How to recognize implantation bleeding

How to recognize implantation bleeding

Many people focus on missing their period as one of the first signs of early pregnancy. You might be surprised to learn that a small amount of blood and some cramping – known as implantation bleeding – can be a sign of pregnancy as the fertilized egg attaches to the uterine lining and your 9-month journey begins.

Here are 5 things you need to know about implantation bleeding and how to tell if the bleeding may be a sign of pregnancy or of your oncoming period.

1. What is Implantation Cramping & Bleeding?

Implantation cramping and bleeding are not the same as menstrual cramps and bleeding. But since implantation spotting often occurs around the same time as you expect your period, it can be confusing which type of cramping and bleeding you’re experiencing.

Every month, the lining of the uterus builds up with blood to prepare for a potential fertilized egg. If no egg implants, the lining is shed as your period. When an egg implants, it physically embeds into that uterine lining, and some spotting and cramping can be normal as a result.

This smaller amount of blood and lighter cramping can be one of the first signs that you are pregnant. It can be hard to tell for certain whether its implantation bleeding or the start of your period (especially if your periods are light) so taking a pregnancy test will help you know for sure.

2. When Does Implantation Bleeding Occur?

Implantation bleeding – if it happens – usually occurs 9-12 days after conception when the fertilized egg implants, or attaches to the lining of the uterus. It can take as few as 6 days for the egg to make its journey from the Fallopian tubes or as many as 14, with the average around 9 days.

If you’re trying to determine when implantation occurred, knowing when you ovulated and the date your last period began will give you the best idea. Ovulation is typically 12-14 days after the first day of your last cycle, and implantation is 6-12 days after ovulation, if the egg is fertilized.

Don’t worry if you don’t experience any implantation bleeding at all. In fact, most people who become pregnant (about 70-75%) don’t report any implantation spotting. But that means 25-30% of women do have some implantation bleeding. We’ve been conditioned to worry that any bleeding at all when you’re hoping to be pregnant may be a sign of a miscarriage, but it isn’t that simple.

3. What Does Implantation Bleeding Look Like

Even though you may be used to bleeding every month, implantation bleeding, aka implantation spotting, typically looks different than your usual period bleeding.

During implantation, a small amount of the uterine lining can be displaced or disturbed, resulting in the light bleeding. During menstruation, the uterus contracts to expel the entire uterine lining, resulting in heavier bleeding that lasts until all of the lining is released.

Implantation Bleeding vs Period Bleeding

Implantation bleeding and cramping can easily be mistaken for the onset of your monthly cycle, but what’s happening in your body is completely different. There are differences between implantation bleeding and period bleeding in terms of flow amount, duration of bleeding, pain and the color of the blood.

Here’s a quick comparison so you can know how to recognize implantation bleeding or spotting:

Implantation Bleeding

  • Color: Pink or brown
  • Flow: Light or spotting, generally not enough to soak a tampon or pad
  • Duration: 1-2 days or less
  • Cramping: mild or moderate tightening, pricking or pulling feeling in the lower abdomen as the egg implants
  • Consistency: often thinner or more watery

Period Bleeding

  • Color: Bright red
  • Flow: Heavier, menstrual products and protection needed
  • Duration: Usually 5-8 days
  • Cramping: more intense pain and tightness in the lower abdomen and back as the uterus contracts to expel menstrual blood.
  • Consistency: thicker and can include clots or clumps

4. How Long Does Implantation Bleeding Last?

Many people do not experience implantation bleeding, but those that do may have spotting for a few hours or 1-2 days. Bleeding that isn’t your period but lasts longer than a day or two or is heavier than spotting is a good reason to see your doctor.

5. What Are Some Symptoms of Implantation & Early Pregnancy?

Every person is different, but many describe the feeling of implantation as a mild tingling, tightening or pulling in the uterus. Mild discomfort and a pink or brownish watery discharge are typical symptoms – if you experience implantation bleeding at all.

Since the symptoms of implantation cramping and bleeding can be so similar to those of a light period, you may want to take a pregnancy test to help know if you are pregnant and be on the lookout for other early signs of pregnancy:

  • fatigue
  • tender, swollen, heavier or fuller breasts
  • nausea or vomiting
  • food aversions or cravings
  • heightened sense of smell
  • mood swings or feeling tearful or easily upset
  • headaches
  • constipation
  • dizziness or feeling faint
  • elevated body temperature
  • missed period

You should always consult with your doctor or medical provider if you experience any symptoms or issues concerning your health.

First Response™ Pregnancy Tests to Help You Know

When you may be pregnant, the earlier – and the faster – you can know, the better. The First Response™ Early Result Pregnancy Test can help confirm a pregnancy as soon as 6 days sooner than your missed period. In laboratory testing, Early Result Pregnancy Test detected pregnancy hormone levels in 76% of pregnant women 5 days before their expected period. See package for details about testing early.

While, the First Response™ Rapid Result Pregnancy Test lets you know if you’re pregnant in 60 seconds on the day of your missed period. Enhanced technology isolates and detects the pregnancy hormone in your urine to give you fast results.

To get double the confirmation and same accuracy of results, use the First Response™ EasyRead app, compatible with the First Response™ Early Result and Rapid Result tests to translate your results into the words “Pregnant” or “Not Pregnant.”

How to recognize implantation bleeding

When you’re actively trying to get pregnant, those two weeks between ovulation and a positive home pregnancy test (or your period) can seem much longer. If you’re like most women, you’ll spend them hyper-aware of every ache, twinge and craving your body has, wondering whether it’s an early sign of pregnancy.

One of the most telltale symptoms of pregnancy is bleeding. If you do have some light spotting, does it mean anything?

While it can be hard to tell, many women who go on to have healthy, normal pregnancies have what’s called implantation bleeding around the time that their embryo lodges itself into the side of the uterus.

What is implantation bleeding?

Implantation bleeding is light bleeding or spotting that occurs between seven and 14 days after fertilization.

After ovulation and at the moment an egg is successfully fertilized by a sperm in a fallopian tube, the embryo starts dividing and growing. At this time, the inner lining of the uterus, called the endometrium, starts to change. It’s already been thickening throughout the menstrual cycle, but it’ll need to grow and mature even more to protect and nourish an embryo.

Around five to six days after fertilization, the quickly growing embryo has moved down the fallopian tube and into the uterus. It’s starting to need more nutrients, and the endometrium has filled in enough to support it.

Next, the embryo attaches itself to the endometrium, where it becomes reliant on a mother’s body — for the first time — for nutrients and oxygen. When the embryo implants, it can disrupt tiny blood vessels in the spot it burrows into. This won’t cause any problems (the endometrium recovers!) but some women will experience light bleeding, from pinkish or red to brown discharge.

When does implantation bleeding happen?

So-called implantation bleeding will likely arrive earlier than your expected monthly menstrual period, usually around seven to 10 days after fertilization or conception.

One in three women have implantation bleeding. Between the first and second week of gestation they detect a slight loss of blood that happens when the embryo nests in the wall of the uterus. This may be one of the first obvious signs of pregnancy.

It can also be a time of real distress for those who wish to have a baby, as it can be mistaken for the start of the next period.

From the blog of IVF-Spain we want to help clear up the doubts about this important topic for those who are looking for pregnancy, either with the help of medicine and an IVF or without it.

What is implantation bleeding?

During the first weeks of pregnancy the uterus is very irrigated. When the embryo adheres to the endometrium, which has thickened to receive the embryo, some blood vessels may break, causing slight vaginal bleeding.

Not all pregnant women have implantation bleeding and, if they have had it, it does not have to be repeated in all their pregnancies.

This can be a source of anxiety and stress for those who are anxious to have a baby, since it can be confused with the start of the next period.

When does implantation bleeding occur?

The egg meets the sperm in the fallopian tube and fertilization occurs, and together they begin their journey to the uterus. Then a process of cell division begins until they become a blastocyst (day 5-6 of fertilization). Once in the uterus, and for pregnancy to occur, the embryo must implant in the endometrium of the future mother.

This process takes approximately ten to fourteen days after conception, so that this small bleeding can be confused with the start of menstruation.

How do you differentiate between implantation bleeding and menstruation?

As we have already mentioned in this article, since implantation bleeding can occur during the first weeks of pregnancy, it is not strange that it can be confused with the beginning of the next period.

Although it is difficult to differentiate by date, there are other factors that can help us easily identify that it is bleeding due to the correct implantation of the embryo in the wall of the uterus.

One aspect to evaluate is the quantity. The bleeding that occurs when the embryo adheres to the uterine wall is lighter than that of menstruation. It can be from a drop to a light bleeding. It is true that the amount at the beginning of menstruation is usually light. However, it will increase as the days go by.

The colour can also help us identify one bleeding from another. Usually the blood from a implantation is darker, unlike the bright red that usually appears during the period.

Compared to menstruation, the duration of bleeding is shorter. While menstruation increases the amount of bleeding as the days go by, implantation may last a few hours or no more than three days. Another key factor is the texture, which tends to be more fluid and lighter.

The truth is that every woman is unique and so are her symptoms and the bleeding she experiences during each period. That is why it is important to look at other types of symptoms that may indicate the beginning of a pregnancy.

Pregnancy symptoms such as: breast sensitivity, nausea at certain times, tiredness or the constant need to go to the bathroom, may be giving us a clue that we have achieved the desired pregnancy.

How to get the confirmation that you are really pregnant?

The easiest way is to take a urine pregnancy test. The drawback is that it can be a little early to get a positive result. This type of test takes longer to detect the levels of the hormone hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin), so if it is not carried out at the right time, a false negative can be obtained even though the embryo has implanted.

To be able to do a urine pregnancy test properly, you must wait until you have had your period for a few days.

The hormone hCG, also known as Beta-hCG, is secreted by the embryo when it implants in the uterus. Measuring the levels of Beta-hCG is a reliable indicator of whether a pregnancy has been achieved.

In assisted reproduction centres such as IVF-Spain, ten days after the transfer of the embryo to the patient, the levels of the hCG hormone are measured with a blood test. In order for us to confirm that the pregnancy is progressing favourably, the levels of the hormone will grow exponentially during the first trimester.

That period, between the transfer of the embryo or the insemination until the result is obtained, is usually the most difficult time for patients within a fertility treatment. It is a life-changing blood test.

How should you act if you have a bleed?

If you have undergone fertility treatment, the first thing we recommend is to continue with the medication and contact our patient care team so that one of our fertility doctors can assess that everything is going normally and tell you the steps to follow.

On the other hand, if you have not undergone any treatment and if you have any doubts, the best thing to do is to consult your gynaecologist so that he can assess what type of bleeding it is. Therefore, we invite you to consult your case with one of our specialists.

  • How to recognize implantation bleeding

Implantation bleeding appears in some women between the first and second week of pregnancy. This is due to the irrigation the endometrium receives when the fertilized egg arrives in the uterus, remaining there for the rest of the pregnancy.

This phenomenon is usually confused with menstruation, as the difference in the bleeding is very subtle. It basically differs in that it may be slightly darker and of shorter length than periods.

Implantation bleeding can confuse the mother-to-be, since she might believe the spotting is due to the arrival of her period if she is not aware of it.

In this article from Equipo Juana Crespo we will help you understand the concept of implantation bleeding and how to recognize it.

How does the process of fertilization begin?

The magic of the fertilization process begins when the egg receives the sperm creating a zygote or fertilized egg. When the zygote starts its segmentation process, it forms a morula which becomes a blastocyst after dividing for 72 hours or approximately 3 days. This cell adheres to the uterus wall to form the embryo.

Fertilization

Once the patient has undergone conventional IVF or ICSI, and approximately 18 hours later, it should be possible to observe 2 pronuclei in the cell. In other words, fertilization has been successful and the embryo is in the development phase.

On the second day, the embryo should enter the cell division phase (between 2 and 4 cells). By the third day, it will increase. (6 and 8 cells). By now, the embryologists begin to observe certain parameters such as: aspect, symmetry, number of cells… that help to classify the quality of the embryo in order to select the best ones.

If the embryo culture is prolonged in the laboratory (IVF), the embryo will divide further, forming a mass and reaching the cavitating morula state. So on the fourth day, we will be in the pre-blastocyst phase.

The blastocyst is a stage in the development of the embryo that usually occurs 120 hours after the puncture (fifth day). We know it is a blastocyst because of its appearance and structure, that is, it must have an optimal internal cell mass and a trophyectoderm with hundreds of cells. When the embryo has the right structure it is transferred to the woman’s uterus where it will continue to evolve.

The approach of the blastocyst to the endometrium is literally an invasion, causing a tear where new terminations are formed and amalgamate, and where the future embryo remains attached to the wall of the uterus.

Beginning of bleeding

At this moment, the confluence of this new element in the area and the anchoring process provokes irritation and a consequent tear causing implantation bleeding.

It is estimated that between 25 and 30% of women with pregnancies will experience implantation bleeding, so it is important avoid discarding pregnancy in this case.

Women who are thinking of becoming mothers can pay special attention and notice differences to those provoked by menstruation and therefore be prepared.

Implantation bleeding and menstruation: main differences

The bleeding from the process of embryo implantation is usually somewhat darker than menstrual bleeding. It is the first sign that can be evaluated with the naked eye.

After the color, you should also pay attention to how heavy you are bleeding since implantation bleeding is lighter than menstrual bleeding.

Finally, be aware of how long the bleeding lasts. At day 14th, the blastocyst fully settles in the uterus, so the implantation bleeding time is shorter than the duration of the period.

Other related symptoms

There are some other signs that may assure you of the kind of bleeding you are experiencing. As women, we can feel some changes in our bodies such as: breast sensitivity, alteration in basal temperature, frequent urination, nausea, headache, discomfort or tiredness, among others.

It must be clear that each organism experiences the embryonic implantation process differently. That is why some women will not even have any symptoms while others will bleed. So it’s important to be aware of the kind of signs you might encounter.

When in doubt, the best solution is to go to a specialist and have a pregnancy test done 10 to 12 days after the transfer -preferably at least 12 days after ovulation-, to confirm whether the bleeding is due to conception, menstruation, or any other cause.

At Equipo Juana Crespo we are ready to help you in any aspect related to fertility. Contact us, come and visit us, and leave your doubts behind.

How to recognize implantation bleeding

Outlines how to recognize implantation bleeding, when it is likely to occur, what to do about it, and how to determine if you are actually pregnant.

The implantation bleeding (also sometimes called nidation bleeding) indicates that pregnancy has occurred. However, some women mistake it for a normal menstrual period. We explain about implantation bleeding – when it occurs, how it occurs, and how it differs from normal menstrual bleeding.

Every third woman has an implantation bleeding. Between the first and second week of pregnancy, you will notice slight bleeding. This occurs when the embryo is implanted in the uterine wall. This could be one of the first obvious signs of pregnancy.

It can also be a painful moment for couples wanting to have children, as this bleeding can be mistaken for the start of the next period.

How to recognize implantation bleeding: the key factors

What is implantation bleeding?

In the first few weeks of pregnancy, the uterus has a lot of blood supply. If the embryo adheres to the lining of the uterus, which has thickened to accommodate the embryo, some blood vessels may rupture, which can cause slight vaginal bleeding.

Not all pregnant women have implantation bleeding, and if they did, it may not occur in all pregnancies.

This can be a source of anxiety and stress for those trying to have a child, as it can be mistaken for the start of the next period.

When does implantation bleeding occur?

The egg cell meets the sperm in the fallopian tube, fertilization takes place, and together they begin their journey into the uterus. Then a process of cell division begins until they become a blastocyst (days 5-6 of fertilization). Once in the uterus, the embryo has to implant itself in the uterine lining of the future mother so that pregnancy can occur.

This process takes about ten to fourteen days after conception, so this small bleeding may be mistaken for the start of menstruation.

How to recognize implantation bleeding vs menstruation

As we mentioned earlier in this article, it is not surprising that implantation bleeding in the first few weeks of pregnancy can be confused with the start of the next period, as it can occur in the first few weeks of pregnancy.

Although it is difficult to tell by timing, there are other factors that can help us easily identify that this is bleeding for the embryo to implant properly in the uterine wall.

The amount of blood

One aspect to be assessed is quantity. The bleeding that occurs when the embryo adheres to the uterine wall is less than that of menstruation . It can range from a drop to a little bleeding. It is true that the amount is usually small at the beginning of menstruation. However, it will increase over the days.

The color

The color can also help to tell what the bleeding is. The blood at implantation is usually darker in contrast to the bright red that normally appears during menstruation.

The duration

Compared to menstruation, the duration of bleeding is shorter. Since only small vessels are injured during implantation, nidation bleeding subsides quickly. It usually only lasts about a day or two. In rare cases it can last a little longer. If you are unsure, you can ask a doctor for advice in this case. Describe the bleeding in more detail (type and extent of bleeding? Since when?).

The texture

Another deciding factor is the texture, which tends to be more fluid and lighter.

The truth is that every woman is unique, as are her symptoms and the bleeding she experiences during each period. This is why it is important to address other types of symptoms that could indicate the onset of pregnancy.

Pregnancy symptoms such as: breast tenderness , nausea at certain times, tiredness or the constant need to go to the bathroom can give us an indication that we have achieved the desired pregnancy.

How can you confirm that you are pregnant?

The easiest thing to do is to do a urine pregnancy test. The downside is that it can be a little early to get a positive result. This type of test takes longer to check for levels of the hormone hCG (human chorionic gonadotropin). If it is not carried out at the right time, a false negative result can come out, although the embryo has implanted.

In order to properly perform a urine pregnancy test, you will need to wait a few days before you have had your period.

The hormone hCG, also known as beta-hCG , is secreted by the embryo as it implantes in the uterus. Measuring beta-hCG levels is a reliable indicator of whether or not pregnancy has been achieved.

In centers for assisted reproduction, the levels of the hCG hormone are measured with a blood test ten days after the transfer of the embryo to the patient. In order for us to confirm that the pregnancy is going well, hormone levels will increase exponentially during the first trimester.

This period of time between embryo transfer or insemination until the result is achieved is known as the beta waiting time . It is usually the most difficult time for a patient to have fertility treatment. It’s a life changing blood test.

What to do if you see signs of blood when pregnant

If you have had fertility treatment, the first thing we recommend is that you continue with the medication and contact your patient care team so that one of your fertility doctors can assess whether everything is going normally and advise you on the next steps .

On the other hand, if you have not yet had any treatment and are in doubt, it is best to see your gynecologist so that they can assess what type of bleeding it is.

Implantation bleeding may be an early sign of pregnancy for approximately 1/3 of all women who conceive. The fertilized egg travels down the Fallopian tube and into the uterus, where it implants into the uterine lining. When it does, the tissue that forms around the egg, known as the trophoblast, may damage some of the mother’s blood vessels in the uterus, resulting in a small amount of blood leaking from the cervix and down the vagina. Learning how to recognize implantation bleeding may be an early clue for some women that pregnancy has begun.

How to recognize implantation bleeding

Method 1: Recognizing the Signs

Consider the timing. This type of bleeding during pregnancy usually occurs 6 to 12 days after conception–close to the time when the next menstrual cycle is expected. Ask yourself when was the last time you had s e x. If more than a month or two has passed, then it’s unlikely that what you’re seeing is implantation bleeding.

  • Since implantation bleeding may be confused with the normal menstrual cycle, some women are surprised to discover their pregnancy is a month further along than they originally estimated.
  • Once the pregnancy is confirmed at a doctor’s office, the physician can use other testing to determine the correct gestational age of the fetus, particularly if implantation bleeding has left some question about when the last real menstrual cycle occurred.

Examine the color and quantity of the bleeding.

This will help to distinguish between pregnancy implantation and the start of a regular menstrual cycle. Implantation bleeding does not usually resemble bleeding during a normal period. It will be lighter, and of lower quantity. Sometimes, implantation bleeding can just be spotting for a few hours, or even a single spot.

Implantation bleeding is light bleeding from the vagina that happens in some women 10 to 14 days after conceiving a baby.

You may think it’s just a light period, but it’s an early sign of pregnancy. It’s not dangerous, and you don’t need treatment.

But heavy bleeding (more than you’d have with a typical period) can be a sign of a problem. Call your doctor if you bleed a lot, with or without fever, chills, or have cramps that get worse.

When Does Implantation Bleeding Happen?

After a sperm fertilizes your egg, the combination becomes an embryo. It travels to your uterus, where it implants itself into the lining.

Sometimes, as the embryo attaches, it causes a little bleeding. This usually happens about the time you would have your period. You may even confuse it with your period and not realize you’re pregnant. Implantation bleeding is normal and doesn’t mean you or your baby will have problems.

Implantation Bleeding Symptoms

Implantation bleeding tends to happen before you notice morning sickness. You might have:

  • Blood that’s brown or pinkish
  • Blood that’s lighter in flow and doesn’t last as long as your period
  • Mild or no cramping
  • Unlike your period, you won’t see any blood clots or tissue in the blood

It’s probably implantation bleeding if you have some of the other signs of early pregnancy, including:

  • Tender, swollen breasts or nipples
  • Fatigue
  • Headache
  • Upset stomach
  • Vomiting (morning sickness)
  • Food cravings or aversions
  • Mood swings
  • Peeing more than usual

If you’re not sure whether you’re having implantation bleeding or your period, take a pregnancy test or talk to your doctor.

How Long Does Implantation Bleeding Last?

Unlike most periods, it usually stops after 1 or 2 days.

Implantation Bleeding Treatment

It will stop on its own. If you’re worried that you’ve bled a lot, call your doctor. They may want to know how much blood you saw and what color it was.

Other Causes of Bleeding During Pregnancy

Many things can cause bleeding in pregnant women, some of them harmless and some serious. If you’re bleeding a lot, with or without pain or cramping at any time, call your doctor.

Continued

If you’re pregnant and see blood in your underwear, it may be caused by:

Sex . Hormonal and physical changes may be to blame for this. It should stop on its own.

Fibroids and polyps. Your doctor might do some tests to check for these growths on your uterus.

Cervical problems. Conditions like infection or growths on your cervix can also cause bleeding.

Infection. Sexually transmitted diseases like trichomoniasis can cause light bleeding as well as more serious problems. Starting treatment as soon as possible will keep your baby healthy.

Ectopic pregnancy. This is when an embryo implants outside your uterus. You may have bleeding with pain and cramps. It’s dangerous and needs medical care right away.

Miscarriage. About 15% of known pregnancies end during the first few months. Most women bleed and cramp afterward. Call your doctor right away if you know that you’re pregnant and you have these symptoms.

When to See a Doctor

Call your doctor if the bleeding doesn’t stop after a few days or if you’re worried about how much you are bleeding.

Sources

March of Dimes: “Pregnancy Complications.”

National Institute of Child Health and Human Development: “What Are Some Common Signs of Pregnancy?”

American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists: “Abnormal Uterine Bleeding” and “Early Pregnancy Loss.”

Victoria Department of Health & Human Services: “Pregnancy — bleeding problems.”

UpToDate: “Overview of the etiology and evaluation of vaginal bleeding in pregnant women.”

MemorialCare Health System: “What Color Is Implantation Bleeding? Experts Explain.”

Mayo Clinic: “Bleeding during pregnancy,” “Is Implantation Bleeding Normal in Early Pregnancy.”

One of the early pregnancy signs is implantation bleeding and this will happen for about one-third of all women who get pregnant. This is actually a lesser known symptom. Keep reading to know more as this article will look at how to recognize implantation bleeding or period.

Although it is not noticeable at all times, this type of bleeding might take place when a fertilized egg is implanted into the uterine wall or lining.

The egg will implant itself six to twelve days after being fertilized by a sperm and traveling down from the fallopian tube and then into the uterus. While this is happening, a very small part of the uterine lining might be released or disturbed.

This small percentage of blood might appear as bleeding or spotting. If you learn how to recognize the sign of implantation bleeding, then you will have an early clue that pregnancy has started.

Implantation Bleeding or Period – How to recognize what do you have

Look at the timing. As mentioned above, this type of bleeding usually occurs during pregnancy about six to twelve days after conception, which is near to the time of your expected menstrual cycle.

Check when you had sex last. If the time is over one or two months, then it is not likely that you are seeing implantation bleeding.

Implantation bleeding can be confused with the regular menstrual cycle, so some women discover that their pregnancy is one month further along than the original estimated time.

If you cannot visit the doctor to confirm a pregnancy, other testing can be done to determine the right gestational age of your fetus.

Examine the quantity and color of the bleeding. When you do this, it can help you to distinguish between the start of a normal menstrual cycle and implantation bleeding.

The implantation bleeding doesn’t generally resemble the bleeding that occurs in a normal period as it’s lighter in color and low in quantity. At times, this bleeding can be just a single spot or spotting for several hours.

Typically, implantation bleeding comes with a brownish tint or pink discharge. It’s often darker in color when compared to period blood since it takes some time to travel from the wall of the uterus to the vagina. This bleeding is also relatively light and you will only experience it for a couple of days.

In some cases, the flow of blood resembles a very light period. For most women, the menstrual blood color has a more red shade and it will flow heavier within one or two days.

See if you are having cramps. Implantation bleeding is frequently accompanied by mild to moderate cramping as the embryo is invading the uterine wall. Cramping is actually common in this type of bleeding and it might happen as early as 7 days prior to a missed period.

The cramps can differ in severity, some women experience similar ones to menstrual cramps or feel like their period is starting.

As you can imagine, these symptoms can be tricky as early pregnancy signs are similar to what you might feel immediately before your period. In the event that abdominal cramps continue to intensify, it could be a regular period or a pregnancy problem like an ectopic pregnancy.

There are also instances when the pain may be linked to a totally different medical condition like a bladder infection or appendicitis.

Confirming the Symptoms

if you believe that you are experiencing implantation bleeding, You should wait for at least a day after your period is due before taking a pregnancy test.

This type of bleeding can take place very early in your cycle and you might not have sufficient pregnancy hormone to get back a positive test. It is always a good idea to do a follow-up test at the doctor after getting a positive pregnancy result.

When You Should Be Concerned About Implantation Bleeding

As a pregnant woman, you should be worried about heavy, very red bleeding that contains clots or maybe comes with severe discomfort or cramps. Implantation bleeding might take place after artificial insemination as well. If the bleeding continues you should contact your doctor as early as possible.

It also recommended for you to consult a doctor if the bleeding is causing an uneasy feeling or if you have any questions or concerns. You should also get checked out by your doctor if you are feeling any pain that you might not experience during your normal period and is not subsiding on its own after a couple of days.

Aside from those things, you should contact your doctor if have other symptoms such as chills, fever or heavy bleeding.

Approximately 20 to 30% of pregnancies have bleeding during the early stages [1]. If you think that you are pregnant and you are experiencing light spotting or bleeding, it could be a normal healthy pregnancy sign.