How to make blancmange

Our easy blancmange uses only a handful of thrifty ingredients. This retro, milky dessert is infused with lemon and can be topped with juicy fresh berries.

Gluten-free

Nutrition: per serving

Highlight Nutrient Unit
kcal 274
low in fat 6 g
saturates 3 g
carbs 48 g
sugars 44 g
fibre 0.2 g
protein 7 g
salt 0.18 g

Ingredients

  • vegetable oil , for the mould
  • 10 sheets gelatine
  • 40g cornflour
  • 1.2l whole milk
  • 4 large lemons , zest peeled
  • 300g caster sugar
  • 150g mixed fresh berries , to serve (optional)

Method

  • STEP 1

Oil a 1.2-1.5 litre jelly mould, then set aside. Soak the gelatine in cold water following pack instructions. Mix together the cornflour with 6 tbsp of the milk and pour into a saucepan. Add the remaining milk, lemon peel and sugar, then bring to a boil. Lower to a medium-low heat and whisk continuously until thickened enough to coat the back of a spoon (around 8-10 mins).

Squeeze any excess water out of the gelatine, then stir into the warm milk mixture to dissolve. Set aside to cool down for 5 mins. Discard the lemon peel, pour the mixture into the prepared jelly mould and put in the fridge to set overnight.

When ready to serve, bring a kettle of water to the boil and pour into a large heatproof bowl. Dip the mould in the water, holding it there for 1 min. Turn the blancmange out onto a serving plate, and top with a handful of fresh berries, if you like.

Prue Leith

Based on a retro classic, this blancmange is a far cry from its wobbly 1970s’ reputation – it’s a light and creamy raspberry and almond dessert, here served with buttery langues de chat biscuits.

  • Ingredients
  • Method

Ingredients

For the blancmange:

8 gelatine leaves

50ml raspberry liqueur

300ml whole milk

150g caster sugar

40g ground almonds

1 tsp almond extract

450ml double cream

crystallised rose petals, to decorate

For the langues de chat:

40g unsalted butter, softened

40g icing sugar

¼ tsp almond extract

1 large egg white

40g plain flour

150g good-quality white chocolate, melted

green cocoa butter

Equipment

You will also need:

1.4-litre ring or jelly mould

medium piping bag

9mm round nozzle

baking sheet lined with baking paper

small disposable piping bag

medium star nozzle

Buy the book

How to make blancmange

This is a recipe from The Great British Bake Off: Get Baking for Friends and Family. For more like it, buy the book.

Method

Step 1
Soak the gelatine leaves in a small bowl of chilled water for 5 minutes.

Step 2
Tip the raspberries into the bowl of a food processor and blitz to a fine purée. Pass through a sieve into a clean bowl, discarding the pips, then stir in the raspberry liqueur.

Step 3
Mix the cornflour with a little of the milk in a medium pan. Add the remaining milk, along with the sugar and ground almonds. Bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer gently for 3–5 minutes, to thicken. Remove the pan from the heat.

Step 4
Squeeze out any excess water from the gelatine leaves, then add them to the pan, stirring continuously until dissolved. Add the almond extract.

Step 5
Stir in 300ml of the double cream and all the raspberry purée, combine thoroughly, then pour into the mould. Leave to set for at least 6 hours, preferably overnight.

Step 6
To make the langues de chat, beat the butter and icing sugar until pale and smooth. Stir in the almond extract. Whisk the egg white with a fork to break it up, then gradually beat it into the mixture.

Step 7
Sift the flour with the salt over the top of the mixture, then fold in. Place the mixture into a piping bag fitted with a 9mm round nozzle. Pipe 12 fingers, each 8cm long, onto the baking sheet, leaving a 3.5cm space between each biscuit.

Step 8
Tap the baking sheet on the underside to release any air bubbles in the dough, then chill for 15 minutes, until the dough is firm to the touch. Heat the oven to 180°C/160°C fan/350°F/Gas 4.

Step 9
Bake the biscuits for 8–10 minutes, or until golden brown around the edges and pale in the middle. Remove from the oven and leave to cool on the baking sheet for 2 minutes before transferring to a wire rack to cool completely.

Step 10
Spoon about 50g of the melted white chocolate into a small disposable piping bag and set aside.

Step 11
Gently melt the green cocoa butter in the microwave or by placing it in a bowl stood in a jug of hot water. Add a small amount of green cocoa butter to the remaining melted chocolate to colour it mint green.

Step 12
Dip 1 cooled langue de chat into the chocolate, lengthways on the diagonal. Allow the excess to run off, then place on a sheet of baking paper to set. Repeat with the remaining biscuits, until all 12 biscuits are half-coated in chocolate.

Step 13
Snip the end of the piping bag and drizzle the white chocolate in lines from side to side across the langues de chat. Leave to set.

Step 14
To serve, lightly whip the remaining 150ml of cream to soft peaks, then spoon into a medium piping bag fitted with a medium star nozzle.

Step 15
Remove the mould from the fridge and quickly dip it into a bowl of hot water to loosen the blancmange. Invert the mould onto a serving plate to turn out the blancmange.

Step 16
Pipe the cream around the base of the blancmange, then decorate with crystallised rose petals. Serve immediately with the langues de chat on the side.

How to make blancmange

“And for dessert, we’ll be having blancmange.

Just imagine the “oohs” from your guests! Little do they know that while blancmange may have a fancy French name, it’s actually a simple, no-special-equipment, 4-ingredient recipe that’s just as easy to whip up for a fancy dinner party as it is an afterschool snack!

In fact, when you translate it to English, it sounds a lot less fancy. Blancmange means “white eating,” which is fitting since it is white. However, you can dress it up with some delicious fresh, seasonal fruits!

If you’ve never had blancmange before, you could compare it to a panna cotta . It’s thick and smooth like a custard, but it holds its structure. This delicious blancmange has a beautiful subtle vanilla flavor, and it comes together in no time. The toughest part is waiting for this delicious treat to chill!

This recipe is part of my Bold Baking Worldwide series. You should try the last three recipes, Portuguese Custard Tarts, Maamoul, and Bananas Foster, too!

How to make blancmange

What Is Blancmange?

Blancmange is a subtle dessert that is custard-like in texture, lightly flavored with vanilla, and either eaten alone or topped with berries. And can you believe you can make it with just some milk, cornstarch, sugar, and vanilla?

This humble dish can be traced all the way back to the Middle Ages. Back then, chicken was added to milk, sugar, and rice, and even though it has a French name, it more likely came into existence when traders from Arabic areas gave rice to Europeans. There are similar dishes in Iran, Spain, England, and France.

The oldest recipe that can be found is written in Danish, which may have been translated from a German cookbook.

You can see the confusion.

In the 17th century, however, chicken and other meats were taken out of the recipe, and by the 19th century, blancmange became the dessert we know today.

What You Need To Make Blancmange

  • Measuring cups and spoons
  • Six small teacups
  • Mixing bowls
  • Saucepan

How To Make Blancmange

This seemingly fancy dessert is simply delicious and simply easy to make! Here is how you make blancmange:

  1. Place 6 small teacups on a tray and set them aside. These will be the molds for your blancmange.
  2. Whisk 1 cup (8oz/225ml) milk with the cornstarch in a small bowl to form a slurry. Then, whisk in the sugar and vanilla paste or extract. Set aside.
  3. In a saucepan, heat the remaining 3½ cups (28oz/790ml) of milk over medium-low heat until it starts to steam.
  4. Once it starts steaming, reduce the heat to low and whisk the cornstarch mixture into the warm milk. Continue to heat while stirring constantly until it thickens and is just under boiling. This will take around 5-7 minutes.
  5. Divide the mixture evenly into your teacups and let them cool on the counter for an hour.
  6. Once cool, refrigerate the blancmange for at least 4 hours until it is cold and set.
  7. Serve with the fruit in the teacups or carefully unmold the blancmange onto plates by dipping the cup in hot water and then running a thin knife, carefully, around the rim.

How to make blancmange

Gemma’s Pro Chef Tips For Making Blancmange

  • Don’t skip making the slurry—otherwise, you make end up with an uneven mix of cornstarch, and you’ll end up with lumpy blancmange.
  • Serve this with macerated berries: mix 4 cups (20oz/568g) fresh or frozen berries (sliced if large) with ½ cup (4oz/115g) granulated sugar. Let sit on the counter for about 45 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the berries have released some liquid and a sweet sauce is formed.
  • You can make a chocolate blancmange as well! Whisk 2 tablespoons of cocoa powder and 2/3 cup finely chopped dark chocolate into your slurry and proceed as directed!
  • You can make one large blancmange instead of six small individual blancmanges if you prefer. Simply pour it into a mold or pan of your choice and let set.
  • If this becomes a favorite, you can find blancmange molds online and use them instead of teacups!

How Do I Store Blancmange?

You can store any leftover blancmange in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Be sure to cover it well!

Make More Fine Desserts

  • Homemade Baklava
  • Blueberry & Lemon Curd Bread Pudding
  • Authentic Irish Crumble

And don’t forget to buy my Bigger Bolder Baking cookbook for more desserts!

Full (and printable) recipe below the video!

How to make blancmange

There is an old saying that Blancmange should be wobbly but not as rubbery as a rubber ball. I recently made a hundred-year-old recipe for Chocolate Blancmange, and using the criteria in the old saying, it was excellent. The Blancmange was rich and decadent, and trembled just a little.

Even though Blancmange is an old dessert, it was new to me; and this was the first time that I ever made this lovely molded dessert.

This recipe is a keeper. As my husband finished the Blancmange, he asked, “When are you going to make this again.?”

The old recipe was part of an advertisement for Minute Tapioca. (Yes, Minute Tapioca as been around for more than a hundred years).

Here’s the original recipe:

When I saw the illustration for the Blancmange, I realized that I actually owned some old dessert plates that once belonged to my grandmother that looked very similar to the ones in the picture. I hadn’t seen the plates in years, but I pulled a chair over to my highest kitchen cupboard, and climbed up. A few minutes later I’d found the plates. They weren’t identical to the ones in the drawing, but I had a lot of fun trying to semi-replicate the old picture.

The old recipe called this dessert “blanc mange.” I think that today, the two words are generally combined into one (blancmange), so that is the way that I’ve spelled it.

How to make blancmange Source: Ladies Home Journal (May, 1916)

Here’s the recipe updated for modern cooks:

Chocolate Blancmange

  • Servings: 5 – 6
  • Time: 25 minutes active prep time
  • Difficulty: moderate
  • Print

1/2 cup minute tapioca

1/8 teaspoon salt

1 teaspoon vanilla

whipped cream, optional

In a medium saucepan stir together the tapioca, sugar, cocoa, and salt. While stirring, slowly add the milk. Using medium heat, and while stirring constantly, bring to a boil. Reduce heat so that there is a slow rolling boil. Cook for an additional 5 minutes while stirring constantly. Be sure to stir to the very bottom of the pan because this mixture will easily burn. Remove from heat and stir in the vanilla.

Pour into individual molds. Custard cups work well as molds. Refrigerate for at least 3 hours.

To serve, set the molded dessert in a pan of hot water for a few seconds; then run a table knife around the edge of the mold to loosen and turn upside down on serving plate to unmold.

If desired, serve with whipped cream.

To make homemade whipped cream, Put 1 cup whipping cream in a mixing bowl. Add 2 tablespoons confectioner’s sugar. Whip until there are stiff peaks.

Cook’s note: I did not make the cocoa (hot chocolate) prior to making this recipe. It seemed unnecessary to use a two-step process. Instead, I found a recipe for hot chocolate on a can of cocoa. I combined the dry ingredients in that recipe with the dry ingredients called for in the hundred-year-old Blancmange recipe. I then stirred in three cups of milk. This streamlined process worked just fine.

How to make blancmange

makes: 8
Skill: easy
Cost: cheap
Prep: 10 min

Nutrition per portion

This delicious dessert recipe was originally featured in a 1970 issue of Woman’s Weekly – they’ve updated it to make it even tastier

Ingredients

  • 90g (3oz) cornflour
  • Rind and juice of 3 oranges
  • 250g (8oz) caster sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • Juice of 1 lemon
  • 1 orange, segmented, or mandarin oranges, to decorate
  • 6-8 small jelly moulds or 1.25 litre (2 pint) mould, lightly oiled

Method

Put the cornflour into a large bowl and blend in about 100ml (3½fl oz) water taken from 900ml (1½ pints). Put the rest of the water in a pan. Add the rind from the oranges and the sugar. Warm it gently and when the sugar has dissolved, bring to the boil and pour the liquid into the cornflour mixture, stirring all the time.

Beat in the eggs, lemon and orange juices. Mix well and pour it all back into the pan. Bring the mixture to the boil and cook for a minute. Pour into moulds and leave to set.

Dip the moulds in hot water and turn out on to serving plates. Decorate with orange segments or mandarin oranges.

Top tip for making Orange blancmange

This recipe was included in a feature called ‘Spring-cleaner cook.’ They said: ‘Families still need feeding even when mum is otherwise engaged with household chores.’

This Blancmange is a light and creamy dessert that can be served on its own or with various toppings, including fresh berries, brown sugar sauce, or cinnamon. I make this recipe every time I need an impressive and quick dessert!

How to make blancmange

My family loves mini desserts for parties. Some of our favorites include Chocolate Pudding, Mango Panna Cotta, and this delicious and gluten-free Blancmange.

Creamy, rich blancmange can be prepared ahead of time and served as an elegant dessert any time of the year. Flavors such as strawberry, raspberry, and chocolate give this classic dessert a modern and delicious twist.

Table of Contents

What is Blancmange?

Blancmange is a sweet and flavored dessert similar to panna cotta. It’s usually made with milk and starchy or gelatinous ingredients. Traditionally it has a white color and served cold.

How to make blancmange

Ingredients You’ll Need

  • Cornflour
  • Sugar
  • Salt
  • Vanilla Extract
  • Milk
  • Cooking Spray

How to Make Blancmange

  1. Add milk, sugar, salt, and vanilla to a saucepan over medium heat. Bring it to a boil, and remove it from heat, and set aside.
  2. Add cornflour to a medium bowl. Then gradually add about 1 cup of the milk mixture. Mix until thoroughly combined.
  3. Add the flour mixture back to the remaining milk mixture in the saucepan over low-medium heat.
  4. Stir occasionally until the mixture has thickened. Remove from heat. Let it cool down.
  5. Spray the mold with cooking spray, and wipe with paper towels.
  6. Pour the mixture into the mold.
  7. Cover with plastic wrap. Refrigerate until firm for about 6 hours or overnight. Serve and enjoy!

How to make blancmange

Tips for the Perfect Blancmange

  • Spray the mold with cooking spray for easy unmolding.
  • Use the correct ratio between cornflour and milk.
  • Allow enough time to chill before unmolding: Letting the blancmange cool before unmolding will help the dessert to set and hold its shape before serving.

Can I Make It Ahead of Time?

Blancmange can be prepared ahead of time and stored in the fridge for a couple of days.

Toppings for Blancmange

You can add berry sauce or fresh berries to this dessert and take it to a new level. Below are some of my favorite options.

  • Berries such as raspberries, blueberries, and strawberries
  • Strawberry Glaze
  • Shaved Chocolate
  • Whipped Cream
  • Fruit sauce such as peach compote

If You Like This Recipe Try These Out

Welcome to Jiggle All The Way , The Takeout’s holiday celebration of Jell-O, gelatin, and all things wiggly. We’ll be releasing new feature stories and original holiday recipes every day this week, and each of them will have a little bit of wobble.

When it comes to wiggly desserts, you should look no further than Regency England, when gelled things were de rigueur and any scullery maid worth her salt was practiced in the art of boiling calves’ feet. Luckily for us, we are blessed with packets of gelatin that require no such machinations, and thus we can easily bring back the magic that is blancmange.

For most of us, this oddly named dessert is something we have only heard referenced as a horrible nursery food or lunch punishment imposed on uniformed British school children. Paul Hollywood shudders when he thinks of blancmange shivering on a plate during his formative years. But if you have never had a decent one, you should. A lightly gelled mold of fruit and cream bolstered with almond is actually a perfect delight, and well worth making.

Many recipes call for unflavored gelatin and rely solely upon fresh fruit puree to flavor them, but I am here to say that Jell-O and frozen fruit are the way to go. The flavored Jell-O amps up the flavor in the frozen fruit, but the fruit helps prevent it from tasting overly artificially flavored. The texture is almost mousse-like, bolstered by the almond meal to a dense velvet that is a deep pleasure to eat. If you don’t like raspberries—which are traditional—you can use other Jell-O and frozen fruit combos: strawberry, blueberry, blackberry, peach, and mango all work well. Avoid citrus flavors or pineapple, as the acid will impact gelling and fight with the dairy.

How to make blancmange

“And for dessert, we’ll be having blancmange.

Just imagine the “oohs” from your guests! Little do they know that while blancmange may have a fancy French name, it’s actually a simple, no-special-equipment, 4-ingredient recipe that’s just as easy to whip up for a fancy dinner party as it is an afterschool snack!

In fact, when you translate it to English, it sounds a lot less fancy. Blancmange means “white eating,” which is fitting since it is white. However, you can dress it up with some delicious fresh, seasonal fruits!

If you’ve never had blancmange before, you could compare it to a panna cotta . It’s thick and smooth like a custard, but it holds its structure. This delicious blancmange has a beautiful subtle vanilla flavor, and it comes together in no time. The toughest part is waiting for this delicious treat to chill!

This recipe is part of my Bold Baking Worldwide series. You should try the last three recipes, Portuguese Custard Tarts, Maamoul, and Bananas Foster, too!

How to make blancmange

What Is Blancmange?

Blancmange is a subtle dessert that is custard-like in texture, lightly flavored with vanilla, and either eaten alone or topped with berries. And can you believe you can make it with just some milk, cornstarch, sugar, and vanilla?

This humble dish can be traced all the way back to the Middle Ages. Back then, chicken was added to milk, sugar, and rice, and even though it has a French name, it more likely came into existence when traders from Arabic areas gave rice to Europeans. There are similar dishes in Iran, Spain, England, and France.

The oldest recipe that can be found is written in Danish, which may have been translated from a German cookbook.

You can see the confusion.

In the 17th century, however, chicken and other meats were taken out of the recipe, and by the 19th century, blancmange became the dessert we know today.

What You Need To Make Blancmange

How To Make Blancmange

This seemingly fancy dessert is simply delicious and simply easy to make! Here is how you make blancmange:

  1. Place 6 small teacups on a tray and set them aside. These will be the molds for your blancmange.
  2. Whisk 1 cup (8oz/225ml) milk with the cornstarch in a small bowl to form a slurry. Then, whisk in the sugar and vanilla paste or extract. Set aside.
  3. In a saucepan, heat the remaining 3½ cups (28oz/790ml) of milk over medium-low heat until it starts to steam.
  4. Once it starts steaming, reduce the heat to low and whisk the cornstarch mixture into the warm milk. Continue to heat while stirring constantly until it thickens and is just under boiling. This will take around 5-7 minutes.
  5. Divide the mixture evenly into your teacups and let them cool on the counter for an hour.
  6. Once cool, refrigerate the blancmange for at least 4 hours until it is cold and set.
  7. Serve with the fruit in the teacups or carefully unmold the blancmange onto plates by dipping the cup in hot water and then running a thin knife, carefully, around the rim.

How to make blancmange

Gemma’s Pro Chef Tips For Making Blancmange

  • Don’t skip making the slurry—otherwise, you make end up with an uneven mix of cornstarch, and you’ll end up with lumpy blancmange.
  • Serve this with macerated berries: mix 4 cups (20oz/568g) fresh or frozen berries (sliced if large) with ½ cup (4oz/115g) granulated sugar. Let sit on the counter for about 45 minutes, stirring occasionally, until the berries have released some liquid and a sweet sauce is formed.
  • You can make a chocolate blancmange as well! Whisk 2 tablespoons of cocoa powder and 2/3 cup finely chopped dark chocolate into your slurry and proceed as directed!
  • You can make one large blancmange instead of six small individual blancmanges if you prefer. Simply pour it into a mold or pan of your choice and let set.
  • If this becomes a favorite, you can find blancmange molds online and use them instead of teacups!

How Do I Store Blancmange?

You can store any leftover blancmange in the refrigerator for up to 3 days. Be sure to cover it well!

Make More Fine Desserts

And don’t forget to buy my Bigger Bolder Baking cookbook for more desserts!

Full (and printable) recipe below the video!