How to teach letter writing

From my classroom to yours! Created by: Andrea Howell Chouhan

How to teach letter writing

by: Andrea Howell Chouhan

The ABC’s of Teaching Letters

What is the first step in teaching a child to read? Letters and sounds instruction is the key! In simple terms, for a child to learn to read independently and construct meaning from text – he needs to be able to identify words automatically. He can do this after he decodes unknown words. In order to reach this point, children have to first learn the 44 speech sounds of letters and more than 100 spellings that are made. Therefore, a child must first be able to identify letter names and then be able to produce letter sounds. Then, he will be ready to read! The next step is to implement a carefully planned and systematic presentation of explicit letter/sound teaching.

Which Letters Should Be Taught First?

The hardest question for researchers and professionals to answer is – “What order should the letters be taught?” Although there is not one universal answer to this question, there is great data to give professionals guidance in creating and/or implementing the necessary systematic order of instruction. Teachers everywhere successfully teach children to read. Children also learn differently. Quite honestly, there is no wrong order to teach letters. Many teachers follow the curriculum, which determines the letter order.

When deciding the order to teach the letters, please keep in mind what some research says.

What Does Research Say?

  • Some letters are harder to learn than others: U, Q, V
  • The following letters are most well-known by children, even if they have not been taught them: O, A, B
  • Children are most likely to learn the first letter of a their name more easily and quickly
  • Teach the letters in an order that allows a child to form many words with them (for example: C, M, A, T)
  • Begin with letters that make “simple sounds” that are easiest to stretch out and are easier to blend: M, S, F, R, N, L
  • Teach new sounds in small steps
  • Review previously taught letters and sounds
  • Introduce commonly encountered sounds before the infrequent sounds: For example, “A” occurs more commonly than “Q” or “V.”
  • Teach the letters that occur more frequently in most words. The most commonly occurring letters are: E, T, A, I, N, O, S, H, R, D, L, C
  • Introduce vowels early. A child must know the vowel sounds, in order to make and read words.
  • It is suggested to teach graphemes together, like C and H, C and K, T and H
  • Alphabetic order is not ideal because it does not address the needs listed above
  • Do not pair and teach together letters that are auditorily and/or visually similar: E, I and D, B
  • Introduce some continuous sounds early: M, S
  • One study suggests introducing lower case letters first, unless upper case letters are similar in shape: (Similar: S, s, U, u, W, w; Dissimilar: R, r, T, t, F, f) Note: I have always taught capital and lowercase at the same time: Ss, Rr, Tt, so I do not disagree with this study, I myself and just unfamiliar with its effectiveness
  • Do not teach similar looking letters together: b, d, p, q
  • Introducing letters in isolation may confuse some children about the purpose of letters in relation to words and reading
  • Some letters take longer to visually discriminate: t, a, e, o, s, i

Suggested Letter Order Instruction

As a teacher, I always used the “letter order” sequence that was outlined by my school. I wondered what reasonings were behind teaching letters in a certain way. So, I set out and discovered that research proves that there are various effective methods for teaching letters in a systematic sequence. Below are the compilations of my finding. The last column is what I created based on the feedback that I received from other educators who used each of these systems.

Letter Order Suggestions

Public School in Houston

(No More Letter of the Week Method by P. Lusche)

Montessori Method (Montessori Matters by M. Carinato et.al)

Another

Montessori Method

(How to Raise an Amazing Child the Montessori Way by T. Seldin)

Right Track Reading

Combined Curriculums (Montessori & No More Letter of the Week)

Letters Overview and 1 st letter of childs name

Letters Overview and 1 st letter of childs name

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Teaching the alphabet is foundational for reading and writing. Around the age of 2, children begin showing interest in learning alphabet letters. While some kids learn letters very quickly, others need more repetition and time to learn letters. Today I’m going to share with you some of my favorite ways to teach the alphabet to little ones.

How to teach letter writing

Here’s what a preschooler should know before kindergarten:

  • Recite/sing the alphabet
  • Identify uppercase letters
  • Identify lowercase letters
  • Match uppercase letters to lowercase letters
  • Identify the sounds each letter makes
  • Traces letters
  • Write some alphabet letters

Here are my five favorite ways to teach the alphabet to children.

1. Read Alphabet Books

Read all sorts of alphabet books to your children, even starting as babies. The repetition will really help your child learn the alphabet at a young age. When my oldest was born, I was surprised at how many alphabet books we had been given as gifts. We loved reading all of them because they were different from each other. I found that around 18 months both my kids really started enjoyed reading alphabet books. Here are a few of our alphabet books:

How to teach letter writing

Here are some of our favorite alphabet books.

2. Sandpaper Letters

Using sandpaper letters is a great way to introduce letters to children. My favorite ones are Didax Sandpaper Tracing Letters or School Supply Tactile Letters Kit . This is a perfect pre-writing activity because children use their finger to trace the sandpaper letters. I love that the cards tell the child where to start and which direction to go.

How to teach letter writing

Sandpaper letters are part of the Montessori approach to learning how to read. These letters provide a tactile and visual way to help children learn the alphabet. In the Montessori method, you teach letters to a child in the 3-period lesson.

1 st period is introducing the letter (“this is” period). Show your child the letters. Have them trace the sandpaper letters. The best way to teach children alphabet letters is by telling them their phonetic sound. So each time they trace the letter, say the phonetic sound.

2 nd period is association (“show me” stage). Ask your child to follow simple directions with the letters. For example, please pick up the /m/ and set it by the window. Continue to do this with each letter several times to reinforce this. If it is too difficult, return to the first period.

3 rd period is recall (“what is this?” period). Only go to this period when they’ve mastered the other two periods. Put a letter in front of the child and say “Can you trace this and tell me what it is?” Continue with the other letters in the same way.

When you use these sandpaper letters, you are teaching them 3 things: the shape of letters, the feel of its shape and how its written, and how you pronounce its sound.

3. Alphabet Puzzles

I think teaching letters with alphabet puzzles are an amazing tool for teaching the alphabet. This is my favorite puzzle, from Melissa and Doug. It’s a beautiful wooden puzzle with neat pictures. This is a great way to practice vocabulary and verbal skills, too.

How to teach letter writing

4. Sensory Activities

While some kids learn letters very quickly, others need more repetition and time to learn letters. I’ve always said that children learn best when they have many multisensory experiences with letters.

I love to incorporate sensory play into learning alphabet letters. When children have meaningful activities with repeated exposure, they start to pick up on letter names. One way is this alphabet ice excavation activity.

How to teach letter writing

You could also make a sensory bin and do an uppercase and lowercase matching activity, like this one.

How to teach letter writing

Or practice writing letters in the sand, like this sensory writing tray.

How to teach letter writing

5. Alphabet Printables

I have quite a few alphabet printables on my blog, but here are is a set that is easy and fun for preschoolers. You will need Do a Dot Markers or dot stickers to fill in the circles.

How to teach letter writing

I love pulling printables out for a quick and easy activity. I’m always advocating for hands-on learning, but sometimes it’s nice to do a few paper activities. Using Do a Dot markers or dot stickers is great for hand-eye coordination and fine motor skills.

How to teach letter writing

If you’d like to download this printable, just click the button below.

One thing that is apparent in teaching Handwriting is the very real need that parents and teachers struggle with when it comes to teaching letter formation. Teaching letter formation can be a complicated thing for children with visual perception challenges, fine motor skill difficulties, or sensory processing concerns. In this article, you will find creative ways to teach letter formation.

So many members of the group question how to teach letter formation. They wonder where to start with teaching kids to write letters or they are challenged by kids who have formed bad habits with letter formation. They are seeing kiddos who form letters incorrectly or don’t know where to even start to teach letters accurately from the beginning. Read on to find 10 creative ways to teach letter formation whether you are starting at the beginning with a young child or are addressing those pesky bad handwriting habits that have resulted in poor letter formation and therefore, legibility.

Creative Ways to Teach Letter Formation

These fun handwriting activities are those that add a fresh concept to teaching letter formation. You can use these ideas to teach pre-writing skills or to work on specific letters.

But first, consider these thoughts when teaching kids to write letters…

When using the ideas below, it’s typically recommended to start with uppercase letters because of the simplified forms and letters that for the most part, start at the top and are formed in a downward pencil stroke, which is developmentally appropriate for young children. Read more about the order to teach letters like cursive letter order here.

Using a non-pencil activity to teach handwriting can be the trick to get kids interested in writing!

How to teach letter writing

10 Ways to Teach Letter Formation

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1.) Work on letter formation by “building” letters- This is a question for some parents, teachers, and therapists. Sometimes we see children who construct letters by parts, but use inappropriate letter formation when building letters. When writing a lowercase letter “d”, they might draw a circle and then draw a line, without the re-trace. Drawing or building letters can have inefficient consequences if kids are just allowed to copy letters inaccurately and without being taught. So often, we see this in those writing tray videos over on Pinterest or Facebook. Read more about writing trays and handwriting and how to use writing trays to effectively teach letter formation. Teaching kids wot build letters with proper sequence in each letter formation is essential! This color-coded letter building activity teaches kids to start at the correct starting spot and to pick up the pencil when necessary. Try this activity for those children who respond well to visual cues. Adding a kinetic twist to teaching letter formation can be just the tool that makes formation stick!

2.) Teach Letter Formation with a Writing Tray- The fact is, using a sensory writing tray for handwriting is a technique to practice proper letter formation is a way to incorporate multiple senses into learning letter formation. Be sure to encourage proper starting points and direction of letter lines such as starting letters at the top and lifting the writing utensil when appropriate to form parts of letters such as the curves in a “B” or the slanted little lines in a “K”. Writing trays can come in all sorts of themes, sizes, and using all types of mediums. You can even create a mini-sensory writing tray like we did. Take it along in your therapy bag or on-the-go to learn and practice letter formation anywhere!

3.) Use the Sandpaper Letter Trick to Teach Letter Formation- Use a sheet of sandpaper to work on letter formation! This multi-sensory activity uses the senses to teach letter formation, by providing feedback for pencil control and line placement. Adding a quick sheet of sandpaper to your therapy toolkit is an easy way to work on letter placement by adding additional prompts to handwriting.

4.) Teach Letter Formation with Soap- Kids can learn to write letters in shaving cream, soap, and even pudding! Using multi-sensory strategies to work on letter formation can help kids remember the proper formation. So often we see strategies that are taught in isolation and then not carried over to the classroom or home. When a child is asked to write with increased speed or in a distracting environment, we may see letters that revert back to those bad habits. Adding sensory activities to letter formation such as writing in soap, shaving cream, or sandpaper can provide the feedback kids need to add just one more cue for formation. Remember to provide instruction in proper letter formation and line placement and not just setting up a child with an activity and then letting them “play and write”.

5.) Teach Letter Formation with Gross Motor Play- Sometimes, adding a movement component to teaching letter formation can be all it takes to make letters “stick”! There are so many options for adding gross motor to letter formation.

6.) Teach Letter Formation on an alternate surface with a sensory bag- Fill a sandwich bag with soap, foam, or other liquid material and practice letter formation. You can even tape the sensory bag onto a wall or window to practice letter formation. Read more about how to create and use a sensory bag to teach letter formation in this older post on sensory handwriting.

7.) Use a resistive surface to teach letter formation- The motor plan needed for letter formation can occur with practice on a resistive surface. We’ve shared ideas to teach letter formation on resistive surfaces such as using carpet squares or carpet scraps, a styrofoam tray to learn letter formation, and foam sheets to teach letter formation.

8.) Teach Letter Formation with the “Ghost Writing” Trick- Have you tried the ghost writing trick to teach letter formation? It’s a fun way to explore the pencil strokes needed for letter formation as well as skills needed for legible handwriting and pencil pressure in written work.

9.) Use Boxes and Dots to Teach Letter Formation- This box and dot letter formation trick also helps kids learn letter size or spatial awareness in written work. It’s also a tool to help kids who struggle with letter reversals. You can make your own paper or use graph paper to create a quick practice tool for teaching letter formation.

10.) Help kids learn to write with a Kinetic Letter Formation- This is fun kinetic fine motor activity is another spin on adding resistive input and a motor component to letter formation, all using recycled materials or objects found around the home. Use a recycled can and push pins to teach letter formation while improving hand strength and fine motor skills.

How to teach letter writing

Do you have any letter formation activities that you love to use when teaching handwriting? Tell us about them! There are over 14,000 members in the Sweet Ideas of Handwriting Help Facebook Group that love sharing ideas to work on handwriting.

How to teach letter writing

Most children learn to recognize the letters in the alphabet between the ages of 3 and 4. By age 5, the majority of children begin to make letter-sound associations. Children’s reading development is dependent on their understanding of the Alphabetic Principle – which is the idea that letters and letter patterns represent the sounds of spoken language. For some children this life skill does not come naturally or easily and will require some specific teaching strategies. On this post, I will share will you how you can easily teach the alphabet letters and sounds to your child using engaging strategies and activities.

Step 1: Build Phonological Awareness Before You Teach Letters and Sounds

This crucial pre-reading skill is often overlooked as teachers and parents want to rush straight into teaching letters and sounds. I am here to tell you…don’t do it! Teach phonological awareness first.

What is phonological awareness? It means that your child can recognize the sounds, rhythm, and rhyme involving spoken words. You hear it and you speak it. There is no print involved in phonological awareness. This happens way before children are introduced to letters of the alphabet.

Research has proven that without this crucial skill, a child cannot learn to read well.

Building phonological skills requires these 3 steps: rhyming, syllable division, and phonemic awareness

For more information on rhyming, including teaching tips and specific teaching strategies and activities, please read my previous post:

When you are ready to begin teaching the letters and sounds to your child, you will need a set of letter/sound cards. (You can make these by writing each lowercase letter on a separate index card).

Teach Lowercase Letters First

Children will come across lowercase letters the most when they begin printing and blending words, so they will need a solid knowledge of the lowercase letters. Uppercase letters are usually easier for children to master and they typically gain proficiency with uppercase letters due to more frequent exposure in environmental print as well as with initial uppercase letters in names . Therefore spending more time teaching the lowercase letters with benefit your child greatly, as these letters tend to be a bit more difficult to learn.

Teach Each Letter in Isolation

You will want to work on just one letter at a time and not teach a new letter until the previous letter is mastered. It doesn’t matter what order you teach the letters and sounds as long as you go slowly and use a lot of repetition. If you are working with a reading program such as the PRIDE Reading Program, you will simply follow the program’s lead and use the program’s sequence.

Review Previously Learned Letters

Each time you add a new letter to the mix, review the previously learned letters. Because children need a lot of repetition, it is really important to Review Review Review. When you hold up the letter flashcard, you will want your child to say the letter sound and the letter name within 3 seconds.

Say, “When I hold up a letter, say the letter’s name and give its sound.”

How to teach letter writing

If your child is not saying the letter and sound in 3 seconds…go back and reteach. It means you went too fast and didn’t give your child enough time and enough practice to master the letter and sound. For some children learning the letters and sounds can take up to a year!

Take your time and go slowly. There is no rush. It is really important that each letter and sound ‘stick’ and that can only happen slowly over time with practice and repetition.

Use Tactile Materials

Use lots of tactile material when teaching letters and sounds. Ex: glitter glue, sand, playdough, LEGO or canvas (to write and feel the letters). You can watch this video here to give you some ideas on how to make your own tactile letter cards:

Use Multisensory Activities

Multisensory means engaging more than one sense at a time. You see it, you say it, you hear it, you touch it, and you move with it! Using multisensory activities in your alphabet lessons makes learning fun and memorable. Here are some multisensory activities you can use when you are teaching your child the letters and sounds of the alphabet:

  • Pair up with your child and write letters on each other’s back with a finger. Guess what the letter is.
  • While sitting on a carpet, write down each letter directly onto the carpet with two fingers.
  • Fill a tray with sand or salt and write the letters in it.
  • Spread shaving cream out on a tray and have your child write out the letters in the cream.

Here are some more alphabet activities and games from my previous posts that you might also be interested in:

How to teach letter writing

Learn More about the Effective Orton-Gillingham Approach by Signing Up for our Free Course

Plus, get teaching tips and fun learning activities delivered straight to your inbox with the PRIDE Weekly Roar.

How to teach letter writing

Most children learn to recognize the letters in the alphabet between the ages of 3 and 4. By age 5, the majority of children begin to make letter-sound associations. Children’s reading development is dependent on their understanding of the Alphabetic Principle – which is the idea that letters and letter patterns represent the sounds of spoken language. For some children this life skill does not come naturally or easily and will require some specific teaching strategies. On this post, I will share will you how you can easily teach the alphabet letters and sounds to your child using engaging strategies and activities.

Step 1: Build Phonological Awareness Before You Teach Letters and Sounds

This crucial pre-reading skill is often overlooked as teachers and parents want to rush straight into teaching letters and sounds. I am here to tell you…don’t do it! Teach phonological awareness first.

What is phonological awareness? It means that your child can recognize the sounds, rhythm, and rhyme involving spoken words. You hear it and you speak it. There is no print involved in phonological awareness. This happens way before children are introduced to letters of the alphabet.

Research has proven that without this crucial skill, a child cannot learn to read well.

Building phonological skills requires these 3 steps: rhyming, syllable division, and phonemic awareness

For more information on rhyming, including teaching tips and specific teaching strategies and activities, please read my previous post:

When you are ready to begin teaching the letters and sounds to your child, you will need a set of letter/sound cards. (You can make these by writing each lowercase letter on a separate index card).

Teach Lowercase Letters First

Children will come across lowercase letters the most when they begin printing and blending words, so they will need a solid knowledge of the lowercase letters. Uppercase letters are usually easier for children to master and they typically gain proficiency with uppercase letters due to more frequent exposure in environmental print as well as with initial uppercase letters in names . Therefore spending more time teaching the lowercase letters with benefit your child greatly, as these letters tend to be a bit more difficult to learn.

Teach Each Letter in Isolation

You will want to work on just one letter at a time and not teach a new letter until the previous letter is mastered. It doesn’t matter what order you teach the letters and sounds as long as you go slowly and use a lot of repetition. If you are working with a reading program such as the PRIDE Reading Program, you will simply follow the program’s lead and use the program’s sequence.

Review Previously Learned Letters

Each time you add a new letter to the mix, review the previously learned letters. Because children need a lot of repetition, it is really important to Review Review Review. When you hold up the letter flashcard, you will want your child to say the letter sound and the letter name within 3 seconds.

Say, “When I hold up a letter, say the letter’s name and give its sound.”

How to teach letter writing

If your child is not saying the letter and sound in 3 seconds…go back and reteach. It means you went too fast and didn’t give your child enough time and enough practice to master the letter and sound. For some children learning the letters and sounds can take up to a year!

Take your time and go slowly. There is no rush. It is really important that each letter and sound ‘stick’ and that can only happen slowly over time with practice and repetition.

Use Tactile Materials

Use lots of tactile material when teaching letters and sounds. Ex: glitter glue, sand, playdough, LEGO or canvas (to write and feel the letters). You can watch this video here to give you some ideas on how to make your own tactile letter cards:

Use Multisensory Activities

Multisensory means engaging more than one sense at a time. You see it, you say it, you hear it, you touch it, and you move with it! Using multisensory activities in your alphabet lessons makes learning fun and memorable. Here are some multisensory activities you can use when you are teaching your child the letters and sounds of the alphabet:

  • Pair up with your child and write letters on each other’s back with a finger. Guess what the letter is.
  • While sitting on a carpet, write down each letter directly onto the carpet with two fingers.
  • Fill a tray with sand or salt and write the letters in it.
  • Spread shaving cream out on a tray and have your child write out the letters in the cream.

Here are some more alphabet activities and games from my previous posts that you might also be interested in:

How to teach letter writing

Learn More about the Effective Orton-Gillingham Approach by Signing Up for our Free Course

Plus, get teaching tips and fun learning activities delivered straight to your inbox with the PRIDE Weekly Roar.

It can be a tricky thing to teach kids how to write their letters. They learn a letter a week in preschool or at home. When a child is just not interested in coloring, writing, and fine motor tasks, teaching letters can be difficult. I am all about creative and playful learning and when it comes to teaching kids to write letters in no different. This sensory soap writing activity is a fun way to teach kids how to write letters correctly and in a messy, (yet equally clean) environment. Today I’m sharing a few tips and tools to work on letter formation for little ones who need to learn how to form letters.

The key to teaching kids how to write letters is to correct any poor formation practices before they become habits. In Preschool and Kindergarten, children typically learn correct letter formation. If they begin forming letters from the bottom to the top, or form parts of a letter and “build” letters, those poor formation habits can stick with the child and lead to illegible handwriting as they grow and are required to write more and at faster speeds in the older grades. A few tips for teaching handwriting and letter formation from my days in school-based Occupational Therapy. (This post is part of my 31 day Occupational Therapy series where I’m sharing activities for development using materials you might already have in the home.

How to teach letter writing

Tips for Teaching Kids to Form Letters Correctly: (Teaching Kids to Write)

  • Teach kids to always write letters from the top to bottom. Forming letters from the bottom up is slow and inefficient, and will lead to poor handwriting. Cue your child to start “at the top” as they form letters.
  • Teach capital letters first. Capital letters are easier to learn than lower case letters because they all have the same height, all start at the top, and are easy to recognize.
  • Start by teaching individual letters, then words, then sentences (all in capitals).
  • Progress to lower case letters once the upper case letters have been well established.
  • Use blank printer paper or simple lined paper. Using worksheets with pictures is distracting.
  • Use a multi-sensory approach to teaching letters. Use multiple techniques to practice letters using sensory bins, proprioceptive techniques, gross motor kinesthetic techniques, or high contrast activities. The possibilities are endless for creative learning with handwriting!
  • Practice during short sessions.
  • Use consistent verbal cues for letter formation.
  • Try a handwriting program. I love
  • Make sure the child has a good posture in their chair.
  • How to teach letter writing

    Sensory Handwriting Practice

    How to teach letter writing

    How to teach letter writing

    Next, practice forming letters! Use the tips from above to start letters at the top, and use consistent verbal cues. We practiced writing spelling words with my second grader. How many ways can you think of to use this sensory writing activity in learning? (Math, learning a phone number or address, practicing number formation, and cursive handwriting are a few ideas.)

    How to teach letter writing

    You will love our Handwriting Pinterest Board for more ideas.

    Some favorite handwriting activities for kids learning to write:

    How to teach letter writing How to teach letter writingHow to teach letter writing
    Functional Handwriting Practice Ideas

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    So it’s late November and we have just a few first graders who have not yet mastered their letters and sounds. For these little firsties, we needed to readjust their intervention plan and bump it up a knotch in terms of intensity. It’s always difficult to find time in a jam-packed school day, but mastering letters and sounds is really important and must take priority right now. One way to add intervention time is to teach volunteers and/or the child’s parent in how to teach and practice letters and sounds. Having the right activities available and directions for correctly using the activities is really important. I’ve collected 10 of my most favorite activities for teaching letters and sounds and gathered them in a teaching bag with the directions for each activity. The alphabet bags can either be used at home or at school.

    How to teach letter writing

    It all begins with assessment. Before beginning with the alphabet bags, it is important that you know which sounds your student knows and does not know. If you do not have an assessment that you already administer at school, feel free to download the Make, Take & Teach Letters and Sounds assessment. I’ve included progress monitoring charts so that you can track your student’s progress.

    How to teach letter writing

    Click the following link to download the FREE assessment with progress monitoring charts Letter Sound Assessment

    The following pdf contains the directions for each activity as well as a time recording sheet to keep track of the practice sessions. Be sure to write the upper- and lowercase letters that the student missed at the top of the form as these letters will be used in the teaching activities.

    How to teach letter writing

    Click the following link to download the free directions for using this kit Learning Letters and Sounds

    Each practice session will begin with the letter flashcards. Specific directions for this review are listed on the pdf above. To make the flashcards, you’ll simply need to cut along the dotted line.

    How to teach letter writing

    Click the following link to download FREE letter flashcards Small Flashcards- Alphabet

    Following the flashcard review, have your student choose one of the six teaching activities. (1) I printed the unknown letters from the Dough Letters activity to use with the Play Doh, but you can also use the free Multi-Sensory cards for this activity if you choose. (2) Bendaroos are wax covered sticks often found in the arts and crafts or toy section in large chain stores such as Walmart. You can purchase those in any size. I typically purchase a large box and place about 20 in a baggie for each student. (3) Craft sand can be purchased at Walmart. Simply put sand on a paper plate and have the student write the letters in the sand. (4 and 5) Dry erase boards and small Magnadoodles can be purchased in a dollar store. (6) Plastic screens can be purchased in the arts and crafts needle work section of Walmart or a similar store. Specific directions for the volunteer or parent are on the pdf.

    How to teach letter writing

    How to teach letter writing

    Click the following link to download FREE multi-sensory letter cards Multi-Sensory Letters

    How to teach letter writing

    If you’d like to use the Dough Letters for the Play-Doh, click HERE. Helpful hint: I used only the unknown letters and covered the page with contact paper so it would be easy to use multiple times.

    After the direct teaching activity, have your student choose one of the 5 letter/sound games. My all time favorite activity for practicing letters (and sight words too) is (7) Fiddle Sticks. To make this activity write a letter with a black Sharpie marker at the end of a large craft stick (you’ll need about 50 sticks). On one stick color the tip red or, in this case, I put a snowflake on the stick to match the cup. Directions for playing this game are on the pdf above.

    How to teach letter writing

    The (8) ABC Turtle game is a fun game for practicing letters and sounds. This activity can be downloaded for free from my Teachers Pay Teachers store.

    How to teach letter writing

    Click HERE to download the FREE ABC Turtle game.

    To make the (9) Make A Word activity you will need 3 wooden blocks. I use 1″x1″ blocks. Using a black Sharpie marker, write the following letters on the first block: g, r, d , m, j and p . Again using the black marker, write the following letters on second block: f, c, b , h, t and s. Using either a blue or red Sharpie marker, write the following letters on the third block: a, e, i, o, u and a. Again, directions for this activity are on the “Learning Letters and Sounds” pdf.

    How to teach letter writing

    Click the following link to download this free template Make A Word Template

    How to teach letter writing

    The (10) ABC Order and (11) Making Words activity from the Cookie Sheet Activities file complete the alphabet bag! Okay, so my math is a bit off. I guess there are 11 alphabet activities in the bag. For these activities you’ll need magnetic letters and I often place the templates and the letters on a cookie sheet. You can find magnetic letters at the dollar store, but I purchase mine through Banks School Supply as I like the size and shape of the letters (picky, I know).

    How to teach letter writing

    How to teach letter writing

    Click HERE to download this file from my Teachers Pay Teachers store.

    I’m hoping that this little alphabet bag will quickly help those first graders master their letters and sounds! Hope you, too, find it helpful with your students.

    How to teach letter writing

    Kids these days might use all kinds of technology to stay in touch with each other, but it’s still a good idea for them to learn how to write a letter. Writing letters to people can be a lot of fun, and receiving something back is enjoyable too. Learning how to write a letter can also be helpful for other forms of communication, such as writing emails. Sometimes writing a letter is the best way to get in touch with people, such as sending something special or sending a complaint letter. Here’s how and why you should consider a letter writing project with your children.

    Table of Contents

    Why Write Letters?

    Writing letters might seem like an archaic practice. After all, you can send an email, an instant message, a text, or call someone with both voice and video options available. But both writing and receiving handwritten letters can be a lot of fun for children. It can also help them develop several valuable skills, from improving their handwriting to writing using different tones and vocabulary. Your children can write letters just for practice, or they can send them to someone and receive letters in return.

    Choose People to Write To

    If you’re thinking about sending some letters, think about who you can send them to. This could help motivate your children if you get them to suggest who they might like to write to or offer them some choices. They might like to write to a friend or family member, especially someone they don’t see in person very often. Or they could write letters to someone fictional as a fun way to practice writing. They could even write letters for their future self, which you could put away later or put into a time capsule.

    Examine the Process of Sending a Letter

    Writing and sending a letter can help your child to learn many skills. First, there’s writing the letter by hand formatting it in the right way. Then, letters need to be placed into envelopes, and they need to have the correct stamps attached. This could be a chance to do some work with money to figure out how much you need to pay to send the letter. Then the letter needs to be sent in the mail, whether it’s dropped into a mailbox or taken to the post office.

    Encourage Different Types of Writing

    Letter writing with your children can also give them a chance to explore different types of writing. They can write different types of letters for various people, whether it’s a casual letter to a friend or something more formal to send as an invitation, a thank you, or to send to a favorite celebrity. They could also try out writing things like stories or poems, which are fun to send to people.

    Try to write some letters with your children, and they’re sure to enjoy the fun of sending and receiving various letters.

    By TheMomKind

    Alicia Trautwein is an Autism advocate, writer, motivational speaker, and dedicated mom of four. Alicia’s desire to advocate for Autism comes from her own autism diagnosis and that of her three children, niece, and brother. Her life’s mission is to educate on autism acceptance and change the world for future generations of autistic individuals.

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