How to cut face framing layers

Here at Sam Villa, we make it a point to offer as much value as possible to all hairdressers by giving you options, because let’s face it – not every technique that we demonstrate will be right for every guest that sits in your chair.

This week, we’re excited to share another face framing technique that is especially great for your guests with long layered hair. By utilizing a V-shaped design technique, you will provide your medium to coarse haired guests the perfect face frame with the right amount of lightness and movement!

ADDING FACE FRAMING LAYERS TO LONGER HAIR

STEP 1: SECTIONING
  • To begin, place your client in a natural head position with them looking forward, then locate the high point of the head.
  • From the high point of the head, you’re going to draw a line from the hight point of the head to behind the ear on either side of the head.
    • Why behind the ear and not to the top of the ear? Great question! The hair changes density at the top of the ear and you want to make sure you are gathering all of the hair on the side of the head to create the best possible face frame.
    STEP 2: CUTTING THE V-SHAPE INTO THE FRONT
    • Pick up your Sam Villa Signature Series 7” Dry Cutting Shear for this next step. Since you are cutting through a large, dry section of hair, this shear will perform better without pushing the hair due to the reinforced blade design and length of the blade.
    • Over direct the entire top rectangle section forward to an imaginary square line in front of the head.
    • Elevation is 90° horizontal (meaning, the hair will be horizontal/flat with the floor).
    • The length that you cut the hair is determined by the shortest point where you want the face framing layer to fall. An easy way to measure this is to elevate all of the hair forward then drop a small piece out to see where it falls on the face. Pinch that point with your index finger and thumb then bring it back to your section and that will be your guide.
    • Next, you’re going to cut a V into the front of the rectangle section, making sure that you are cutting from long on the outside to shorter in the center.Go back and clean up your cutting lines until you have established a well balanced “V” cutout in the section, then you can release the hair.
    STEP 3: CONNECTING THE FRONT V INTO THE SIDES
    • Begin by taking a center part.
      • Hot Tip: If your guest wears a side part, shift your part to the side so the face frame is more even.
      • Note: As long as your perimeter lengths were balanced prior to cutting the V, you will have balance on either side of the head.

      There you have it! A simple way to cut V-shaped face framing layers for your long haired guests. As we mentioned earlier, this technique is perfect for your guests with medium to coarse hair types because it will add layers and lightness with plenty of movement.

      Give it a try in the salon and be sure to come back and let us know how it went.

      If you have any questions or comments please leave them in the box below. Make sure you join our email list and be the first to know when we release new free education!

      Follow Sam Villa on Facebook & Instagram and be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel for FREE education!

      If you find yourself looking in the mirror wondering what you can do to spice up your one-length haircut, we have just the answer: face-framing layers! In case you didn’t already know, face-framing layers involve your hairstylist cutting your hair in varying lengths at the front of your face in order to define or “frame” your features. That said, as with most beauty trends, face-framing hairstyles aren’t a one-size-fits-all deal—there’s a face-framing haircut that’s best suited for every face shape. To help you out, we’ve taken it upon ourselves to breakdown the best face-framing layers based on your face shape. Ready to switch up your mane with a new cut? Read on!

      THE BEST FACE-FRAMING LAYERS FOR OVAL FACES

      If you have an oval face, you’re lucky—there is no shortage of options when it comes to layered haircuts that will suit your face shape. Since your symmetrical shape gives you a bit of leeway, consider emphasizing its symmetry with some face-framing bangs—curtain bangs, to be exact. Pair this with long, face-framing layers that start beneath your chin, and you’ll be sure to turn heads! To style, try adding some heat-free texture by applying the L’Oréal Paris Advanced Hairstyle CURVE IT Elastic Curl Mousse to damp strands, scrunching, and allowing your hair to air dry.

      THE BEST FACE-FRAMING LAYERS FOR HEART-SHAPED FACES

      Those with a heart-shaped face have a wider forehead and narrower chin. Your ideal face-framing hairstyles will take attention away from your forehead. This is why face-framing bangs, like those curtain bangs we talked about, and long, subtle face-framing layers, which will help balance out the bottom half of your face, are just what you need. To really define and emphasize your already prominent cheekbones, ask your hairdresser for face-framing bangs that just graze the highest point on your face.

      THE BEST FACE-FRAMING LAYERS FOR SQUARE FACES

      Square faces are equal in height and width and have sharp, defined features. Use your face-framing layers to help soften your features while adding a bit of length. To do this, you’ll want to ask for soft, wispy long layers. Pair them with side-swept bangs for a winning ‘do! To style, create large, bouncy curls—just be sure to spritz your strands with the L’Oréal Paris Advanced Hairstyle BLOW DRY IT Quick Dry Primer Spray prior.

      THE BEST FACE-FRAMING LAYERS FOR ROUND FACES

      If you have a round face, you likely already know that the goal of your haircut should be to add length to your visage. To create the illusion of an elongated face, ask your stylist for long, face-framing layers that start below the chin. Style with loose waves that are focused on the ends of your hair. Don’t forget to set your look with the L’Oréal Paris Elnett Precious Oil Satin Hairspray!

      THE BEST FACE-FRAMING LAYERS FOR DIAMOND FACES

      Diamond faces feature a small forehead, defined cheekbones, and a tapered chin. Since your cheekbones are so sharp, you’ll want your face-framing layers to help soften their appearance a bit. Opt for medium and long layers that fall past your cheekbones. Side-swept bangs are also a great addition!

      THE BEST FACE-FRAMING LAYERS FOR TRIANGLE FACES

      What’s a triangle face shape? This involves a smaller forehead and a more prominent jawline. So, it should come as no surprise that your best face-framing hairstyle is all about adding volume at the top of your head. Ask your stylist for face-framing bangs that will help add fullness around your forehead. Styles like blunt and rounded bangs will be most flattering!

      THE BEST FACE-FRAMING LAYERS FOR RECTANGULAR FACES

      As with square faces, rectangular faces look best with face-framing layers that help soften their chiseled features, like wispy layers. If you have a long forehead you’d like to minimize, you’ll also find that face-framing curtain bangs are a great option!

      THE BEST FACE-FRAMING LAYERS FOR OBLONG FACES

      Speaking of long faces, if you have an oblong face shape, ask your hairdresser for face-framing strands that will help shorten your face and define your features. Side-swept bangs and face-framing layers that stop at your cheekbones are our top choice.

      As a reaction to the COVID-19 pandemic, state and local governments are mandating temporary closures of hair salons, among other beauty businesses, across the country. Many salons that are not legally required to shut their doors are doing so voluntarily to keep their employees and customers safe — and we don’t know how long these closures will last. In any other circumstance, Allure would never advise skipping a visit to a professional, but as hairstylist Justine Marjan points out: “We’re in uncharted territory.”.

      How to Trim Curly Hair at Home: A Three-Step Guide

      Plus, it’s a useful skill to have even when the lockdown lifts: “Giving yourself a trim in between professional cuts can help maintain your style for a longer period of time,” Massey notes. Massey suggests it might even be best to do the trim on the second or third day after washing your hair because by that time, “it has fully settled into its natural state. “Really take your time to observe the landscape of your hair, paying attention to all the different strands, their shapes, and how they each fall,” Massey recommends.

      How to Cut Face-Framing Layers at Home

      That’s why, under normal circumstances, we’d never recommend attempting to cut your own face-framing layers at home, as it only increases the chance for things to go awry. Now is the exception, though, seeing as we’re living in uncharted territory due to the on-going pandemic, and many folks are still steering clear of salons and choosing to play hairstylist at home. “My advice for cutting your own face-framing layers is simply. don’t,” says New York City-based hairstylist Sherene, who’s responsible for giving Jonathan Van Ness a new lob.

      ‘Mussed Layers’ Hair Trend Gives You Instant Cheekbones

      Those of us who overdid flicky layers in the Noughties and spent the next two years trying to blow dry them into submission may (justifiably) be thinking they’re not worth the hassle. “Layers are pretty much a part of any haircut unless you’ve got a sharp bob,” explains leading hair stylist, Luke Hersheson. It may be a rebellion against the overgrown strands we had to live with during lockdown, but 70s rumpled texture is dominating the trends this summer, and its brought with it the shag, Charlie’s Angels flips, swooshy curtain fringes and even (if you’re brave) a modern spin on the mullet.

      Deliberately bold and choppy styles are back in, but they’re totally customisable, too – you can create soft takes on the trends by paring them back, like the “pretty shag” which leans into mussed-up texture, but keeps the layers in hair longer so they’re easier to style. Created using thinning scissors or a razor to avoid stark lines, “they’re not cut in a way where the ends are as blunt and ruler-like,” says Luke.

      Nail them around the face (we’re talking a relaxed jaw-length fringe skimming either side of your cheek) and they can be the answer to instant cheekbones. Depending on how much styling you want to do, they can go undetected in a chic ponytail or left loose one day, then can be amped up with texturiser to give oomph and sexy texture the next.

      More specifically, “it is the lightest form of hair cutting,” explains Ryan Forsythe, senior director at Trevor Sorbie’s Covent Garden salon. “Layering hair not only removes weight but can also help to create shape, give volume, movement and texture,” explains Ryan. “Or if your long hair feels a bit flat on top, some layering around the crown will give it some bounce.”. “Depending on the shape you want to create, or where you want to lighten, it is generally done in the ‘internal’ area (top, back, sides ),” says Ryan. Provided you’ve chosen a low maintenance style (that’s been cut in by a pro) “it can be pretty easy,” agrees Ryan.

      Here’s How To DIY Perfect Hair Layers At Home

      While you can keep telling yourself that hair will grow back, it’s better to start off slow. You can decide which you’re more comfortable with, but Rubell explains that by cutting dry, you’ll get a better idea of what your hair will look like naturally and “be able to cut the hair in response to its cues, not against them.”.

      Skip the Salon, and Trim Your Layers at Home

      I wanted to show you guys how to thin your hair out and soften your layers at home — all with a simple disposable razor blade! In it this guy was styling his hair with a razor blade he got at a hair salon, and I figured that if he could do it, so could I.

      A *new* disposable razor. Depending on the length of your hair, start at the lower end, and gently slide the razor blade downward without pushing in the blade.

      You want to create or soften your layers, and not take off all of the ends. You’ll notice that it won’t take a lot of hair off at all — just a few ends per section.

      How to cut your own hair at home during lockdown – an expert guide

      While the easing of some lockdown measures has begun, it is still unclear when we will be able to return to the salon. Cutting hair is complicated and takes years of training, which is why most stylists are advising their clients to side-step the scissors and wait until the pandemic is over.

      But if you simply cannot wait, here is what you need to know: from trimming a fringe to snipping split ends and shaving your head, we asked the experts how to cut your own hair at home. Before you think about making the first snip, ensure that your mirror is a comfortable height and you have a plan in mind.

      ‘Try putting a chair in the bath and having them sit there while you play hairdresser,’ suggests stylist and Moroccan Oil educator Laura Bell. ‘They are usually too big for haircuts,’ says Adam Jones, hair stylist at Live True London. ‘Use the thinnest scissors you can find, so that you can control the amount of hair being cut.’. ‘Also, get yourself some thinning scissors as these will help to soften hard uneven lines in the hair,’ he adds. “You’ll need a super steady hand for the trickier bits,’ says Bell. ‘A good tip is to temporarily hold your breath while you’re doing these, as it’ll steady your hand and give you more control.’.

      “You’ll need a super steady hand for the trickier bits,’ says Bell. ‘A good tip is to temporarily hold your breath while you’re doing these, as it’ll steady your hand and give you more control.’ Err on the side of caution.

      ‘When you’ve decided where to cut your hair, go a bit longer,’ says Stevens. ‘When you’ve decided where to cut your hair, go a bit longer,’ says Stevens. ‘It stretches more easily and you can end up with it being shorter than you want, or uneven because of the tension when you pull it between your fingers,’ says Stevens.

      ‘It stretches more easily and you can end up with it being shorter than you want, or uneven because of the tension when you pull it between your fingers,’ says Stevens. ‘A trim is the only viable cut to do on yourself, as you can follow the lines your hairdresser has put in,’ says Stevens.

      Cut only half a centimetre at a time, so you have control over the length, adds Jones. Repeat the same movement with shorter guards, stopping roughly 1cm lower each time.’ Repeat the same at the back – while holding a mirror, if you’re cutting it yourself – and then snip the tips on the top before connecting with the sides and back.

      ‘Go over the same section in a perpendicular way so that all small hair is cut evenly.’. This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses.

      The power of a good haircut can change flat fine hair to a bodyful, trendy style. One of the biggest challenges for stylists when cutting fine hair is keeping the ends from losing density, especially at the perimeter near the ears due to the change of direction.

      Andrew Carruthers, Cultural Ambassador for Sam Villa explains how to properly layer hair to achieve textured, fuller styles with the illusion of density and bounce for your clients with super fine hair.

      WHY DO YOU PREP HAIR BEFORE CUTTING?

      Prepping the hair before cutting seals the ends and assists with moisture retention, also helping the blades of your scissor to glide smoothly for precision. We suggest a conditioning cutting spray like Redken One United, a lightweight spray with moisturizing properties and pH balancing that can be used from roots to ends. Prepping is a step that should be done on all hair types prior to cutting.

      WHERE DO YOU START YOUR HAIRCUT?

      We recommended starting your haircut in the back of the head to focus on where the heaviest part of the haircut will be. This is also where the most hair lives. This will best achieve the goal of this haircut, which is to create the illusion of more density as you move around the head towards the face.

      1. Your first section will start from the high part of the crown down to the center back of the head ending at the nape.
      2. This section will be a 1-inch, pie-shaped section to create a guide to follow for the left and right sides of the back of the head, following around to each ear.
      3. Hold each section at a lower elevation (approximately 90 degrees horizontal). This will ensure cutting even layers throughout the entire section eliminating a “shelf-like” result at the ends.
      4. Follow a traveling guide* bringing every section to the previously cut section.
      5. Continue with 1-inch partings, 90 degree elevation and a diagonal finger angle.
      6. Complete until you reach behind the ears where the change of direction starts.
      7. Technique continued below at #1.

      HOT TIP: The use of Sam Villa Artist Series Shears with a 6.25” sharp blade will result in a seamless, less-heavy cut. The precision of these blades is important for cutting while using a diagonal finger angle. This emphasizes shorter hair at the top of the section while maintaining length at the ends. The size of the blade will glide smoothly across the section to ensure an even layering technique.

      Tip: Using high elevation will result in a heavy perimeter which we don’t want.

      WHAT GUIDE IS RECOMMENDED FOR THIS TECHNIQUE OF CUTTING FINE HAIR?

      Traveling guides* create over-direction and keep more length at the perimeter as you move around the head. Starting this haircut at the back, the hair will get slightly longer as you get closer to the face. This is especially important to be aware of once you reach behind the ear where the hair tends to be the most sparse at the perimeter.

      Without over-directing we risk a common cutting mistake known as a “hole” around the ear-when the length is cut too short.

      The traveling guide will remain as you move around the ear yet the elevation will change.

      WHY DO YOU INCREASE ELEVATION ONCE YOU REACH BEHIND THE EAR?

      Increasing elevation preserves more density in the perimeter which will eliminate the hair from looking too sparse on the ends.

      To continue the cutting technique:

        1. Starting from the back of the ear, the elevation of your sections will change to vertical straight up towards the ceiling.

        a. You will continue using a traveling guide, and diagonal finger angle mirroring the previously cut sections in the back.

        Note: This will create a detached area. The difference between a disconnected haircut and detached haircut is within our mindset. There are reasons and purposes for both perfectly blended haircuts and detached haircuts. It’s important to have the foundations and principles so that you are able to customize haircuts per your clients’ needs.

        We purposely designed this as a detached haircut to maintain density and create the illusion of fullness at the ends. By using a traveling guide throughout the cut we ensure length and density.

        1. As you move towards the face, continue with vertical elevation and a slightly more diagonal finger angle so that the ends are just lightly dusted.
        2. As you reach your final section, you have a choice:

        a. Don’t want layers around the face? Carve out the perimeter around the face and leave out. Dust the ends to meet the desired length in the front.

        b. If you do want the layers around the face, continue with the same technique to complete the entire head!

        Hot tip: To ensure the layers around the face are cut precisely, stand behind the section and place the teeth of the comb facing you at the root of your section. Slide the comb against the scalp towards you and stop at the end of the section. From there, comb the hair up to vertical, and follow your diagonal finger angle as the previously cut section.

        FINAL WORDS

        Refining your layering technique and changing your elevation will create the illusion of the hair your clients always dreamt of. Continue watching our videos for tips and tricks to step up your game behind the chair!

        Face framing layers have quickly become one of the most popular hairstyles of 2021. This look has gained so much popularity because it can easily be worn on any hair type and with practically any hairstyle. From celebrities to our friends showing off their new hairstyle online, this look has been spotted everywhere.

        While face-framing layers have been so popular, curtain bangs have been too. These looks are similar and often get confused. Don’t worry, we’re here to break it down for you. Keep scrolling to find out the difference between face-framing layers and curtain bangs and get inspo for how to wear this style.

        Curtain Bangs vs. Face Framing Layers

        These styles get confused more often than you would think. Keep scrolling to learn how to tell them apart.

        The Difference Between Curtain Bangs and Face Framing Layers

        Curtain bangs vs face-framing layers.

        When asking your stylist for face-framing layers or curtain bangs it’s important to know the difference so you get the results you want. Oftentimes, people ask for curtain bangs when they really mean face-framing layers, then they’re left with shorter fringe than expected–definitely a bummer if it’s not what you expected.

        Curtain bangs are very popular right now, but this is a shorter style that has a middle part. The bangs will usually hit anywhere from your eyebrow to your cheekbones. Curtain bangs will also gradually get longer as they cascade from your eyebrow, creating a curtain effect.

        Face framing layers replicate this shape, except at a longer length. This type of layered look is often jaw-length or longer and can usually be tucked behind the ear. The layers seamlessly blend into your look and don’t look light you have fringe. However, they’re great for leaving out updos for a no-so-slicked look.

        Face Framing Layers You Need to Try

        1. Blended Layers

        Seamlessly blend layers into your long hair.

        Face-framing layers that are slightly on the longer side help add movement to your style while blending seamlessly into the rest of your hair.

        2. Layers with a Headband

        Add a headband to your look!

        Who doesn’t love an accessorized hairstyle? Dress up your look with a headband. From casual to fancy events, it’s perfect for just about anything!

        3. Bandana Style

        How to cut face framing layers

        Make your layers stand out with a bandana.

        A bandana is an easy, on-trend way to make your layers stand out. Plus, you don’t have to worry about a disappearing hairline with these face-framing pieces.

        4. Framing Layers with a Bob

        Add face-framing layers to short styles.

        Bobs are such a classic look, but it’s always fun to play around with this shape and try something new. Face-framing layers help add more dimension and shape to a commonly straight and sleek style

        5. Layered Lob

        How to cut face framing layers

        Add face-framing layers to a lob!

        This classic haircut isn’t going away anytime soon. The face-framing layers are the perfect way to add movement. Leave these pieces out of any updos. For more texture, loosely curl your hair.

        TRESemmé Compressed Micro Mist Level 2 Hold Curl Hair Spray

        Use a hair spray like TRESemmé Compressed Micro Mist Level 2 Hold Curl Hair Spray to keep waves in place all day without feeling stiff.

        6. Long Framing Layers

        How to cut face framing layers

        Layers like this add shape to longer haircuts.

        Layers like this can help take some heaviness off the bottom of thick hair.

        7. Red Hair Look

        How to cut face framing layers

        This style is great on any length of hair.

        If face-framing layers aren’t enough, extend the layers down the length of your hair. This technique helps add shape to longer lengths and can even add attention to your face if you have an elongated face shape.

        8. Wavy Layered Hair

        How to cut face framing layers

        This style is perfect for wavy hair.

        If you have wavy hair you’re in luck. The natural texture is your hair will create the perfect amount of volume in this look.

        9. Middle-Parted Style

        How to cut face framing layers

        Go for a middle part with the look.

        Sporting this trend for the first time? We love a middle part with this look!

        10. Ombré Layers

        How to cut face framing layers

        Try out an ombré color.

        Already have face-framing layers, but still want to change up your style? Try a subtle ombré look with your style gradually fading from light to dark.

        How to cut face framing layers

        Additionally, Fitzsimons strongly suggests having a comb on hand (we like the Carbon Tail Comb by Harry Josh Pro Tools). “A comb is definitely a must when cutting layers in order to distribute the hair for an even cut,” he says. “We want feathered layers, not chunks!”

        Speaking of which, working on damp hair can allow for a more “precise cut,” according to our experts, so spritz your strands with some water beforehand — or wait for your hair to dry roughly three-quarters of the way after washing it.

        2. Part and section your hair.

        Once you’re prepped and ready with your tools laid out in front of you, part your hair where it normally falls. Then, it’s time to section the hair, which is super important as it ultimately determines how much you cut.

        “Always make sure to section your hair and clip away any pieces that you don’t want to cut,” says New York City-based hairstylist Erickson Arrunategui.

        The hair you’ll want to work with should be at the “very front top of the head,” explains Fitzsimons. “It should make a triangle shape into your part — this will be the hair you use to create your layers or bangs.”

        3. Start cutting slowly.

        The speed in which you cut truly can’t be stressed enough. “You can always trim more if you want, but you can’t put it back once you make the cut,” says Fitzsimmons.

        Now, when you’re ready, take the front triangle section of hair you created and divide it down the middle, as these will be the pieces used to create your layers. “Hold one section at a time, and cut at a diagonal parallel to the section’s part,” says Fitzsimons. “Then repeat this step with the other section, being careful to match the length of hair on the opposite side.”

        As far as length is concerned, Brooklyn-based hairstylist Teddi Cranford says it can be helpful to use your own face as a guide. “When cutting your own hair, always go a little longer and use your facial features as reference points,” she says. “For example, the shortest pieces should be around your nose and the longest ones should be at the chin.”

        Another tip from Cranford? “When creating your own face-framing bits, you want to slightly elevate and cut up and into the hair,” she says. “We call this point cutting.”

        Additionally, Fitzsimons strongly suggests having a comb on hand (we like the Carbon Tail Comb by Harry Josh Pro Tools). “A comb is definitely a must when cutting layers in order to distribute the hair for an even cut,” he says. “We want feathered layers, not chunks!”

        Speaking of which, working on damp hair can allow for a more “precise cut,” according to our experts, so spritz your strands with some water beforehand — or wait for your hair to dry roughly three-quarters of the way after washing it.

        2. Part and section your hair.

        Once you’re prepped and ready with your tools laid out in front of you, part your hair where it normally falls. Then, it’s time to section the hair, which is super important as it ultimately determines how much you cut.

        “Always make sure to section your hair and clip away any pieces that you don’t want to cut,” says New York City-based hairstylist Erickson Arrunategui.

        The hair you’ll want to work with should be at the “very front top of the head,” explains Fitzsimons. “It should make a triangle shape into your part — this will be the hair you use to create your layers or bangs.”

        3. Start cutting slowly.

        The speed in which you cut truly can’t be stressed enough. “You can always trim more if you want, but you can’t put it back once you make the cut,” says Fitzsimmons.

        Now, when you’re ready, take the front triangle section of hair you created and divide it down the middle, as these will be the pieces used to create your layers. “Hold one section at a time, and cut at a diagonal parallel to the section’s part,” says Fitzsimons. “Then repeat this step with the other section, being careful to match the length of hair on the opposite side.”

        As far as length is concerned, Brooklyn-based hairstylist Teddi Cranford says it can be helpful to use your own face as a guide. “When cutting your own hair, always go a little longer and use your facial features as reference points,” she says. “For example, the shortest pieces should be around your nose and the longest ones should be at the chin.”

        Another tip from Cranford? “When creating your own face-framing bits, you want to slightly elevate and cut up and into the hair,” she says. “We call this point cutting.”

        Discover how to cut face framing layers using diagonal sections and high elevation for an extremely soft face framing haircut! Sam Villa creates an approach that is easy to replicate and creates predictable … Ещё results.

        For another way to create beautiful face framing layers, enjoy this post from our Sam Villa Professional Blog: https://www.samvilla.com/pro/blog/simple-way-to-cut-v-shaped-face-framing-layers-for-long-hair/

        All Sam Villa tools are available through your local Salon Centric sales rep or local Salon Centric store.

        To learn more about all of our styling tools, discover upcoming events, or to book one of our artists visit us:
        www.samvilla.com

        And if you are looking for exclusive full length digital education, check out our Artist Studio! https://www.samvilla.com/pro/artiststudio

        Страница Sam Villa Professional была в прямом эфире.

        Snatched & Plaited Ponies With Evie Peterson

        Learn from a NYFW veteran on how to create two (2) editorial looks in under an hour! Master a speedy 'snatched' fishtail pony & an editorial pony that's runway-inspired. You'll learn the basics of building … Ещё these styles, & all the speedy backstage secrets to creating these looks in a pinch!

        What You'll Learn:
        – See how to give your styles a firm foundation with a directional blow dry & the perfect products for stay-all-day wear
        – Learn the ideal high ponytail placement based on your client's bone structure
        – Hear how you can seamlessly add inches with the ideal extension ponytail placement
        – Watch how to secure these styles for a smooth exterior & undetectable bungee placement