everbilt portable clotheslines. All these materials cost about $13. The first step begins with cutting the PVC pole, drilling holes, spray painting the PVC pipes, and adding a fastener to make it strong, and then mounting it on the ground. The pole can easily be collapsed and moved to another location, making this the ideal flag pole for anyone.

9. DIY Flag Pole Mount

This guide teaches you how to mount a flag pole. This means you must have gotten the necessary tools and materials for the project and need help mounting on the back of a pickup truck. Yeah, a truck this time around, not the ground. So, if you have a truck and you like to have your country’s flag flying at the back, this guide has got you covered. The materials you need to mount this will cost about $15 and within 15 minutes you’ll be done.

10. How To Make A PVC Flag Pole

How to make a flagpole

This is not your regular flag pole that stands erect. This guide offers a new design and concept that you will love if you try it out. You will be making the pole out of PVC pipes. You need PVC pipe elbow connectors, ‘T’ connectors, PVC coupling, 2-foot piece PVC pipe, spray paint poster board, PVC cement, and sand.

The pipes are easy to connect, so start with making the flag. You can print something or create any design you want by yourself. Once you’re done with the flag, you’ll attend to the PVC pipes, setting up the base with several PVC elbow connectors. The PVC cement will be used for the base construction to make it firm. The process is quick and easy.

Flagpoles are the standard for displaying our nation’s flag. You can buy a flagpole from a number of different manufacturers or you can build your own. Building a flagpole is easier than you might think. This method requires very little specialized labor.

Build the flagpole

  1. Buy one 5 foot length each of 1”, 1 ¼”, and 1 ½” diameter galvanized pipe. You will also need one 1 ¼” x 1” galvanized reducing coupling, one 1 ½” x 1 ¼” reducing coupling, and one 1 ½” ips threaded flange. You can buy these materials at your local hardware store or plumbing company. As an alternative, you can purchase one 21’ length of 2” galvanized pipe but you will need to make the base proportionately larger.
  2. Screw the couplings and lengths of pipe together and screw the threaded flange on the 1 ½” pipe end.
  3. Obtain a square of ½” or ¾” mild steel plate and have it welded on the flange. Make certain the pole is centered on the steel plate.
  4. Burn or drill a ½” hole in each corner of the steel plate.
  5. Paint the steel plate with a good primer and at least one coat of galvanizing.
  6. Buy the pulley and rope assembly, known as a single pulley truck and halyard, for the top of the flagpole and have it welded in place or buy the type that is bolted in place.
  7. At this point, you can also install an ornament like an eagle on the top of the pulley truck.
  8. You can also paint the flagpole with multiple coats of exterior paint at this point, if you wish. An oil based paint will serve you best.

Building your own flagpole is fun and easy

  1. While you are waiting for the paint on the flagpole to dry, you can start on the base. Choose a location for your flagpole that is suitable and visible.
  2. Dig a square hole at least 12“ deep and several inches larger all around than your steel base.
  3. Build a square frame that projects above the ground at least 3 ½”.
  4. Buy enough cement mix to fill the hole and add water to make a concrete base.
  5. Pour the cement into the square form and trowel it off.
  6. Cut a square of ¾” plywood that is larger than the steel base.
  7. Clamp the plywood to the steel base and drill out the four corner holes.
  8. Install 4 – 3/8” x 4” or ½” x 4” quick bolts or concrete anchors in the holes in the plywood, locking them in place with nuts and washers on each side of the plywood.
  9. Press the bolts and plywood into the wet cement and level the plywood with a torpedo level.

Show your patriotism; fly our nation’s flag

  1. After the cement hardens and cures, remove the plywood.
  2. Leave the bottom nuts on each bolt the same distance from the surface of the cement.
  3. Raise the flagpole and install it over the bolts.
  4. Install washers and nuts.
  5. Plumb the flagpole in all four directions.
  6. Attach the flag.
  7. Play reveille or our national anthem while you raise your new flag.

Tips

Check with your local community building and codes division for flagpole ordinances. You can plumb your new flagpole by adjusting the top and bottom nuts on all four bolts at the base.
Learn the rules for properly displaying our nation’s flag.

How to make a flagpole

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How to make a flagpole

Anyone out there done this? I think I’ve gotten the mechanics of the process down ok, but am still wondering about the wood to us. As I remember, Northern Spruce is usually used for the masts on sailboats, so that would work, except that 30 foot lengths of Spruce are not usually available to me at a price anyone that doesn’t own a sailboat could afford. I’ve laminated lots of wood over the years and would consider that approach. Popular is easily available, long grained and dense, but withstands weather poorly. I plan to lay down several coats of the best epoxie based paint that I can buy, but the strength and resistance of the wood underneith is of great import.

Replies

Heres Norms pole.

How to make a flagpole

I’ve watched a neighbour build a laminated mast; really neat. He built up clear cedar around a styrofoam core and then made it round in his driveway by suspending it at each end with a 6″ spike riding in a notch in a sawhorse and his daughter turned it slowly by hand while he used a belt-sander.

DW says he used a draw-knife to rough it round first – I must have missed that part.

The Unionville Woodwright

Edited 5/17/2003 6:22:16 PM ET by Phill Giles

How to make a flagpole

Personally, I just selected the height I wanted, 40 feet, from the selection of 20- to 80-foot spruce trees and trimmed the branches off. The downside is I can’t pivot it down like the man-made ones for service.

I like the foam core idea. Especially on the top part. Leaving the bottom part solid would help the balancing about the pivot point. And I’d leave a few feet around that pivot point solid wood as well.

Take a good look at real flagpoles for dimensions and ratios. It is definitely possible to have one whose strength is fine but looks too stout or too skinny. (I learned that while disguising industrial dischrage stacks as flagpoles in California). A flagpole manfacturer’s website probably has top and bottom diameters for different heights all spelled out already.

How to make a flagpole

IMHO, if you look for flagpole literature, you’ll get schlock – go to the library (or internet) and lookup ship-building: how to build spars, booms, and masts..

The Unionville Woodwright

A place in New England has been making them out of doug fir for years. No laminations, just solid stock. Planers and drawknives and sanding to get the stock round and tapered.

Another makes them out of solid cedar snags taken out of the woods.

A coat of epoxy, then three coats of marine white paint.

For a wood pole, a hinged base is a neccessity.

Anyhoows, here’s a page from Architechtural Graphic Standards. Some info on sizing the pole, entasis, size of flag to size of pole, etc. Couldn’t make the file too small due to the fine print.

You can purchase flagpole hardware to make your own flagpole and to replace worn parts or to give your existing flagpole a whole new look. We have quality parts available for you to choose from in a variety of price ranges.

How to Choose the Right Hardware for Your Flagpole

The hardware that you need will depend on the type of flagpole that you have. Internal halyard flagpoles have some different parts than external halyard poles do. External halyard poles are those that have the mechanisms for raising and lowering the flag on the outside of the pole, while internal halyard poles have the mechanisms on the inside. In addition, some of the hardware for different types of poles, such as fiberglass and aluminum, will also be different.

Before purchasing any hardware or decorations, be sure to click on the link for your type of flagpole to ensure that you are purchasing parts that will fit your needs.

Decorative Attachments

Decorative attachments are mounted on the top of the flagpole.

Balls are available from 3 to 12 inches in a variety of spindle threading sizes. These balls are silver satin or gold anodized in color and are made of spun cast aluminum. Whichever you choose, the ball will give your flagpole a nice traditional look.

Eagles are designed to replace the traditional ball on top of your flagpole. These attachments feature an eagle taking off in flight from the top of a round ball and are a very decorative addition for your flagpole. Our eagles are made of cast aluminum and can be purchased in 12 or 24 inch sizes, and gold anodized or natural painted eagle colors.

Hardware

The hardware listed below is common to both internal and external halyard flagpoles.

Truck

The truck is the pulley device that is placed over the top of the pole that the halyard threads through. You will need to purchase the diameter that fits your particular flagpole.

Halyards and Halyard Covers

Halyards are the ropes that are used to raise and lower the flag. The halyards that are used on flagpoles are generally made of either multi-braided nylon, nylon wire cored or stainless steel aircraft cable. As a general rule, the length of your halyard should be twice the height of your flagpole. For example, if your flagpole is 30 feet tall, you will need 60 feet of halyard.

Snaps and Covers

Snaps are connected to the halyard and used to attach your flag. We carry nylon snaps, solid brass, rubber coated, nickel plated zinc and chrome plated swivel snaps as well as stainless steel spring clips in a variety of sizes to suit your needs.

Snap covers are designed to fit over the flag snap. The covers help reduce the noise made from metal snaps clanging against the flagpole when it is windy and help protect the pole’s finish. Our covers are available in gray or brown.

Cleats

Cleats are metal devices that are attached to the flagpole and used to tie off the ends of the halyard. They are available in a variety of styles so that you can choose the type that will match your flagpole. Cleat covers with locks are also available to help protect against theft of your flag.

Flash Collars

Flash collars rest around the bottom of the flagpole and cover your foundation sleeve. The inside diameter of the flash collar must match the diameter of the butt, or bottom, of your flagpole. These are used to help with water runoff and to give your flagpole a finished look.

Foundation Sleeves

Foundation sleeves are made of galvanized steel or PVC. The sleeve is designed to be installed in the ground and used to hold the base of the flagpole. The size that you need will depend on the butt size of your pole.

We have all the hardware that you will need to make your own flagpole or replace parts on your existing flagpole. If we do not have the particular item that you are looking for, we will be happy to find it for you. Our experienced flagpole staff is standing by to help you with all of your flagpole needs.

The flagpole has taken on many forms, from a simple de-branched tree to ornate metal piping with elaborate scrollwork. You can make your own flagpole with materials available at your local home improvement center.

Step 1 – Measure the Bucket Height

Measure the bucket height with the tape measure. Mark the same height up from the bottom of the PVC pipe.

Step 2 – Wrap the Pipe

Wrap the bottom of the PVC pipe up to the mark with plastic wrap. Secure the plastic wrap with tape. Cover the wrap with petroleum jelly; make sure you cover the whole surface area of the plastic wrap. You must cover all the plastic so you can easily pull the pole out from the cement.

Step 3 – Mix the Cement

Follow the manufacturer’s directions to mix the concrete cement. Once you have thoroughly mixed it, fill the 5-gallon bucket with 2 inches of concrete. Let it sit for a short time, then place the plastic-wrapped end of the PVC pipe into the 2-inch layer of concrete. Use the level to make sure the pipe stands straight when you place it in the concrete.

Step 4 – Pour in More

While you hold the PVC pipe straight, get a helper to pour in more quick-drying concrete about halfway up. Do not fill the bucket completely with concrete because it will become too heavy for you to easily move. The concrete will dry quickly, so hold the pole straight until it can stand on its own. Make sure the pole is level before the concrete hardens too much to allow the pole to move.

Step 5 – Allow Drying Time

Let the concrete dry overnight to make sure it hardens properly. Remove the PVC pipe from the concrete. It will come out easily if you applied the petroleum jelly properly. You may decorate or paint the flagpole to give it a more personal look. Allow adequate drying time before you replace the pole in the cement.

Step 6 – Attach the Rope Cleat

You should position the rope cleat about halfway up the flagpole. Drill pilot holes before you attach the cleat with screws. Make sure the holes are set evenly so the cleat sits balanced.

Step 7 – Place Wood Insert

Place the wood insert inside the PVC pipe so it sits flush with the opening at the top. Attach the pulley to the wood insert using some heavy-duty eye screws.

Step 8 – Thread the Rope

Once you have attached the pulley firmly, thread the flag rope through it and attach the flag hooks. You are now ready to locate the flagpole in your yard and fly your flag proudly. You may need to use a hand truck to move your flagpole to your selected location.

How to make a flagpole

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Things You Will Need

4 plastic washers

2 permanent plastic zip ties

2 unfurl sleeves

2 reusable plastic zip ties

Securing your flag to a flag pole seems simple, but you need to consider the likelihood that wind will cause your flag to get tangled around the pole. That’s why it is important to install a system that will prevent tangling. Installing an unfurl sleeve can keep your flag flapping high. The sleeves rotate your flag around the pole when the wind blows.

Slide a plastic washer onto the flagpole. Push it until it stops immediately below the top.

Place an unfurl sleeve onto your flagpole. Push it until it’s snug against your plastic washer.

Slide another plastic washer to the top until it’s snug against the unfurl sleeve.

Secure the second plastic washer into place with a permanent zip tie. Tighten the zip tie with pliers. Trim the excess zip tie with scissors.

Thread a reusable plastic zip tie into the flag’s grommet and then through your sleeve loop. Tighten the zip tie and cut off the excess. This will attach your flag’s top to the unfurl sleeve.

Pull down on the flag to find out where you need to install the second unfurl sleeve.

Repeat Steps 1 through 5, positioning the items to where the bottom of the flag will touch the pole. Secure the bottom of the flag to the unfurl sleeve with your second plastic zip tie. Cut the end of the zip tie to size.

Phillip Woolgar has been a reporter since 2008 in communities throughout western Canada. His work has appeared in Canadian national publications such as the “Globe and Mail” and the “Vancouver Sun.” In 2009, he received second-place recognition in the Alberta Weekly Newspaper Association’s Excellence in Arts and Culture writing category. Woolgar graduated from the Langara College Journalism Diploma program in 2008.