How to pass ap spanish

How to pass ap spanish

Gearing up for the AP Spanish exam? Check out these 13 helpful tips from tutor Jason N. to increase your confidence…

Spanish continues to prevail as the second language of the United States. It is also the most frequently studied second language in high schools, colleges, and graduate schools. If you are preparing for the AP Spanish Language and Culture Exam, it probably means that your Spanish is already strong, and you are on track to becoming fluent. Congratulations!

This AP Spanish test is designed to measure how well you communicate with others in Spanish, how well you can present, and how well you can interpret (and respond to) what you read and hear. This includes your ability to think critically, your overall fluency, and how accurate your grammar is, especially your ability to form coherent sentences. You should pass if you can comprehend Spanish close to how a native speaker would in many different contexts, most of which come from various Spanish-speaking milieu. The exam also gauges your cultural knowledge of Spanish-speaking countries and peoples.

If you’re feeling overwhelmed, bear with me. It may sound daunting, but you can do it! Similar to any standardized or AP test, the key is anxiety management and preparing well in advance. Here are 13 tips that will help you prepare for and defeat the AP Spanish exam:

  1. Get a Spanish tutor! There are tons of study booklets and materials available to help you practice, but a tutor can help you find the best ones, plus provide tips for helping you organize and channel your time. For a limited time, you can also check out one of TakeLessons’ live, online Spanish classes for free.
  2. Practice Spanish on mobile applications. These can help make learning fun and dynamic, where textbooks may fail.
  3. Manage your anxiety! Your fear about bombing the test may become a significant barrier, potentially bigger than the studying and the test’s difficulty itself! Remember, you got this far already. Mindfulness techniques can help — it’s no coincidence that students who believe in their ability to pass usually do.
  4. Begin studying early — preferably four months before. Our brains absorb information the best when it’s presented relatively briefly but consistent over a large time span, such as 30-60 minutes of studying 3-6 times weekly. This is particularly true of language learning — this is why many Spanish classes are scheduled daily for an hour, whereas non-language classes are often scheduled in two-hour blocks once or twice weekly.
  5. Don’t underestimate the importance of practice tests. Kaplan and the Princeton Review both offer practice tests online. There are also many practice tests for the AP Spanish exam available for free online.
  6. Know how to conjugate most verbs, especially the most commonly used ones, like tener, poder, and hablar.
  7. Know the difference between por and para, ser and estar, and conocer and saber. The multiple choice part, which is half the test, tends to focus on this and is formulaic and straightforward to learn and practice.
  8. Know the basic formulas of certain grammatical structures, such as superlatives (Él es el más…).
  9. Know the time tenses, like el imperfecto, perterito, el plusperfecto, condicional, and futuro.
  10. Know plural and singular, and masculine vs. feminine. I cannot tell you how many people have incorrectly answered certain multiple questions, or were dinged in the writing sections due to a silly mistake here. Remember that many nouns don’t follow the basic rule that nouns ending in -a are feminine and nouns that end in -o are masculine. There are many exceptions to this rule, such as el tema and la mano.
  11. Keep your general Spanish skills fresh by practicing regularly! Keep in touch with friends you meet from Spanish-speaking countries and practice with people you know who also speak Spanish.
  12. Watch telenovelas. They can be funny, but corny. If they hook you, they make for great practice!
  13. Download Pandora and listen to Spanish music on your smartphone. Many of them are catchy and learning the lyrics can give your Spanish a great lift!

In conclusion, you can do it! Systematic and early practice is the key. Set up a consistent study schedule, consult your Spanish tutor for additional study tips and conversation practice, and stay positive!

Need help with additional AP tests? Check out our tips for the:

How to pass ap spanishJason N. tutors English and Spanish in Fairfax, CA. He majored in Spanish at UC Davis, lived in Mexico for 3 years where he completed a Master’s degree in Counseling, and studied Spanish Literature and Psychology at the University of Costa Rica. Learn more about Jason here!

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The overachieving high school students often think they can pile another class onto their plate. AP Spanish is usually the class everyone thinks will be a breeze until the first story rolls around and then it is evident: you are all royally screwed. Passing AP Spanish can seem impossible but fear not, this article shall devolve all the secrets of the class.

Steps

  1. Make sure and sit in the front of the room. Even if your teacher assigned you to sit in the back of the room it is imperative to sit in the front. See if you can switch with another student.
  2. Participate! Participation shows that you are interested in the subject. If you don’t know the answers don’t worry, make your best guess. Participating often and getting the answer wrong once in a while is generally a better strategy than not participating at all.
  3. Work Hard. Unfortunately, you won’t learn simply by showing up to class everyday. You’ve got to take good notes and do all of your homework. If it comes down to studying for a test and going out with your friends, choose the studying. You can go out with your friends once the test is over.
  4. Hire a tutor. If you’re still having a hard time, it may be time to seek outside help. Ask your teacher if they can recommend a good tutor, or give you extra practice.
  5. Learn to Like Spanish. It is difficult to do well in a class that you hate. Instead of blaming the teacher or your classmates, which you likely can’t change, suck it up and learn to enjoy your class. You’ll be much more motivated to learn if you look forward to class everyday.
  6. Study effectively. Make sure that you start studying a good 4-8 weeks before the exam. Ask your teacher for recommendations on good practice books to use. Be sure to refresh your memory on what you did at the beginning of the year.
  7. Make friends. Find friends that are good at Spanish. Have them help you study, have meals where you only speak in Spanish, anything that will help you up your fluency level.
  • Make friends with a native speaker
  • Go into the teacher early on if you feel you’ll need help

Warnings

  • Do not cheat in AP Spanish. Not only can most teachers tell when you’ve used an online translator, you will regret it when it comes time to take the AP exam.

Article provided by wikiHow.

Learn Spanish Grammar with Rocket Spanish. You’d be surprise at how easy learning Spanish could be.

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    Most colleges and universities have a foreign language requirement, and a high score on the AP Spanish Language and Culture exam will sometimes fulfill that requirement. Successful completion of an Advanced Placement Spanish Language class is also a strong credential for demonstrating your language proficiency during the admissions process.

    About the AP Spanish Language and Culture Exam

    The AP Spanish Language and Culture exam takes just over three hours to complete. The test has listening, reading, and writing components.

    Section I of the exam is made up of 65 multiple choice questions and counts for 50% of the total exam score. This section has two parts:

    • Part A ask students to answer questions related to Spanish language sources drawn from literature, ads, maps, tables, letters, and newspapers.
    • Part B of the exam focuses on a combination of listening and reading. Students will answer questions after listening to audio texts drawn from sources such as interviews, podcasts and conversations.

    Section II of the exam focuses on writing. Students must perform four tasks:

    • Task 1 asks students to read and respond to an email message.
    • For Task 2, students write a persuasive essay that integrates three source documents (an article, a table or graphic, and an audio text).
    • Task 3 requires students to preview a conversation and then answer five questions related to the conversation.
    • The final task involves presentation speaking in which students compare cultural features of their own community with those found in an area of the Spanish-speaking world.

    To learn more specific information about the AP Spanish Language exam, be sure to visit the official College Board website.

    AP Spanish Language and Culture Score Information

    In 2018, over 180,435 students took the exam and those test-takers earned a mean score of 3.69.

    AP exams are scored using a 5-point scale. The distribution of scores for the AP Spanish Language exam is as follows:

    AP Spanish Language Score Percentiles (2018 Data)
    Score Number of Students Percentage of Students
    5 42,708 23.7
    4 62,658 34.7
    3 53,985 29.9
    2 18,597 10.3
    1 2,487 1.4

    Note that these scores represent the total group of students who took the exam, including students who studied outside of the U.S. and may be regular speakers of Spanish. For the standard group of test-takers (those from the U.S. who learned Spanish in U.S. schools), the mean score was a 3.45, and a smaller percentage of students received a 4 or 5.

    College Credit and Course Placement for AP Spanish

    Most colleges and universities that have a liberal arts and sciences core curriculum will have a foreign language requirement, and Spanish is the most popular option among U.S. students.

    The table below presents some representative data from a variety of colleges and universities. This information is meant to provide a general overview of the scoring and placement practices related to the AP Spanish Language exam. For colleges not listed below and to get the most up-to-date placement data, you'll need to search the school's website or contact the appropriate Registrar's office.

    You can see that nearly all colleges provide college credit for a high score on the AP Spanish Language and Culture exam. Placement, however, varies significantly. At UCLA, a score of 3 or higher fulfills a student’s foreign language requirement. Highly selective schools like MIT, Yale, and Grinnell, however, do not award any course placement based on AP Spanish exam scores.

    AP Spanish Language Scores and Placement
    College Score Needed Placement Credit
    Grinnell College 4 or 5 4 semester credits; no placement
    LSU 3, 4 or 5 SPAN 1101 and 1102 (8 credits) for a 3; SPAN 1101, 1102, and 2101 (11 credits) for a 4; SPAN 1101, 1102, 2101, and 2102 (14 credits) for a 5
    MIT 5 9 general elective credits; no placement
    Mississippi State University 3, 4 or 5 FLS 1113, 1123, 2133 (9 credits) for a 3; FLS 1113,1123, 2133, 2143 (12 credits) for a 4 or 5
    Notre Dame 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 Spanish 10101 (3 credits) for a 1; Spanish 10101 and 10102 (6 credits) for a 2; Spanish 10102 and 20201 (6 credits) for a 3; Spanish 20201 and 20202 (6 credits) for a 4 or 5
    Reed College 4 or 5 1 credit
    Stanford University 5 10 quarter units; placement exam required if continuing in Spanish
    Truman State University 3, 4 or 5 SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish I and II (6 credits) for a 3; SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish I and II, and SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I (9 credits) for a 4; SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish I and II and SPAN 201 Intermediate Spanish I and II (12 credits) for a 5
    UCLA (School of Letters and Science) 3, 4 or 5 8 credits; language requirement fulfilled
    Yale University 4 or 5 2 credits

    A Final Word About AP Spanish Language and Culture

    Whatever score you get on the exam, and whether or not you earn college course credit, the AP Spanish exam can help on the college admissions front. Colleges want to see that applicants have taken the most challenging courses available to them, and AP classes play on important role on that front. Also, completion of an Advanced Placement language class typically means that you have exceeded the minimal foreign language requirement for admission. This shows that you have pushed yourself to learn more than is required of you, a fact that will be a plus when applying to college.

    Finally, realize that AP exam scores, unlike the SAT and ACT, are typically self reported and are not a required part of a college application. If you scored a 1 or 2 on the exam, you can simply choose to not report your score on your college application.

    Very few kids at my school in the past have passed AP Spanish as a non native speaker – we've only had a 50% pass rate. Who has passed this and how?

    Is it Spanish Lang or Spanish Lit? That will change things.

    I'm going to assume it's the Spanish Lang exam that you're asking about. I took this last year as a non-native speaker (but I've been speaking Spanish for a while so this might differ for you). The first step would be to familiarize yourself with the format and understand what each section is asking of you. If you understand the purpose, you'll feel more at ease. It will also help you to study/learn material for the parts that you can, such as the speaking.

    Work on your accent now. Challenge yourself to use exclusively Spanish in your classroom. Practice every chance you can get. Heck, read some books in Spanish. Not too hot at it? No problem, start with Clifford and work your way up to novels. (Personally, I like reading the Spanish translation of books written in English because there's a resource if you don't understand what's happening.) Not only will you develop a better understanding of written text and spoken Spanish, but you'll also build your vocabulary for the parts of the exam that ask for you to write a response or speak.

    Reading will also help you learn the grammar rules, things that some classes gloss over or that may not have been taught yet. At the end of the year I retook notes from Albert.io, which really helped explain the subjuntivo to me. It also explains the rules for tildes, which is an incredibly important aspect of the exam. The website also has a sample of practice questions for you to work on the multiple choice part of the exam. They're like any other standardized test questions, but everything's in Spanish.

    For the speaking portion, make sure you speak clearly. Listen to the instructions well, and make sure you press the right buttons at the right times. You'll want to know the cultural and political background of several countries (at least 2) so that you can compare them to each other (or to where you live). My question last year had to do with the role of technology in Central and Latin American countries versus where I lived. To keep it simple, I picked Mexico. Speak clearly, concisely, and naturally, and you should be fine. Don't worry if you blank on a word, sometimes rephrasing to go around it can be fine too.

    I got lucky and was put into a Spanish Immersion program early on in my life, so I've had years to know this stuff. (And frankly, I'm still not as good at it as I should be.) Really, it's all about hard work and putting in the effort to know the basics of Spanish. After that, you're basically set to go. Good luck with the material!

    How to pass ap spanish

    Attention: We only use officially released College Board information for our calculators, which may not reflect all of the latest changes in different AP® tests. If we present you with a calculator that is marked as (Projected), we have used trends from previous versions of the exam and the relative percentages for each exam section to calculate score ranges. Until the College Board releases more information, we will not be able to update our (Projected) calculators with full accuracy.

    Wondering where you stand for the AP® Spanish Language Exam? Use this AP® Spanish score calculator to predict your score. Just input your points for each section and the score calculator with compute for final score.

    Need extra help in preparing for AP® Spanish Language? Check out our AP® Spanish Language section for tons of review articles.

    If you’re an educator interested in boosting your AP® Spanish Language student outcomes, let us know and we’ll tell you how you can get started on Albert for free!

    How are you projecting the 2021 scoring curve?

    At this time, the College Board has not officially released a scoring worksheet that reflects the latest changes in AP® Spanish Language. In order to create our projected curve, what we have done is taken the relative percentages of the MCQ and FRQ as well as the point values of each question as outlined In the scoring guidelines released for 2019-2020 here.

    Enter your scores

    Results

    Section I: Multiple-Choice – Section 1A

    Section I: Multiple-Choice – Section 1B

    Section II: Free Response – Interpersonal Writing

    Section II: Free Response – Presentational Writing

    Section II: Free Response – Interpersonal Speaking

    Section II: Free Response – Presentational Speaking

    Section I: Multiple-Choice – Listening

    Section I: Multiple-Choice – Reading

    Section II: Free Response – Writing: Paragraph Completion

    Section II: Free Response – Writing: Interpersonal

    Section II: Free Response – Writing: Presentational

    Section II: Free Response – Speaking: Interpersonal

    Section II: Free Response – Speaking: Presentational

    Section I: Multiple-Choice – Listening

    Section I: Multiple-Choice – Cloze

    Section I: Multiple-Choice – Error Recognition Sentences

    Section I: Multiple-Choice – Reading Comprehension

    Section II: Free Response – Writing: Fill-Ins

    Section II: Free Response – Essay

    Section II: Free Response – Picture Sequence

    Section II: Free Response – Directed Responses

    Choose your score curve

    Did you find this helpful? Click here to to share this calculator on Twitter.

    Looking for AP® Spanish Language study materials?

    Also, check out this reference for the best AP® Spanish Language review books.

    What is a good AP® Spanish Language score?

    Receiving a 3, 4, or 5 is commonly accepted as scoring well on an AP® exam. According to the College Board a 3 is ‘qualified,’ a 4 ‘well qualified,’ and a 5 ‘extremely well qualified.’ Depending on the school you plan to attend, college credits can be available for scores within the 3-5 range. To review the AP® Credit Policy, for schools you’re considering, use College Board’s search tool.

    When evaluating your performance on the AP® SpanishLanguage Exam take into account the subject matter and your performance versus your peers. According to the latest 2020 AP® Spanish Language score distribution report, 90% of the test takers received passing scores of 3 or above.

    What is the average AP® Spanish Language score?

    The average AP® Spanish Language score changes yearly due to factors such as student preparation and revision of exams (most recently redesigned Fall 2013). The College Board typically attempts to maintain consistency in exams for each subject. We can analyze the average AP® Spanish Language score more efficiently by considering a multi-year trend.

    We can refer to the AP® Student Score Distributions, released by the College Board annually. Keep in mind that these reports are separated for standard group (excluding native speakers) and total group (including native speakers). The standard group mean score was 3.52 in 2014, 3.54 in 2015, 3.53 in 2016, 3.45 in 2017, 3.45 in 2018, 3.41 in 2019 and 3.53 in 2020. The raw average for the standard group over the previous seven years is 3.49. Meanwhile, the total group mean score was 3.72 in 2014, 3.79 in 2015, 3.78 in 2016, 3.61 in 2017, 3.69 in 2018, 3.71 in 2019 and 3.86 in 2020. This calculates to a raw average of 3.74 for the total group, over the last five years.

    Why are AP® Spanish Language scores curved?

    The scores on AP® exams are curved every year by the College Board to preserve consistency and standardize student performance. Courses, AP® Spanish Language included, are essentially college-level subjects. The scoring guidelines are intended to emulate the austerity of similar college courses.

    How do I get a 5 on AP® Spanish Language?

    This is the question every student asks which, unfortunately, has no easy answer. To achieve a 5 on the AP® Spanish Language exam, you will need a combination of determination, commitment to learning, and a well-executed study plan. The AP® Spanish Language exam will test your proficiency in interpretive, presentational and interpersonal communication. You will be required to listen to an analyze legitimate texts from the Spanish-speaking world.

    Luckily, Albert.io has developed the following informational articles to help you further prepare for the AP® Spanish Language Exam.

    For more practice visit the Albert.io guide to AP® Spanish Language where we’ve collected many invaluable resources for the continuation of your studies. It’s widely accepted that practice is the best way to increase your chances on any exam. It is especially important to take advantage of all the available study materials to overcome the standard mean score, for this difficult language.

    Why should I use this AP® Spanish Language score calculator?

    Albert.io’s AP® Spanish Language score calculator was created to inspire you as you prepare for the upcoming exam. Our score calculators use the official scoring worksheets of previously released College Board exams to provide you with accurate and current information. We know that preparation is the key to success and in that spirit have provided you with this easy tool. Once you know the makeup of a 3, 4, or 5 AP® Spanish Language score, you will be better prepared to ace your exam with minimal worry.

    Looking for AP® Spanish Language practice?

    Kickstart your AP® Spanish Language prep with Albert. Start your AP® exam prep today.

    COVID-19 UPDATE: The Global Seal of Biliteracy will continue to process awards during the COVID-19 outbreak. Many of our accepted tests offer online proctoring.

    The AP Language Tests are comprised of 2 sections and takes approximately 3 hours complete. The test is given once a year in May, is available in 7 languages, and no longer meets our established criteria for the Global Seal of Biliteracy’s qualifying tests.

    AP (Advanced Placement) Language Test Overview

    Approximately 3 hours

    Section I: Multiple Choice, 65 questions based on authentic audio, visual, and written resources, 95 minutes, 50% score

    Comprehension and synthesis of information from a variety of authentic audio, visual, and audiovisual resources (Listening)

    Comprehension and synthesis of information from a variety of authentic written and print resources (Reading/Listening)

    Section II: Free-Response Section, 4 prompts, 80 minutes, 50% score (each prompt is 12.5%)

    Interpersonal Writing – Email Reply

    Presentational Writing – Persuasive Essay

    Interpersonal Speaking – Simulated Conversation

    Presentational Writing – Cultural Comparison

    Aligned to the ACTFL Proficiency Scale

    How to pass ap spanish

    ACTFL Intermediate-Mid = AP Score of 3

    ACTFL Advanced-Low = AP Score of 5

    Nationally & Internationally Recognized

    AP exams are commonly used for college credit and/or placement. State universities in AZ, CA, CO, FL, IL, IN, KY, LA, MN, NV, ND, OH, OR, SC, SD, TX, UT, VA, WA and WV award college credit for AP scores of 3 or higher.

    Accepted by the Global Seal of Biliteracy

    Yes. (AP Spanish Literature and Culture not accepted*)

    Functional Fluency Requirements: AP Score of 3 or higher.

    Working Fluency Requirements: AP Score of 5.

    Professional Fluency Requirements: Not Available

    How is it rated?

    Exams are rated on a scale of 1 to 5 with a composite score being given. Raters are trained and convene in June following testing. Algorithms validate testing prior to score release.

    When/Where

    Schools approved by College Board. All exams are given in May. 2019 testing dates are May 6-17.

    Cost

    $94 per student in the US, US territories, and Canada (free & reduced lunch discounts)

    How to pass ap spanish

    In 2020, as a response to the disruption caused by COVID-19, the College Board modified the AP exams so they were shorter, administered online, covered less material, and had a different format than previous tests. But thousands of students faced technical problems and had to retake their exams.

    This year, the College Board is providing 3 testing dates starting in early May for each AP exam with options for in-school and at-home, as well as traditional and digital, testing.

    “While this year’s exam options look different from years past, this schedule will maximize opportunities for AP students in a variety of different situations to test and earn college credit and placement,” according to the College Board.

    The AP Spanish Language and Culture exam for 2021 will be a full-length, traditional (i.e., paper and pencil) exam that students can take only in school (unlike exams for other AP subjects).

    Here are the key changes you need to know to do well in the upcoming AP Spanish Language exam.

    Will I get AP credit for the 2021 AP Spanish Language exam?

    Students who take the 2021 AP Spanish Language exam will be eligible for college credit.

    As in previous years, a student must obtain a score of 3, 4, or 5 to be eligible for college credit.

    How long is the 2021 AP Spanish Language exam?

    The 2021 AP Spanish Language exam will be 3 hours, 3 minutes long. Students can take it in school or school-proctored locations. There are NO digital versions of the AP Spanish Language exam (unlike exams for many other AP subjects).

    What’s the 2021 AP Spanish Language exam date?

    The College Board is offering 3 exam dates for the AP Spanish Language exam this year.

    Date Time Location Method
    Tuesday, May 11, 2021 8 AM Local Time In School Paper & Pencil
    Friday, May 21, 2021 8 AM Local Time In School Paper & Pencil
    Friday, June 4, 2021 8 AM Local Time In School Paper & Pencil

    It is up to individual schools, though, to choose the exam options that work best for them.

    What will be tested on the 2021 AP Spanish Language exam?

    The 2021 AP Spanish Language exam will test students on the whole course content, so be prepared to answer questions on these topics:

    • Unit 1: Families in Different Societies
    • Unit 2: The Influence of Language and Culture on Identity
    • Unit 3: Influences of Beauty and Art
    • Unit 4: How Science and Technology Affect Our Lives
    • Unit 5: Factors That Impact the Quality of Life
    • Unit 6: Environmental, Political, and Societal Changes

    What is the AP Spanish Language exam format for 2021?

    The 2021 AP Spanish Language exam consists of 2 sections: multiple-choice and free-response. Each section is worth 50 percent of the exam score.

    The multiple-choice section has an audio component, and the free-response section has a spoken component.

    The chart below breaks down the exam components.

    Section # Questions Time Allocation Exam Weight
    IA: Multiple Choice 30 40 minutes 23%
    IB: Multiple Choice with Audio 35 55 minutes 27%
    IIA: Free Response Written 2 70 minutes 25%
    IIB: Free Response Spoken 2 18 minutes 25%

    For free examples of free-response questions, check here for the actual questions posed in the 2019 AP Spanish Language exam and here for those posed in the 2018 exam.

    You can also practice multiple-choice and free-response questions within the digital exam app starting early April.

    Is the College Board offering any free AP Spanish Language exam review courses?

    The College Board is offering free AP resources to students.

    The College Board’s AP YouTube channel gives students access to APLive classes and recordings delivered by AP teachers from across the country. Additionally, to help students review course content and skills before their exam, the College Board will give students access to AP Daily: Live Review sessions from April 19 to 29. You can sign up for the live review sessions here.

    What are my other options for preparing for the 2021 AP Spanish Language exam?

    If you don’t have an AP Spanish Language review book already, check out TUN’s Textbook Save Engine to compare prices and get the best deals.

    There are also online resources that you can use to help you prepare for the 2021 AP Spanish Language exam.

    EdX

    EdX’s AP Spanish Language and Culture is an interactive MOOC (massive open online course) taught by Boston University professors. Taught entirely in Spanish, its aim is to prepare students for the AP Spanish Language exam.

    You can audit this course for free, but the fee for a Verified Certificate is $50.

    Note that at the time of publishing this article, future dates for the course are yet to be announced.

    Princeton Review

    If you would like to get one-on-one instruction to help you prepare for the AP Spanish Language exam, the Princeton Review offers private tutoring, available both in-person or online, for a fee starting at $167 an hour. If you decide to go with this personalized option, expert tutors will work with you to “make a plan, set goals, and exceed them.” The Princeton Review guarantees that if you’re not 100% satisfied, they will match you with another tutor and your next lesson will be free.

    If you’re taking more than one AP exam in 2021, check TUN’s AP Exam Review for details on other revised AP exams.

    On this page you can see the regular and late-testing dates and times for AP Exams for the past five years—just use the drop – down menu to choose a year.

    Looking for upcoming AP Exam dates? Go to this year’s calendar.

    Select a year to update the tables.

    The 2021 exam schedule provided three testing dates (Administrations 1, 2, and 3) for each subject between early May and mid-June.

    • In Administration 1, all exams were paper and pencil*, administered in school.
    • In Administration 2, half of the subjects were paper and pencil*, administered in school, and half were digital, administered in school or taken at home.
    • In Administration 3, most subjects were digital, administered in school or taken at home.

    *Includes Chinese and Japanese Language and Culture exams. As always, these exams are computer based and administered in schools.

    Administration 1

    WEEK 1: Paper, In School

    8 a.m. Local Time

    12 p.m. Local Time

    2 p.m. Local Time

    Monday,
    May 3, 2021

    United States Government and Politics

    Physics C: Mechanics

    Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism

    Tuesday,
    May 4, 2021

    German Language and Culture

    Wednesday,
    May 5, 2021

    English Literature and Composition

    Japanese Language and Culture (computer-based)

    Physics 1: Algebra-Based

    Thursday,
    May 6, 2021

    United States History

    Computer Science A

    Friday,
    May 7, 2021

    Spanish Literature and Culture

    Physics 2: Algebra-Based

    Administration 1

    WEEK 2: Paper, In School

    8 a.m. Local Time

    12 p.m. Local Time

    Monday,
    May 10, 2021

    French Language and Culture

    World History: Modern

    Tuesday,
    May 11, 2021

    Spanish Language and Culture

    Wednesday,
    May 12, 2021

    English Language and Composition

    Thursday,
    May 13, 2021*

    NO EXAMS SCHEDULED

    Friday,
    May 14, 2021

    Italian Language and Culture

    Chinese Language and Culture (computer-based)

    Monday,
    May 17, 2021*

    Comparative Government and Politics

    Computer Science Principles

    Administration 2

    WEEK 1: Digital, In School and At Home

    Tuesday,
    May 18, 2021

    English Literature and Composition

    Computer Science A

    Wednesday,
    May 19, 2021

    United States History

    Thursday,
    May 20, 2021

    United States Government and Politics

    World History: Modern

    Administration 2

    WEEK 1: Paper, In School

    8:00 a.m. Local Time

    12:00 p.m. Local Time

    Friday,
    May 21, 2021

    Italian Language and Culture

    Japanese Language and Culture (computer-based)

    Spanish Language and Culture

    Chinese Language and Culture (computer-based)

    French Language and Culture

    German Language and Culture

    Spanish Literature and Culture

    Administration 2

    WEEK 2: Paper, In School

    8:00 a.m. Local Time

    12:00 p.m. Local Time

    Monday,
    May 24, 2021

    Physics 1: Algebra-Based

    Physics C: Mechanics

    Tuesday,
    May 25, 2021

    Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism

    Physics 2: Algebra-Based

    Administration 2

    WEEK 2: Digital, At Home or In School

    Wednesday,
    May 26, 2021

    English Language and Composition

    Computer Science Principles

    Thursday,
    May 27, 2021

    Friday,
    May 28, 2021

    Comparative Government and Politics

    Administration 3

    WEEK 1: Digital, At Home or In School

    Tuesday,
    June 1, 2021

    English Literature and Composition

    Computer Science A

    Wednesday,
    June 2, 2021

    United States History

    Thursday,
    June 3, 2021

    United States Government and Politics

    World History: Modern

    Administration 3

    WEEK 1: Paper, In School

    8 a.m. Local Time

    12 p.m. Local Time

    Friday,
    June 4, 2021

    Italian Language and Culture

    Japanese Language and Culture (computer-based)

    Spanish Language and Culture

    Chinese Language and Culture (computer-based)

    French Language and Culture

    German Language and Culture

    Spanish Literature and Culture

    Administration 3

    WEEK 2: Digital, In School and At Home

    Exam Start Times: Local times vary depending on a student’s geographic location.

    Monday,
    June 7, 2021

    English Language and Composition

    Computer Science Principles

    Tuesday,
    June 8, 2021

    Comparative Government and Politics

    Wednesday,
    June 9, 2021

    Physics 1: Algebra-Based

    Physics C: Mechanics

    Thursday,
    June 10, 2021

    Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism

    Physics 2: Algebra-Based

    Friday,
    June 11, 2021

    2020 AP Exam Dates

    Note: Because of the unusual circumstances of the 2020 AP Exam administration, each course-specific AP Exam was administered at the same time around the world that year. This table shows the exam times in U.S. Eastern Time.

    Physics C: Mechanics

    Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism

    United States Government and Politics

    Physics 2: Algebra-Based

    English Literature and Composition

    Spanish Literature and Culture

    Physics 1: Algebra-Based

    United States History

    Computer Science A

    Chinese Language and Culture

    Japanese Language and Culture

    Italian Language and Culture

    German Language and Culture

    English Language and Composition

    French Language and Culture

    World History: Modern

    Comparative Government and Politics

    Spanish Language and Culture

    All portfolios for Art and Design courses (3-D, 2-D, and Drawing) must be submitted in the AP Art and Design digital submission web application by 11:59 PM (ET).

    All final performance tasks for Computer Science Principles, Research, and Seminar must be submitted in the AP Digital Portfolio by 11:59 PM (ET).

    2020 Late-Testing AP Exam Dates

    Note: Because of the unusual circumstances of the 2020 AP Exam administration, each course-specific AP Exam was administered at the same time around the world that year. This table shows the exam times in U.S. Eastern Time.

    The 2020 AP Exam administration included two additional late-testing opportunities that some students were eligible for. To see these testing dates, go to 2020 Late-June and August AP Testing Dates.