How to raise a child

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From day care to the monthly grocery bill, the cost of raising a child is climbing at a rate that many families can’t keep up with.

It will cost an estimated $241,080 for a middle-income couple to raise a child born last year for 18 years, according to a U.S. Department of Agriculture report released Wednesday. That’s up almost 3% from 2011 and doesn’t even include the cost of college.

At the same time, wages aren’t keeping up. The country’s median annual household income has fallen by more than $4,000 since 2000, after adjusting for inflation, and many of the jobs lost during the recent recession have been replaced with lower-wage positions.

The USDA’s latest estimates include expenses for housing, food, transportation, clothing, health care, education and child care, as well as miscellaneous expenses, such as toys and computers.

The biggest price tag is for families in the urban Northeast earning $105,360 or more. They will spend $446,100, much more than the national average, according to the report. Meanwhile, families earning less than $61,590 a year in rural areas will spend the least, at $143,160.

How to raise a child

While expenses in all categories rose in 2012, health care, education and child care spending increased the most.

Health care spending made up around $20,000, or around 8%, of the USDA’s estimated child-rearing expenses for a child born in 2012. Meanwhile, child care and education expenses represented nearly 18% of the total costs for middle-income parents.

Since 2000, the cost of child care has increased twice as fast as the median income of families with children, according to the most recent report from Child Care Aware of America. In 2011, the average cost of full-time center-based care for an infant ranged from about $4,600 a year in Mississippi to more than $15,000 in Massachusetts.

“Many families are priced out of licensed child care services,” said Lynette Fraga, executive director of the nonprofit group. “If they are priced out, then the health and safety of those children are at risk.”

Amanda Holdsworth, who lives outside of Detroit with her husband and 22-month-old daughter, pay more than $1,000 a month for their daughter’s day care center — or nearly 15% of their monthly income. The costs are so high that they think twice about having a second child.

“To think about paying two day care rates, it’s shocking,” she said.

Another factor hurting families: rising transportation and food costs. Gas prices almost doubled between 2000 and 2012, even after adjusting for inflation, according to AAA. Meanwhile, food costs have spiked.

Turlock, Calif., resident Jason Hicks, a father of 10- and 13-year old sons, said his family has seen their monthly grocery bill grow from $500 to $800 in the past few years.

“As prices are going up and our kids are reaching teenage years, it’s compounded quite quickly,” he said.

There are ways to ease the cost burdens, said Stuart Ritter, a T. Rowe Price financial planner who teaches a money management class for new parents. Many employers, for example, offer tax-advantaged accounts that let parents pay for health and child care expenses with before-tax dollars.

“I have to reassure everybody there are other people who successfully have children,” he said. “I personally have three. People figure out ways to make this work.”

Raising children is tough but it can also be extremely rewarding.

11 Tips on Raising Children – According to Kids Themselves

1. “I learn by watching you. Become a role model for me.”

Showing is better than telling in parenting

“Be a good role model” seems pretty obvious. But it’s easier said than done. Remember the last time your kid was pushing and pushing and finally you yelled?

If we don’t want our kids to lose it when they feel being pushed to their limits (chores, homework, vegies, etc.), we have to model how to regulate our emotions and handle things that make us mad calmly. It’s very difficult, but our kids are watching us. We need to be the person we want our kids to become.

2. “Give me hugs and kisses. You can’t spoil me with those.”

They want our love, and we need to show them.

Love cannot spoil children. Only things we do or give in the name of love, or even worst, in place of love, may do that.

Showing affections to children helps create secure attachment and allows them to build an internal working model of loving relationships. This will have tremendous impact on how they relate to others, especially in adulthood.

There are many healthy ways to show your love. Here are some examples that will not spoil your child.

  • Give them hugs and kisses.
  • Spend time doing things that you can enjoy together.
  • Talk with them, and LISTEN to them.
  • Cheer for their success.
  • Empathize with their struggles.

3. “My brain is still developing and so I’m slow in learning. But I do want to learn if you patiently and kindly teach me.”

Kids are not born to “push our buttons”. Most children do want to learn. But learning takes time. Remember how many times your child fell before they learned to walk without wobbling?

Learning “human rules” is even more complex than learning “gravity rules”. It takes time to understand, absorb, incorporate and use that information.

If a child doesn’t get it the first ten times you say it, it doesn’t mean they are stubborn or strong-willed. It means they need more time and practice. They need your kind and firm guidance, not punishment.

4. “Always be here for me no matter what.”

Be your child’s secure base for them to explore from and return to. Raise a child who is securely attached by being a warm and responsive parent.

Securely attached children are more resilient, show less behavioral problems ​1​ , perform better in school, and enjoy better mental well-being ​2​ .

For more help on calming tantrums, check out this step-by-step guide

How to raise a child

5. “Talk with me. Don’t just talk at me.”

Have real conversations and listen carefully.

We often forget that communication is a two-way interaction. Talk with your child, Discuss what’s on their mind and what’s important to them. Things that are not important to grownups can be very important to your child.

If we listen to the small things when they’re small, they’ll come to us with big things when they grow up.

6. “Sometimes I just want to be heard without judgment or lecture.”

Like grownups, kids often want to vent. They want to be heard and be understood. Listen with an open mind and empathy.

Parents of teenagers often wonder why their kids don’t talk to them anymore. One reason could be that no one likes to be lectured all the time. Also, no one wants to be around someone who lectures all the time.

7. “Accept who I am. Don’t constantly compare me to other kids.”

Every parent wants their child to be the best they can be. This natural desire may sometimes cause you to compare your kid with others.

The Harvard Grant Study has found that having a parent-child relationship in which the child feels nurtured and accepted is the key to success in life ​3​ . So your tendency to compare is actually doing your child a disservice.

8. “Let me play outside a lot.”

Playing has many benefits to a child’s development. Unstructured play outdoors is even more better.

Outdoor environment is full of rich opportunities for development and learning. Playing outside usually allows children to have more autonomy and develop independence. Children can also engage in sensory play often not available in indoor facilities.

9. “Give me food that is nutritious and yummy.”

Children cannot buy or make their own food. So they rely on us to provide what they need.

Your child may not have the exact same taste as you do. When they refuse certain food, it may be tempting to use the “Eat or Starve” method.

“You either eat it or starve” is essentially starving a child into submission, into having the exact same taste that you do.

Instead, look for healthy food that your child likes. There are many different types of nutritious food. It may take many trials and some creativities to find what your kid likes, but it’s doable.

10. “Please trust me.”

Making mistakes is not always a bad thing. If we want our children to have good judgement, we need to let them practice making decisions. That means they will inevitably make mistakes.

Let them make decisions on things that won’t be a danger, health risk or inconvenience to others. A child cannot learn to walk without falling. They also can’t learn to make good decisions without making bad ones.

11. “Your praise means so much to me.”

Encouraging words can have powerful positive effect on kids. Praise sincerely and focus on their efforts, not abilities. When praises for kids are used right, they can make a big difference in a child’s self-esteem and intrinsic motivation.

How to raise a child

In This Article

As compared to previous generations, the current generation has seen an incredible increase in the number of single fathers. Back in the days, several single fathers could attain the title of singlehood as a result of a few grounds, which were mainly the death of a partner or divorce. As years progressed, divorce gained prominence among various couples and this increased the need for help for single fathers. Today, in the 21st century, cases of divorce and death are not the only causes of single fatherhood. But now there are various reasons for more single fathers.

First, let’s get to know what we mean by “a family”. Several definitions have been brought up but for our purpose here, we define it as the basic unit in a society consisting of two parents nurturing their children.

A single parent is defined as a parent who exercises parenthood alone, without the support of the other parent. Even with the existence of other adults and children in a household, a parent is viewed as a single parent if he is not partnered with anyone else in the household. It is quite clear that we need help for single fathers, especially in today’s generation. More fathers are raising their children solely without the help of their partner. Sometimes, the best place for children is with their Dad.

These come as a result of circumstances that cannot be avoided which may include;

  1. Death of the mother
  2. Irresponsibility of the mother
  3. Divorce
  4. Unintended pregnancy
  5. Single parent adoption

Single fathers need help too

Families headed by fathers are still covering a small percentage in the overall family percentage ranking. Help for single fathers is of importance and much needed, just as much as help is needed for single mothers. There are frequent dreads among single fathers that if the children’s mother comes in, she’ll regain custody, so single, custodial fathers will often not follow up, or rather go after child support as much as single mothers would have done.

Help for div orced fathers for raising a child alone can be achieved in various ways, which will in turn help their children too.

1. Community support groups for single dads

Various communities are of full support for single mothers in which they provide help for single moms. But with the rise in number of single dads, community groups for dads have come up too. These support groups will help single fathers meet like minded people, get help and provide some in return.

2. Female mentors for their daughters and sons

Single fathers need mentors for their children, either male mentors or female mentors. Their daughters need women role models, whom they can look up to and inspire them. Same case applies to sons, who need relational models that only women can provide to them. As a single dad, search within your immediate circle of influence including neighbors, sisters, cousins, coworkers, etc. for women willing to devote a few hours in order to provide proper guidance from a female perspective.

3. Government & social-service programs for low-income dads

Single fathers can attain help by making extensive use of government programs, which provide financial help for single parents. Enroll for various programs and schemes to benefit from them in the long run.

4. Online resources

Much of what is available on the web is for single and married mothers than it is for single fathers. These resources often give an outline on raising children, challenges faced by single parents and many more tips which might be of help for single fathers. Fortunately, there are few resources online for single fathers for the benefit of their children. There are p arenting education portals and other tool kits that will help you with how to be a good dad.

5. Join A Group

Joining a group as extra curricular activity with your child is a great way to build the bond and establish new connections. This will help you spend productive time with your child and you will also know other parents raising their kids. If you are a divorced dad with hectic work schedule, such activities and hobby classes will not only let you spend time with your child and strengthen the father son relationship after divorce but also help in the overall development of your son or daughter. Ultimately it will lead to a good work life balance .

6. Engage Your Family

You are leaving no stone unturned in being a good father. But stretching yourself beyond your boundaries to perform your fatherly duties is not what makes a good dad. As single fathers, it is obvious to feel lonely and gloomy at times. Asking for help is not something you should be ashamed of. The best people to go to is your extended family. Your child’s grandparents, uncles and aunts will not only help you in raising the child but also make him social. The bond is only going to be stronger, better, healthier and happier.

7. Allow Financial Advice

Life after divorce for single fathers can be overwhelming at times. So, another advice for divorced dads is to get in touch with a financial advisor to set financial goals. Considering you are the head of the household, you will need some money management advice to budget your monthly expenses and become a money pincher. This will help you allocate your money to different needs in a more diligent way.

In the video below that is still breaking the internet, Robert Kiyosaki talks about how to manage money, how to be financially sound and a solid tip of money management.

Being a better dad for single fathers doesn’t mean standing alone. So, make use of the resources around and make your life and that of your child’s more balanced.

July 31, 2021

July 31, 2021

We love grateful children and the many ways they show their appreciation, but can “giving thanks” also be taught? A topic on many parents’ minds is how to raise a child that is appreciative. One of the worst feelings is when a parent takes a child on an outing, you both have a great time, only then for the child to want more or to throw a tantrum because they didn’t get their way as you are leaving.

How to raise a child

What steps can we take to raise a grateful child? How can we teach kids to give thanks and be content with what they have? In this article, we’ll give you some helpful tips on how important it is to give thanks!

Set A Good Example

When it comes to behavior, the most important thing that we as parents can do is to be good role models. Children look up to us to see what’s acceptable and what’s not. Values like honesty, integrity, empathy, kindness, and gratefulness are best taught to your little ones by practicing them yourself.

Be grateful and mean it. Make a habit of giving thanks or calling loved ones to tell them you appreciate them. Did your child finish their chores with no complaints? Tell them how much it means to you. Thank them. They’ll normalize this behavior, mimicking it naturally, and will be quickly on their way to becoming grateful children.

Also, practicing gratitude at the end of each day is a great way to get your little one appreciating the little things in life. Was it sunny and beautiful today? Was tonight’s dinner extra delicious? Were the evening cartoons really funny? Talk with your child about the most wonderful moments in their day and explain how lucky they are to have experienced them.

Encourage Your Child To Help Others

Lending a helping hand is a great way for kids to develop a sense of gratitude. Volunteer with them at a local children’s hospital, help collect canned food to donate to a shelter, bake holiday cookies for the neighbors, or walk an elderly woman’s dog. VolunteerMatch.org will show you volunteer opportunities in your area that you and your children can do together, like a local beach cleanup.

Get your kids excited about volunteering and sharing time with other grateful children by choosing work that produces results they can see. Giving thanks and receiving them are both important. Here’s an example: Volunteer to plant trees with a local organization, so every time you drive by the tree, you can say “ You planted that tree!” They’ll feel an exciting sense of accomplishment, and they’ll also understand the work that goes into all the trees and flowers in public spaces.

Teach your child the value of little acts. It can be hard for kids to understand how much value something may have or even how money works. They don’t get why some children have more than others and why they can’t have all the shiny new toys in the store.

Have them “work” for special rewards and most importantly, thank them for their achievements. Does your little one want a new action figure? Tell them, “If you help your brother or sister clean the playroom this week, we’ll go on a special trip on Saturday to get that toy you’ve been wanting.”

Make sure they know the moral of the story: people have to work hard for the things they want. On top of that, if receiving something for free, encourage giving thanks for the effort that person has made, even if it’s you.

How to raise a child

Go 24-Hours Without Negativity

How kids say thank you is as important as the words themselves. If they frequently use a negative or even sarcastic tone, it could be because they’re exposed to too much negativity. Often, raising grateful kids is as much about considering your own actions as theirs.

Why not challenge the whole family to go 24-hours without a single complaint? Turn it into a game. The ones who make it to the end get a special ice cream treat.

At the end of the game, reflect on what you learned. Think about how looking at the bright side of things affected your mood. Afterward, you can brainstorm ways to deal with challenges without using negative speech.

Give Thanks Together

The classic tradition at Thanksgiving dinner or during Umoja Karamu is to go around the table listing things we’re grateful for and giving thanks for them. It could be family and friends, school, your home, or the delicious Thanksgiving dinner. Instead of just doing this once a year, it is a great habit to get into on a regular basis.

Set a day each week like on a Friday, for example, to list five things you’re thankful for. And then get creative. At Christmas, have them make a list of things they’re grateful for from last Christmas. During back-to-school season, challenge them to make a list of things they’re excited about. Pick a theme to get the wheels turning and to make it fun.

It may seem unrelated, but limiting your child’s exposure to advertisements and other types of online consumption can actually decrease their desire for more, including more toys, more clothes, more books, and such. The less they ask for material things, the more content they’ll be and the more grateful children are for what they have.

You can limit the amount of advertising your child views with the Lingokids app, your child will learn in a controlled and ad-free environment, so you don’t have to worry about targeted advertisements giving them ideas for their holiday Wishlist and more.

At Lingokids, they strive to instill good habits in children from a young age. They have online learning tools that can help children beyond concrete subjects. It helps them to form their cognitive and analytical abilities while having fun playing games.

This article was originally posted on the Lingokids blog.

Why Raise A Grateful Child?

Research studies out of Harvard have proven that grateful people are more positive and satisfied in their own lives. Here is why it is important to foster gratitude in children.

  • It fosters optimism
  • It helps one feel better about their lives
  • Their is a connection with positivity and good health
  • Those who practice optimism are overall more happier in life
  • The positive good feelings are long lasting
  • Genuine gratitude toward another person can help build great relationships
  • Just saying “thank you” motivates others
  • Those who keep a gratitude journal are more satisfied with their lives

How to raise a child

Amber Brandt

Articles by Amber

Published: Aug 02, 2021

Published: Jul 06, 2021

Published: Jun 08, 2021

Published: May 24, 2021

“One of the best lessons a child can learn is “a little kindness goes a long way.” Respectful people have an easier time building healthy relationships, navigating through tough decisions (because they realize their behaviors directly impact others) and ultimately help them earn respect from others. Raising a respectful kid does them a true favor. As a parent, you can set your child on course toward developing empathy and respect simply by demonstrating the behavior yourself. Here are a few ideas to consider:

Stay calm. It’s natural to feel a sense of panic or split-second anger when you observe unsightly behavior from your child. While at times it’s immediately clear they’re being inappropriate and they know it, there are other times where our perception isn’t reality. Kids do silly, innocent things when they’re not paying attention, and sometimes they simply don’t realize a certain behavior is actually disrespectful. When there’s room to reasonably give your child the benefit of the doubt, do your best to give it. Watch how other children respond to your child’s behavior and determine how to calmly approach the situation before running to discipline. Kindly drawing their attention to what they’ve done — or how they’ve made another child feel — is a great approach.

HALT. Kids are generally good-natured and typically only demonstrate behaviors that could be seen as “acting out” because they’re trying to fill a legitimate need in a misguided way. Identifying the root cause can help you figure out whether they’re intentionally being disrespectful or if their behavior is simply a by-product of a personal need. H.A.L.T. is a simple acronym that represents four of these key needs: is your child hungry, angry, lonely or tired? Get down on their level and determine how best you can help. Finding a way to meet their need will often eliminate the behavior and course-correct your day together.

Practice authenticity. According to The Danish Way of Parenting by authors and psychologists Jessica Alexander and Iben Sandahl, demonstrating authenticity and honesty with your emotions is a good way to help your child learn how to sort through their own. Ultimately, being kind and honest with oneself helps us to practice this in our other relationships as well. “Emotional honesty, not perfection, is what children truly need from their parents. Children are always observing how you feel anger, joy, frustration, contentment, and success and how you express it in the world. We have to model honesty for our children and let them know it is OK to feel all of their emotions… Acknowledging and accepting all emotions, even the hard ones, early on makes it easier to maneuver in the world…” and to learn what it looks like to treat others kindly. When a child understands that emotions are OK, but it’s what we do with them that really matters, they’ll begin to develop a greater awareness of how to treat others respectfully.

Draw attention to the value of others. It’s human nature to zero in on things we don’t like about others or even exploit what we perceive as different. This is a systemic problem we see played out across our culture on a daily basis. But it doesn’t take that much more effort to focus on what is good. You can help stop bullying before it has a chance to happen by placing value on others. Exhibit the behavior you wish to see.
Teach your child the people matter — no matter who they are — and everyone has something wonderful to offer. “I really appreciated how the librarian spent all that time helping me find the right book. She really knows her stuff, eh?” or boil it right down to their level, “I noticed Rebecca invited you to play on the swings with her. Isn’t she a kind girl?”

Help your child develop empathy. Let’s say your child comes home in tears over an altercation they had with a classmate. A few simple questions can help to validate their feelings, while helping them to move beyond judgment and consider what may be below the surface. “I see you’re upset. I’m so sorry. And Ethan was angry? Why, what happened? What do you think about what happened?” Perhaps there are big changes happening in Ethan’s family or he’s struggling with math. Helping your child consider the outburst may have been motivated by something deeper may help them see beyond their hurt and consider their classmate with greater compassion. Empathy can be a great equalizer. Remind your child that everyone is in the process of growing up, and we all make mistakes. Our goal should be to move through the world with greater patience and understanding.

Because kindness goes a long way.

How to raise a child

Perhaps one of the most important lessons we can teach our children is the art of having empathy. Empathy is the ability to understand and share the feelings of another. It’s getting down to their level without patronizing, judging or feeling sorry for them. We are our children’s first teachers and they look up to us more than we know. It’s our responsibility to teach our children empathy through our actions, words and the way we treat others.

Here are six ways to create empathy in your home, mama:

1. Practice active listening.

Busy schedules and that never-ending to-do list can prevent you from being totally present with your child. Set up times to check in with your little one throughout the day. Cultivate active listening by putting away distractions and practice rephrasing what your child says so they know you are listening.

For example, if your child just had a fight with a close friend, you might say, “I hear that you are feeling frustrated and sad. I hear that your friend didn’t play with you at school today. How can I support you with this?”

Remember that your child doesn’t always need a solution—just your open heart and a listening ear. As they talk through difficult situations and feelings, they may come up with a solution themselves!

2. Validate their feelings.

You’ve probably heard adults say to children, “Enjoy life now because once you’re an adult. ” Comments like that undermine your child’s feelings. Their feelings matter and they are not less than yours just because you have more responsibilities.

When your child starts crying because they don’t want to share their toys, their hamster dies, or a toy breaks, support your child by validating their feelings. You can connect with your child by using simple phrases like, “I can see you are having some big feelings” or, “It’s okay to cry. I know how much you loved your special toy.”

3. Start with yourself and model kindness.

The seemingly inconsequential interactions we have with our children are important. Kids will remember them. Think back to your childhood and how your parents, caregivers and family members interacted with you. Can you remember a certain tone, look, or words that hurt you?

Pay attention to how you interact with your child. Remind yourself that you can choose to respond to your child with love, kindness, and open-heartedness. When you snap at your child, or react in a way that you regret, remember to be compassionate with yourself. Always admit your mistakes and apologize.

4. Identify kindness when you see it.

The world is your classroom. When you see people doing the right thing—being kind, empathetic, or just good-hearted individuals—point it out. When your child cleans up their toys, helps set the table, or takes turns with a friend, remember to let them know that you are proud of them!

It’s also important to support your child in understanding kindness by discussing what kindness looks, sounds, and feels like. First, ask your child to brainstorm words you can say to others that are kind. Next, think about actions you see in your home and community that are kind. These might be simple acts like opening the door for someone, offering to help an elderly person carry their groceries to the car, or donating toys to your local thrift store.

Encourage your child to think about how these words and actions make them feel. Do they feel connected? Proud? Like their actions matter? Discussing what kindness is (and isn’t) will help your child (and the rest of your family) build their kindness muscles.

5. Avoid saying people are “good” or “bad.”

When we label typical child-like behaviors “good,” our children may avoid expressing their other feeling in the future. Try using language like, “Oh, wow, it looks like you are enjoying what you are doing,” or, “You are so intelligent, look how you figured that out!”

If your child is expressing challenging behaviors, you may say, “I see that you are feeling upset right now. Is there something I can do to help?” or “Are you sad? Do you need some time alone or a hug?”

6. Embrace differences.

Show your child that differences should be embraced and celebrated by reading children’s books that display inclusion with their illustrations, words and narratives. Purchase books written by indigenous authors and people of color. Follow disabled, autistic and LGBT authors. The point is to show your child that they can connect with different kinds of people when they show up, practice active listening and value everyone’s perspective.

How to raise a healthy child-A parent may lose his mind a little if he has a baby. They do not only have the sleepless nights. The parents’ biggest fear is that their child may have something wrong with him. The parent fear of every breath of a child. Though most of the children grow and develop reasonably. The parents should stay calm, and they should take the necessary care for their children so that they get a healthy life.

Here we are going to talk about pediatricians and have collected the crucial facts about the health of the children that we all should know.

You should not prescribe medications by yourself.

You should not give your child the medication without any prescription from the doctor. You should also not give your child medicine without showing him to the doctor if the neighbor child also has the same symptoms. You should try to provide the same dose to your child. Even a simple nose drops can cause more harm to your child. If your child’s situation is not critically and there is no need to call an ambulance for the help, then you should try to do the best possible thing for him.

Improve the immune system

The parents should create the most comfortable environment to make sure that their children thrive and they can fight against the viruses and bacteria and for developing their immune system. The parents should:

  • Try to give breastfeeding to their children at least for six months.
  • Try to create a comfortable environment for them at home. They should keep the temperature below then 720F, humidity and proper ventilation of the room.
  • Children should g for a walk daily.
  • Should d physical activities daily.
  • The child should sleep well and get enough sleep.

Be patient

Sometimes the health issues of children may get disappeared when the children grow up on their own — for example, colic or food intolerance.

Do not ignore vaccines.

A lot of children and adults get confused with the anti-vaccine movement recently. The only fact is that several decades ago, tetanus, poliomyelitis, and diphtheria killed a lot of children. And in many countries, TB is still a severe problem. Again, in this world, there is not even a single doctor who would recommend the patients for not getting vaccinated. And also parents do not know more about vaccines. They do not understand that the vaccines allow the children to fall in danger of sickness.

Remember the symptoms

Sometimes children get sick even we take good care of them. It is a normal situation. It is the way how your immune system learns. But parents should be aware of the most common symptoms of the favorite sicknesses which need to call specialists as soon as possible for the treatment like:

  • Pneumonia: This is the sickness in which you will difficult in breathing, skin color gets changed, anxiety, appetite, and fever take place very late.
  • Rotavirus infection: You feel anxiety, fever in the body, loss of appetite, tiredness, vomiting, diarrhea, cough, and runny nose.
  • Bronchitis: You will difficulty in breathing, weakness, fever, cough, loss of appetite, sweating, headache, and change of the skin color.

Bonus: Body language of children understand it to raise a healthy child

According to the experts, it is imperative to pay attention to the body language of the children. As we know babies cannot talk but they can make us understand about them in their way. When the babies are hungry, they get tense and start crying. They begin to clench their fists. In the same way, we should take care and look at the hands of our babies if we think that they may be hungry. If they clench their fists, it means that they are hungry and want their feed and if their hands are open, then you should not worry because your baby feels relax and he is full.

You should not panic for your child and stay calm and keep patience. Make sure that you can do all this. And if you more about these facts, you can share within the comments below.

How to raise a child

Amber Brandt

Articles by Amber

Published: Aug 02, 2021

Published: Jul 06, 2021

Published: Jun 08, 2021

Published: May 24, 2021

“One of the best lessons a child can learn is “a little kindness goes a long way.” Respectful people have an easier time building healthy relationships, navigating through tough decisions (because they realize their behaviors directly impact others) and ultimately help them earn respect from others. Raising a respectful kid does them a true favor. As a parent, you can set your child on course toward developing empathy and respect simply by demonstrating the behavior yourself. Here are a few ideas to consider:

Stay calm. It’s natural to feel a sense of panic or split-second anger when you observe unsightly behavior from your child. While at times it’s immediately clear they’re being inappropriate and they know it, there are other times where our perception isn’t reality. Kids do silly, innocent things when they’re not paying attention, and sometimes they simply don’t realize a certain behavior is actually disrespectful. When there’s room to reasonably give your child the benefit of the doubt, do your best to give it. Watch how other children respond to your child’s behavior and determine how to calmly approach the situation before running to discipline. Kindly drawing their attention to what they’ve done — or how they’ve made another child feel — is a great approach.

HALT. Kids are generally good-natured and typically only demonstrate behaviors that could be seen as “acting out” because they’re trying to fill a legitimate need in a misguided way. Identifying the root cause can help you figure out whether they’re intentionally being disrespectful or if their behavior is simply a by-product of a personal need. H.A.L.T. is a simple acronym that represents four of these key needs: is your child hungry, angry, lonely or tired? Get down on their level and determine how best you can help. Finding a way to meet their need will often eliminate the behavior and course-correct your day together.

Practice authenticity. According to The Danish Way of Parenting by authors and psychologists Jessica Alexander and Iben Sandahl, demonstrating authenticity and honesty with your emotions is a good way to help your child learn how to sort through their own. Ultimately, being kind and honest with oneself helps us to practice this in our other relationships as well. “Emotional honesty, not perfection, is what children truly need from their parents. Children are always observing how you feel anger, joy, frustration, contentment, and success and how you express it in the world. We have to model honesty for our children and let them know it is OK to feel all of their emotions… Acknowledging and accepting all emotions, even the hard ones, early on makes it easier to maneuver in the world…” and to learn what it looks like to treat others kindly. When a child understands that emotions are OK, but it’s what we do with them that really matters, they’ll begin to develop a greater awareness of how to treat others respectfully.

Draw attention to the value of others. It’s human nature to zero in on things we don’t like about others or even exploit what we perceive as different. This is a systemic problem we see played out across our culture on a daily basis. But it doesn’t take that much more effort to focus on what is good. You can help stop bullying before it has a chance to happen by placing value on others. Exhibit the behavior you wish to see.
Teach your child the people matter — no matter who they are — and everyone has something wonderful to offer. “I really appreciated how the librarian spent all that time helping me find the right book. She really knows her stuff, eh?” or boil it right down to their level, “I noticed Rebecca invited you to play on the swings with her. Isn’t she a kind girl?”

Help your child develop empathy. Let’s say your child comes home in tears over an altercation they had with a classmate. A few simple questions can help to validate their feelings, while helping them to move beyond judgment and consider what may be below the surface. “I see you’re upset. I’m so sorry. And Ethan was angry? Why, what happened? What do you think about what happened?” Perhaps there are big changes happening in Ethan’s family or he’s struggling with math. Helping your child consider the outburst may have been motivated by something deeper may help them see beyond their hurt and consider their classmate with greater compassion. Empathy can be a great equalizer. Remind your child that everyone is in the process of growing up, and we all make mistakes. Our goal should be to move through the world with greater patience and understanding.