How to pass a math test or paper with a good grade

Tips and techniques

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  2. How to pass Maths Edexcel GCSE

You may say, ‘Maths is just Maths, there’s only one way to do a sum’ but there were still two key questions;

“Which exam board do we use?”

“Which tier do we enter pupils for?”

We poured over the specifications and the sample materials, eventually coming to some tentative conclusions.

The three exam boards had chosen significantly different approaches to how they structured the questions; AQA had chosen to use less wordy questions but their questions were far more abstract, OCR was much wordier but the questions were a lot more straight forward and Edexcel had set their stall somewhere in the middle.

That Edexcel had staked themselves in the middle ground was no great surprise, while some pupils preferred the straight forward questions of OCR or the more convoluted examples in AQA, the majority of pupils preferred a mix of both. Edexcel was, and remains, the largest GCSE Maths exam board.

The majority of my colleagues had chosen Edexcel for this very reason, they wanted the exam they chose to play to the strengths of as many of their pupils as possible.

How to pass a math test or paper with a good grade

What is the difference in the Edexcel maths tiers?

The first choice that needs to be addressed is which tier, Higher or Foundation, is the best choice for you. Unfortunately, this isn’t quite as simple as it looks.

With the changes to the specification, the overlap between Higher and Foundation has widened. Previously, the only grade you could achieve on both was a grade C, but now you can achieve both a grade 4 and a grade 5 on both (This is very roughly the same as being able to achieve a Grade C or a low-Grade B).

There is one very simple conclusion that we can make here; The higher tier was being shifted more to cater for the higher achieving pupils, those aiming to move onto more scientific and mathematical pursuits when they had finished their GCSEs.

When the first set of results came in, this opinion was shown to be correct, the examiner’s reports spoke about the pupils who had been entered for the higher tier but had failed to access the questions.

The conclusion we reached here is that unless you need a grade 6 or higher, then study the foundation tier, it’s far harder to get the standard (Grade 4) or good (Grade 5) on higher than foundation for pupils who are a borderline choice.

In maths, for all three exam boards, there are three assessment objectives;

AO1 – Recall of facts

(Higher: 40% Foundation: 50%)

AO2 – Interpreting and communicating

(Higher: 30% Foundation: 25%)

AO3 – Problem solving

(Higher: 30% Foundation: 25%)

Tips and techniques for Edexcel maths exams

Let’s start by taking a look at AO3, this is the one where historically students have struggled. Viewing a question and deciding on the approach was usually reserved for later stages of the papers; however, Edexcel have changed this and sprinkled them through the papers. These early problem-solving questions can be very easy marks to pick up which leads us directly into my first tip.

1) Highlighters and keywords are your friends.

I always told my pupils that the first step in any problem solving was to work out what the question was asking, I drilled them in going through a question and highlighting the keywords and numbers.

An example here could be, “Dave has £5, he gives £2 to Emma. How much does Dave now have?”

The numbers are obvious, £5 and £2, and the key word here is ‘gives’, this means he has less so it must be a subtraction. If you search for ‘Maths keywords’ there are plenty of examples out there.

While this seems an obvious point, it leads directly into tip 2.

2) Work through the questions backwards.

Backwards? What kind of craziness is this? It does, however, make sense if you realise that maths is always hunting for a specific answer. If you start by asking ‘What do I need to find’ and then asking the question ‘What do I need to do to get to this answer’, you are far more likely to make that breakthrough that will allow you to get to the solution.

If we now go back and look at the other assessment objectives, AO1 is where a lot of pupils gain marks as their revision has focused on retaining these key facts. This leads me neatly onto tip 3.

3) Know your formulas and how to use them

All the exam boards have, on their websites, posters and displays that have all the formulas that are used at both tiers.

Get a copy of these, stick them on your wall and learn them, I have lost count of the number of times I have seen pupils lose a mark by forgetting to divide a triangle’s area in two or saying that the angle in a triangle adds up to 360.

These are the simple marks that could make the difference to you achieving your grade or missing out on a grade 5 (and a college place) by 1 mark! Trust me, I’ve seen this happen.

Top tip: AO2 is usually the area where pupils lose the most marks but it’s one of the easiest to rectify!

4) There are only so many ways the exam board can ask a question. Learn the Mark Schemes!

This is perhaps best illustrated by an example. If a question comes up about scatter graphs, the examiners will be looking for certain things. They will be looking for a line of best fit, draw one even if you aren’t asked for it, if they ask for the correlation, it is enough to say positive, negative or none. While there are very few differences between what the exam boards will be looking for in a specific question, it is worth noting that if the question is worth, for example, 5 marks, you must make 5 distinct points, the final one of which will be your final answer.

If you are doing past papers, great! But always use the mark scheme to check the working out as well as the answer, the chances are that if it comes up in your exam, it will be the same.

Top tip: It’s worth noting that if the question is worth, for example, 5 marks, you must make 5 distinct points, the final one of which will be your final answer.

5) Always show your working

This is the one point I have emphasised to all students I have taught.

– If you just put the answer and get it right, you will most likely get the marks.

– If you just put the answer and get it wrong, you will get nothing.

– If you show your working and get it wrong, you could get some method marks.

Would you want to miss out on your target because you didn’t show the working? Didn’t think so!

EdPlace can help you pass your Edexcel maths GCSE

GCSE prep. It can feel a bit neverending, right? Don’t worry, you’ve got this! but if you or your child are in need of an extra boost, we have hundreds of maths GCSE revision materials and practice papers to help you hone your skills. We’re here to ensure comprehension is in tip-top shape for exam day! Try these activities and practice papers for free to get you started:

Let’s take a look at what it takes to do well on the TACHS. Many Catholic high schools in New York City look at a student’s TACHS score to determine admission, placement, and scholarships.

How to pass a math test or paper with a good grade

First, it’s important to know that there is no passing score for the TACHS. Students will be given a percentile based on their performance when compared to the other students who have to take the TACHS. While there is no magic score to get, it is still very important for students to try and maximize their scores, to score in the highest percentile possible.

Like any standardized test, time management is important. As a result, it’s important to not just know the material on the test but know how to get the answers quickly. Each standardized test is different (TACHS and HSPT are different), meaning the way questions are asked aren’t always the same. Even though both tests may have a reading and a language section, the passages and format of the questions may be different. That is why it is important to not just study the material that appears on the tests but to become familiar with the questions and format of each test.

Our online TACHS course covers the topics that appear on the test in our lessons, and they are followed by questions similar to the ones that students will see on the test. In addition, we have practice TACHS tests for students to get used to the format and learn their strengths and weaknesses.

Scoring on the TACHS

Students’ scores are reported as percentiles. Students will not get their actual grade on the test, but rather how they rank among other students. A percentile lets you know how high you rank. For example, a student in the 90th percentile for math scored higher than 90% of the students in math. It doesn’t mean that he answered 90% of the questions correctly.

The score report will include a percentile for each of the four sections. For each section, a student will be given two percentiles. One for his performance against other students in his city and one for all students who took the TACHS.

Overview of the Test

The test is broken down into four main sections: Reading, Written Expression, Mathematics, and Ability.

The reading section will consist of short passages followed by questions about the passage. Students can read the passages in any order and skip ahead to read the questions before they read the passage. We suggest reading the questions first, before reading the passage, so students know what information to look out for. Students should not read the answer choices before reading the passages because reading the wrong answer choices may influence their thoughts while they read the passage.

How to pass a math test or paper with a good grade

  • Written Expression

Written expression questions may present themselves as a paragraph followed by some questions on how to improve the paragraph or fix errors. They may also be single sentences in which students have to identify the error.

How to pass a math test or paper with a good grade

  • Mathematics

The math section covers a lot of topics including integers, fractions, percents, word problems, algebra, and geometry.

How to pass a math test or paper with a good grade

  • Ability

There are basically three types of questions that show up on the ability section. They are Figure Matrices, Paper Folding (Hole-Punch), and Figure Classification.

Figure Matrices

For Figure Matrices questions, students are presented with a three by three matrix of figures. Typically the figure in the bottom right will be missing, and students have to determine which of the answer choices is the correct figure for the missing spot. There is a way in which the figures are related, sometimes by row and sometimes by column. There may be a common similarity or change between figures in each row or column.

How to pass a math test or paper with a good grade

Paper Folding

For the Paper Folding questions, a piece of paper is shown to have been folded one or more times. While it is folded, holes are punched through the paper. It is the student’s job to figure out what the paper would like when it is unfolded.

How to pass a math test or paper with a good grade

Figure Classification

For Figure Classification questions, three figures are shown together that have some special similarity. The student has to choose the figure from the answer choices that share that similarity.

GED stands for General Education Development or General Education Diploma. The GED is a secondary option for individuals who did not complete high school and receive their high school diploma. The GED, recognized in all 50 states, serves as a high school equivalency credential. With this credential, graduates can apply for colleges and entry-level employment positions. The math section of this assessment tests student’s ability to solve algebraic and quantitative problems.

Who is eligible to take the GED Math Test?

You are eligible to take the GED math test if you meet the following requirements:

  • You are at least 16 years old
  • You are not enrolled in high school
  • You have not graduated from high school
  • You meet all of your state’s additional requirements (ex. the length of time since leaving school)

How much is the GED Math Test?

In most states, the GED Math test is $30 or less. Students are encouraged to check out the GED website for their state’s prices.

What type of math is on the GED Test?

The mathematical reasoning section of the GED test consists of two types of problems, quantitative problem-solving and algebraic problem-solving. Some of the many topics include:

  • Mean & median
  • Surface area
  • Slope of a line
  • Perimeter
  • Circumference
  • Simple interest
  • Pythagorean theorem
  • Quadratic formula
  • Total cost

How long is the GED Math Test?

The GED Math Test is 115 minutes (1 Hour & 55 minutes).

Can you use a calculator on the GED Math Test?

The GED math test has two sections. On the first section, which consists of 5 questions, you are not allowed to use a calculator. For the second section, which includes 41 questions, you may use a calculator. Please note that you must bring your own TI-30XS calculator.

How many questions can you miss on the GED Math Test?

The GED scoring system is complex, so one question doesn’t always equal one point. Some questions are fill in the blank or multiple select, where you must select multiple answers, which means multiple points. The GED Math Section has 46 questions, and a passing score is 145-164. There is no exact number of questions you can miss and still pass, but, according to the GED Testing Service, you need approximately 60%-65% of your points to pass.

How many times can you retake the GED Math Test?

There are no restrictions on how many times you can retake the GED Math Test. Generally, you can take the GED 3 times, and after the 3rd attempt, you have to wait 60 days. Similar rules apply to students taking the test in different languages. For example, if a student takes a test 3 times in Spanish, after the 3rd attempt, there is a 60-day waiting period to take it in English. Some states have individual retake rules. For example, in the District of Columbia (D.C.), after the first attempt, there is a 30-day waiting period before you can retake the test. Students are encouraged to check out their state’s retesting policy.

What do you have to score to pass the GED Math Test?

To pass the GED math test, you must earn a score of at least 145. The highest score is 164, and anything below 145 is considered failing.

How many questions are on the GED Math Test?

The GED math test consists of 46 questions. Some of the many question types include multiple-choice, drag-and-drop, hot spot, and fill-in-the-blank.

GED Math Practice Test

What to expect on test day

The rules and procedures for test day vary with each testing center. Below you will find some common tips to help you on test day.

  • Arrive at your testing site at least 15 minutes early. Some testing locations will not allow you to take your test if you are more than 15 minutes late.
  • Bring an unexpired photo identification card, such as a driver’s license, state-issued ID, military ID, or passport.
  • You will be able to take a break if you scheduled more than one subject on the same day.
  • You will not be able to eat or drink in the testing area.
  • Cell phones and other electronics are not allowed in the testing area.
  • You must bring your own TI-30XS calculator.
  • You will receive a reference sheet and math formula sheet
  • Any additional items, such as backpacks and handbags are put in storage if it’s available.

How to study for the GED Math Test

Does the thought of taking the GED math test make you nervous? Don’t worry- you are in the right place! Our test-taking experts thoroughly researched the GED to create the Mometrix GED Study Guide. This comprehensive study guide not only covers the major topics on the GED math test, like variables and line plotting, but it also includes practice test questions. With our easy-to-read explanations, you’re sure to ace the practice test, as well as the official one! The Mometrix GED Study Guide covers all four sections (social studies, science, reasoning through language arts, and mathematical reasoning) on the GED test.

Repetition is one of the most proven study strategies, so our experts also developed the Mometrix GED Flash Cards. Making the study experience fun and effective, the Mometrix GED Flash Cards are ideal for quizzing and studying on the go! These all-in-one cards cover all the major topics on all four sections of the GED test. You can also look forward to learning effective test-taking strategies that will make a big difference on test day!

We congratulate you on taking the first few steps toward earning your GED. We look forward to helping you ace the test!

Upgrade your studying with our GED study guide and flashcards:
GED Study Guide
GED Flashcards

GED Math Practice Test Tutorials

by Mometrix Test Preparation | Last Updated: July 9, 2021

Use this calculator to find out the grade of a course based on weighted averages. This calculator accepts both numerical as well as letter grades. It also can calculate the grade needed for the remaining assignments in order to get a desired grade for an ongoing course.

Final Grade Calculator

Use this calculator to find out the grade needed on the final exam in order to get a desired grade in a course. It accepts letter grades, percentage grades, and other numerical inputs.

The calculators above use the following letter grades and their typical corresponding numerical equivalents based on grade points.

Letter Grade GPA Percentage
A+ 4.3 97-100%
A 4 93-96%
A- 3.7 90-92%
B+ 3.3 87-89%
B 3 83-86%
B- 2.7 80-82%
C+ 2.3 77-79%
C 2 73-76%
C- 1.7 70-72%
D+ 1.3 67-69%
D 1 63-66%
D- 0.7 60-62%
F 0 0-59%

Brief history of different grading systems

In 1785, students at Yale were ranked based on “optimi” being the highest rank, followed by second optimi, inferiore (lower), and pejores (worse). At William and Mary, students were ranked as either No. 1, or No. 2, where No. 1 represented students that were first in their class, while No. 2 represented those who were “orderly, correct and attentive.” Meanwhile at Harvard, students were graded based on a numerical system from 1-200 (except for math and philosophy where 1-100 was used). Later, shortly after 1883, Harvard used a system of “Classes” where students were either Class I, II, III, IV, or V, with V representing a failing grade. All of these examples show the subjective, arbitrary, and inconsistent nature with which different institutions graded their students, demonstrating the need for a more standardized, albeit equally arbitrary grading system.

In 1887, Mount Holyoke College became the first college to use letter grades similar to those commonly used today. The college used a grading scale with the letters A, B, C, D, and E, where E represented a failing grade. This grading system however, was far stricter than those commonly used today, with a failing grade being defined as anything below a 75%. The college later re-defined their grading system, adding the letter F for a failing grade (still below 75%). This system of using a letter grading scale became increasingly popular within colleges and high schools, eventually leading to the letter grading systems typically used today. However, there is still significant variation regarding what may constitute an A, or whether a system uses plusses or minuses (i.e. A+ or B-), among other differences.

An alternative to the letter grading system

Letter grades provide an easy means to generalize a student’s performance. They can be more effective than qualitative evaluations in situations where “right” or “wrong” answers can be easily quantified, such as an algebra exam, but alone may not provide a student with enough feedback in regards to an assessment like a written paper (which is much more subjective).

Although a written analysis of each individual student’s work may be a more effective form of feedback, there exists the argument that students and parents are unlikely to read the feedback, and that teachers do not have the time to write such an analysis. There is precedence for this type of evaluation system however, in Saint Ann’s School in New York City, an arts-oriented private school that does not have a letter grading system. Instead, teachers write anecdotal reports for each student. This method of evaluation focuses on promoting learning and improvement, rather than the pursuit of a certain letter grade in a course. For better or for worse however, these types of programs constitute a minority in the United States, and though the experience may be better for the student, most institutions still use a fairly standard letter grading system that students will have to adjust to. The time investment that this type of evaluation method requires of teachers/professors is likely not viable on university campuses with hundreds of students per course. As such, although there are other high schools such as Sanborn High School that approach grading in a more qualitative way, it remains to be seen whether such grading methods can be scalable. Until then, more generalized forms of grading like the letter grading system are unlikely to be entirely replaced. However, many educators already try to create an environment that limits the role that grades play in motivating students. One could argue that a combination of these two systems would likely be the most realistic, and effective way to provide a more standardized evaluation of students, while promoting learning.

Our Final Exam Grade Calculator calculates what you need on your final exam to get a desired grade in the course. If you have asked yourself “what do I need on my final exam. ” then this site is for you!

Want to calculate your weighted average grade? Then try our Weighted Average Calculator

Do you know your Current Grade?

Fill in your assignment grades on the right to automatically calculate your current grade!

Grade Needed on Final Exam

Please make sure all textfields are filled out.

MINIMUM Attainable Course Grade: 0%

MAXIMUM Attainable Course Grade: 100%

Enter your assignment scores here to automatically calculate your current grade! (eg midterms, tests, homework, labs, etc.)

# Score / Out Of Grade (%) Weight (%)
1 /
2 /
3 /
4 /
5 /
6 /
7 /

Important Notes

Our Final Exam Grade Calculator calculates the final exam grade you would need to get a desired overall course grade and would require you to input your current course percentage grade as well as the weight of the final as a percentage. If you do not know your current grade, you would need to select “no” on the question “Do you know your Current Grade?” and then input the grades you received for your assignments, tests, homework, labs, etc. as well as the weight as a percentage of each. Our grade calculator automatically calculates your current grade as well as the grade needed on the final exam to get your desired overall course grade! Not only that but the minimum and maximum course overall course grades are also calculated. Furthermore, a table and chart of the different possible final exam grades and their corresponding overall course grades are also generated, all automatically.

Inputting Data in our Final Exam Calculator

When inputting your Current Grade and the Weight of the Final, our calculator automatically assumes that your current grade is based is based on weight of your course prior to the final exam and is calculated as 100% minus the inputted weight of the final. If your current grade does not account for all the course work (assignments, labs, tests, homework, etc.) prior to your final exam then the calculator results will not be accurate for you.

Similarly, if you don’t know your Current Grade and you input your course work and corresponding grades and weights into our calculator, the calculator automatically calculates your current grade as well as the Weight of the Final. In this case the weight of the final is simply calculated as 100% minus the Sum of the Weights of your course work. Thus if you inputted too many or too little assignments, tests, etc. then the Weight of the Final calculated may not match the actual weight of the final in your course.

For a more in-depth breakdown of how our grade calculator works, make sure to check out our Grade Calculator Tutorial!

About South Carolina’s Standardized Tests

How to pass a math test or paper with a good grade
Are your kids preparing for South Carolina’s Palmetto Assessment of State Standards? Also known as SC PASS, these South Carolina standardized tests measure the progress of students from 3rd grade to 8th grade. South Carolina PASS test results provide actionable data that will help parents, teachers, and students improve academic performance in English language arts, math, writing, science, and social studies. SC PASS testing is also used in evaluating each school’s Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) as required by the federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB).

Time4Learning and Time4Writing—two online services that teach many of the SC PASS skills—provide this page to support your research on SC PASS and the best ways to help your kids with SC PASS practice and test prep.

SC PASS Tests for 3rd – 8th Grades

South Carolina’s Palmetto Assessment of State Standards is aligned to South Carolina State Curriculum Standards, which define what students should learn each year. The annual SC PASS tests are given as follows:

  • All students in 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th grades take the SC PASS tests in English language arts, writing, and math
  • Fourth and seventh graders also take SC PASS tests in science and social studies
  • Third, fifth, sixth, and eighth graders take either science or social studies SC PASS tests, with half of the students in each grade taking each test

How SC PASS Tests Are Scored
SC PASS tests measure how well students have mastered the South Carolina state standards, and report student performance in each subject using the following three levels:

Exemplary: Student demonstrated exemplary performance in meeting the grade level standard.
Met: Student met the grade level standard.
Not Met: Student did not meet the grade level standard.

Other South Carolina Standardized Tests

SC High School Assessment Program
The South Carolina High School Assessment Program (HSAP) is administered to all 9th grade students and is required for graduation. SC HSAP consists of two tests—English language arts and math—and has four achievement levels. Students must score at level 2 or higher, or retake the test(s).

SC End-of-Course Examination Program (EOCEP)
The South Carolina EOCEP tests are administered in Algebra 1, Math for the Technologies 2, English 1, Physical Science, and U.S. History and the Constitution. Students in public middle and high schools, as well as alternative, virtual, and home schools take the tests, which count for 20 percent of the final grade.

Additional South Carolina Assessments
South Carolina uses a balanced range of assessments to promote learning for all students. The South Carolina Alternate Assessment (SC-Alt) is designed to measure the progress of students with severe cognitive disabilities who require special accommodations. Students with Limited English Proficiency (LEP) take the English Language Development Assessment (ELDA), which measures their progress in English language acquisition. Gifted and talented students are identified through South Carolina’s Project STAR performance assessments.

NAEP in South Carolina
South Carolina also participates annually in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), known as the Nation’s Report Card, where a sampling of students (from grades 4, 8, and/or 12) are tested in several content areas as part of a nationally representative assessment of student performance.

A good resource on South Carolina state testing is the South Carolina Department of Education’s assessment webpage.

Preparing for the South Carolina PASS

For general tips on test preparation, please visit our standardized test overview page.
The real preparation for the SC PASS tests, or any standardized test, begins with your commitment to your children’s education throughout their school years. Devote time and effort to helping your children learn. Start by making sure your kids do their homework and read every day. Many families also employ tutors or an online learning program, such as Time4Learning, to build fundamental skills.

When preparing for standardized tests, students often benefit from test prep programs and books, which offer guidance and practice with test formats, time restrictions, test-taking strategies (when to guess, when not to), and different types of questions. For instance, when a reading passage is followed by comprehension questions, many test prep programs teach students to scan the questions first in order to know what areas of the passage require close reading. Time4Learning is not a test prep program, it is a program that builds the skills that will be tested.

Time4Learning is a new approach that takes advantage of today’s technology. It’s a convenient, online home education program that combines learning with fun educational teaching games.

The online language arts and math curriculum comprise a comprehensive program for preschool, elementary school, and middle school. Science and social studies programs are provided for most grades.

Time4Writing provides highly effective 8-week writing courses online that help elementary, middle and high school students build writing skills through one-on-one interaction with a certified teacher.

Kids like using the computer to learn and to develop their skills. Time4Learning’s educational teaching games give students independence as they progress at their own pace.

Parents like that it tracks progress and helps kids advance by teaching through individualized learning paths that assure mastery of the skills and concepts that makes kids succeed.

Have a child with math and language arts skills at different grade levels? No problem, just tell us in the online registration process.

Time4Learning is proven effective, has a low monthly price, and provides a money-back guarantee so you can be sure that it works for your family, risk free!

About North Carolina Standardized Tests for 3rd Grade – High School

How to pass a math test or paper with a good gradeAre your kids preparing for the North Carolina End-of-Grade Tests? Also known as NC EOG, these North Carolina standardized tests are used to measure the progress of students from 3rd grade to 8th grade. Results from the NC EOG tests, and NC End-of-Course (EOC) tests for high school students, provide actionable data that will help parents, teachers, and students improve academic performance in reading, math, science, writing, and other subjects. The North Carolina Testing Program also uses NC EOG and NC EOC to determine each school’s Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) as required by the federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB).

Time4Learning, an online service that teaches many of the skills that these exams test, offers this page to help you understand the North Carolina End-of-Grade Tests and NC End-of-Course Tests, and how you can help your children prepare.

NC EOG and NC EOC at a Glance

North Carolina public, charter, and private school students take the following NC EOG and NC EOC tests:

NC EOG: 3rd Grade – 8th Grade
The NC End-of-Grade tests are aligned to North Carolina State Standards, which define what students should learn each year. The NC EOG reading test and NC EOG math test are given to students in 3rd, 4th, 5th, 6th, 7th, and 8th grades, and measure how well they are meeting grade-level expectations. Fifth graders and eighth graders also take the NC EOG science test. The North Carolina Writing Assessment is administered in 4th grade, 7th grade, and 10th grade. In addition, all students take the North Carolina Test of Computer Skills beginning in eighth grade and must achieve a proficient score to graduate.

High School: NC End-of-Course Tests
All North Carolina high school students take End-of-Course (EOC) tests to assess their mastery of the content areas as mandated in the North Carolina Standard Course of Study. NC EOC tests are given in algebra I, algebra II, English I, biology, civics and economics, U.S. history, geometry, chemistry, physical science, and physics. Students must score proficient on the five essential End-of-Course tests: Algebra I, Biology, Civics and Economics, English I, and U.S. History in order to graduate.

Other North Carolina Standardized Tests

North Carolina uses a broad range of assessments that promote learning for all students. With the goal of leaving no child behind, North Carolina offers alternative tests for struggling students, including the North Carolina Competency Test, which is given to 9th grade students who did not score at or above the proficient level on the 8th Grade NC EOG tests.

The North Carolina NCEXTEND is designed to measure the progress of students with severe disabilities who require special accommodations. Students with Limited English Proficiency take the ACCESS for ELLs®, which measures their progress in English language acquisition.

North Carolina also participates annually in the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), known as the Nation’s Report Card, where a sampling of students (from grades 4, 8, and/or 12) are tested in several content areas as part of a nationally representative assessment of student performance.

How NC Standardized Tests Are Scored
The North Carolina EOG, EOC, and NC Competency Test are standards-based, criterion-referenced tests. Students compete only with themselves and are measured by how well they have mastered grade-specific skills. The NC End-of-Grade and NC End-of-Course tests are scored on four performance levels, with Level 1 being the lowest and Level 4 the highest. Students scoring at or above Level 3 are considered to be proficient. The North Carolina Test of Computer Skills and the North Carolina Competency Tests are scored on a pass-fail basis. North Carolina’s goal is for all students to pass the tests and allows tests to be retaken. A good resource on the North Carolina Testing program is the NC Department of Public Instruction website.

Preparing for North Carolina EOG and EOC Tests

For general tips on test preparation, please visit our standardized test overview page. The real preparation for the NC EOG, NC EOC, or any standardized test, begins with your commitment to your children’s education throughout their school years. All families should devote time and effort to helping their students learn, starting with making sure that homework gets done and reading every day becomes a habit. Many families also employ tutors or an online learning program, such as Time4Learning, to build fundamental skills. In addition, families use test prep programs or books to help their children become familiar with test formats and time restrictions, learn test-taking strategies (when to guess, when not to), and practice strategies for different types of questions. For instance, in the case of a reading passage followed by comprehension questions, many test prep programs teach students to scan the questions prior to reading the passage so that students will know what areas of the text require close reading. Time4Learning is not a test prep program, it is a program that builds the skills that will be tested.

Time4Learning is a new approach that takes advantage of today’s technology. It’s a convenient, online home education program that combines learning with fun educational teaching games.

The online language arts and math curriculum comprise a comprehensive program for preschool, elementary school, and middle school. Science and social studies programs are provided for most grades.

Time4Writing provides highly effective 8-week writing courses online that help elementary, middle and high school students build writing skills through one-on-one interaction with a certified teacher.

Kids like using the computer to learn and to develop their skills. Time4Learning’s educational teaching games give students independence as they progress at their own pace.

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The Common Core State Standards Initiative is an effort to ensure that all students in public schools in America acquire the skills and knowledge they need in order to be prepared to achieve success at college or in the workforce.

The federal government is not responsible for this initiative; it was developed at the state level by government leaders and education professionals who were concerned about the lack of national standards for the education of children. As of this writing, 45 states have voluntarily adopted the standards, along with three territories and the District of Columbia.

Before the initiative, each state set its own educational requirements, which led to a situation in which some states had much lower standards than others. Not only was this unfair to the students who were being held to the lower standards, it also made it very difficult for parents, colleges, and employers to gauge the value of a high school diploma, because requirements varied so greatly.

With one set of standards for all, everyone concerned is better able to judge how effectively a school is teaching its students.

Practice Question Directory

English

  • Grade 1 English Language Arts
  • Grade 2 English Language Arts
  • Grade 3 English Language Arts
  • Grade 4 English Language Arts
  • Grade 5 English Language Arts
  • Grade 6 English Language Arts
  • Grade 7 English Language Arts
  • Grade 8 English Language Arts
  • Grade 9 English Language Arts
  • Grade 10 English Language Arts
  • Grade 11 English Language Arts
  • Grade 12 English Language Arts

Math

  • Grade 1 Mathematics
  • Grade 2 Mathematics
  • Grade 3 Mathematics
  • Grade 4 Mathematics
  • Grade 5 Mathematics
  • Grade 6 Mathematics
  • Grade 7 Mathematics
  • Grade 8 Mathematics
  • Mathematics: Algebra
  • Mathematics: Functions
  • Mathematics: Geometry
  • Mathematics: Number and Quantity
  • Mathematics: Statistics and Probability

Having a consistent standard across the United States is not a magic solution that will solve all the problems in our nation’s schools, but it will certainly play a key role in education reform, for several reasons. Having one standard will allow parents and students to know exactly what will be expected of students in order to earn a diploma.

Teachers will also have a clear expectation of what’s required of them, and education programs at colleges and universities will be better able to train our nation’s future teachers. In addition, educational publishers will have benchmarks to guide them in developing textbooks and other educational materials. Testing will also be more effective with uniform, clear-cut standards across the board.

This does not mean that all schools in America will become carbon copies of each other. Common Core standards set specific goals, but it will be up to the administrators and teachers in each school to determine the best methods of achieving those goals.

They will have the flexibility and autonomy they need to give their students a great education, while having clear outcomes to aim for. The standards offer teachers and administrators guidance without taking over their classrooms and turning them into automatons.

The standards are divided into two main categories: Mathematics, and English Language Arts. Standards have been developed only for these two subjects, as they are the foundations upon which students will build to master all other subjects. In each category, there are detailed and objective standards provided for every level, from kindergarten to 12th grade.

Students will be evaluated on a regular basis to measure their progress against the standards for their grade level, and whether or not they receive a high school diploma will depend in large part on their meeting these standards.

While teachers will play a key role in helping students gain the skills and knowledge required by these standards, it will be up to the student to actually pass the exams. To assist students who desire to excel and have the initiative to seek improvement and mastery of the standards on their own, we have provided Common Core practice questions and answers for self-testing purposes.

By taking advantage of these resources, students can determine their strengths and weaknesses, and pinpoint those areas where they may be falling short of the standards. They can also use the questions and answers as a direct means of improvement. Parents should encourage their children to make use of these resources, and monitor their results, as study after study has demonstrated conclusively that children whose parents take an active interest in their education almost always excel.