How to donate your body to science

How to donate your body to science

For some, donating their body to science is a way to help society. The hope is that by contributing to science, they may, in some small way, help to find a cure for deadly diseases like cancer. For others, the driving force behind donation is reducing cost since donating your body to science means that you will be able to avoid the cost of a funeral and burial.

Regardless of the motivation, donating your body to science is a very personal decision, and it is not for everyone. You should consider your cultural and religious decisions, your family wishes, and your financial situation. The first step is to learn as much as you can about the process, ask questions, and discuss the option with your loved ones.

Important: Donating your body to science is a great way to reduce your end-of-life costs. In most cases, you will know in advance if you are a good candidate. It is possible, however, that your loved ones won’t find out if your remains have been accepted until after your death. It is important that you create a backup plan just in case. Visit our funeral arrangements page for step-by-step guidance.

How does donating your body to science work?

Donating your body to science is a relatively straightforward process. Below are the steps you’ll need to follow.

Step 1: Find an appropriate donation organization. Many medical schools offer full body donation programs. There are also private companies that accept bodies. Start by looking for programs in your general area since this can make transportation easier. We have included some resources at the bottom of this page to help you find a group that is a good fit for you.

Step 2: Contact the organization and pre-register. It is not necessarily a requirement that you pre-register, but it can make the process go more smoothly. Some organizations have requirements that may prevent them from accepting certain bodies. Making arrangements ahead of time can help you narrow your list down to a program with which you are compatible.

Step 3: Find out what your obligations are. Many programs will cover all the expenses including transportation and cremation. You want to be sure that you are fully informed so that you can plan accordingly.

Step 4: Talk with your loved ones. It is important that the people who will be making your arrangements know what you have in mind. If they aren’t aware that this is what you have in mind, it could cause complications when the time comes. Let your family know if you have taken care of all the necessary paperwork or if they will need to fill out forms at your time of death.

Step 5: Update your legal paperwork. If you intend to donate your body to science, you should include your instructions in your will.

Step 6: Create a backup plan. Unless plans are being made for someone who is close to death, things can change over time. In the unlikely event your situation takes a turn and your body is no longer eligible for donation, you should have alternative arrangements. For many people who are considering body donation, cremation is a good alternative. For more on cremation visit our cremation pages.

Step 7: Decide on funeral/memorial options. A popular misconception is that if you choose whole body donation you can not have a funeral. This is not true. You can still have an open casket funeral when you donate your body to science. However, many people who choose to donate prefer to hold a memorial service. If you need information on planning your funeral we recommend that you visit our Celebrations of Life page.

Donating your body to science: questions and answers.

Can I still have a funeral if I donate my body to science?

Yes! You can still have a full funeral with an open casket if you donate your body to science. You should contact the organization that will be handling your donation to get more specific information on how the events will need to be timed.

Will my religion allow me to donate?

Most major religions permit individuals to donate both their full body and organs. Many even encourage it. If you are unsure, you should consult with your pastor or spiritual adviser.

Is indicating donation on my driver’s license enough?

No. You can indicate your preference to have your organs donated on your driver’s license but you will need to make special arrangements with a medical or scientific organization in order to donate your full body.

Can I get paid for donating my body to science?

No. Federal Law prohibits payment for bodies.

How do I find out about body donation programs?

There are several ways you can find information on programs that accept full body donation. We have included links to some good resources for this type of information below. There is a wealth of information available on the Internet or you can consult with a local funeral director.

Can I still donate specific organs if I donate my whole body?

Whether or not you can donate organs as well as your body will depend on the program in which you are enrolled. Some private scientific companies permit organ donation while many educational programs do not. If you would like to donate both, you should make arrangements with the donation program you are enrolled in.

Are all bodies accepted?

There are cases where institutions decline a body that is donated. Communicable disease, extreme obesity, and other conditions may lead to an individual being declined. Most organizations make every effort to honor the decision to donate. You need to make sure that you pre-register since many programs do not accept donations that are not pre-arranged.

Can I request that my body be used in a certain scientific study?

No, you cannot typically request that your donation be used for a particular study. Research organizations do not always know in advance what projects they will be working on when they receive a donation and priorities change. Once you decide which group you will be working with, you can ask them directly if you can request a particular project but, it is unlikely that the request will be honored.

Are there other options besides medical groups?

Some people choose to donate their bodies for use in forensic research rather than medical research. In these cases, your body will be used on a “body farm.” Body farms are properties where bodies are left to decompose under a variety of conditions. There is no charge to donate and you can typically donate your organs as well as your body. It is important that you make arrangements ahead of time.

The process for donating body to science with the BioGift program is very simple. It was designed not only to maximize your donation, but also to make the process of donation as straightforward as possible for your loved ones or next-of-kin. You may be asking yourself, “How does one donate their body to science?” Our typical donation procedure is described below, and is also outlined in the flow chart.

How Does One Donate Their Body To Science?

Body donation for medical research and education is becoming more popular for people wanting an alternative to funeral or cremation costs. They may wonder “How do I donate my body to medical science?” The process begins with requesting our pre-registration forms and information. You can visit our Get Started page to request a package by mail or download the PDF packet. Your decision to donate your body to science as one of the alternatives to funeral services should be made after you are well-informed and have discussed your wishes with your next-of-kin. If you have questions not answered on our website, please visit our contact page to send us an email or call us.

How Does One Donate Their Body To Science When Death Is Near?

If a loved one is near death or on hospice, call us at 866-670-1799 24 hours a day to discuss your options.

The Donation Process

Once you made your wishes known and pre-registered, then nothing else is necessary until your death, at which time your next-of-kin should contact BioGift immediately. Please let your next of kin know if you are placed on hospice or go into the hospital with an illness or situation that could cause your death, contact us immediately.

A representative from BioGift will go through a medical and social interview with the family or next-of-kin to determine if the donor can be accepted into the program.

If the donor qualifies for our program, we will arrange for transport to BioGift’s facility.

Finishing The Donation Process

The donation process takes approximately eight to twelve weeks to conclude. By this time, the family or next-of-kin will have received the cremated remains, and two certified copies of the death certificate. BioGift will then send the family or next-of-kin follow up correspondence about donation, and your last charitable effort will be finished.
If you want to know even more about funeral alternatives like body donation for medical research, visit our Get Started page for more information, or call us at (866) 670-1799, 24 hours a day.

When you ponder what happens to your body after you die, you’re probably deciding between having your body buried or cremated. But what if I told you that you could have a significant impact on the world even after death? What if I said you could potentially save millions of lives?

Donating your body to science and medical research gives you that opportunity. While the thought of your body being used for experimentation and study may be off-putting, there are several upsides to this alternative. End-of-life decisions are a sensitive topic, so it is in our best interest that you be fully informed before making any decision. Here, we’ve compiled a list of advantages (pros) and disadvantages (cons) of donating your body to science, so let’s get right to it.

Benefit medical research

The greatest impact of donating your body to science is in the fields of medicine and science. Many institutions, such as ours and medical school, will surely benefit from body donations for a variety of purposes. Your body could be used as a cadaver for medical students to study and practice surgeries on. It could also be used for experimentation in understanding diseases and possibly coming up with cures for them. You can see that donating your body has some truly altruistic motivation.

Donating your body to science could save you a ton of money.

Average funeral costs in 2020 go between $7,000 and $12,000 while cremation costs go between $6,000 and $7,000. I don’t know about you, but that looks like a lot of money. When donating your body to science, the institution you donate to will cover all charges, including transportation and cremation costs (all donated bodies are cremated after use). Donating your body is, in most cases, free of charge.

Compared to planning burials, donating your body is hassle-free

For some people, planning and arranging funeral or cremation services can be overwhelming. After going through a painful and tragic event, a lot of people won’t want to face the hassles of putting all these activities in order.

Funeral services are integral to the grieving process.

What happens upon death is that the donor’s body is taken away almost immediately. This means that you won’t have enough time to host a funeral service, where the deceased’s body is present. However, you may opt for a memorial instead, which is similar to a funeral minus the body. Studies have emerged that show the importance of funerals in the grieving process. Medical schools may hold a communal memorial for all the donors, but that tends to happen 18 months after the start of a semester. The lack of a funeral service may not satisfy the need for closure.

Not all bodies will be accepted.

For specific medical reasons, your body may not be accepted. In many cases, organizations only accept bodies with complete organs. So, if you have donated organs in the past, many organizations will disqualify you. Additionally, depending on the nature of your death, you may also be disqualified as a donor. If this happens, you may be left with your relative’s body without prior funeral plans in place, so you may get into a frantic rush in making last-minute arrangements. It’s best to have contingency plans in case you run into unforeseen circumstances.

It may not be acceptable in some religions.

As I’ve mentioned, after the practitioners use your body for research or experimentation, your body is cremated. However, some religions prohibit this practice. You will want to consider this if you’ve been thinking of donating your body to science.

Conclusion

All end-of-life decisions require a lot of time and reflection before you make them. Discuss this with your family, close friends, and religious leaders before making such a significant decision. We hope this article was able to lay out the advantages and disadvantages of donating your body to science.

Interested In Our Company?

DonorCure is a company that connects body donors with the researchers who will use their contribution to further science and make the world a better place. Learn more about how to donate your body to science on our website and register online.

How to donate your body to science

For some, donating their body to science is a way to help society. The hope is that by contributing to science, they may, in some small way, help to find a cure for deadly diseases like cancer. For others, the driving force behind donation is reducing cost since donating your body to science means that you will be able to avoid the cost of a funeral and burial.

Regardless of the motivation, donating your body to science is a very personal decision, and it is not for everyone. You should consider your cultural and religious decisions, your family wishes, and your financial situation. The first step is to learn as much as you can about the process, ask questions, and discuss the option with your loved ones.

Important: Donating your body to science is a great way to reduce your end-of-life costs. In most cases, you will know in advance if you are a good candidate. It is possible, however, that your loved ones won’t find out if your remains have been accepted until after your death. It is important that you create a backup plan just in case. Visit our funeral arrangements page for step-by-step guidance.

How does donating your body to science work?

Donating your body to science is a relatively straightforward process. Below are the steps you’ll need to follow.

Step 1: Find an appropriate donation organization. Many medical schools offer full body donation programs. There are also private companies that accept bodies. Start by looking for programs in your general area since this can make transportation easier. We have included some resources at the bottom of this page to help you find a group that is a good fit for you.

Step 2: Contact the organization and pre-register. It is not necessarily a requirement that you pre-register, but it can make the process go more smoothly. Some organizations have requirements that may prevent them from accepting certain bodies. Making arrangements ahead of time can help you narrow your list down to a program with which you are compatible.

Step 3: Find out what your obligations are. Many programs will cover all the expenses including transportation and cremation. You want to be sure that you are fully informed so that you can plan accordingly.

Step 4: Talk with your loved ones. It is important that the people who will be making your arrangements know what you have in mind. If they aren’t aware that this is what you have in mind, it could cause complications when the time comes. Let your family know if you have taken care of all the necessary paperwork or if they will need to fill out forms at your time of death.

Step 5: Update your legal paperwork. If you intend to donate your body to science, you should include your instructions in your will.

Step 6: Create a backup plan. Unless plans are being made for someone who is close to death, things can change over time. In the unlikely event your situation takes a turn and your body is no longer eligible for donation, you should have alternative arrangements. For many people who are considering body donation, cremation is a good alternative. For more on cremation visit our cremation pages.

Step 7: Decide on funeral/memorial options. A popular misconception is that if you choose whole body donation you can not have a funeral. This is not true. You can still have an open casket funeral when you donate your body to science. However, many people who choose to donate prefer to hold a memorial service. If you need information on planning your funeral we recommend that you visit our Celebrations of Life page.

Donating your body to science: questions and answers.

Can I still have a funeral if I donate my body to science?

Yes! You can still have a full funeral with an open casket if you donate your body to science. You should contact the organization that will be handling your donation to get more specific information on how the events will need to be timed.

Will my religion allow me to donate?

Most major religions permit individuals to donate both their full body and organs. Many even encourage it. If you are unsure, you should consult with your pastor or spiritual adviser.

Is indicating donation on my driver’s license enough?

No. You can indicate your preference to have your organs donated on your driver’s license but you will need to make special arrangements with a medical or scientific organization in order to donate your full body.

Can I get paid for donating my body to science?

No. Federal Law prohibits payment for bodies.

How do I find out about body donation programs?

There are several ways you can find information on programs that accept full body donation. We have included links to some good resources for this type of information below. There is a wealth of information available on the Internet or you can consult with a local funeral director.

Can I still donate specific organs if I donate my whole body?

Whether or not you can donate organs as well as your body will depend on the program in which you are enrolled. Some private scientific companies permit organ donation while many educational programs do not. If you would like to donate both, you should make arrangements with the donation program you are enrolled in.

Are all bodies accepted?

There are cases where institutions decline a body that is donated. Communicable disease, extreme obesity, and other conditions may lead to an individual being declined. Most organizations make every effort to honor the decision to donate. You need to make sure that you pre-register since many programs do not accept donations that are not pre-arranged.

Can I request that my body be used in a certain scientific study?

No, you cannot typically request that your donation be used for a particular study. Research organizations do not always know in advance what projects they will be working on when they receive a donation and priorities change. Once you decide which group you will be working with, you can ask them directly if you can request a particular project but, it is unlikely that the request will be honored.

Are there other options besides medical groups?

Some people choose to donate their bodies for use in forensic research rather than medical research. In these cases, your body will be used on a “body farm.” Body farms are properties where bodies are left to decompose under a variety of conditions. There is no charge to donate and you can typically donate your organs as well as your body. It is important that you make arrangements ahead of time.

Do you donate your whole body, or just your organs? Who accepts donations? And what happens to your cadaver? Get the basics on body donation.

Roughly 18 years ago, a woman named Susan Potter asked to donate her body to science when she died. Now, she lives on as the highest-resolution digital cadaver that exists to date. Potter’s story, detailed in the January issue of National Geographic, has inspired many people to ask: How do I donate my body to science?

Bear in mind that if you decide to donate your body, chances are slim you will also become a digital cadaver. That process is highly intensive, and so far, only two people have become official Visible Humans. Instead, your cadaver will most likely be used for teaching purposes in medical schools. Sometimes, donated corpses even help teach forensics teams how bodies decompose, like in the program at the University of Tennessee’s Forensic Anthropology Center.

She donated her body to science, and now she'll live forever

The United States does not have a centralized governing agency for whole-body donations, though the American Association of Anatomists has come up with a policy for how bodies should be handled when they’re donated. For instance, the policy states that donations must follow all state and local laws, and “donation literature should describe all possible uses of donated bodies at that institution.”

In many places, your state’s anatomical board is the main institution that accepts applications for whole-body donation, and that organization decides where the body is sent. In other states, such as Nebraska, the body-donation process is centralized through the state anatomical board, but the donor can choose which medical institution the body goes to. In yet other states, the state university system manages donations.

Generally, these institutions do not charge for body donation, though the University of Alabama asks for $750 to cover the costs of transportation, preservation, maintenance, and ultimately cremation. For-profit tissue brokers also exist. It is legal to sell bodies and body parts in the U.S., and some people choose to use brokers because they market their services and will cover the costs of claiming and transporting the body. Of course, then they will go on to sell the body parts, and the system is not closely regulated.

Certain physical conditions at the time of death can prevent acceptance to a whole-body donation program, including obesity, communicable diseases, jaundice, severe trauma to the body, and decomposition. Organ donations are handled differently from whole-body donations, and often times, an individual cannot be both an organ donor and a whole-body donor.

To find out who you can contact to make a body donation in your state, check out this list maintained by the Anatomical Board of the State of Florida.

Body, organ, and tissue donation is vital for researchers to improve their understanding of how diseases start and progress, and what keeps us healthy. There is no substitute for human tissue when studying the human body. Through donation, scientists are able to advance our understanding of disease and the development of new treatments. Research breakthroughs in Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, heart disease, diabetes, Parkinson’s disease, and more have been made possible because individuals chose to donate.

Body donation also plays a critical role in helping medical and health-related science students master their comprehension of the complex anatomy of the human body. Medical students and other healthcare professionals use human bodies to learn and perfect the skills that will one day benefit the health of society.

Body Donation 101

Donating your body to science is not the same as being an organ donor. Whole-body donation is slightly more complicated because there’s no single organization or network that oversees the process of matching donors with research programs and medical schools. Instead, the steps you’ll need to take to become a whole-body donor will depend on where you live or what type of program you want your gift to benefit.

Some states—such as Florida, Texas, Maryland, and Illinois—have state anatomical boards that you can contact if you want to become a donor. In other states, you must reach out directly to institutions and find out if you qualify for their body donation program.

The organ donor designation symbol on the back of your license does not imply consent for whole body donation. A whole-body donor would need to register with both the organ donation organization and the whole-body donation organization. Both organ and whole-body donations are extremely time-sensitive processes, so it’s important to talk to your loved ones and make sure they are aware of your preferences.

There are many whole-body donation programs that offer services at no cost to the donor or the donor’s family. The organization that receives your gift may cover the transportation and cremation costs related to the donation process. Make sure you talk to the organization about any costs associated with the end of life.

Donate

Do your research! There are numerous accredited organizations dedicated to providing valuable human bodies, organs, and tissues to medical researchers and students. Most institutions have comprehensive websites full of information; they also have people on staff who are ready to answer questions from potential donors.

If you want to help a particular research program, university, or hospital, contact them directly to ask if they have a whole-body donation program.

If you’re just getting started, you can browse this sample list of body donation programs by state. Keep in mind, many programs accept donors from out of state. A few accredited organizations you can also look into include Anatomy Gifts Registry, United Tissue Network, and Research for Life.

We often receive these questions from people wanting to do whole body donation. And the answer is no, you don’t get paid for donating your body to science. It’s, after all, called “donating” and not “selling”. Most states allow body donation for the sake of science but selling your body is definitely illegal.

There are, however, financial benefits to donating your body to science. Most body donation institutions take care of all body donation related expenses. It’ll help you and your family save up to thousands of dollars on funeral expenses.

What Costs Do Body Donation Institutions Cover?

Body donation institutions have differing policies when it comes to covering expenses. But most of the time, they take care of the following costs for their donors:

1. Transportation

When the body donation institution is notified of a donor’s death, they will make arrangements for the body’s transport to their facility. Usually, they partner with a local funeral home or send their own vehicle. Either which, you need not worry about transportation fees.

2. Cremation

On average, the cost of cremation in the US is about $2,300 . But it can go as high as $6,000 depending on the services included in the package.

If you donate your body to science, you won’t have to worry about cremation expenses. Body donation institutions cover cremation costs for their donors. This includes the payment for an urn to store the cremains in.

3. Death Certificate

Death certificates are necessary when processing documents like government benefits and real estate settlements. Insurance companies will also look for it when processing claims.

In general, the cost of getting one can range from $6 to $25 per copy depending on your state and county. Body donation institutions will also take care of this for you.

How to donate your body to science

Most everyone will meet criteria for body donation to science, including those with cancer, heart disease, arthritis, or diabetes. Joining the registry is not required, but it is recommended because it is the first step in sharing your wishes with your loved ones.

How to donate your body to science

No-cost cremation services in Colorado

Once accepted into the Science Care program, there is no cost for the donation process, cremation, or the return of final remains.

How to donate your body to science

HOPE® Program

If you have been diagnosed with a terminal illness, or if you are under hospice or palliative care, you may qualify for our Science Care Hope Program.

Body donation to science in Colorado: by county and city

Adams – Aurora, Bennett, Brighton, Commerce City, Denver, Dupont, Eastlake, Henderson, Strasburg, Thornton, Watkins, Westminster

Alamosa – Alamosa, Hooper, Alamosa East

Arapahoe – Aurora, Byers, Deer Trail, Denver, Englewood, Littleton

Archuleta – Pagosa Springs, Arboles, Piedra

Baca – Campo, Pritchett, Springfield, Two Buttes, Vilas, Walsh

Bent – Las Animas

Broomfield – Broomfield

Boulder – Allenspark, Boulder, Eldorado Springs, Erie, Hygiene, Jamestown, Lafayette, Longmont, Louisville, Lyons, Nederland, Niwot, Pinecliffe, Ward

Chaffee – Salida, Buena Vista, Poncha Springs

Cheyenne – Cheyenne Wells, Kit Carson

Clear Creek – Dumont, Empire, Georgetown, Idaho Springs, Silver Plume

Conejos – Antonito, Capulin, Conejos, La Jara, Manassa, Romeo, Sanford

Costilla – San Luis, Fort Garland, Blanca

Crowley – Ordway, Crowley, Olney Springs, Sugar City

Custer – Westcliffe, Wetmore

Delta – Austin, Cedaredge, Cory, Crawford, Delta, Eckert, Hotchkiss, Lazear, Paonia

Denver – Denver

Dolores – Dove Creek, Rico

Douglas – Castle Rock, Franktown, Larkspur, Littleton, Lone Tree, Louviers, Parker, Sedalia

Eagle – Avon, Basalt, Bond, Burns, Eagle, Edwards, Gypsum, Mc Coy, Minturn, Red Cliff, Vail, Wolcott

Elbert – Agate, Elizabeth, Kiowa, Matheson, Simla

El Paso – Calhan, Cascade, Colorado Springs, Elbert, Fountain, Green Mountain Falls, Manitou Springs, Monument, Palmer Lake, Peyton, Ramah, Rush, Yoder

Fremont – Canon City, Coal Creek, Coaldale, Cotopaxi, Florence, Hillside, Howard, Penrose, Rockvale

Garfield – Carbondale, Glenwood Springs, New Castle, Parachute, Rifle, Silt

Gilpin – Black Hawk, Rollinsville

Grand – Fraser, Granby, Grand Lake, Hot Sulphur Springs, Kremmling, Parshall, Tabernash, Winter Park

Gunnison – Almont, Crested Butte, Gunnison, Ohio City, Parlin, Pitkin, Powderhorn, Somerset

Hinsdale – Lake City, Cathedral

Huerfano – Walsenburg, La Veta

Jackson – Walden

Jefferson – Arvada, Broomfield, Buffalo Creek, Conifer, Denver, Evergreen, Golden, Idledale, Indian Hills, Kittredge, Littleton, Morrison, Pine, Wheat Ridge

Kiowa – Arlington, Eads, Haswell, Sheridan Lake, Towner, Brandon

Kit Carson – Bethune, Burlington, Flagler, Seibert, Stratton, Vona

La Plata – Durango, Bayfield, Ignacio

Lake – Leadville, Twin Lakes, Leadville North

Larimer – Bellvue, Berthoud, Drake, Estes Park, Fort Collins, Glen Haven, Laporte, Livermore, Loveland, Masonville, Red Feather Lakes, Timnath, Wellington

Las Animas – Aguilar, Boncarbo, Branson, Hoehne, Kim, Model, Trinchera, Trinidad, Weston

Lincoln – Hugo, Limon, Arriba, Genoa

Logan – Atwood, Crook, Fleming, Iliff, Merino, Padroni, Peetz, Sterling

Mesa – Clifton, Collbran, De Beque, Fruita, Gateway, Glade Park, Grand Junction, Loma, Mack, Mesa, Molina, Palisade, Whitewater

Mineral – Creede

Moffat – Craig, Dinosaur

Montezuma – Cortez, Mancos, Dolores, Towaoc, Lewis

Montrose – Bedrock, Cimarron, Montrose, Naturita, Nucla, Olathe, Paradox, Redvale

Morgan – Fort Morgan, Brush, Wiggins, Log Lane Village, Hillrose

Otero – Cheraw, Fowler, La Junta, Manzanola, Rocky Ford, Swink

Ouray – Ouray, Ridgway, Loghill Village

Park – Fairplay, Hartsel, Alma, Guffey

Phillips – Holyoke, Haxtun, Paoli

Pitkin – Aspen, Meredith, Snowmass, Snowmass Village, Woody Creek

Prowers – Lamar, Holly, Granada, Wiley, Hartman

Pueblo – Avondale, Beulah, Boone, Colorado City, Pueblo, Rye

Rio Blanco – Meeker, Rangely

Rio Grande – South Fork, Monte Vista, Del Norte

Routt – Clark, Hayden, Oak Creek, Phippsburg, Steamboat Springs, Toponas, Yampa

Saguache – Saguache, Crestone, Moffat, Bonanza

San Juan – Silverton

San Miguel – Egnar, Norwood, Ophir, Placerville, Telluride

Sedgwick – Julesburg, Sedgwick, Ovid

Summit – Breckenridge, Dillon, Frisco, Silverthorne

Teller – Woodland Park, Cripple Creek, Florissant, Victor, Goldfield

Washington – Akron, Anton, Cope, Lindon, Otis, Woodrow

Weld – Ault, Briggsdale, Brighton, Carr, Dacono, Eaton, Evans, Firestone, Fort Lupton, Frederick, Galeton, Gilcrest, Gill, Greeley, Grover, Hereford, Hudson, Johnstown, Keenesburg, Kersey, La Salle, Longmont, Lucerne, Mead, Milliken, New Raymer, Nunn, Pierce, Platteville, Roggen, Severance, Stoneham, Windsor

Yuma – Wray, Yuma, Eckley

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