How to avoid high fructose corn syrup

Our diet sodas , like Diet Coke , Fanta Zero and Sprite Zero, do not have high fructose corn syrup . They are sweetened with sugar substitutes that add few or no calories. Click here to learn about the sugar substitutes we use .

Is there a ginger ale without high fructose corn syrup?

Launches Real Ginger Ale . NORWALK, Conn. This refreshing new soda is made with no artificial flavors, no artificial colors, no artificial preservatives and no high fructose corn syrup , it is naturally, the REAL ginger beverage consumers have been seeking, with the classic taste they know and love.

Does ginger ale have high fructose corn syrup in it?

The sugar content? Sure, it’s raw cane sugar, and there’s no high fructose corn syrup , but lest we forget, ginger ale is still soda, folks.

Why you should never eat high fructose corn syrup?

It is known, however, that too much added sugar of all kinds — not just high – fructose corn syrup — can contribute unwanted calories that are linked to health problems, such as weight gain, type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome and high triglyceride levels. All of these boost your risk of heart disease.

Does Canada Dry have high fructose corn syrup?

The ingredients listed for each serving of Canada Dry are carbonated water, high fructose corn syrup , citric acid, sodium benzoate, natural flavors, and caramel color.

Is Mexican Coca Cola better?

That primary difference comes down to sweeteners. Mexican Coke is made with cane sugar while American Coke is made with high fructose corn syrup. Plastic and metal cans that American Coke comes in can affect its taste, and Mexican Coke comes in glass bottles, which might help it to maintain a better flavor.

What’s the unhealthiest soda?

The 10 Unhealthiest Sodas of 2017 Pepsi Fire . Coca-Cola Zero Sugar. Salted Caramel Pepsi . Mtn Dew Kickstart Mango Lime. Mtn Dew Kickstart Raspberry Citrus. Crystal Pepsi . Sprite Cherry. Sprite Cherry Zero .

What is the healthiest ginger ale?

Brilliantly refreshing in every sip, Zevia Ginger Ale will illuminate your taste buds with its pure ingredients. With a sweet blend of real ginger and citrus oils, Zevia Ginger Ale has a delicious taste with zero calories and no sugar , making it a healthy alternative to diet ginger ale brands.

Does vodka have high fructose corn syrup?

Most vodkas are gluten-free to begin with; it’s when you add flavoring that things get about as complicated as a long distance relationship. Unlike most flavored vodkas , Sourced has no high fructose corn syrup ; instead, it’s sweetened with real fruit juice and cane sugar.

Does Gatorade have high fructose corn syrup?

Also, high fructose corn syrup is not an ingredient in any Gatorade products. For those looking for a lower-calorie sports beverage, Gatorade offers G2, which delivers the same amount of electrolytes as original Gatorade but with half the calories.

Does Dr Pepper have high fructose corn syrup?

As a result, most US soft drinks, including Dr Pepper , now use high fructose corn syrup instead of sugar. A handful of United States bottling plants still use sugar to sweeten Dr Pepper . Beginning in July 2010, Dr Pepper’s 125th Anniversary edition in some markets was made with sugar as opposed to other sweeteners.

Why is corn syrup banned in the UK?

Europe countries like UK don’t have this problem because they do not authorize the use of this ingredient. It is banned in the UK by a production quota. It’s called glucose-fructose syrup if you want to research it. HFCS is sweeter and is far more addicting than sugar.

What fruit has no fructose?

Low-sugar fruits include: Strawberries . Strawberries , like many other berries, are often high in fiber and contain very little sugar. Peaches. Although they taste sweet, a medium sized peach only contains around 13 g of sugar. Blackberries . Lemons and limes . Honeydew melon . Oranges. Grapefruit. Avocados .

What can replace high fructose corn syrup?

Here’s some of the best substitutions for corn syrup: Agave Nectar . “If I had to make a substitution, I would probably try agave first. Brown Rice Syrup. A one-to-one substitution, brown rice syrup is made by breaking down rice starches into simple sugars then boiling them into a syrup. Honey. Golden Syrup. Cane Syrup.

Why does America use high fructose corn syrup?

So much cheaper that it’s less expensive in the US to process corn into a sweetener than it is to buy sugar from foreign growers. So the reason we use so much corn syrup instead of sugar is that it’s cheaper for food makers. It’s cheaper because tax payers pay for it to be cheaper to “protect” a native industry.

According to the FDA, there is no evidence that foods with high-fructose corn syrup are less safe than foods containing similar amounts of other types of sugar.

The concern is the amount of sugar you are eating, not what kind of sugar, says Kyle Fagnanon, MS, RDN, a registered dietician and founder of Strata Nutrition.

The negative health effects of consuming too much added sugar are well known, but whether HFCS poses additional risks is debatable.

Find out more about the health concerns connected to high fructose corn syrup.

High fructose corn syrup and obesity

A widely cited 2004 study launched the notion that HFCS was a key culprit in the US obesity epidemic. However, more recent data has suggested otherwise.

According to a 2009 review, the use of HFCS peaked in 1999 and has since dropped, while the obesity rates have remained high.

Although the research is mixed, “the thing that seems consistent is that added sugars of all types should be limited,” says Fagnanon.

That’s where HFCS can be more of an issue than natural sugar, because it’s less expensive to produce and, therefore, is a common additive in many popular foods including soda, juice, and candy, as well as less obvious foods like tomato sauce and salad dressing.

And, in fact, chemically-speaking, HFCS and table sugar are similar:

  • Table sugar is molecules of fructose and glucose bound together in a one-to-one ratio, forming sucrose.
  • HFCS is a mix of unbound fructose and glucose molecules, made from combining water and cornstarch. HFCS is sweeter than table sugar but both are considered added sugars since they aren’t naturally present in foods.

Health concerns

Eating a lot of sugar, of any kind, comes with multiple health risks:

  • Nutritional deficiency: Sugar-heavy foods tend not to be the most nutritious, so you are likely missing out on important vitamins and minerals.
  • Weight gain: Foods with added sugars are frequently high in calories, which can lead to weight gain. Foods with naturally occurring sugars, like fruit, tend to be lower in calories.
  • Dental trouble: And, of course, sugar is bad for your teeth and can cause decay and cavities.
  • Heart disease:Excessive sugar increases levels of triglycerides, a type of fat, which can put you at risk for heart disease. Fructose in particular can lead to hypertension because it increases uric acid, which raises blood sugar.

That’s not all the havoc that excess added sugars like HFCS can wreak.

Diabetes

One major risk from a diet high in fructose is insulin resistance, which can lead to type 2 diabetes .

A 2009 study looked at the effects of consuming fructose vs. glucose in overweight patients between the ages of 40 and 72. For 10 weeks, participants drank a sweetened beverage — either with glucose or fructose — alongside their regular diet.

At the end of the 10 weeks, the researchers found that insulin sensitivity did not change in the group consuming glucose-sweetened drinks, but decreased 17% in the group consuming fructose-sweetened drinks. Decreased insulin sensitivity can lead to insulin resistance, a factor of type 2 diabetes .

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease

Fructose can take a toll on your liver.

Fructose is metabolized in your liver, and consuming too much fructose — in the form of HFCS or another added sugar— can overwork it making it harder for your liver to function properly.

And that’s important since your liver is responsible for converting toxins in your blood into waste products and producing bile to break down fats, says Fagnanon.

But how much fructose is too much? A 2008 study compared patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease to a control group and found the NAFLD group consumed two to three times more fructose (365 calories/day) than the control group (170 calories/day).

Cancer

Fructose consumption may also put you at risk for certain types of cancer, including pancreatic cancer and small intestine cancer, according to a 2012 review.

Research also shows that fructose may indirectly increase tumor growth by enhancing protein synthesis, and it is associated with more aggressive cancer behavior, including metastasis, or the spread of cancer.

Glyphosate

Because HFCS is made from corn, there is concern about contamination with glyphosate, an herbicide, says Fagnanon. Glyphosate is toxic to human cells, according to a 2020 review, but epidemiological studies looking at the effect of glyphosate exposure on individuals are contradictory.

In 2015, the World Health Organization’s cancer agency, International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), labeled glyphosate as “probably carcinogenic” for consumers, but risk assessment is ongoing. Although glyphosate is used on corn crops, that doesn’t mean it is always present in corn syrup.

Insider’s takeaway

High-fructose corn syrup is often seen as a “red flag” on ingredient labels due to its reported connection to heart disease , diabetes, liver disease, and certain types of cancer.

While high-fructose corn syrup has some serious health risks, it’s important to remember that just because HFCS gets a lot of attention, it’s not the only sugar that is cause for concern, says Fagnanon.

All sources of added sugar should be limited to the daily recommended intake level, as one type of sugar isn’t necessarily better for you than another.

Many of the health risks associated with HFCS are linked to consuming high amounts of added sugar, in general. Some health risks, such as diabetes, liver disease, and cancer, may be related to fructose consumption specifically. As with any added sugar, HFCS should be consumed in moderation.

How to avoid high fructose corn syrup

If the food you’re eating tastes sweet, chances are good that it contains some type of sugar such as fructose. This simple sugar is present in a wide variety of foods, some healthy and some unhealthy. Fruit, honey, syrups and confections are among the most common sources of fructose. If you have a fructose intolerance, restrict your intake of the sugar to avoid symptoms such as bloating, abdominal pain, gas, diarrhea and heartburn.

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Meat and Protein Foods

Fresh meat and protein foods are naturally free of fructose. A serving of fresh beef, pork, chicken or turkey, for example, are fructose-free foods to include in your diet. Fresh seafood, such as salmon, trout, crab legs or shrimp, are also free of fructose. The key is to eat the meat and seafood without the addition of sauces that contain fructose. Fresh herbs and spices are one way to season the meat without adding fructose. Skip condiments, such as barbecue sauce, ketchup and steak sauce, because most of these contain fructose. Beans, eggs, nuts, seeds and tofu are additional protein foods that don’t contain fructose.

Dairy Products

Many dairy foods don’t contain fructose, but reading labels is essential because some dairy products contain added sugar, much of it in the form of high-fructose corn syrup. Fresh milk and cheese don’t contain fructose. Plain yogurt can be fructose-free, as well, but read the ingredient label to be sure. Sweetened milks, such as chocolate, strawberry or vanilla, contain fructose, according to the University of Wisconsin Madison School of Medicine and Public Health. Flavored yogurts, milkshakes and malts are additional dairy foods to avoid.

Certain Vegetables

Asparagus, leeks, onions, tomatoes and artichokes are examples of vegetables to avoid if you have a fructose intolerance, but most other vegetables can a have place in your fructose-free diet. Most vegetables that contain small amounts of fructose are well-balanced with glucose, which means that they aren’t as likely to cause a problem, according to the University of Wisconsin Madison School of Medicine and Public Health. Carrots, green beans and leafy greens, such as spinach and kale, are examples of vegetables to include in your diet.

Fruits and Fructose

Though fruits contain fructose, you can safely eat a few varieties of fruit even if you’re intolerant of the sugar, according to Wayne G. Shreffler, author of “Understanding Your Food Allergies and Intolerances.” Berries, pineapple, kiwis, citrus fruit, melon and papaya are examples of fruits lower in fructose and more easily tolerated by people with a fructose intolerance.

Miscellaneous Fructose-Free Foods

Foods with dextrose, glucose, raw sugar, sucrose and sugar substitutes, such as aspartame, are safe on a fructose-free diet, according to the University of Wisconsin Madison School of Medicine and Public Health. Avoid foods that contain sorbitol, which is an artificial sweetener, as your body converts it to fructose during the digestive process, according to Shreffler. Brown rice, gluten-free cereals and breads, rice noodles and rye bread are usually safe on a fructose-free diet, too.

How to avoid high fructose corn syrup

High fructose corn syrup is commonly used in place of sugar in processed foods in the USA. In fact, the average American eats an astounding 41.5 lbs of high fructose corn syrup per year. American subsidies and tariffs have resulted in corn being a much more economical sweetener than sugar–a trend that is not seen in other parts of the world. Now that high fructose corn syrup is being added to an increasing variety of foods (breads, cereals, soft drinks, and condiments); some people are looking for ways to avoid it.

If you eat any processed foods, you probably eat too much high fructose corn syrup. But, the problem is that in today’s culture, almost everything that you eat is processed. The majority of foods sold at any supermarket are processed at a plant before they are shipped out. This means that you probably have too much high fructose corn syrup in your diet and high fructose corn syrup can lead to obesity, high blood pressure, coronary disease and even diabetes. Because of this, it’s a good idea for you to limit to amount of high fructose corn syrup that you ingest everyday. Try these ways to avoid high fructose corn syrup in the future.

Be clear about your reasons for avoiding high fructose corn syrup. Reasons cited for avoiding it are:

  • There are increasing concerns about the politics surrounding the economics of corn production (subsidies, tariffs, and regulations) as well as the effects of intensive corn agriculture on the environment.
  • The corn from which high fructose corn syrup is derived may be genetically modified.
  • Beverages containing high fructose corn syrup have high levels of reactive carbonyls which are linked with cell and tissue damage that leads to diabetes, although there is no evidence so far that high fructose corn syrup consumption directly leads to diabetes. No significant metabolic differences exist between high fructose corn syrup and regular sugar.
  • Some people are allergic to products derived from corn.
  • Some people believe that sugar satiates, or creates the feeling of “full”, faster than HFCS, which, if true, would likely lead to reduced caloric consumption.
  • Although the enzymatic process used to create high fructose corn syrup is a naturally occurring process, it is an additional processing step that sugar refined from beets does not undergo. Some people prefer to avoid additionally processed foods and ingredients as much as possible.
  • Some argue that sugar simply tastes better than high fructose corn syrup.

Understand what “natural” or “organic” means on labels with regard to HFCS. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) doesn’t regulate the use of the word “natural”. Foods and beverages can be labeled as “natural” even though they contain high fructose corn syrup, because fructose is a naturally occurring sugar. The word “organic” is heavily regulated, and basically, only foods labeled as 100% organic can be assumed to be HFCS-free.

Read food labels. It’s nearly impossible to avoid eating all processed foods. And that’s okay. You just need to be aware of the foods that contain high fructose corn syrup. Try to limit how often you eat them. Certain types of bread contain high fructose corn syrup, so try and pick one that doesn’t.

  • Read more nutritional labels to find out how much high fructose corn syrup is contained in many of the foods you eat. Then, see if you can substitute better foods to limit the amount of high fructose corn syrup that you ingest.

Lower your sweetener consumption altogether. It’s been suggested that the supposed link between high fructose corn syrup and obesity is not due to the high fructose corn syrup itself, but to the increasing consumption of sweeteners in general, especially soft drinks. In fact, where the fructose comes from doesn’t seem to matter. The fructose found in fruits could be just as bad as that added to soft drinks. The USDA recommends that a person with a 2000 calorie, balanced diet should consume no more than 32 g (8 tsp) of added sugar per day. Here are some sweet foods and the percentage of the daily recommended amount of sweeteners they provide:

  • Serving of Kellogg’s Marshmallow Blasted Fruit Loops – 40%
  • Cup of regular ice cream – 60%
  • Typical cup of fruit yogurt – 70%
  • Burger King’s Cini-minis with icing – 95%
  • Quarter-cup of pancake syrup – 103%
  • 12-ounce Pepsi – 103%
  • Hostess Lemon Fruit Pie – 115%
  • Large McDonald’s Shake – 120%
  • Cinnabon – 123%
  • Large Mr. Misty Slush at Dairy Queen – 280%

Eat more fruits and vegetables. Obviously, high fructose corn syrup is not a natural source of sugar. So, anytime you eat something that’s literally grown straight out of the earth, you can be sure you’re not getting any high fructose corn syrup in your diet.

  • Additionally, most fruits and vegetables contain natural sugar so you’ll still get the energy that sugar provides without all the harmful side effects.

Buy fresh produce and learn to cook it. The real problem is too much refined and processed food, not any one particular ingredient.

Avoid fast food. Fast food is literally loaded with high fructose corn syrup. So, while it may be tempting to pull in for a quick burger, you should avoid eating fast food regularly to limit your high fructose corn syrup intake.

Avoid canned or bottled beverages. Soft drinks, sports drinks, lemonade, iced tea, and almost every sweet drink you can think of contains high fructose corn syrup.

  • Buy from small bottlers who use sugar instead of high fructose corn syrup. Some smaller brands, such as Jones Soda and Dublin Dr. Pepper, have switched to pure cane sugar.
  • Check the Passover section of your supermarket. Some soda companies produce a sugar/sucrose-based version of their products around Passover for Jews who are restricted by custom from eating corn during this time. Coca-Cola produces a version of Coke without corn syrup that can be identified by a yellow cap and is considered by some to taste better than Coke Zero, which is also free of corn syrup but contains artificial sweeteners, not sugar.
  • Buy soft drinksfrom across the border. If you must have your fix of certain soda brands and you happen to live near Canada or Mexico, look into buying in bulk from those countries, which use sugar instead of high fructose corn syrup.

How to avoid high fructose corn syrup

High fructose corn syrup has crept into more of our foods over the last few decades. Compared with regular sugar, it’s cheaper and sweeter, and is more quickly absorbed into your body. But eating too much high fructose corn syrup can lead to insulin resistance, obesity, type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Functional medicine expert Mark Hyman, MD, explains the many ill effects of high fructose corn syrup, and he offers strategies to avoid it.

Fat production factory for your body

Fructose was initially thought to be a better choice for diabetics due to its low glycemic index. But only your liver cells can process fructose, and that’s where the problems begin.

“Fructose goes straight to your liver and starts a fat production factory,” Dr. Hyman says. “It triggers the production of triglycerides and cholesterol.” He explains that it’s actually the sugar — not the fat — that causes the most trouble for your cholesterol.

What’s even worse, Dr. Hyman notes, is high doses of fructose “punch little holes in your intestinal lining, causing what we call a leaky gut.” He explains that this allows foreign food proteins and bacterial proteins to enter into your bloodstream, which triggers inflammation, makes you gain weight and causes type 2 diabetes.

Increases appetite, promotes obesity

Studies show that high fructose corn syrup increases your appetite and it promotes obesity more than regular sugar. “High fructose corn syrup also contributes to diabetes, inflammation, high triglycerides, and something we call non-alcoholic fatty liver disease,” says Dr. Hyman. He says it increases all the fat in the liver which now affects over 90 million Americans.

“It can even cause fibrosis or what we call cirrhosis. In fact, sugar in our diet is now the major cause of liver failure and that makes sugar the leading cause of liver transplants,” says Dr. Hyman.

Alternative options

So, should you stay away from everything fructose?

Well, you should as much as possible, says Dr. Hyman, but fruit is the exception.

Fruit has fructose, but it’s naturally occurring and it doesn’t have the same effects as high fructose corn syrup. Additionally, fruit is packaged with fiber, vitamins, minerals and all sorts of healing nutrients. So unless you eat massive amounts of fruit, fructose should not be a problem.

High-fructose corn syrup represents more than 40% of the caloric sweeteners that are added to our foods and beverages. If you find the words “high- fructose corn syrup” or the new term corn sugar on a label, stay away if you want to be healthy. “These are signs of very poor quality foods,” says Dr. Hyman. He says the easiest way to completely avoid high-fructose corn syrup is to eat real, whole, unprocessed foods.

But, if you must buy packaged foods, Dr. Hyman says read the labels carefully to identify sugar in other disguises.

“Sugar is hidden in over 80% of the 600,000 processed foods on the market,” he says. But beware: it’s disguised with over 200 different names, things like maltodextrin and other things you wouldn’t recognize.

As a general rule of thumb. Dr. Hyman says “If you can’t pronounce it, or you don’t recognize the ingredients, or you wouldn’t add it to food you cooked in your own kitchen, then don’t eat it!”

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

How To Avoid High Fructose Corn Syrup

How to avoid high fructose corn syrup

If you eat any processed foods, you probably eat too much high fructose corn syrup. But, the problem is that in today’s culture, almost everything that you eat is processed. The majority of foods sold at any supermarket are processed at a plant before they are shipped out. This means that you probably have too much high fructose corn syrup in your diet and high fructose corn syrup can lead to obesity, high blood pressure, coronary disease and even diabetes. Because of this, it’s a good idea for you to limit to amount of high fructose corn syrup that you ingest everyday. High fructose corn syrup is hard for your body to digest. Try these ways of avoiding high fructose corn syrup in the future.

Buy fresh produce

To stay completely on top of what goes into your food, avoid canned or processed food altogether and cook everything yourself. When you cook a food item from scratch, you are in control of every ingredient that goes into it. People are surprised to learn that items like canned green beans and processed instant mashed potatoes can contain HFCS – remember that in America it is far cheaper and easier to use HFCS than to use sugar, and any item that requires a sweetener will most likely lean in the direction of HFCS.

Eat Less Fast Food

Fast food is literally loaded with high fructose corn syrup. So, while it may be tempting to pull in for a quick burger, you should avoid eating fast food regularly to limit your high fructose corn syrup intake. More often than not, the food and drink you get at your favorite fast food restaurant contains high fructose corn syrup. Almost no menu items are safe from the invasion of HFCS. At Mcdonald’s, for instance, even the croutons in the salad contain HFCS, as does Newman’s Own Cobb Dressing (available with salads) and even the honey wheat roll the restaurant has recently introduced. Rather than attempting to memorize lists of fast food items containing HFCS, or trying to pick and choose menu items that don’t “seem like” they’d contain HFCS, you’d be better off avoiding fast food in favor of meals cooked at home

Eat More Fruits and Vegetables

Obviously, high fructose corn syrup is not a natural source of sugar. So, anytime you eat something that’s literally grown straight out of the earth, you can be sure you’re not getting any high fructose corn syrup in your diet. Additionally, most fruits and vegetables contain natural sugar so you’ll still get the energy that sugar provides without all the harmful side effects.

Avoid Drinking Soda

If you’re like most Americans, you probably grew up drinking soda. Some people drink more than one can a day. This can be incredibly bad for your health because soda is filled with high fructose corn syrup. The availability of soda over the last few decades has certainly been to blame for the spike in diabetes and obesity throughout the country.

Read More Nutritional Labels

It’s nearly impossible for you to avoid eating all processed foods. And that’s okay. You just need to be aware of the foods that contain high fructose corn syrup. Try to limit how often you eat them. Certain types of bread contain high fructose corn syrup, so try and pick one that doesn’t. Seltzer water is carbonated just like soda, but doesn’t contain the high level of high fructose corn syrup, so try substituting it.

In general, read more nutritional labels to find out how much high fructose corn syrup is contained in many of the foods you eat. Then, see if you can substitute better foods to limit the amount of high fructose corn syrup that you ingest.

Eat less sweeteners altogether

By avoiding candy, cookies, desserts, pastries, chocolates, and other sugary snacks and foods, you will be doing your body a big favor. At the same time, you will go far to eliminated high fructose corn syrup from your diet. When you want to sweeten coffee or tea, use honey – honey is actually sweeter than sugar, and is considered good for you. Maple syrup, molasses, and fruit juice are other alternatives to consider for sweeteners. The average American consumes almost 3 ounces of sugar a day, according to the Sugar Association – this is far too much, especially considering that the FDA recommends you eat “as little sugar as possible” for a healthy diet.

As more and more restaurants and manufacturers turn their backs on HFCS, it will be easier to avoid. Until then, read food labels and practice these common sense steps to remove corn syrup substances from your diet. Your body will thank you for it.

How to avoid high fructose corn syrup

As modern medical knowledge expands, sugar has been the target of a wealth of misconceptions — and a whole lotta hate. But perhaps no form of the sweet stuff is ostracized as much as high fructose corn syrup (HFCS).

True, its sheer ubiquity in processed foods is staggering. While most consumers pretty much expect its presence in sugary sodas, candy, and ice cream, it also hides out in so-called health foods, like yogurt and granola bars, as well as in innocuous-seeming staples such as salad dressings, breads, and condiments (via Healthline).

HFCS was first unleashed on an unsuspecting public in 1957, and by 2010 comprised “as much as 40 percent of caloric sweetener in the United States,” even in foods that previously did not incorporate sweeteners, according to LiveScience. The Corn Refiners Association lures manufacturers by pointing out its low cost as well as “taste, flavor and texture” enhancing attributes, helping create “breads that are more golden-brown,” “chewier” breakfast bars, “creamier” yogurts, and “refreshing” beverages.

Obviously, overconsumption of any form of sugar is a bad idea, and Americans are reported to devour more than triple the recommended amount (via UPMC HealthBeat). But critics warn that HFCS has particularly insidious effects on the body.

The health effects of high fructose corn syrup

How to avoid high fructose corn syrup

HFCS (not to be confused with corn syrup) is a chemically-produced product created from cornstarch, often made from genetically modified corn, and treated with enzymes to raise its fructose levels (via Healthline). That extra fructose generates numerous health hazards, since the liver must convert fructose into “glucose, glycogen (stored carbs), or fat by the liver before it can be used as fuel,” Healthline explains.

More technically speaking, Mark Hyman, MD, notes that this process enables lipogenesis, or “the production of fats like triglycerides and cholesterol,” causing the condition of fatty liver and skyrocketing insulin, which both lead to “increased metabolic disturbances that drive increases in appetite, weight gain, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, dementia, and more.” Hyman adds that HFCS saps energy and triggers full-body inflammation, which can also lead to long-term issues like obesity, diabetes, cancer, heart disease, dementia, and accelerated aging.

Hyman explains that HFCS may even contain contaminants, such as mercury, that fly under the FDA’s radar, while UPMC HealthBeat warns it can alter mood and increase the risk of cavities. And, of course, HFCS is not only totally devoid of nutrients itself (via Healthline) but also a sure sign of what Hyman calls “poor-quality, nutrient-poor, disease-creating industrial food products or ‘food-like substances.'”

Though the FDA claims it’s “not aware of any evidence” that HFCS is less safe than other sweeteners, with such a litany of possible ill effects, sounds like this sugar-like substance deserves its spot on health advocates’ most-hated list.

How to avoid high fructose corn syrup

High-fructose corn syrup is a sweetener commonly used in processed foods as a substitute for sugar, since the former is a much economical option. This syrup not only adds flavour to the food but also increases its shelf life. Almost every processed food (breads, cereals, soft drinks, and condiments) contains a specific amount of the syrup.

High fructose corn syrup is hard for your body to digest and can lead to many diseases, including coronary disease, high blood pressure, obesity and even diabetes. If you are also concerned about the side effects of high fructose corn syrup, limit your intake by switching to organic foods and eating more fruits and vegetables.

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Eat organic food

Since almost every processed food product contains high fructose corn syrup, you need to avoid them if you want to limit your intake . Instead add more and more organic food items to your daily diet. Organic foods contain natural sugar that the human body can easily digest as compared to HFCS.

Eat more fruits and vegetables

Fresh fruits and vegetables are a rich source of natural sugar. By adding more and more fruits and vegetables to your diet plan you will not only limit the intake of HFCS but will also get the energy that sugar provides without any harmful side effects.

Eat less fast food

Limit your fast food intake. Fast food restaurants use high amounts of HFCS in their food to add flavour. The syrup’s use is not limited to sweet food items, even foods that do not taste sweet, like bread and ketchup, contain this ingredient in large amounts.

Stop drinking soda and other soft drinks

If you want to limit intake of high fructose corn syrup, avoid canned or bottled drinks. Nearly all varieties of artificial drinks contain HFCS and are generally unhealthy if consumed regularly.

Buy fresh products and cook them at home

One of the main reasons behind growing obesity and other health related issues is the increasing reliance on processed food. Always try to buy fresh products and learn to cook your food at home using low fat.

As opposed to snacking on processed treats, keep a supply of apples, carrots and celery in the refrigerator. For your convenience, cut up fruits and vegetables before hand so can conveniently eat them when you feel hungry.

How to avoid high fructose corn syrup

High fructose corn syrup has crept into more of our foods over the last few decades. Compared with regular sugar, it’s cheaper and sweeter, and is more quickly absorbed into your body. But eating too much high fructose corn syrup can lead to insulin resistance, obesity, type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Functional medicine expert Mark Hyman, MD, explains the many ill effects of high fructose corn syrup, and he offers strategies to avoid it.

Fat production factory for your body

Fructose was initially thought to be a better choice for diabetics due to its low glycemic index. But only your liver cells can process fructose, and that’s where the problems begin.

“Fructose goes straight to your liver and starts a fat production factory,” Dr. Hyman says. “It triggers the production of triglycerides and cholesterol.” He explains that it’s actually the sugar — not the fat — that causes the most trouble for your cholesterol.

What’s even worse, Dr. Hyman notes, is high doses of fructose “punch little holes in your intestinal lining, causing what we call a leaky gut.” He explains that this allows foreign food proteins and bacterial proteins to enter into your bloodstream, which triggers inflammation, makes you gain weight and causes type 2 diabetes.

Increases appetite, promotes obesity

Studies show that high fructose corn syrup increases your appetite and it promotes obesity more than regular sugar. “High fructose corn syrup also contributes to diabetes, inflammation, high triglycerides, and something we call non-alcoholic fatty liver disease,” says Dr. Hyman. He says it increases all the fat in the liver which now affects over 90 million Americans.

“It can even cause fibrosis or what we call cirrhosis. In fact, sugar in our diet is now the major cause of liver failure and that makes sugar the leading cause of liver transplants,” says Dr. Hyman.

Alternative options

So, should you stay away from everything fructose?

Well, you should as much as possible, says Dr. Hyman, but fruit is the exception.

Fruit has fructose, but it’s naturally occurring and it doesn’t have the same effects as high fructose corn syrup. Additionally, fruit is packaged with fiber, vitamins, minerals and all sorts of healing nutrients. So unless you eat massive amounts of fruit, fructose should not be a problem.

High-fructose corn syrup represents more than 40% of the caloric sweeteners that are added to our foods and beverages. If you find the words “high- fructose corn syrup” or the new term corn sugar on a label, stay away if you want to be healthy. “These are signs of very poor quality foods,” says Dr. Hyman. He says the easiest way to completely avoid high-fructose corn syrup is to eat real, whole, unprocessed foods.

But, if you must buy packaged foods, Dr. Hyman says read the labels carefully to identify sugar in other disguises.

“Sugar is hidden in over 80% of the 600,000 processed foods on the market,” he says. But beware: it’s disguised with over 200 different names, things like maltodextrin and other things you wouldn’t recognize.

As a general rule of thumb. Dr. Hyman says “If you can’t pronounce it, or you don’t recognize the ingredients, or you wouldn’t add it to food you cooked in your own kitchen, then don’t eat it!”

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From our Read Your Labels Campaign, an installment in the series “Top Ten Food Additives to Avoid”, courtesy of Linda Bonvie

The only way to avoid this additive, which turns up almost everywhere, is to read the ingredient label.

Our number-one additive to avoid in the Citizens for Health “Read Your Labels” campaign is a man-made laboratory creation that turns up in such a wide variety of foods and drinks that you need to read labels constantly in order to keep from ingesting it.

Experts have implicated this unnatural ingredient in scores of health issues and diseases. Author and pioneer in integrative medicine Andrew Weil, M.D. calls it “…one of the very worst culprits in the diet.” Consumers have made it perfectly clear they don’t want it in food products, yet manufacturers of those products keep on using it because it’s cheap and easy to add to foods and beverages.

Like processed glutamic acid, this additive also has the backing of a powerful, multimillion-dollar lobbying group whose purpose is to keep it in widespread use, no matter how unpopular it becomes.

Our number one additive to avoid: High Fructose Corn Syrup (or HFCS)

High fructose corn syrup is a highly-processed, industrial sweetener in which glucose from corn syrup is further processed to create a desired amount of much-sweeter fructose. The manufacturing of HFCS is a highly complicated process, but the product is typically less expensive than sugar. It was first created in the late 1950s and hit the marketplace during the ’70s as a sweetening ingredient in soft drinks, its use soon expanding to almost every conceivable processed food product.

Due to increasing consumer dislike of the additive, the lobbying group representing the manufacturers of HFCS, the Corn Refiners Association (CRA), made a failed attempt several years ago to “officially” change the name of HFCS to “corn sugar.” Although the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) firmly rejected the name switch attempt last May, the CRA had already gone full steam ahead in promoting the “corn sugar” concept. And even now, almost a year after the FDA ruled that HFCS is most decidedly not sugar, the CRA still can’t let go of the idea that it is, currently referring to the industrial sweetener and preservative as “…simply a form of sugar made from corn.”

While the CRA wants us all to believe that HFCS and sugar are identical twins – a misconception often unwittingly spread by media and politicians who describe beverages containing HFCS as “sugary drinks” – there are numerous and substantial differences between the two, one of them being the higher and varying amounts of damaging fructose found in HFCS.

Dr. Michael Goran, director of the Childhood Obesity Research Center (CORC) and professor of preventive medicine at the University of Southern California, in a 2010 study published in the journal Obesity, found fructose amounts in several HFCS-sweetened sodas, such as Coke, Pepsi and Sprite to be as high as 65 percent – almost 20 percent higher than if they actually contained the 55 percent fructose version of HFCS we’ve all been led to believe they do.

While Dr. Goran’s research should have been the definitive “change (in) the conversation,” as the CRA likes to say, further research by Citizens for Health has turned up additional reasons why high fructose corn syrup is the perfect name for this laboratory-concocted additive.

Last year Citizens for Health filed a petition with the FDA asking that the agency take action against food and beverage manufacturers using HFCS with fructose amounts above 55 percent (the highest amount the FDA allows), and also, in the interim, to provide accurate label information so consumers know just what they’re buying (you can read the petition here and sign it by clicking here). The petition asks that the FDA require a manufacturer that uses HFCS to state the fructose percentage in that formulation and have the label reflect that information, such as HFCS-55, or HFCS-90.

Haven’t yet heard about HFCS 90? This is a version of the additive that is 90 percent fructose, described by one manufacturer and CRA-member company as “…the ideal choice for reduced calorie foods such as beverages, jellies and dressings.”

A research rap sheet that gets longer all the time

One of the latest negative HFCS studies, done by Dr. Goran, found that countries consuming large amounts of HFCS have a 20 percent higher prevalence of diabetes than those where it isn’t used. Goran said what that study suggests is that “HFCS poses an additional risk” over and above other risk factors, such as obesity, most likely due to the higher amounts of fructose in HFCS (which even if used at the ‘allowed’ 55 percent is a 10 percent increase over real sugar).

Goran is far from the only researcher to implicate HFCS and high fructose consumption with a variety of diseases and health problems. For example:

  • Georgia Health Sciences University researchers found in 2011 that high fructose consumption by teens can put them at risk for heart disease and diabetes, and also speculated that kids may “crave the cheap, strong sweetener.”
  • A Yale University study in 2013 published in the the Journal of the American Medical Association found that fructose – especially in the form of HFCS – may contribute to weight gain and obesity, since it has little effect on brain regions that act as a check on appetite.
  • Researchers at the University of California at Los Angeles in 2012 showed that a diet high in fructose slows the functioning of the brain, hampering memory and learning – and that omega-3 fatty acids may counteract the disruption.
  • University of California at Davis researchers in 2011 found adults who consumed high fructose corn syrup for two weeks as 25 percent of their daily calorie requirement had increased blood levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, indicators of increased risk for heart disease.

And with the Corn Refiners Association reporting over 19 billion pounds of HFCS shipped in 2011, it’s pretty obvious that this unhealthy and ubiquitous sweetener is not something folks are consuming in “moderation” as the CRA claims they should. And that, many experts believe, goes a long way in explaining why our population has suddenly become so “large.”

So there you have it – a rogue’s gallery of 10 undesirable food additives that, taken together, are no doubt responsible for many of the health problems that plague our nation, marring the quality of life for tens of millions of us and steadily driving up the cost of health care. And, unfortunately, so powerful and politically connected are the corporations that profit from their continued use in processed food that we cannot depend on regulatory agencies to keep these harmful substances out of our diet, but must take responsibility ourselves. This is why Citizens for Health has declared April 11 as “Read Your Labels Day,” which, hopefully, will mark the beginning of a healthy new trend. Stay tuned for more details and how you can participate now that you have the “411? on the top 10.

What is the big deal about high fructose corn syrup or HFCS? Most of us are aware that sugar is bad for us. But did you know HFCS is worse for your health than regular sugar?

  • According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA), the average American eats over 100 pounds of sugar in one year!
  • The average child (under 12 years old) eats 49 pounds of sugar.
  • 1/2 of that sugar is high fructose corn syrup.

What is high fructose corn syrup?

  • High Fructose Corn Syrup is a chemical sweetener blend of glucose and fructose.
  • It is an ingredient found in many processed foods including soft drinks.
  • HFCS is a highly processed sugar made from corn stalks.

How is HFCS Made?

  • High fructose corn syrup is a man made chemical.
  • It is created through a complex process involving extracting sugar from corn stalks.
  • HFCS is cheaper than sugar because of government farm bill corn subsidies.

Why is High fructose corn syrup is bad for you?

  • It is highly addictive
  • A study published in the Journal of Nutrition shows definitive correlation between High Fructose Corn Syrup consumption and negative health outcomes.
  • Fructose goes right to the liver and causes a condition called “fatty liver” which can lead to a damaged liver.

Health issues associated with HFCS

  • Obesity
  • Diabetes
  • High Blood Pressure
  • Heart Disease
  • Increased Belly Fat

Why is high fructose corn syrup worse than sugar?

  • HFCS and cane sugar are NOT biochemically identical.
  • A slight chemical difference between the two causes the body to react differently.
  • There is no chemical bond between the fructose and glucose molecules in HFCS so it can bypass digestion and be rapidly absorbed into the bloodstream – Dr. Mark Hyman
  • The fructose goes directly to the liver, where it converts to fat.
  • Sugar can make you feel full, but HCFS does not.
  • The lack of a “full” signal causes you to eat more calories than you actually need.

How to avoid high fructose corn syrup

  1. Stop buying foods made with high fructose corn syrup.
  2. Read every label and if you see HFCS listed, don’t buy it.
  3. Sodas are the number one offenders. A lot of sodas use high fructose corn syrup as the only sweetener.
  4. Note that HFCS is also commonly found in things such as children’s medicine.
  5. Watch out for label changes in the near future.

Companies are getting smart and adding “fructose” instead of high fructose corn syrup. Don’t be fooled when the front of the package says that a product contains no high fructose corn syrup. This fructose is actually a manufactured sugar called HFCS-90, and is made up of 90% pure fructose.

Foods to check for HFCS include:

  • Jelly and jam
  • Condiments like BBQ sauce, ketchup mayo etc.
  • Salad dressings
  • Yogurt
  • Breads
  • Cookies
  • Ice cream
  • Crackers
  • Cereals and breakfast foods
  • Apple sauce
  • Pasta sauces

You are in control of what you eat so just avoid it! We all know you are going to eat sugar because it’s everywhere, so avoid the worse stuff and go with the regular sugar!

What Is High Fructose Corn Syrup?

Posted October 29, 2014

How to avoid high fructose corn syrupHigh fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is an extremely processed, inexpensive, man-made sweetener found in many of the foods you consume. Commercially used high fructose corn syrup is made using enzymes and sometimes acids to break down corn starch into simple sugars, fructose and glucose. And while it might start with corn kernels, HFCS goes through many processes to become that super sweet syrup added to many processed foods, including soft drinks, ice cream, even yogurt and breads. It is so widely used, that the United States Department of Agriculture found that approximately 40 percent of the nutritive sweeteners consumed in the US came in the form of high fructose corn syrup.

Is it really bad for you?

High fructose corn syrup in moderation is probably just fine. The problem is moderation is seemingly impossible due to its widespread use. It is usually in processed sweet treats like cookies, where you might expect it, but HFCS is also hiding in crackers, bread, yogurt and “healthy” cereal. Since the introduction of HFCS, the obesity rate in the United States has skyrocketed. Several studies make a direct connection to high fructose corn syrup. HFCS interferes with the body’s metabolism. It slows down the secretion of leptin. Leptin is a crucial hormone that tells your body you’re full and should stop eating. HFCS fools your body into thinking it’s hungry. It’s no wonder our waistlines are expanding!

Metabolic Syndrome and Diabetes

Metabolic syndrome is defined as a group of risk factors – high blood pressure, high blood sugars, high cholesterol levels and belly fat – that increases risk of heart disease and diabetes. It is estimated by the American Heart Association that one out of six people have it. The scary thing is that most people don’t even know they have it. The only outward symptom is weight gain. Everything else would only be detectable by a medical doctor. And yet, it is to be taken very seriously. Metabolic syndrome can lead to much more serious ailments including diabetes, stroke and heart attack. Diabetes is on the rise, too. 29 million adults and children in the United States have diabetes. Seven million people are walking around undiagnosed and according to the CDC, a whopping 86 million people have prediabetes! Limiting your intake of fructose, especially high fructose corn syrup can help.

What to Do?

1. Read labels — Avoid high fructose corn syrup, especially if it’s at the top of the ingredient list. Listed there, it’s safe to assume the product is laden with it.

2. Fresh is best — Eat fewer processed and packaged foods. Sweetened grains like cookies, cakes and cereals should be avoided.

3. Shop the perimeters — Of the grocery store that is. Produce is typically on one side, meat, poultry and fish on the other. With dairy, eggs and bread on the third. The middle aisles usually contain the most processed foods likely to contain HFCS and should be avoided.

4. Skinny D — If you’re already overweight and dieting, read those labels as well. Slim Fast is full of high fructose corn syrup. Dr. Newton’s Naturals offers a better choice: Skinny D.

View products related to Weight Management.

For people who suffer from gout, there are certain factors that should be considered and be taken with great consequence. Similar to other health diets that focus on a particular health path and treatment, a diet for gout sufferers also has a distinct outline. Included in this are the Foods to Avoid for Gout, and those foods that are encouraged to consume. For gout, a meal program generally includes a low-fructose diet. Studies have revealed that there is a strong correlation between a high fructose diet and gout. To avoid the frequent occurrence of gout attacks, it is essential that you know the different sources of food that contains a high amount of fructose and for you to refrain from consuming it. Below are the sources of high fructose corn syrup.

1. Soft Drinks and Fruit Punch

Various soft drinks and fruit punches are first on the list of those food sources high in fructose corn syrup. High fructose corn syrup principally contributes as an inexpensive sweetener when it comes to manufacturing these drinks. Furthermore, taking into account the gradual increase of bottle sizes over the years, soda drinks have been considered as one of the most common sources of high fructose corn syrup in America. Sadly, when people decides to dismiss the consumption of soda in their diet, they usually move into the sphere of consuming fruit juices, which may sound “healthy” on the outside but holds the same rate to that of the soft drinks when it comes to high fructose corn syrup content. A healthy alternative for this dilemma is going for fresh fruit juices. Opt for those drinks that are made from pure fruit juices with no added sweeteners. Or, better yest, cut out all sweet drinks entirely.

2. Breakfast Cereals

There is no wonder as to why many people opt to have breakfast cereals in the morning. They are easy to prepare, requires little time, and actually makes you feel full – a cost effective solution for individuals who do not have time to spare in the morning. Nonetheless, most breakfast cereals contain high fructose corn syrup in them, making them an unhealthy choice for people with gout. Unfortunately, even those advertised as “healthy” breakfast grains or “organic” are not exempted to this high fructose corn syrup content. Although it may not apply to all breakfast cereals, it is still important to read the label just to make sure. If you are going to have a cereal for breakfast, choose one that is unsweetened.

3. Breads

Included in the Foods to Avoid for Gout are breads. Even though a lot of people have switched to the consumption of wheat breads rather than white breads, this does not necessarily entail an effective diet choice. Though dietary fiber and fewer carbohydrates are what people are generally looking for when choosing wheat breads, these do not always do the trick when it comes to losing weight. Both white bread and wheat bread often include high fructose corn syrup, or other sugars. A healthier alternative to this is by choosing whole grain sprouted breads.

4. Flavorings and Dressings

In the effort to embrace a healthy lifestyle, many people decide to begin eating more eating salads and adding more fruits in their meal program. However, the benefits of a healthy salad are often erased by the addition of a high sugar salad dressing. The sad truth about this is that even most low-fat salad dressings chosen by many to add flavor to their healthy meal contain high fructose corn syrup content. Experiment with olive oil and balsamic vinegar for a tasty sugar free dressing!

Condiments such as ketchup and other sauces, including vegetable dips, are also packed with high fructose corn syrup. Refrain from eating sweetened jams and jellies as well and opt for a better choice of fresh or raw fruits in your diet.

5. Yogurt

Most people go for yogurt to assist them with their digestive disorders, considering the probiotic content found in them to be beneficial. Unfortunately, many yogurts do contain high fructose corn syrup and other sugars to “enhance” the flavor and the firmness of the fruit. This also helps in separating the liquid and solid mixtures of the food. Although it is promoted for its digestive benefits, yoghurt loses most of its benefits due to its sugar content, A healthier alternative for this is to go for plain unsweetened yogurt. You can just add fresh fruits for your flavoring or added taste.

Since gout attacks are so painful and debilitating, it is important for people who suffer from this affliction to be extra careful of the foods that they consume. See to it that your food choices are not included in the Foods to Avoid for Gout list. Moreover, remember that the list above is a general overview, and you can always find alternative choices that contain little or no high fructose corn syrup. To avoid problems, it is vital to always read the labels when picking out your food.

by Permanent Weight Loss Coach JoLynn Braley | Published on Apr 10, 2007 | Last updated Apr 14, 2012 | Food

Yesterday I gave you 5 (more) Reasons to Avoid High Fructose Corn Syrup. At the end of the post I mentioned that I would give you an experiment today that you could conduct on yourself. You’ve probably read about many of the dangers of HFCS, but how about you put that information aside for a moment and try this:

For one week, do not eat any food that contains HFCS. This means that you won’t eat any fast food unless you can obtain the complete list of ingredients for the item(s) that you want. For any other food, read every ingredient and if high fructose corn syrup, corn syrup, crystalline fructose, fructose, or any other ingredient is listed that you think could possibly be in this category, do not eat it. The reason that I suggest the latter is because I only recently learned of crystalline fructose, so there could be other versions of fructose and corn syrups out there.

After one week, pick out something that you like that has HFCS listed as one of the top 4 ingredients. Pick a time when you can sit down and eat without any distractions; have your notebook handy. Keep the TV and radio off, mute the phone, and focus on your food. Eat the food that you have selected and remain conscious of how your body feels while you are eating it. How does your stomach, your gut, your head physically feel? How long does it take until you feel full? (Remember that HFCS interferes with the hormone that sends the signal to your brain to tell it that your stomach is full.) Write down any notes, anything at all that you learn while you are consciously eating.

After you finish, continue to note how your body feels over the next hour, two hours, during the rest of the evening or day. Keep jotting notes down in your notebook or journal.

Tune in and use your intuition along with the feedback that your own body is giving you to determine whether or not HFCS works well in your body. Does it give you more energy or do you feel sluggish? Do you observe that you have cravings for more food and you aren’t even hungry? How do your intestines feel? (Yes, I mean it, pay attention to your gut!)

Now, this exercise will be much more effective if you eat only whole foods for at least a week, and then eat the food containing HFCS. The way that I have experienced my body’s reaction is when I have eaten processed food after having been eating only whole foods, and doing so for several weeks or months. I get very bloated, lethargic, foggy headed, and overall don’t feel well. Even so, if your diet has consisted mainly of processed foods up until this point, I think that this exercise will be very telling, especially since so many processed foods contain the fructose and corn syrup ingredients (so you will be knocking out a large number of processed foods during your week).

By conducting this experiment, you will learn for yourself how HFCS plays havoc with your body. This way, you will have your own proof that it is not a healthy ingredient to ingest. Not only does it increase your cravings for more and more food, it just makes your body feel bad.

I have a lot of information to share with you based on my own experiences, my research, extensive reading, studying, and the work that I have done on myself thus far, however I believe that you already have all of the answers within you, as everyone does. In order to discover them, you must become conscious of what your body and mind is trying to tell you. I can give you information and help you remember what you already know (just like I am reminded of what I know by reading, the teachings of others, and direct experience), but if you tune in and listen to yourself, you will gain much more knowledge than anyone else can give you.

Please let me know how this goes if you conduct this experiment. I’m interested in what you discover, and others could learn from your experience, too.

Chiropractics, Yoga, Tai Chi, Healthy Living

  • Posted on March 21, 2017
  • by Lanjopoulos Chiropractic
  • in Health News

Traditional EatingHow to avoid high fructose corn syrup

High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) is a highly processed chemical used in a lot (too many) of commercial products as a cheap substitute for regular sugar.

If sugar is bad for your health then HFCS is HORRIBLE!

Not only does it contribute far more to obesity than sugar (1) it produces (in animal studies):

  • Impaired glucose tolerance
  • High insulin levels
  • Insulin resistance
  • High triglycerides
  • High blood pressure

HFCS also contributes to fatty liver and the buildup of dangerous deposits in your blood vessel walls. (2) This leads to plaque buildup, causing increased susceptibility to both strokes and heart attacks, and accelerated aging. (3)

As if that weren’t bad enough, HFCS has now been found to contain mercury. In January 2009, the journal Environmental Health reported that mercury had been found in nearly half of all tested samples of commercial HFCS.

How can you avoid HFCS?

That’s simple, merely read food labels. Other processed sugars to avoid are:

  • inulin
  • iso glucose
  • glucose-fructose syrup
  • dahlia syrup
  • tapioca syrup
  • glucose syrup
  • corn syrup
  • crystalline fructose
  • fruit fructose
  • agave

Which foods have it?

Most sodas are loaded with HFCS as are many fruit juices, ketchup, salad dressings, sauces, baked goods, crackers, cornflake crumbs, chicken broth, stuffing mixes, cereals and more.

NOTE: this weekend it was mentioned on the weekend talk shows that Americans are now buying more WATER than soda…YES!!

Table of Contents

Why should you Avoid High Fructose Corn Syrup In Your Diet? High Fructose Corn Syrup is one the the most common, well known food additive and possible the most controversial. If I had only one piece of advice to give on having a healthy diet it would be to eliminate high fructose corn syrup from your life. If your food has this listed on the ingredient list I can also guarantee it’s processed junk and you would be better of leaving it of the supermarket self. I am a strong advocate against processed foods. Our bodies are made to consume natural foods and this is the primary form of fuel. Please do not pollute your body with this harmful toxin. Here is a fantastic article written by Mark Hyman, MD on why you need to stop eating food containing High Fructose Corn Syrup:

High Fructose Corn Syrup: The Ultimate “NO” in Any Diet

Renaissance physician Paracelsus famously said, “The dose makes the poison,” meaning that even harmless substances can become toxic if you eat enough of them. Many people ask me, “Is high fructose syrup really that bad for you?” And my answer to this question is “Yes,” mainly for this very reason.

In America today, we are eating huge doses of sugar, especially high fructose corn syrup. It is sweeter and cheaper than regular sugar and is in every processed food and sugar-sweetened drink. Purging it from your diet is the single best thing you can do for your health!

In recent history, we’ve gone from 20 teaspoons of sugar per person per year to about 150 pounds of sugar per person per year. That’s a half pound a day for every man, woman, and child in America. The average 20-ounce soda contains 15 teaspoons of sugar, all of it high fructose corn syrup. And when you eat sugar in those doses, it becomes a toxin.

As part of the chemical process used to make high fructose corn syrup, the glucose and fructose — which are naturally bound together — become separated. This allows the fructose to mainline directly into your liver, which turns on a factory of fat production in your liver called lipogenesis.

This leads to fatty liver, the most common disease in America today, affecting 90 million Americans. This, in turn, leads to diabesity — pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes. So, high fructose corn syrup is the real driver of the current epidemic of heart attacks, strokes, cancer, dementia, and of course, Type 2 diabetes.

HFCS contains dangerous chemicals and contaminants

Beside the ginormous load of pure fructose and sugar found in HCFS, as an added bonus, it contains other chemical toxins. Chemical contaminants used during manufacturing end up in the HFCS and in our food. What we know, for example, is that chloralkali is used in making high fructose corn syrup. Chloralkai contains mercury. And there are trace amounts of mercury found in high fructose corn syrup-containing beverages. Now, it may not be a problem if we eat this occasionally, but the average person in the country consumes more than 20 teaspoons a day of high fructose corn syrup and the average teenager has 34 teaspoons a day. Over time, these heavy metals can accumulate in the body, causing health problems.

Additionally, when we look at the chemical components of high fructose corn syrup on a spectrograph, we can see that it contains many weird chemicals that we know nothing about. That’s why I say better safe than sorry.

Look out for the red flag

The main reason you should give up high fructose corn syrup is that it’s a big red flag for very poor quality food. If you see this ingredient on a label, I guarantee you the food is processed junk. So, if high fructose corn syrup is anywhere on the label, put it back on the shelf. You should never eat this food.

If you want to stay healthy, lose weight easily, get rid of chronic disease, and help reduce the obesity epidemic, the single most important thing you can do is eliminate high fructose corn syrup from your diet and from your children’s diet. Just banish it from your house.

Purge your kitchen

I challenge you to go into your kitchen right now, go in the cupboard and refrigerator, and look at every single label. And I want you to count how many products you have right now in your house that contain high fructose corn syrup. Then, I want you to get a big garbage bag and throw them out and find replacements that are free of it.

If you want to have some sugar, that’s fine. Have a little sugar, but add it to your food yourself. Don’t eat food made with added sugar. Cut the high fructose corn syrup from your life forever. You’ll be healthier. Our planet will be healthier. And we’ll have a healthier generation of children.

Be sure to avoid High Fructose Corn Syrup In Your Diet. Click here to hear more on this topic. Natural is always better for you. If you are ready to change your diet for the better check out the banner below for a 8 week simple meal plan!

How to avoid high fructose corn syrup

Contents

Ever notice high fructose corn syrup is in an ingredient list of any of your favorite foods and wonder what it is?

In this article, we will explore what high fructose corn syrup is, how your body digests it, and why you should avoid it.

What is high fructose corn syrup?

High fructose corn syrup is a common sweetener made from the process of converting starch.

As the importation of cane sugar became increasingly expensive, multiple manufacturers started using high fructose corn syrup to lower production costs and increase profits.

High fructose corn syrup and government subsidies

High fructose corn syrup production receives government subsidies making it a great product for manufacturers, as well as consumers, as it helps lower costs.

Government tariffs on imported sugar (these sugar tariffs cost the U.S. businesses and consumers 3.86 billion dollars annually) make high fructose corn syrup even more tempting for businesses as the high demands/costs of sweeteners would raise prices substantially if sugar cane were used.

What foods are high fructose corn syrup in?

High fructose corn syrup is a sweetener found in nearly all kinds of different foods, including baking ingredients, cereal, bread, soft drinks, pastries, waffles, bars, candy, children’s treats, condiments, cookies, cakes, crackers, soups, chocolate, dairy, canned fruits and vegetables, ice creams, spreads, salad dressings, chips, and granola bars.

The top 5 high fructose corn syrup dangers

High fructose corn syrup danger #1: High fructose corn syrup is processed differently than cane sugar in the body

Regular sugar, called cane sugar, is made up of the sugar molecules, glucose and fructose, bound together in equal amounts.

The digestive tract enzymes break down the sucrose into the glucose and fructose molecules to be absorbed into the body.

On the other hand, high fructose corn syrup is broken down into glucose and sucrose as well, but in a 55-45 glucose-to-fructose ratio.

There is no chemical bond between the 2 sugars in high fructose corn sugar, which allows for the rapid absorption of them into the blood sugar.

The rapidly absorbed glucose causes spikes in insulin, which is the major fat hormone of the body.

The rapidly absorbed fructose goes right to the liver and triggers lipogenesis, causing a condition that affects 70 million Americans called Fatty Liver.

High fructose corn syrup danger #2: High Fructose Corn Syrup depletes our energy storage!

Research is done at the Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute found that free fructose from high fructose corn syrup requires more energy to be absorbed by the gut and soaks up two phosphorous molecules from ATP (our body’s energy source).

This causes the energy stores in our gut to be depleted, which is required to keep the intestinal lining intact.

To put into simpler terms, high doses of high fructose corn syrup consumption has been shown to literally rip holes in our gut, which allow nasty gut bacteria and partially digested proteins to enter the bloodstream and trigger inflammation that has been known to cause obesity, diabetes, cancer, dementia, accelerated aging, and heart disease.

This is one of many high fructose corn syrup dangers that could cause harmful effects on our bodies.

High fructose corn syrup danger #3: Mercury found in products containing high fructose corn syrup!

In a report published at the Institute of Agriculture and Trade Policy located in Minnesota showed detectable levels of Mercury in 17 of 55 products tested that were rich in high fructose corn syrup.

These products included Jack Daniel’s barbecue sauce, Quaker Oatmeal to go bars, nutra-grain strawberry cereal bars, and many more. Mercury exposure at high levels can cause brain, heart, kidney, immune system, and lung damage.

This is one of many high fructose corn syrup dangers.

High fructose corn syrup danger #4: High fructose corn syrup has been linked to obesity.

High fructose corn syrup represents more than 40% of sweeteners added to foods and beverages and is the sole caloric sweetener in beverages in the United States.

The average American ages 2 and up consume approximately 132 calories daily from high fructose corn syrup.

High fructose corn syrup does not stimulate insulin secretion or enhance leptin production (insulin and leptin play a key role in the regulation of food intake and bodyweight) and thus, dietary fructose may have a big role in increased energy intake and weight gain as well as caloric over-consumption.

Obesity is a huge problem and the likelihood of obesity is increased with high fructose corn syrup dangers.

High fructose corn syrup danger #5: High fructose corn syrup is a sign of poor nutrition.

Most products, if not all, that contain the ingredient, high fructose corn syrup, are a sign of nutrition depleted, processed, unhealthy industrial food full of empty calories and artificial ingredients.

These products will not be whole, real, fresh foods and will not contain vitamins, minerals, antioxidants, phytochemicals, and fiber.

The verdict

If you want a healthy diet, stay away from products containing high fructose corn syrup.

Real, fresh, whole foods will not contain high fructose corn syrup and the associated high fructose corn syrup dangers.

How to avoid high fructose corn syrup

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  • Wheat Free Vs. Gluten Free
  • Tips to Avoiding Grains & Sweets

High-fructose corn syrup, often abbreviated as HFCS on food labels, is one of the most commonly used sweeteners in the food industry, now appearing not only in sweets, soft drinks and desserts, but even in breads, ketchup and peanut butter. If you have a corn allergy, a corn intolerance or fructose malabsorption problem, eating foods sweetened with HFCS can cause mild to serious symptoms.

Corn Allergy

A food allergy is a serious, possibly life-threatening, reaction that can occur shortly after eating a food. Peanuts and other nuts, soy, seafood, wheat and dairy products are common food allergens, but it is possible to be allergic to almost any food — corn is no exception. The most common symptoms that you may experience from high-fructose corn syrup if you are allergic to corn include an itchy sensation in your mouth, swelling of your mouth, hives, eczema, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, a drop in your blood pressure and even breathing difficulty. If you get a severe reaction or have difficulty breathing, seek immediate medical attention. If you are allergic to corn, avoid all products containing corn-derived ingredients including high-fructose corn syrup.

Corn Intolerance

A food intolerance is different to a true food allergy and although it is not life-threatening in the short-term, it can also trigger health problems. If you are intolerant to corn, eating foods or drinking beverages sweetened with high-fructose corn syrup can result in abdominal pain, aches and pains, arthritis, diarrhea, fatigue, fibromyalgia, fluid retention, headaches, rashes, urticaria and wheezing. If you experience any symptoms after eating corn or products containing HFCS, ask your doctor to be tested to determine whether you are allergic or intolerant to corn. Knowing that corn is the culprit will allow you to adapt your diet to avoid experiencing these symptoms.

Fructose Malabsorption

Even if you don’t have a corn allergy or corn intolerance, consuming high-fructose corn syrup could cause unpleasant digestive symptoms. Bloating, flatulence, abdominal pain, diarrhea and constipation are all potential side effects that can occur after eating foods or drinks containing HFCS if you have fructose malabsorption. Most people with fructose malabsorption are unaware of the problem, but it actually is a common factor in irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, according to dietitian Kate Scarlata, writing for Today’s Dietitian. Ask your doctor to be tested for fructose malabsorption with a hydrogen breath test if you suspect you have it.

Foods to Avoid

Whether you have fructose malabsorption, a corn allergy or a corn intolerance, keep high-fructose corn syrup out of your diet by carefully reading ingredient lists of any foods you eat. Be aware that high-fructose corn syrup can also be listed as HFCS, corn syrup, corn syrup solids or corn sugar. Avoid buying foods that come with a sauce or marinades, which are likely to contain corn-derived ingredients such as HFCS. To avoid unpleasant symptoms, prepare most of your foods from scratch at home with corn-free ingredients.

  • National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases: What Is An Allergic Reaction to Food?
  • Children’s Hospital of the King’s Daughters: Corn Allergy
  • Allergy Kids Foundation: The Truth About High Fructose Corn Syrup
  • Food Intolerance Awareness: Symptoms
  • Today’s Dietitian: The FODMAPs Approach — Minimize Consumption of Fermentable Carbs to Manage Functional Gut Disorder Symptoms

Aglaee Jacob is a registered dietitian. She has experience working with people who have diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension and obesity issues. Jacob obtained a bachelor of science and a master of science, both in nutrition, from Laval University in Quebec City, Canada.

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is a non-nutrient bearing, calorie-providing sweetener, used to sweeten many of our processed foods and beverages.

This relatively new food ingredient was first produced in Japan in the late 1960s. It then entered the American food supply system in the early 1970s.

When (HFCS) first entered the American food system, consumption of this sweetener averaged roughly 3 pounds per/person, per/year. Since that time however, consumption on average, has skyrocketed to over 60 pounds per/person, per/year.

High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) is now the most desirable sweetener used by food manufacturers because it is equally as sweet as table sugar, blends well with other foods, helps foods to maintain a longer shelf life, and is less expensive than other sweeteners due to government subsidies on corn.

Even though it floods many of the foods and beverages Americans love to consume, there is reason to be concerned.

Here are 6 reasons why you should try to avoid High Fructose Corn Syrup

1. (HFCS) requires no digestion

There is no digestion required for High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS), so, because of the way its metabolized 100 percent of the metabolic process rests on your liver. (HFCS) is immediately main-lined directly into the liver triggering the production of triglycerides and cholesterol causing liver damage.

2. (HFCS) Raises Bad Cholesterol and Triglycerides

Every cell in your body, including your brain, utilizes glucose. Therefore, much of it can be “burned up” after being consumed. By contrast, High Fructose Corn Syrup is turned into free fatty acids, the damaging type of cholesterol and triglycerides, which get stored as fat.

3. (HFCS) Causes Insulin Resistance and (NAFLD)

Fatty acids created during High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) metabolism accumulate as fat deposits in your liver and skeletal muscle tissues. This in turn causes two major symptoms, one is called insulin resistances, which now affects 1 in 3 Americans and the other is called Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD) which affects nearly 30 percent of the entire American population.

4. (HFCS) Increases Body Fat Storage

High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) is the most lipophilic carbohydrate. Simply put (HFCS) converts to Glycerol-3-Phosphate (G3P) which is then directly used to turn fatty acids into triglycerides. The more (G3P) you have in your body, the more fat your body will store.

5. (HFCS) Produces Hormonal Interferences

High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) interferes with the brain’s communication with leptin, a hormone which plays a key role in regulating appetite. This miscommunication negates the feeling of being satiated resulting in overeating.

6. (HFCS) is a Marker for Poor Quality Food

High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) is a marker for poor-quality, nutritionally-depleted, processed industrial food full of empty calories and artificial ingredients. If you find high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) on the label you can be sure it is not a whole, real, fresh food full of fiber, vitamins, minerals, phytonutrients, and antioxidants.

Bottom Line

As we can see, High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) has become ubiquitous in our food supply. The sticky stuff features prominently in everything from breakfast cereals, breads and processed snacks to soft drinks, sauces and salad dressings.

How to Avoid (HFCS)

The best way to avoid the dangers of High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) and all of its adverse effects is to avoid processed or pre-packaged foods and drinks. Instead, focus on whole ‘real food’ choices consisting of quality lean meats, poultry and fish, nuts and seeds and plenty low glycemic fruits and vegetables.

Effective Ways Avoid High Fructose Corn Syrup

The use of sweet potato and corn sugar cane sugar substitute

The use of sweet potato and corn sugar cane sugar substitute. Sugar is a simple carbohydrate that is the source of energy. Sugars such as sucrose from cane juice, sweet potatoes, sugar or palm sugar produced. However, there are other smaller sources of sugar such as coconut, sources of other sweeteners such as corn and tubers, produces a type of sugar / sweetener, but is composed of sucrose.

Potato Fudge scientist can help blood circulation and heart health, this was due to anthocyanins found in sweet potatoes. Power for the content of anthocyanin in sweet potato tubers to accelerate the cure of diseases of migraine

Sugar Sweet Potatoes contain carbohydrates disaccharide sucrose as disaccharides, lactose and maltose. Sucrose in many foods and can be found in the sugar derived from sugar cane or beets, sweet potato. Sucrose is formed from glucose and fructose.

Sugar sweet potatoes will be taken at a time isomerase fruktosanya be consumed only as safe for everyone, excess fructose is bad is a complication of cancer, in order to prevent this, a natural anthocyanin content in purple sweet potatoes to be enriched with sugar, so sugar sweet potato sweet potato contains cancer, this is good for the body.

POTATO
The sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) var ayamurasaki comes from Japan, the market price is pretty cheap, and has its own advantages compared with other root vegetables, sweet potatoes are also very good for young people in its infancy, due to vitamins A sweet tubers, B1, B2, B6 contain, B12 and C, which serves to promote a healthy body and beauty products to keep skin.

These lamps have a tuber anthocyanins contain carotenoids, folate and potassium. Thus, the sweet potato as an effective antioxidant. Potassium is always play normal blood pressure, control cholesterol levels in the blood and maintain good eye health. Purple sweet potato tubers, which contains elements of anticancer cancer ward. In the execution of 100 g potato tubers containing nutrients into energy 112 kcal, 2.4 g mg of protein, 0.1 g fat, 26.3 g carbohydrates, 9 mg calcium, phosphorus, 45, 0.6 mg zinc and 14 g ascorbic acid. Tubers of sweet potatoes have anthocyanins are purple pigments in the flesh and skin of sweet potatoes contain anthocyanins contained may have antioxidant effects, is good enough, which can inhibit free radicals so that the consumption of anthocyanin reasonable to to protect the onset of disease complications in DM

Sweet Sugar Production Process
The procedure for the preparation of sugar includes phase extraction (extortion), followed by purification by distillation (distillation).
Stages:

First Extraction: This phase begins with finely cut sweet potato tubers. Extraction takes place in a diffuser. In the diffuser, cut sweet potatoes into contact with hot water in a long time, about an hour. This extraction is almost the same as if we are to make a tea, in which the color and flavor will come out of tea, sweet potato. Removal of fluid containing 14% sugar and pulp waste contains about 1-2% sugar and 12.8% total solids content.

Two Presses: This process takes place in a clamp-clamp to squeeze the juice of the sweet potato as much as possible. Results pengempasan juice with the juice then mixed diffuser.

Third Karbonatasi: This phase aims to speed up the juice of sweet potato solids that cause cloudy. At this time the color will disappear.

Fourth Boiling: This stage is the final stage of the production of sweet sugar. At this stage, sweet juice karbonatasi results in a large pot for cooking included, and evaporated. The use of sweet potato and corn sugar cane sugar substitute

How to avoid high fructose corn syrup

If you have read this post on “Foods To Avoid” you will know that I work very hard to keep High Fructose Corn Syrup out of our home. Here are a couple of the reasons why:

Breads/Cereals
(MOST breads have HFCS. There is more of a demand for HFCS-free bread, so I have been seeing bread companies respond to that demand, slowly but surely!

  • Natures Own 100% Whole Wheat bread (note, their other varieties do contain HFCS, but not this one)*
  • Rudi’s Organic 100% Whole Wheat bread
  • Sara Lee Hearty and Delicious 100% Wheat With Honey Bread*
  • Sara Lee Hearty and Delicious 100% Whole Wheat Bread*
  • Pepperidge Farms Whole Grain Wheat Bread
  • Pepperidge Farms 100% Whole Wheat Bagels*
  • Kashi Cereals*
  • Cheerios*
  • Total
  • Total Cinnamon Crunch
  • Post Grape-Nuts
  • Life Cereal
  • Quaker Oatmeal*
  • (or make homemade granola )
  • Annie’s Naturals Organic Ketchup
  • Annie’s Naturals Organic Honey Mustard
  • Annie’s Naturals Smokey Maple BBQ Sauce
  • Annie’s Naturals Roasted Red Pepper Vinaigrette (great used as a grilled chicken marinade!)
  • Bull’s-Eye Original Barbeque Sauce
  • Cascadian Farms Sweet Pickle Relish
  • Frenchs Honey Dijon Mustard (Most regular mustard contains hfcs, but a lot of the “honey” mustard’s do)
  • Heinz Organic Ketchup*
  • Hellman’s Mayonnaise
  • Wishbone Bountiful’s Salad Dressing
  • Natural Jif Peanut Butter*
  • Polaner All Fruit Spread(*we use jelly all the time on pb & j sandwiches and toast, so finding on w/o HFCS was exciting!)
  • Welches 100% Fruit Spreads
  • Nature’s Promise Organic Ice Creams
  • Breyer’s All Natural Ice Cream*
  • Breyers Pure Fruit Strawberry Fruit Bars*
  • Luigi Italian Ice
  • Dreyers/Edy’s Strawberry Fruit Ice Cream Bars
  • Some Ben & Jerry’s (ones with bits of candy and cookies usually do have HFCS
  • Nabisco Original Triscuits*
  • Some Pepperidge Farm Crackers and Cookies
  • Cadbury-most
  • Hershey’s Skor
  • Hershey’s Special Dark Candy Bar
  • Dove-most *
  • Kashi*
  • Nature Valley Oats and Honey Granola Bars*
  • Kashi Go Lean
  • Breyer’s
  • Brown Cow*
  • Dannon Activa
  • Stoneyfield Farm*
  • Wallaby Organic*
  • Mott’s Natural Apple Sauce (add honey to sweeten, I use this in place of oil in many baking recipes)*
  • Simply Orange Juice Products*
  • Simply Lemonaide
  • China Cola
  • Archer Farms Brand Natural Italian Soda
  • Blue Sky Soft Drinks
  • Jones Pure Cane Soda

Pasta Sauce (I usually made homemade, recipe here)

  • Ragu Organic Pasta Sauce
  • Classico (most )

Think of it as an ‘exchange” — HFCS food for non-HFCS. It seems less restricting, it is not that you have to go without, but be aware of th e ingredients in certain products, and exchange the products you have been using, for more healthful ones.
I am fairly sure these products do not contain Non-hydrogenated Oils, which is another BIG thing to avoid.

*the products I use most often
**excuse the crazy sized font and spaces on this post. After trying for 45 minutes to fix it, I gave up!

How to avoid high fructose corn syrup

How to avoid high fructose corn syrup

It’s that time of year again–time to dress up the little ones and hit the candy circuit, right?! Well, not so fast. Most candies that hit your child’s Halloween bag will be loaded with high fructose corn syrup (HFCS). Also referred to (somewhat misleadingly) as corn sugar and corn syrup, high fructose corn syrup has been linked to diabetes, obesity, heart disease, and tooth decay. It can be contaminated with mercury and it’s almost always genetically modified. With a little forethought, however, you can protect your child from this dangerous sweetener without missing out on Halloween fun.

1. Make your own Halloween treats.

The easiest way to avoid high fructose corn syrup is to make your own Halloween candies. Choose natural sweeteners like organic cane sugar, organic cane syrup, agave syrup, honey, and brown rice syrup and use Halloween molds to achieve a festive shape.

2. Choose organic, fair trade chocolate.

Chocolate is a great option because there are so many organic and fair trade chocolate options. These sweet treats are often much less processed than conventional candies. Be sure to choose dark chocolate that’s high in antioxidant cocoa and low in sugar.

3. Buy organic.

Organic candies are free of high fructose corn syrup and usually sweetened with organic cane sugar. Some of my organic candies for Halloween include Endangered Species chocolate bars, Glee Gum, Alter Eco Candies, and Yum Earth Organic Lollipops.

From the Organic Authority Files

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4. Give treasures instead of candy.

Cut down on high fructose corn syrup consumption by giving treasures instead of Halloween candy. Some good ideas include polished stones, crystals, stickers, temporary tattoos, and crayons. Be creative–kids love trinkets and they won’t rot their teeth.

5. Host a Halloween party.

Instead of trick-or-treating, host a Halloween party at your house. Kids (and adults!) can dress up, make fun homemade candies, play games, and you don’t have to worry about high fructose corn syrup. Make a spread at home with fruit alternatives like frozen grapes, fresh fruit dipped in dark chocolate, and organic apples dipped in homemade caramel. Yum!

6. Give pumpkin points.

Instead of candy, consider “pumpkin points”. Kids can trade pumpkin points for treats like a trip to the movies, fun trinkets, a trip to the park, or a trip to the kid’s museum. Make Halloween about more than just the candy, make it an experience.

High fructose corn syrup, HFCS, also known as glucose/fructose in Canada, is a sweetener used in most packaged foods and soft drinks. It is cheaper to produce than refined sugar mostly due to large government subsidies.

How to avoid high fructose corn syrup

It is good to see that more people are becoming aware of the consequences of eating food (or should I say non-food) containing HFCS.

Concerns about HFCS contributing to diabetes and obesity are real. There is an increasing amount of experimental data supporting these claims!

Some companies such as Heinz, and Hunts, are bowing under pressure and running adds stating the product or drink does not contain HFCS.

Buyer beware, they are back to using sugar, trying to trick consumers into believing that sugar is much better for us!

Also, now that the public have been alerted to the dangers, the corn refiners association wants the FDA to change the name of high fructose corn syrup to corn sugar. Same product, different name.

Use of HFCS in processed foods began in the 70’s and gradually replaced cane and beet sugar in foods.
The 80’s showed a huge spike in the use of HFCS and not surprisingly this coincides with skyrocketing obesity.
85% of HFCS is made from genetically modified corn.

HFCS can be found in candies, juice, ketchup, canned fruits and vegetables, aperetifs, chocolate, frozen meals, vitamins, cough syrup, crackers, mayonnaise, salad dressing, pastry, ice cream, cookies, yogurt, yogurt drinks, gum, jam, etc.

The trouble with HFCS?

There is no level of satiation.

Here’s what happens.

Sugar, glucose and other sugars cause the pancreas to produce insulin. Fructose does not. Fructose also has no effect on the production of leptin, a hormone produced by the body’s fat cells. Both insulin and leptin signal the body to start suppressing appetite.

How to avoid high fructose corn syrup

When soft drinks were sweetened with sugar if you drank a lot you would probably vomit. Now you can drink a few liters and the body will tolerate it. You can also consume a whole bag of cookies and want to eat more. The same holds true for any snack sweetened with HFCS.

Also, HFCS does not raise glycemic levels, it is transformed into triglycerides, which is a kind of fat, which is found in the blood and deposited in the arteries. It raises our cholesterol and is a major factor in the cause of heart disease, heart attack and other health disorders.

Sugar and HFCS have some of the same effects on the body. here are only a few

  • Immediately depresses the immune system
  • Increases acidity in the body
  • Increases free radicals
  • Can contribute to hyperactivity, anxiety and depression
  • Causes cavities

1. Drink pure water, kick your soft drink habit. If you have a real addiction, reduce slowly to avoid severe withdrawal symptoms, severe headaches, etc.

2. Cook more from scratch. Making your own healthy food instead of consuming processed packaged food is one way to ensure you are not consuming HFCS.

3. Read labels carefully. If you do buy packaged foods read the labels and avoid foods with HFCS.

4. If you need to use sweetener, choose a natural sweetener

Once you start making healthy eating choices and following a healthy diet it is easy to avoid foods that contain high fructose corn syrup.

The healthier you eat the more you crave healthy foods.

How to avoid high fructose corn syrup

High fructose corn syrup or HFCS is seen by some to be the single cause for the obesity epidemic we are currently facing, but is it really any worse that other forms of sugar?

Depending on who you talk to, you will get a different answer to this question. However, despite the varying opinions on the subject, the consensus in the scientific world seems to be that HFCS is no worse for us than other forms of sugar.

Epidemiological studies have shown a definite rise in obesity that coincides with the increased use of HFCS in the American food chain, however, studies into the action of the substance on the body have suggested that there is no difference between this and normal table sugar on biochemical processes in the body.

Although there is no evidence suggesting that HFCS is causing obesity, it is admitted that the area will benefit from further research.

What is high fructose corn syrup?

HFCS contains a mixture of the two sugars fructose and glucose. There are two main types of HFCS, one which contains 55% fructose and 45% glucose (HFCS-55) and the other, HFCS-42, which contains 58% glucose and 42% fructose. In comparison, table sugar, also a mix of fructose and glucose contains roughly 50% of each sugar type, so there really is very little difference in the composition. Similarly both table sugar or sucrose and HFCS contain the same amount of calories per gram.

The main difference between table sugar and HFCS is the structure. Whilst glucose and fructose are bound together chemically in table sugar, this is not the case in HFCS. This means that HFCS is broken down to basic sugars in the body faster as these bonds do not need to be broken. Despite this however, no studies have shown a difference in the effect on hunger hormone production, insulin production, blood sugar levels, satiety or appetite regulation between the two sweeteners.

HFCS has found its way into the American food chain in increasingly high amounts for years, mostly due to its cheap price being attractive to food manufactures. It can also help food to last longer making it even more cost effective. The use of HFCS in food manufacturing varies widely around the globe, however, in America, there is no doubt that many of our supermarket products rely heavily on this sweetener.

What foods contain high fructose corn syrup?

Pretty much any processed food has the potential to contain HFCS, even those that are not considered a ‘sweet’ food such as bread. Soft drinks are a major culprit, as are salad dressing, sauces, jams and spreads, ice cream and any other sweet food.

Should we avoid high fructose corn syrup?

The American Medical Association has deemed HFCS to be no worse than any other calorific sweetener in terms of obesity and health based on the available evidence. HFCS may be a contributor to the obesity epidemic in the United States; however, it is unlikely to be the sole cause.

There is no doubt that as a population we are consuming too much sugar, be it from HFCS, sucrose, honey or any other source. As such, whilst there is no evidence to support the avoidance of HFCS containing products in particular, it is probably advisable to cut down on overall sugar intake, including intake of HFCS, which plays the role of sweetening so many foods.

It is recommended that the average adult should consume no more than about 8 teaspoons of sugar per day, although this number will vary with different energy requirements, gender, and physical activity levels. This may seem like a lot, but remember this is not just the sugar you put in your coffee, it also includes all the added sugars in the processed food we eat, much of which we may not even realise contains sugar. Bear in mind that a 12 oz can of cola drink contains over 10 teaspoons of sugar and you will see how quickly sugar consumption can add up!

How to cut back on sugar

Most people eat too much sugar and sweetened products in day to day life. This can cause to weight gain due to excess calories, damage teeth and increase risk of diabetes. Here are some tips to cut back on your sugar intake.

Reduce sugar in drinks

Slowly reduce the amount of sugar added to hot drinks, if you do this gradually your palate will adjust to the change and eventually you will get used to less or no sugar. Try to choose water as your main drink and limit soft drinks and juices to occasional treats. Juice can have just as much sugar as sodas, so dilute with water and don’t drink them every day. Avoid fruit ‘drinks’ and cordials which contain a huge amount of sugar but very little nutritional value.

Learn to read the food labels

Sugar comes under many disguises so learn the other names that may appear on labels such as dextrin, honey, cane sugar and corn syrup. It’s all sugar! When choosing foods, aim to eat more foods where sugar is further down the list of ingredients and definitely not in the top three as this means the main components of the food are sugar.

Choose foods with less sugar per serve

Compare labels when choosing products and pick those with less sugar per serve, for example breakfast cereals should have less than 5g per serving. Do make sure that you are comparing like serve sizes though, as this can give misleading information and be aware that products containing dried fruit will naturally contain more sugar.

Reduce sugar in baking

Reduce sugar in baking where possible either by replacing with pure fruit purees or simply leaving it out and add flavour with spices or vanilla.

Avoid syrups

Avoid syrups which are simply a concentrated form of liquid sugar that are easy to over consume.

Prefer unsweetened products

Buy unsweetened products where possible, such as natural yogurt.

How to avoid high fructose corn syrup

A lot of people, especially those who work for food manufacturers who use a lot of high fructose corn syrup, will say that high-fructose corn syrup is just like any other sweetener – that there is no reason to avoid it, especially since it comes from corn, which is healthy, right? While all of this sounds nice, it doesn’t line up with the scientific studies, which say that when consumed in excess high fructose corn syrup can do a number on your health.

What is High Fructose Corn Syrup?

Sure, you’ve heard about it, but what is high fructose corn syrup, or HFCS, exactly? HFCS is a liquid sweetener that contains a mixture of glucose and sucrose, two different types of sugar. Developers started working on the creation of HFCS in the 1950s, but it wasn’t fully introduced to the food and beverage industry until the 1970s. Now, HFCS accounts for 40 percent of the calorie-containing sweeteners that are added to the food and beverage supply in America. HFCS is significantly sweeter than sucrose (or regular ol’ table sugar), so manufacturers can use less – and save money in the process.

How HFCS is Hurting Your Health

Although the manufacturers of HFCS, which they also like to call natural corn sugar for dramatic effect, like to think that HFCS and regular sugar are processed the same way in the body, that’s not the case. The chemical bond in sucrose is a lot stronger than the chemical bond in HFCS. Because of this, the HFCS is more rapidly absorbed by your body. This means it enters your bloodstream more quickly, causing spikes in glucose and insulin, putting you on a risky path toward type II diabetes. HFCS also goes right to your liver, triggering a process called lipogenesis – or the creation of triglycerides and cholesterol. Too much HFCS can also lead to “fatty liver” – a condition affecting more than 70 million Americans.

Of course, like any other sweetener, consuming too much HFCS can easily put you over your calorie needs for the day. As you know from our previous blog post, over time, excessive calorie consumption can lead to weight gain. It’s not just that, though. An animal study published in Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior in 2010, reported that male rats who were given water sweetened with HFCS had more significant increases in visceral fat – the fat around the stomach – than male rates who were given water sweetened with sugar. This is important because having a lot of visceral fat increases the risk of developing heart disease, high blood pressure, type II diabetes, and certain types of cancer.

Another reason to avoid HFCS – one that really doesn’t have anything to do with the sweetener itself – is that the foods that contain HFCS are often highly-processed and lacking in nutrients. If you see HFCS on an ingredient label, you can almost be sure that there are better choices out there.

So what do you think? Do you look for high-fructose corn syrup on the label? Do you avoid foods that contain it?

5 Good Reasons to Avoid High Fructose Corn Syrup

How to avoid high fructose corn syrup

High Fructose Corn Syrup (HFCS) is a sweetener found in many types of processed foods, such as candy, baked goods, salad dressings, yogurt, soda and other sugary beverages. There are many reasons why this sweetener is bad for you and should be avoided.

1) According to two U.S. studies, nearly half of tested samples of HFCS contains mercury. It was also found in nearly one third of 55 popular brand-name food and beverage products where HFCS is the first or second-ingredient on the label. Mercury is a toxic heavy metal that is known to wreak havoc on the nervous system, neurological function, and overall biological function.

2) Corn syrup was found to be more toxic to female mice than table sugar, shortening their lives and cutting their rate of reproduction.

3) High-fructose corn syrup consumption has been found to impair learning and memory in adolescents.

4) Fructose is found to increase cardiovascular and diabetes risk in adolescents.

5) Sugar sweetened drinks increase heart disease and diabetes risk in women.

Fructose, or simple fruit sugar is naturally found in fruits and vegetables where it is closely bound with fiber and is slowly released into the blood stream. Many processed food and drink manufacturers use generous quantities of pure high fructose corn syrup extract that is absorbed rapidly and metabolized through a different pathway as compared to glucose or table sugar. Fructose is processed in the liver and high amounts can lead to increased body fat production, weight gain, obesity, liver damage and fatty liver.

The Corn Refiners Association is now wise to the public learning about the dangers of HFCS and are now labeling it as “fructose” or “fructose syrup.” Packaging on products such as General Mills Vanilla Chex cereal now states the product contains no high fructose corn syrup, while the ingredients list contains the simple word, “fructose.” This fructose is actually a manufactured sugar called HFCS-90, and is made up of 90% pure fructose. High fructose corn syrup, or HFCS, contains 42 or 55 percent fructose. Health issues relating to free fructose include diabetes, leaky gut syndrome, and liver failure.

While it is a good idea to cut down or eliminate added sugar in your diet for disease prevention, it is especially important to avoid any food that contains “fructose,” “fructose syrup” or “high fructose corn syrup.”

10.05.2022

Coca-Cola began utilizing high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in their beverages in 1980, and by the mid-1980s, most other soft drink firms had followed suit.

What is the history of fructose?

Fructose: Its Discovery and Evolution in Human History.French chemist Augustin-Pierre Dubrunfaut made the initial discovery of fructose in 1847, and the rest is history.The revelation of how fructoses act in high fructose corn syrup was also extremely significant.In 1977, fructose was introduced into the food industry as part of high fructose corn syrup.

  1. It occurred at a time when the cost of importing sugar was significantly increasing.

How is high-fructose corn syrup made?

High-fructose corn syrup is a sweetener made from corn.Similar to the creation of traditional corn syrup, the starch is broken down into glucose by enzymes throughout the process of making corn syrup.In order to produce HFCS, the corn syrup is further processed by the enzyme glucose isomerase, which converts part of the glucose in the syrup into fructose.The Clinton Corn Processing Company was the first to sell high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in the early 1970s.

When was the first corn syrup made?

It was in 1864 when commercial manufacture of maize syrup began. Clinton Corn Processing Company in Clinton, Iowa, attempted to convert glucose from corn starch to fructose in the late 1950s, but the method proved to be too inefficient to be commercially viable.

How did HFCS take over the soda market?

The government’s subsidization of corn resulted in the sweet syrup produced by the corporation being more inexpensive.″ Consequently, maize subsidies resulted in cheap corn, which in turn resulted in a corn-derived sweetener that was less expensive than sugar. And there you have it: HFCS has taken over the soda business.

When did soda switch to high fructose corn syrup?

In 1984, a nuclear explosion erupted in the food business, altering the path of human history forever: Coca Cola and Pepsi discontinued the use of sugar in soft drinks, opting instead for high fructose corn syrup instead.

Did Coke always have high fructose corn syrup?

Five years prior to the New Coke catastrophe, Coca-Cola had already begun using high-fructose corn syrup into its formulas. By 1984, a year before the introduction of New Coke, the transition was complete: sugar was phased out and high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) was introduced.

Why did soda companies switch to high fructose corn syrup?

From around 1975 to 1985, high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) was rapidly adopted into a wide range of processed foods and soft drinks in the United States. Soft drink manufacturers such as Coca-Cola and Pepsi continue to utilize sugar in other countries, but have shifted to high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) in the United States due to rising sugar costs.

When did coke switch from real cane sugar to high fructose corn syrup Why?

Several Coca-Cola devotees claim that Mexican Coca-Cola has a more ″natural″ flavor than its American counterpart. This change in flavor can be attributed to the fact that Coca-Cola, which is manufactured in the United States, began utilizing high fructose corn syrup as a sweetening ingredient in 1980. Mexican Coke, on the other hand, continues to sweeten their version using cane sugar.

Why is high fructose corn syrup banned in Europe?

High-fructose corn syrup is commonly utilized in the United States because it is significantly less expensive than pure sugar. High-fructose corn syrup production in Europe is controlled in order to comply with production limits set in the name of economic justice and competitiveness, not in order to save people’s lives as is the case in the United States.

Is there a soda without high fructose corn syrup?

Soda without the use of HFCS The Coca-Cola Company includes many beverages that do not contain high fructose corn syrup on its Products Facts website, including Diet Coke, Fanta Zero, and Sprite Zero. Diet sodas are often sweetened with artificial sweeteners in order to reduce the number of calories they contain.

Why is Coke different in Mexico?

On the surface, there appears to be just one significant difference between Mexican Coca-Cola and Coca-Cola produced in the United States (via Smithsonian). The fundamental distinction boils down to the presence or absence of sweeteners. Mexican Coca-Cola is prepared from cane sugar, whereas American Coca-Cola is created from high fructose corn syrup (HFCS).

Is Karo syrup corn syrup?

Pin it to your Pinterest board. Karo is a form of maize syrup that has a laxative effect on the stomach. Karo syrup is mostly used in recipes to keep food wet and to prevent sugar crystallization from occurring. Karo syrup is a commercial corn syrup made from the starch of maize that is used to sweeten beverages.

When was corn syrup first used?

Historically, corn syrup was made by mixing maize starch with dilute hydrochloric acid and then boiling the liquid under pressure until it became syrupy. In 1811, the German scientist Gottlieb Kirchhoff developed a method that would become known as the pyrolysis process.

Does Mexican Coke still use cane sugar?

A response from Arca Continental, the Mexican bottler in question, stated that it has no intentions to alter the sweetener used in the ″Coca-Cola Nostalgia″ bottles that it ships to the United States. According to the company, they will continue to utilize 100 percent cane sugar.

Does Dr Pepper have high fructose corn syrup?

Caffeine, high fructose corn syrup, caramel color (from caramel colorant), phosphoric acid, artificial and natural flavorings, sodium benzoate (preservative), and carbonated water are the main ingredients. Note: In certain markets, Dr Pepper is manufactured with sugar rather than high-fructose corn syrup, which is more expensive.

Does Pepsi use high fructose corn syrup?

For the first time, Pepsico announced that it will only use high-fructose corn syrup to sweeten its bottled, canned, and fountain-drawn Pepsi-Cola and Pepsi-Free soft beverages going forward.

What is the difference between corn syrup and high-fructose corn syrup?

Despite the fact that both corn syrup and high-fructose corn syrup are derived from corn starch, they are two distinct products in their own right. While regular corn syrup is 100 percent glucose, high-fructose corn syrup has had part of its glucose transformed to fructose through the action of enzymes.

Did Pepsi stop making Pepsi with real sugar?

In June 2014, the Pepsi Throwback moniker was replaced by the present name, which continues to be prepared without high fructose corn syrup. As 1 April 2020 it gets a new logo. The ‘throwback’ term was also used for a variation of PepsiCo’s citrus-flavored Mountain Dew. Pepsi-Cola Made with Real Sugar.