How to recognize and treat dengue fever

Key Facts

  • 1 in 4: About one in four people infected with dengue will get sick.
  • For people who get sick with dengue, symptoms can be mild or severe.
  • Severe dengue can be life-threatening within a few hours and often requires care at a hospital.

Symptoms

  • Mild symptoms of dengue can be confused with other illnesses that cause fever, aches and pains, or a rash.

How to recognize and treat dengue fever

The most common symptom of dengue is fever with any of the following:

  • Nausea, vomiting
  • Rash
  • Aches and pains (eye pain, typically behind the eyes, muscle, joint, or bone pain)
  • Any warning sign

Symptoms of dengue typically last 2–7 days. Most people will recover after about a week.

Treatment

  • There is no specific medicine to treat dengue.
  • Treat the symptoms of dengue and see your healthcare provider.

If you think you have dengue pdf icon [PDF – 1 page]

  • See a healthcare provider if you develop a fever or have symptoms of dengue. Tell him or her about your travel.
  • Rest as much as possible.
  • Take acetaminophen (also known as paracetamol outside of the United States) to control fever and relieve pain.
    • Do not take aspirin or ibuprofen!
  • Drink plenty of fluids to stay hydrated. Drink water or drinks with added electrolytes.
  • For mild symptoms, care for a sick infant, child, or family member at home.

How to recognize and treat dengue fever

Symptoms of dengue can become severe within a few hours. Severe dengue is a medical emergency.

Severe dengue

  • About 1 in 20 people who get sick with dengue will develop severe dengue.
  • Severe dengue can result in shock, internal bleeding, and even death.
  • If you have had dengue in the past, you are more likely to develop severe dengue.
  • Infants and pregnant women are at higher risk for developing severe dengue.

Symptoms of severe dengue

Warning signs of severe dengue

Watch for signs and symptoms of severe dengue. Warning signs usually begin in the 24–48 hours after your fever has gone away.

Immediately go to a local clinic or emergency room if you or a family member has any of the following symptoms.

  • Belly pain, tenderness
  • Vomiting (at least 3 times in 24 hours)
  • Bleeding from the nose or gums
  • Vomiting blood, or blood in the stool
  • Feeling tired, restless, or irritable

Key Facts

  • Clinicians should consider dengue in a patient with a clinically compatible illness, and who lives in or recently traveled to a disease-endemic area external icon in the 2 weeks before symptom onset.
  • Patients typically present with acute onset of fever, headache, body aches, and sometimes rash spreading from the trunk.
  • All patients with clinically suspected dengue should receive appropriate management to monitor for shock and reduce the risk of complications resulting from increased vascular permeability and plasma leakage and organ damage without waiting for diagnostic test results to be received.
  • In the United States, because dengue is a nationally notifiable disease, all suspected cases should be reported to the local health department.

Diagnostic Testing

Most state health departments and many commercial laboratories perform dengue diagnostic testing.

Nucleic acid amplification tests (NAATs)
  • For patients with suspected dengue virus disease, NAATs are the preferred method of laboratory diagnosis.
    • NAATs should be performed on serum specimens collected 7 days or less after symptom onset.
    • Laboratory confirmation can be made from a single acute-phase serum specimen obtained early (≤7 days after fever onset) in the illness by detecting viral genomic sequences with rRT-PCR or dengue nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) antigen by immunoassay.
    • Presence of virus by rRT-PCR or NS1 antigen in a single diagnostic specimen is considered laboratory confirmation of dengue in patients with a compatible clinical and travel history.
Serologic tests
  • IgM antibody testing can identify additional infections and is an important diagnostic tool. However, interpreting the results is complicated by cross-reactivity with other flaviviruses, like Zika, and determining the specific timing of infection can be difficult.
    • Later in the illness (≥4 days after fever onset), IgM against dengue virus can be detected with MAC-ELISA. For patients presenting during the first week after fever onset, diagnostic testing should include a test for dengue virus (rRT-PCR or NS1) and IgM.
    • For patients presenting >1 week after fever onset, IgM detection is most useful, although NS1 has been reported positive up to 12 days after fever onset (Figure 3-01). In the United States, both MAC-ELISA and rRT-PCR are approved as in vitro diagnostic tests.
    • IgM in a single serum sample strongly suggests a recent dengue virus infection and should be presumed confirmatory for dengue if the infection occurred in a place where other potentially cross-reactive flaviviruses (such as Zika, West Nile, yellow fever, and Japanese encephalitis viruses) are not a risk.
  • PRNTs can resolve false-positive IgM antibody results caused by non-specific reactivity, and, in some cases, can help identify the infecting virus. However, in areas with high prevalence of dengue and Zika virus neutralizing antibodies, PRNT may not confirm a significant proportion of IgM positive results. PRNT testing is available through several state health departments and CDC.
Cross-reactive flaviviruses
  • If infection is likely to have occurred in a place where other potentially cross-reactive flaviviruses circulate, both molecular and serologic diagnostic testing for dengue and other flaviviruses should be performed.
  • People infected with or vaccinated against other flaviviruses (such as yellow fever or Japanese encephalitis) may produce cross-reactive flavivirus antibodies, yielding false-positive serologic dengue diagnostic test results.
IgG antibody testing

IgG detection by ELISA in a single serum sample is not useful for diagnostic testing because it remains detectable for life after a dengue virus infection.

Availability of Dengue Testing

Dengue diagnostic testing (molecular and serologic) is available from several commercial reference diagnostic laboratories, state and local public health laboratories, and CDC. Consultation on dengue diagnostic testing can be obtained from CDC at 787-706-2399.

Clinician Materials

Zika and Dengue Testing Algorithm for Symptomatic Non-Pregnant Patients

Zika and Dengue Testing Algorithm for Symptomatic Pregnant Women

Zika Testing Algorithm for Asymptomatic Pregnant Women

Last Updated: May 25, 2021 References Approved

This article was co-authored by Chris M. Matsko, MD. Dr. Chris M. Matsko is a retired physician based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. With over 25 years of medical research experience, Dr. Matsko was awarded the Pittsburgh Cornell University Leadership Award for Excellence. He holds a BS in Nutritional Science from Cornell University and an MD from the Temple University School of Medicine in 2007. Dr. Matsko earned a Research Writing Certification from the American Medical Writers Association (AMWA) in 2016 and a Medical Writing & Editing Certification from the University of Chicago in 2017.

There are 9 references cited in this article, which can be found at the bottom of the page.

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Dengue fever is a viral infection transmitted by two specific types of mosquitoes, the Aedes aegypti and the Aedes albopictus species. The number of people that develop dengue fever each year has reached global proportions. One recent estimate, provided by the World Health Organization, suggests as many as 400 million new cases occur every year. An estimated 500,000 people, mostly children, develop the more severe form of dengue fever that requires hospitalization. Sadly, about 12,500 of those people die. The primary focus of treatment is on supportive measures with emphasis on recognizing the more severe forms of the infection in order to promptly seek medical attention.

Overview

What is dengue fever?

Dengue (DEN-ghee) fever is an infection that occurs after the bite of an infected mosquito. Most cases in the United States occur in people who have traveled to areas where dengue is common.

Dengue fever occurs mostly in tropical regions worldwide, especially in Southeast Asia, Africa and tropical areas of the Pacific Ocean, and North, Central, and South America. In recent years, it has occurred in the United States and parts of Australia. Up to half of the world’s population may be at risk for contracting dengue fever.

What is dengue hemorrhagic fever?

Severe cases of dengue fever can develop into a condition called dengue hemorrhagic fever. Patients who have dengue hemorrhagic fever have the same symptoms of dengue fever. However, when the fever goes down, the patient can have more serious symptoms, including continuous vomiting, severe abdominal pain and difficulty breathing.

If it is not treated, dengue hemorrhagic fever can cause nosebleeds, bleeding gums and internal bleeding. This is a serious condition that needs immediate medical care.

Symptoms and Causes

What causes dengue fever?

Dengue fever develops after a bite from a mosquito. The mosquito acquires the virus by biting someone who is already infected, and then transmits it to another person. Dengue fever does not spread directly from person to person.

What are the symptoms of dengue fever?

Dengue fever symptoms are similar to flu symptoms and occur 3-14 days after the mosquito bite. Dengue fever is usually diagnosed when a patient has a high fever and two of the following symptoms:

  • Strong pain behind the eyes
  • Severe headache
  • Muscle, bone and joint pain
  • Rash
  • Mild bleeding

Diagnosis and Tests

How is dengue fever diagnosed?

To diagnose dengue fever, doctors use specific blood tests that identify dengue virus antibodies in the blood. These antibodies only appear when your body is exposed to one of the four dengue viruses.

Management and Treatment

How is dengue fever treated?

There is no treatment for dengue fever. If your doctor thinks you have a mild case of dengue fever, he or she will recommend that you rest, take pain relievers such as acetaminophen (do not take aspirin) and drink a lot of fluids. If you have more serious symptoms, such as vomiting or strong pain in the abdomen, you should seek medical care.

Prevention

Can dengue fever be prevented?

If you live in or travel to an area that has dengue fever, avoid mosquito bites by doing the following:

  • Use mosquito repellents that contain 20-30% DEET.
  • Wear long clothing outdoors, especially at night when mosquitos are more likely to be active.
  • Remove standing water (buckets or barrels, bird baths, old tires that may hold rain water) and fill low spots where water can pool.

Outlook / Prognosis

What is the prognosis (outlook) for people who have dengue fever?

In most cases, people who have dengue fever make full recoveries. However, people who develop dengue hemorrhagic fever need prompt medical attention.

Living With

When should I call my doctor about dengue fever?

If you have signs and symptoms that might be those of dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever, contact your doctor immediately. He or she can evaluate you to determine if you are infected and need special care.

Last reviewed by a Cleveland Clinic medical professional on 03/17/2018.

References

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dengue: Frequently Asked Questions. Accessed 3/30/2018.
  • World Health Organization. Dengue and severe dengue. Accessed 3/30/2018.
  • National Institutes of Health. Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center. Dengue fever. Accessed 3/30/2018.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Related Institutes & Services

Respiratory Institute

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

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In this Article

  • Symptoms of Dengue Fever
  • Diagnosing Dengue Fever
  • Treatment for Dengue Fever
  • Preventing Dengue Fever

Dengue (pronounced DENgee) fever is a painful, debilitating mosquito-borne disease caused by any one of four closely related dengue viruses. These viruses are related to the viruses that cause West Nile infection and yellow fever.

An estimated 400 million dengue infections occur worldwide each year, with about 96 million resulting in illness. Most cases occur in tropical areas of the world, with the greatest risk occurring in:

  • The Indian subcontinent
  • Southeast Asia
  • Southern China
  • Taiwan
  • The Pacific Islands
  • The Caribbean (except Cuba and the Cayman Islands)
  • Mexico
  • Africa
  • Central and South America (except Chile, Paraguay, and Argentina)

Most cases in the United States occur in people who contracted the infection while traveling abroad. But the risk is increasing for people living along the Texas-Mexico border and in other parts of the southern United States. In 2014, an outbreak of dengue fever was identified in Hawaii with other outbreaks in 2013 in Brownsville, Texas and Key West, Fla.

Dengue fever is transmitted by the bite of an Aedes mosquito infected with a dengue virus. The mosquito becomes infected when it bites a person with dengue virus in their blood. It can’t be spread directly from one person to another person.

Symptoms of Dengue Fever

Symptoms, which usually begin four to six days after infection and last for up to 10 days, may include

  • Sudden, high fever
  • Severe headaches
  • Pain behind the eyes
  • Severe joint and muscle pain
  • Fatigue
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Skin rash, which appears two to five days after the onset of fever
  • Mild bleeding (such a nose bleed, bleeding gums, or easy bruising)

Sometimes, symptoms are mild and can be mistaken for those of the flu or another viral infection. Younger children and people who have never had the infection before tend to have milder cases than older children and adults. However, serious problems can develop. These include dengue hemorrhagic fever, a rare complication characterized by high fever, damage to lymph and blood vessels, bleeding from the nose and gums, enlargement of the liver, and failure of the circulatory system. The symptoms may progress to massive bleeding, shock, and death. This is called dengue shock syndrome (DSS).

People with weakened immune systems as well as those with a second or subsequent dengue infection are believed to be at greater risk for developing dengue hemorrhagic fever.

Diagnosing Dengue Fever

Doctors can diagnose dengue infection with a blood test to check for the virus or antibodies to it. If you become sick after traveling to a tropical area, let your doctor know. This will allow your doctor to evaluate the possibility that your symptoms were caused by a dengue infection.

Treatment for Dengue Fever

There is no specific medicine to treat dengue infection. If you think you may have dengue fever, you should use pain relievers with acetaminophen and avoid medicines with aspirin, which could worsen bleeding. You should also rest, drink plenty of fluids, and see your doctor. If you start to feel worse in the first 24 hours after your fever goes down, you should get to a hospital immediately to be checked for complications.

Preventing Dengue Fever

The best way to prevent the disease is to prevent bites by infected mosquitoes, particularly if you are living in or traveling to a tropical area. This involves protecting yourself and making efforts to keep the mosquito population down.В In 2019, the FDA approved a vaccine called Dengvaxia to helpВ prevent the disease from occurring in adolescents aged 9 to 16 who have already been infected by dengue. But, there currently is no vaccine to prevent the general population from contracting it.

Continued

To protect yourself:

  • Use mosquito repellents, even indoors.
  • When outdoors, wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants tucked into socks.
  • When indoors, use air conditioning if available.
  • Make sure window and door screens are secure and free of holes. If sleeping areas are not screened or air conditioned, use mosquito nets.
  • If you have symptoms of dengue, speak to your doctor.

To reduce the mosquito population, get rid of places where mosquitoes can breed. These include old tires, cans, or flower pots that collect rain. Regularly change the water in outdoor bird baths and pets’ water dishes.

If someone in your home gets dengue fever, be especially vigilant about efforts to protect yourself and other family members from mosquitoes. Mosquitoes that bite the infected family member could spread the infection to others in your home.

Sources

Florida Department of Health: “Dengue Fever.”

CDC: “Dengue: Frequently Asked Questions.”

University of Alabama at Birmingham Medicine: “Dengue Fever.”

Directors of Health Promotion and Education: “Dengue.”

University of Florida IFAS Extension: “What is Dengue?”

Overview

What is dengue fever?

Dengue (DEN-ghee) fever is an infection that occurs after the bite of an infected mosquito. Most cases in the United States occur in people who have traveled to areas where dengue is common.

Dengue fever occurs mostly in tropical regions worldwide, especially in Southeast Asia, Africa and tropical areas of the Pacific Ocean, and North, Central, and South America. In recent years, it has occurred in the United States and parts of Australia. Up to half of the world’s population may be at risk for contracting dengue fever.

What is dengue hemorrhagic fever?

Severe cases of dengue fever can develop into a condition called dengue hemorrhagic fever. Patients who have dengue hemorrhagic fever have the same symptoms of dengue fever. However, when the fever goes down, the patient can have more serious symptoms, including continuous vomiting, severe abdominal pain and difficulty breathing.

If it is not treated, dengue hemorrhagic fever can cause nosebleeds, bleeding gums and internal bleeding. This is a serious condition that needs immediate medical care.

Symptoms and Causes

What causes dengue fever?

Dengue fever develops after a bite from a mosquito. The mosquito acquires the virus by biting someone who is already infected, and then transmits it to another person. Dengue fever does not spread directly from person to person.

What are the symptoms of dengue fever?

Dengue fever symptoms are similar to flu symptoms and occur 3-14 days after the mosquito bite. Dengue fever is usually diagnosed when a patient has a high fever and two of the following symptoms:

  • Strong pain behind the eyes
  • Severe headache
  • Muscle, bone and joint pain
  • Rash
  • Mild bleeding

Diagnosis and Tests

How is dengue fever diagnosed?

To diagnose dengue fever, doctors use specific blood tests that identify dengue virus antibodies in the blood. These antibodies only appear when your body is exposed to one of the four dengue viruses.

Management and Treatment

How is dengue fever treated?

There is no treatment for dengue fever. If your doctor thinks you have a mild case of dengue fever, he or she will recommend that you rest, take pain relievers such as acetaminophen (do not take aspirin) and drink a lot of fluids. If you have more serious symptoms, such as vomiting or strong pain in the abdomen, you should seek medical care.

Prevention

Can dengue fever be prevented?

If you live in or travel to an area that has dengue fever, avoid mosquito bites by doing the following:

  • Use mosquito repellents that contain 20-30% DEET.
  • Wear long clothing outdoors, especially at night when mosquitos are more likely to be active.
  • Remove standing water (buckets or barrels, bird baths, old tires that may hold rain water) and fill low spots where water can pool.

Outlook / Prognosis

What is the prognosis (outlook) for people who have dengue fever?

In most cases, people who have dengue fever make full recoveries. However, people who develop dengue hemorrhagic fever need prompt medical attention.

Living With

When should I call my doctor about dengue fever?

If you have signs and symptoms that might be those of dengue fever or dengue hemorrhagic fever, contact your doctor immediately. He or she can evaluate you to determine if you are infected and need special care.

Last reviewed by a Cleveland Clinic medical professional on 03/17/2018.

References

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Dengue: Frequently Asked Questions. Accessed 3/30/2018.
  • World Health Organization. Dengue and severe dengue. Accessed 3/30/2018.
  • National Institutes of Health. Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center. Dengue fever. Accessed 3/30/2018.

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Related Institutes & Services

Respiratory Institute

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy

How to recognize and treat dengue fever

Before we start with anything else, it is best to start with an introduction of dengue fever. The reason we decided to give a quick introduction of dengue fever so, you get an idea of what we are going to discuss today in this blog.

Before we jump to the cause and effect of dengue and severe dengue symptoms, it is better to understand dengue first.

Dengue is a mosquito-borne disease that leads to rashes, high fever and severe joint pain. If we talk about India, the dengue problem is a seasonal disease, mainly during the summer season.

The reason it is important to get dengue treatment on time because ignoring the dengue symptoms and treatment can lead to a life-threatening situation. Dengue can also lead to a drop in blood pressure and severe internal bleeding.

Dengue fever causes and effect of dengue if not treated on time:

The reason it is important to the not ignore the dengue symptoms and treatment because not doing so may lead to a life-threatening situation like strokes, damage of your lungs, liver, heart and drop of blood pressure and sometimes death.

Although we all know that dengue is a mosquito-borne disease. But

do you know what mosquito causes dengue?

Dengue is treated by treating its symptoms because there is no antibiotic and vaccine from dengue fever. Dengue treatment is also called symptomatic treatment, because when in this the treatment is done by curing the symptoms of the disease.

  • Papaya leaf is used to treat dengue fever.
  • The extreme case of dengue fever, which comprises muscle pain and a high fever that will last to a maximum of two weeks.
  • The symptoms of dengue fever usually begin 4 to 7 days after the so-called dengue-spreading mosquito, Aedes has bitten you.
  • This disease lasts for not over 10 days with effective medical supervision.
  • Dengue fever was initially called as breakdown fever because the one suffering from it would feel as though his/her bones would break due to the severe muscle pain.

Dengue Fever Causes:

  1. The mosquitoes cause dengue are Aedes mosquitoes, these mosquito-spread four different viruses.
  2. We mainly find these mosquitoes near water logging bodies, and when a person goes nearby such water bodies, they might get in contact with the virus which further leads to dengue fever by entering the bloodstreams.
  3. If you like travelling in the tropical area, the chances of getting dengue virus to become high.
  4. If you have been infected by dengue fever and symptoms went through treatment and again get infected, you may face severe dengue symptoms.
  5. It is better to carry a mosquito repellent in case you are visiting areas that are not well clean and filled with water logging bodies. It is also better to just carry within the summer seasons, which is the peak time to get such dengue fever.
  6. When the mosquito Aedes become the carrier of the dengue virus from an infected person to a non-infected person this also causes the spread of the virus.

10 Symptoms of Dengue:

  1. Chills.
  2. Nausea and vomiting.
  3. Loss of appetite.
  4. Pink colour rash.
  5. Pain in the back of the eye.
  6. Red dot-like rashes appear on your leg area and other parts of your body.
  7. High fever over 105 F.
  8. Excess sweating.
  9. Severe headache.

Dengue Symptoms in Children:

  1. Severe pain in the muscle, joint and bone.
  2. High fever above 105 degrees F.
  3. Slightly bleeding in the gums and nose.
  4. Pain behind the eyes.
  5. Severe headaches.
  6. Pink-coloured rashes all over the body.

Do not wait for the symptoms to get better you need to see a doctor as soon as you notice these symptoms to get the best dengue treatment in time.

Ways to treat the mild and severe symptoms of dengue:

  1. The patient is given enough clean water to keep him/her hydrated with the help of some minerals and fluids. This is one of many ways that is used in mild symptoms.
  2. If symptoms are severe, then the patients are under strict observation of the doctors.
  3. If the patients are unable to consume fluid from they are given drip fluid, also called intravenous fluids (IV) this help to prevent the patient from dehydration.
  4. The dengue patients need to be hospitalized to keep them under strict observation this will prevent the symptoms to get severe and more complications.

So if you know, the dengue fever causes, how this virus spreads and how the symptoms of dengue get worse if not treated properly on time, you better take action on time and consult a doctor as soon as you see the above symptoms. If you do not follow such precautions you will face life-threatening situations.

How to recognize and treat dengue fever

Rain brings respite from the scorching summer heat, but it also brings some troubles in the form of diseases like dengue, malaria, chikungunya, viral respiratory illness, diarrhoea among others.

Dengue fever is transmitted by the bite of an Aedes mosquito infected with a dengue virus, said Dr Puneet Gupta, pulmonologist who consults on Practo. “With multiple cities including Delhi recording a high number of dengue-related cases every year, it is important that we know about the disease and how to prevent it,” he told indianexpress.com.

Symptoms

Symptoms, which usually begin four to six days after infection and last for up to 10 days, may include

● Sudden, high fever
● Severe headaches
● Pain behind the eyes
● Severe bone, joint, and muscle pain
● Fatigue
● Nausea
● Vomiting
● Breathlessness
● Skin rash, which appears two to five days after the onset of fever
● Mild bleeding (such a nose bleed, bleeding gums, or easy bruising)

Sometimes, symptoms are mild and can be mistaken for those of flu or any other viral infection. However, serious problems can develop if not treated on time. “These include dengue hemorrhagic fever, a rare complication characterized by high fever, damage to lymph and blood vessels, bleeding from the nose and gums, enlargement of the liver, and failure of the circulatory system. The symptoms may progress to massive bleeding, shock, and death. This is called dengue shock syndrome (DSS),” he explained.

People with weakened immune systems as well as those with a second or subsequent dengue infection are believed to be at greater risk for developing dengue hemorrhagic fever.

Diagnosing dengue infection

Doctors can diagnose dengue infection with a blood test to check for the virus or antibodies to it.

Treatment

There is no specific medicine to treat dengue infection. If you think you may have dengue fever, you should use only Paracetamol for fever. “Avoid medicines with aspirin, Ibuprofen, Nemuslide, pain killers, etc. (NSAIDS), which could worsen bleeding. You should also rest, drink plenty of fluids, and see your doctor. If you start to feel worse after 24 hours or if fever goes up, you should get to a hospital immediately to be checked for complications,” Dr Gupta said.

Preventing dengue fever

There is no vaccine to prevent dengue fever yet. The best way to prevent the disease is to prevent bites by infected mosquitoes.

To protect yourself:

● Stay away from heavily populated residential areas, if possible.
● Use mosquito repellents, mosquito repellents cream, while going out and even indoors.
● When outdoors, wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants tucked into socks.
● Use mosquito nets.
● If you have symptoms of dengue, speak to your doctor.
● Avoid collection of water in places where mosquitoes can breed. These include old tires, cans, or flower pots that collect rain. Regularly change the water in cooler, outdoor bird baths and pets’ water dishes.
● If someone in your home gets dengue fever, be especially vigilant about protecting yourself and other family members from mosquitoes.

Mosquitoes that bite the infected family member could spread the infection to others in your home.